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WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15, 2020

News | Page 3

High 30, Low 26 forecast.weather.gov

How smart are AI? WSU researchers are working on a way to measure AI intelligence.

VOL. 126 NO. 74

ROLLIN’ IN ROLOVICH WSU hires former University of Hawai’i coach under five-year, $3 million annual contract; former team led Mountain West conference in yards

By Vasili Varlamos Evergreen sports reporter

A

new era of Cougar football is set to begin as WSU hired former University of Hawai’i coach Nick Rolovich on Monday night. Rolovich replaces Mike Leach, who left WSU on Thursday for a head coaching job at Mississippi State. The former coach for Hawai’i agreed in principle to a five-year contract, worth an average of $3 million a year with WSU, according to the WSU Athletics website. Rolovich made $600,000 last season with Hawai’i, which was the

ninth-highest salary among coaches in the Mountain West Conference. He was named Mountain West Conference Coach of the Year in 2019. He turned the Rainbow Warriors football program around, going from a 3-9 record in 2017 to winning 10 games for the first time since 2010. Rolovich is known for his high-octane offense that he produced at Hawai’i. His run-and-shoot offense lead his team in the Mountain West Conference in total yards, average yards per game and touchdowns. He is responsible for coaching redshirt junior

quarterback Cole McDonald, who was eighth in the nation for passing touchdowns. The new head coach became the 33rd coach in WSU football history. He has yet to name any of his assistant coaches or other staff members. This is Rolovich’s first power five head coaching job in his career. There will be a press conference to introduce Rolovich as the head coach at 2:30 p.m. Thursday in the Rankich Club Room at Martin Stadium, according to the WSU Athletics website.

COURTESY OF KA LEO O HAWAI’I

Council approves town-gown memorandum Law opens

overtime pay rules

Members debated intent of document, rezoning of 25 acres By Benjamin White Evergreen city reporter

The Pullman City Council heard from Tom Handy, Downtown Pullman Association president, who asked the council to vote to have the mayor sign a memorandum approving support for towngown. While this doesn’t specify an amount of funding it does say the city will work with the other partners, which includes the DPA, WSU and the Chamber of Commerce, Handy said. “We’ve all got skin in the game, so to speak, and because we’ve all got skin in the game were all on the hook financially,” councilmember Brandon Chapman said. Five councilmembers voted to approve the agreement, and councilmember Eileen Macoll alone dissented.

Businesses must pay more depending on number of workers, minimum wage By Andrea Gonzalez Evergreen reporter

CAROLYNN CLAREY | DAILY EVERGREEN FILE

Councilmember Eileen Macoll was the only member to vote against the town-gown memorandum. “It mentions WSU and how WSU basically is Pullman and I disagree with that,” she said.

“It mentions WSU and how WSU basically is Pullman and I disagree with that,” Macoll said. “If we’re going to talk about downtown Pullman, then let’s talk about downtown Pullman.”

In this issue: News tip? Contact news editor Jayce Carral news@dailyevergreen.com

(509)-335-2465

She also spoke about how WSU faculty and staff are mentioned several times in the small document while Pullman residents are not mentioned until well into the document. “I agree with this

document in principle, materially I agree with where it’s going, but if this is to be a cornerstone document for what we hope will be a very successful program I’d like to see it written a little better,” she said.

News | 3

City attorney Laura McAloon said the document is mostly a “feelgood” document to provide a general direction and that it will not be a legal cornerstone to the agreement.

Workers will receive fair pay for overtime hours after the federal overtime rule took effect on Jan. 1. The state overtime rule takes effect on July 1. Tim Church, Washington State Department of Labor and Industries public affairs manager, said the changes to the overtime rules restores protections for thousands of Washington workers. Melissa DiNoto, WSU compensation manager, said an employee must be paid a certain amount per year to be exempt for overtime pay depending on the size of the business. On Jan. 1, 2021, Washington’s threshold will exceed the federal threshold, Church said. This means businesses with 1-50 employees will have to pay at least 1.5 times the minimum wage, which is about $43,000

See Council Page 5

Sports | 4

See Pay Page 5

Opinion | 6

Fixing issues for families

Great Expectations

Local underemployment

WSU researchers are working with Micronesian parents to solve education issues.

Nick Rolovich will insert a new offensive scheme to get running backs more involved, argues one writer.

While the economy might be strong, it is important to understand the limits of available jobs.

News | Page 3

Sports | Page 4

Opinion | Page 6


PAGE 2 | WEDNESDAY JAN. 15, 2020

PAGE TWO

Community Calendar

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Daily Police Log

We dnes day 1/1 5

Sunday

Local Collectives and Artists Groups of Our Own While the Palouse does not have a wide variety of gay bars or queer-friendly community centers, local folks take it upon themselves to organize around causes important to the community. Recent queer-identified collectives have hosted dance parties, literary readings, art shows and more. Join us to hear from a few of these organizers and to discuss ways to support and promote these gatherings. PFLAG Moscow meets in the basement of the Unitarian Universalist Church (420 E 2nd Street in Moscow, Idaho.)

Ma l i c i o u s M i s c h i e f NE Campus Street & NE Ruby Street, 1:21 a.m. Officers responded to the repor t of snowballs being thrown at cars .

We dnes day 1/1 5 Trimpin: Ambiente432 at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art In 2016, the museum commissioned Trimpin, a groundbreaking composer and sculptor, to design and create a major new work for the WSU community. Ambiente432 debuted at the inauguration of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and has now entered the museum’s permanent collection. This January the work will be restaged in the gallery space for which it was originally designed. To submit, email events to meditor@dailyevergreen.com. Preference will be given to events that are free and open to the public or are hosted by an RSO, and must include time, date and place.

We l f a r e C h e c k Crestview Street, 11:17 a.m. An officer responded to assist a man w a l k i n g i n t h e s n o w. Pa r k i n g P r o b l e m NE Kamiaken Street, 1:12 p.m. An off icer was advised of a park ing problem. Tr a f f i c A c c i d e n t , w i t h I n j u r i e s NE Westwood Drive, 3:41 p.m. Pu l l m a n l a w, f i r e , a n d E M S r e s p o n d e d to the repor t of a vehicle hitting a p e d e s t r i a n . No p a t i e n t t r a n s p o r t . Agency Assistance SR 270, 8:33 p.m. Wa s h i n g t o n S t a t e Pa t r o l r e q u e s t i n g an agency assist. Officer responded and was unable to safely make it to the bypass. Advising road should be blocked.

Mo n d a y Tr a f f i c Ha z a r d SE Bishop Boulevard , 3:24 a.m. Guy running down the middle of the r o a d t o w a r d s Ma i n . O f f i c e r c o n t a c t e d male and advised to stay off the road. Fa l l NE Providence Court , 6:47 a.m. Law and EMS responded to the repor t o f a f a l l . O n e t r a n s p o r t e d t o Pu l l m a n R e g i o n a l Ho s p i t a l .

Pa r k i n g P r o b l e m NW Maryland Street , 6:47 a.m. A n o f f i c e r wa s a d v i s e d o f a p a r k i n g p r o b l e m. D i s a b l e d Ve h i c l e SW Church Street , 10:51 a.m. Case requested for a disabled vehicle. Pa r k i n g P r o b l e m NE Spaulding Street , 10:52 a.m. C a r p a r k e d i n t h e m i d d l e o f t h e a l l e y. O f f i c e r r e s p o n d e d . Ve h i c l e m o v e d . Pa r k i n g P r o b l e m SE Dexter Street & SE Taylor Street , 1:13 p.m. An officer responded to a parking probl e m. Pa r k i n g P r o b l e m SE Kamiaken Street , 1:13 p.m. Ve h i c l e i s p a r k e d o n t h e s t r e e t m a k i n g i t h a r d f o r p l o w s t o g e t b y. O f f i c e r r e sponded. Pa r k i n g P r o b l e m Oak Ash Aly , 1:13 p.m. Repor ting person says there are vehicles b l o c k i n g t h e a l l e y, s o t h e a l l e y c a n n o t b e plowed. Officer responded, vehicle towed b y Me y e r s . Animal Bites NW Thomas Street, 8:58 p.m. Case requested for a dog bite.

Tu e s d a y Citizen As s ist NE B Street , 12:59 a.m. Officer contacted RP via phone regarding a request for a police escor t.

In the Stars | Horoscopes Today’s Birthday — — Imagine a purpose to dedicate yourself to this year. You can have anything that you’re willing to work for persistently. Winter personal glory inspires solutions for a challenge with a partner. Changing conditions require plan edits next summer before creativity animates your partnership. Envision love.

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Aries (March 21 - April 19) —½— Collaborative efforts flower. Romance is in the air; align your forces for a common goal and realize a beautiful dream. Take advantage of a lucky chance. Taurus (April 20 - May 20) —½ — Get moving! Physical action gets outsize results. A genius friend has a solution to a tech problem. Follow full speed ahead with good food and rest. Gemini (May 21 - June 20) —½ — Take advantage of a spontaneous opportunity to express your admiration, love and respect. You can advance a romance! Create beautiful music together. Cancer (June 21 - July 22) —½ — Commit and take action for beautiful domestic results. Discover a pleasant surprise, an unexpected synchronicity or hidden treasure revealed. Enjoy results with family and friends.

Leo (July 23 - Aug. 22) —— Make your move. Launch a creative project or message for unexpected positive response. Write, broadcast or blog. Refine your pitch. Words can get extra results. Virgo (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) —½ — Lucrative rewards follow your quick actions. Work the numbers. Get your team involved. Use good equipment for best results. Stash away extra loot. Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) —½ — You’re especially charming and attractive. Advance a personal cause with help from friends and get farther than expected. Talk about what you love. Scorpio (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21) —½— Your creative imagination blossoms. Listen to your muses. Capture your thoughts into words and images. What you create today can have long-term benefit.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 - Dec. 21) — —You have more friends than you realized. Share what you’re learning. A chance opportunity presents the perfect connection. Enjoy a moment of social synchronicity. Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19) —— Discover a golden opportunity to resolve a professional challenge or advance in your career. Listen to loved ones. Follow the work that stirs your heart. Aquarius (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) — — Things fall into place with an educational exploration. Grab a lucky chance. Get out and go! Discover hidden treasure. What you’re learning has long-term benefit. Pisces (Feb. 19 - March 20) — — Monitor shared finances and discover favorable conditions for growth. Made adjustments to suit. Collaborate with your team to take advantage of a lucky break. TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICE

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NEWS

Win $100 and your art on a utility box, deadline to submit is on Jan. 31 SEE PAGE 5

Ranking Robots

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EDITOR JAYCE CARRAL DEPUTY EDITOR LUKE HUDSON NEWS@DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15, 2020 | PAGE 3

WSU researchers create a way to test AI smarts, hope method leads to robots that can do more

Facial recognition may be one of the uses for artificial intelligence, but researchers at WSU are hoping to further diversify the use of AI. “Most AI systems are designed to solve a specific task,” said Larry Holder, professor in WSU’s School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. “If you ask those AI systems to solve a different problem, they would fail because they’re designed to do one thing and one thing only.” Holder said they are developing an IQ test with a collection of different problems to determine an AI’s ability to perform multiple tasks. The test would then provide an AI IQ score, which they can compare to others. One of the tasks in the test includes something similar to the Raven Progressive Matrices test, he said, which is when a sequence of shapes or different colors are presented to the AI system.

Christopher Pereyda, doctoral student in computer science, said the system should be able to come up with the next item in the pattern. Holder said another task involves a shooter game, in which the AI system must accomplish a series of tasks and mini-scenarios. Creating an AI system that can do both the Raven Progressive Matrices test and a shooter

a system for evaluating AI, he said. One of the obstacles they encountered was determining how to keep a score of certain tasks, Holder said. An example of this is a game of chess. “What number do you use?” he said. “Number of games? How many moves did it take [to win]? How long did it take to think about the next move?” Pereyda said they hope to

By Angelica Relente Evergreen reporter

I’ve always been intrigued by designing a system that isn’ t just good at one thing

game, he said, is more difficult than creating a system that just does one task or the other. “Nobody had really come up with a measure like this before,” Holder said. Researchers also thought about the ways people measure human intelligence and how that could help them develop

Larry Holder WSU professor

determine a way to balance the level of difficulty of AI IQ tests. Holder said they plan to add more tasks to test different facets of intelligence. “We’re not convinced that the set of tests we have in there now covered all aspects of intelligence that we would like to cover,” he said.

Pereyda said they could also have human participants take the IQ test to compare the score with AI systems. Holder said their ultimate goal is to push the research community away from creating systems that can only fulfill one task. “If you want a robot that’s going to help you around the house, you don’t want to have 10 different robots,” he said. “You’d like one robot that can do all those things, and possibly even some things that it wasn’t originally designed to do.” Holder said exposure to a lot of sci-fi movies like “Star Trek” plays a factor in his research. “I’ve always been intrigued by designing a system that isn’t just good at one thing,”

he said, “but good at a lot of things that ultimately can help humans get past some really tough problems.”

Grants fund community-driven research

WSU investigators learn from ‘parent leaders,’ work on public policy changes By Loren Negron Evergreen reporter

Two new grants will help expand an Oregon-based program that uses community-focused participatory research to empower Micronesian parent leaders. WSU and the Micronesian Islander Community organization partnered up and began their research in 2018. The research team consists of principal investigators Jackie Leung, MIC board chair, and Connie Kim Yen Nguyen-Truong, WSU College of Nursing assistant professor. Kapiolani Micky, MIC program coordinator and community health worker, is a member as well. The team received two additional grants last fall to expand their work. They received a $20,000 grant from the Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon Communities United Fund (Coulter Foundation). The Health and Education Fund Partners (CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Meyer Memorial Trust and Oregon Community Foundation) awarded the team a $125,000 grant, according to WSU Insider. Leung said the first part of their project focused on work-

ing with parents who have children between the ages of zero and eight. It was open to anyone who identified as Micronesian and who is also a parent. Research participants are called parent leaders. Nguyen-Truong said the team learned through storytelling, which meant having deep and authentic conversations with the parent leaders. The conversations they had taught them a lot about the Micronesian community. “We learned from the parent leaders about Micronesians and [that] there’s a shy and humble culture not accustomed to speaking about issues including around health and education, and specifically around reproductive and prenatal care,” she said. Parent leaders were able to mentor each other and see the power in their stories, Nguyen-Truong said. “We are entering that stage where the parent leaders are the experts [...] and that we’re here to fully, actively listen and be a part in facilitating indepth discussions around what they think would be solutions,” she said. Leung said parent leaders identified challenges and needs in the Micronesian Islander community, which helped drive their research. She said the purpose of their work is to

COURTESY OF WSU COLLEGE OF NURSING

Kapiolani Micky, of the Micronesian Islander Community Organization, left; Principal Investigator Jacqueline Leung, middle, board chair of the organization; and Principal Investigator Connie Nguyen-Truong, assistant professor at the WSU College of Nursing in Vancouver, right, lead the project and work with parent leaders.

empower the participants to become leaders within their communities. Parent leaders celebrated their graduation in September 2019, Leung said. At least half of those parent leaders will continue to work with the team for the next phase of their work. Through their grants, Leung said they will expand their work based upon the needs and strategies parent leaders iden-

tified. One of the needs mentioned is to have two meetings per month and to incorporate more public speaking and testimony-sharing opportunities. Nguyen-Troung said one of the strategies that was identified was to connect community members to local resources they did not know existed. Encouraging community members to acquire skills in public policy and leadership is part of their expansion goal as well.

Another strategy is to develop mutual support by creating new parent clubs and interest groups in schools. She said this will lead to structural changes in the school system that will benefit the Micronesian Islander community. “It’s truly data-driven, and the parent leaders, they’re the ones that tell the story and honing what their story means, so it’s really about their voices,” Nguyen-Truong said.


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NEWS

PAGE 5 | JAN. 15, 2020

Arts commission seeks contest entries Submission deadline Jan. 31; winner receives $100, art put on city utility box By Jakob Thorington Evergreen reporter

The Pullman Arts Commission is still seeking submissions for its utility box wrap, where a community member’s design will be displayed on a utility box in the city. The commission observed 25 submissions from five contestants during its meeting Tuesday night. A decision will be made on the winner next month. The deadline to submit a design is Jan. 31. The winner will receive a $100 stipend and have their design showcased on the utility box on Grand Avenue near the Jess Ford of Pullman dealership, commission member Jeri Harris said. “All [submissions] are very different and come from people you wouldn’t expect to submit art,” commission member Lori Clark said. Several changes were made to this year’s Pullman ArtFest by the commission. Commissioners approved a change the start and end time of the festival. This year, it will begin at 9 a.m. and end at 6 p.m. Harris said the decision was made because several people showed up early during last year’s ArtFest with nothing to do.

“This is our third year running this, so we’re still trying to figure out the best time to open,” she said. With a new start time, the commission also decided to require food vendors set up throughout the entire day. Vendors will not be required to stay open the entire day, Harris said. Commission member Judy Dunn said food vendors have been unenthusiastic about participating in previous years despite the festival being meant to help downtown business owners while getting the community engaged with art. “I would like to see businesses take a greater part,” she said. The commission voted for 30-minute intervals for entertainers to perform during the event, with the potential of a longer “headliner act.” Harris said solo entertainers will be paid $50 per 30 minutes, duo performers will be paid $100 and larger groups such as a band will be paid $200. Colfax Arts Council President Debbie Stinson began the meeting with a presentation of how the council boosted art in Colfax. Harris said the two groups were faced with different scenarios because Pullman’s commission must go through city government for every action. Courtesy of the Pullman Arts Commission Colfax is not branched with the A utility box was decorated by photographer Ken Carper and placed on the corner of Main Street and Grand council. Avenue. Winning contestants will have their art showcased on a utility box in Pullman on Grand Avenue.

Census officials want a more accurate count for county By Scott Jackson Moscow-Pullman Daily News

U.S. Census officials say this year they hope to see greater participation from the Palouse’s two chronically under-counted counties. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Whitman and Latah counties — specifically areas inhabited by college students in Moscow and Pullman — have some of the worst census response rates in their respective states. Local census officials say the reason this is problematic is that census data gathered at the start of every decade directly informs the behavior of virtually every level of government. If a large enough portion of the population declines to participate, it could have ramifications for allocation of federal funds, prioritization of public programs and even the number of representatives a state has in Congress. “If we do not get the correct numbers then it affects a tremendous amount of funding — there’s $675 billion up for grabs in federal funds based on the count that comes through,” said Lisa Egan, chairwoman of Latah County’s Complete Count Committee. “Part of that could come to Latah County, but if we don’t get the correct number of people, then we don’t get the correct amount of money.” According to the Census Bureau’s website, three tracts of land in Moscow and four in

Pullman have the lowest response rates in their counties and much of the problem can be traced to a single demographic — college students. Mindy Thorp, the Census Bureau’s partnership specialist for North Idaho counties, said while census workers estimate that between 20 and 25 percent of residents in both cities who live off campus will decline to respond to a census, that number jumps to nearly 27 percent when you consider the University of Idaho campus on its own. In Pullman, between 35 and 40

veys the Census Bureau puts out, Egan said the 10-year or “decennial” census has only 11 quesions that ask for information like age, gender and place of residence. Addressing a controversy that made headlines last year, Egan said there will be no citizenship question on the 2020 census but even if it were, the Census Bureau is legally prohibited from sharing that data with other federal agencies like Immigration and Customs Enforcement. “All the information that

Data informs government action at every level, may affect federal funding

If we do not get the correct numbers then it affects a tremendous amount of funding

percent of those who live on or near Washington State University’s campus are expected to ignore the count — the worst rate in all of Eastern Washington and North-Central Idaho. That’s potentially thousands of people going uncounted and millions in federal funds left on the table, Thorp said. “The data suggests that one of the areas that did not respond very well last time was the area around (the UI) campus,” Egan said. “We think that might be partially because college students don’t understand how this works or they might think that their parents at home are counting them — but it needs to be where you are living on April 1.” Unlike other, longer sur-

Lisa Egan Chairwoman

they submit is confidential,” Egan said. “The people who are involved with the census -- any of the census-takers -- they take an oath to keep this information confidential for 72 years.” By April 1, every home in the country should have received an invitation to participate in the 2020 Census in one of three ways: by phone, mail or, for the first time in history, online at https://respond.census.gov/ acs. Thorp said local census offices are still struggling to find employees, noting Latah County is only about 46 percent staffed. She said those who wish to investigate employment opportunities with the U.S. Census Bureau can find more information at 2020census.gov/jobs.

Council | Cont. from Page 1 “I will go along with that characterization of what it should be, it should be a feelgood document, but this doesn’t feel good at all,” Macoll said. “If this was English 101 I would write this person up.” The council also voted on the rezoning of 25 acres from light industrial to high density residential, which is to be used for university housing. At previous city council meetings, the council heard from residents, both proponents and opponents of the zone change. Pullman Planning director Pete Dickenson said the planning staff recommended the

rejection of the application and the planning commission suggested approval of the application. Both groups heard reasons for and against the rezoning proposal, due to there being a need for both residential and light industrial land, and they came to different conclusions, Dickenson said. Councilmembers Al Sorenson, Brandon Chapman and Dan Records voted in favor of the proposal and councilmembers Eileen Macoll, Pat Wright and Ann Parks voted against the proposal, leaving the tie breaker to Mayor Glenn Johnson, who voted in favor.

Pay | Continued from Page 1 per year, to people who do not qualify for overtime pay. A business with 51 or more employees will have to pay 1.75 times the minimum wage, or about $50,000 a year, to those who do not qualify for overtime pay, he said. To be considered exempt from overtime people must pass a job duties test where the employer confirms if their job duties can be considered overtime exempt, Church said. Positions must be reviewed on a case-by-case basis because each position has different responsibilities and each employee has different salaries, DiNoto said. Students are limited in the number of hours they can work, which means non-student WSU employees will be affected more, DiNoto said. Employees who do not meet the minimum salary or

do not meet the salary duties test become eligible for overtime pay, she said. The numbers given for Jan. 1, 2021 will increase as the minimum wage increases and a formula will be used to determine those numbers, Church said. The minimum wage has been increasing because of an initiative that passed several years ago that set an exact amount for the minimum wage, he said. “The threshold for overtime exempt workers has been woefully low,” he said. “It had not been updated since the 1970s so it was clearly time to do that.” DiNoto said employment laws are always designed to be more favorable to the employees. The changes to federal overtime standards means a larger number of employees can be paid overtime.


PAGE 8 | WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15 2020

OPINION

DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

Meet your makers: Spring 2020 Evergreen editorial staff

In August 2017, a freshman version of myself wandered into the dim By Sydney Brown basement of Murrow Hall, Editor-in-chief lured by the promise of free cookies at an open house. I had no intention of writing for the school newspaper. I’d been editor-in-chief of my high school paper and decided it wasn’t for me. My mind changed after that open house. The lack of light here in this basement — especially while enduring dark snow days — in no way reflects the passion here at The Daily Evergreen for journalism. The 2017 editor-in-chief Gabbie Ramos was cool and funny, and I aspired to be exactly like her. I remember sitting in one of those decades-old chairs and thinking: “I’m going to do that one day.” Nothing really prepared me for the surreality of attaining this position, though. The editor-in-chief role is an intimidating one, as it requires both managerial and journalistic experience. I’m tasked with finding the best editors, reporters, columnists, photojournalists and graphic illustrators; then I have to curate a newsroom that is both productive and fun, a newsroom that is both relevant and consistent. So what’s new with the Evergreen? Recently we took on redesigning our entire front, which has been around since before I came to WSU. We’ve been more ambitious with story ideas, utilizing solutions journalism to find real-life examples of community involvement and connection. We also added Roots, a business news-oriented section that has replaced Life (a section I edited in 2018). Sports will run five days a week, Mint is back to Thursdays and Opinion will now have a spot in our paper three days a week (Monday, Wednesday, Friday). News will continue to reach toward inclusivity and diversity both in-field and behind the scenes. None of this will be easy, nor has it been so far. I’ve spent a long time here at the Evergreen — writing, photographing and editing — but it’s hard to say I feel totally prepared for this new role. However, with the help of an amazing team, I am genuinely excited for this new era of the Evergreen we find ourselves building. Past editors have progressed this WSU staple in ways we current editors must acknowledge and be thankful for, but it’s our duty now to keep pushing boundaries of what the Evergreen can do for WSU and Pullman. We thank you for reading, for being patient when we have made mistakes, for understanding that this is an independent student-run publication that must constantly prove its worth to WSU administration and our own student media board. It’s hard, and sometimes depressing, to keep up with a newspaper in the middle of a dying newspaper industry. We thank you for supporting us and the investigative journalism we’ve done, for finding value in the uncomfortable truths of those stories. I’m only here for the semester, so I can’t promise we’ll be perfect all the time, but I can promise that for these next few months, we will make concerted efforts to reconnect to our roots — as Cougs. Working at The Daily Evergreen allows me to feel. At risk of sounding disgustingly emotional, the journalBy Jayce Carral ism I have produced in that News editor mildly dingy basement has shaped me in a way I did not know was possible. I had the opportunity to interview elementary school children who gleefully spoke about a national competition they participated in. I was pulled away from my desk during production late one night to interview a former employee of a beloved drive-in. At the time, I was unaware the story would blow up the way it did. I poured over numerous documents describing horrendous crimes while swallowing back bile. I completed a nearly six-hour police ride along which began Halloween night. I attended a beautiful celebration of light in an ashram. I knew I would eventually become The Daily Evergreen News Editor. I have worked so incredibly hard to gain the skills and experience for the position. I am too spiteful and selfish of a person to let it all go to waste. I have so much respect for my Managing Editor and Editor-In-Chief. I have the utmost trust in my Deputy News Editor who I know will have my back. We all have amazing staff this semester and together, I know we can create some amazing things. My main goal for this semester is to diversify our content. I want to ensure underrepresented communities find representation in our newspaper. I want to gain back the trust of the students. I want to try to actually have our newspaper be the voice of the students. As a journalist, my most important job is to listen. For the past few semesters at the Evergreen I felt By Luke Hudson myself growing deaf to the Deputy news editor most important voices in the community and this semester I promise to change that. By doing more than what is expected, talking to more people and setting a high standard for the writers who work in the News section, I hope to build new relationships with the WSU and Pullman communities. No newspaper is going to get every story right. Many struggle to get even half right. My hope is that our best gets better and that you never see our worst. We’ll see how it goes. So what’s new with sports nowadays? Well, I’m glad you asked. This semester, it’s all about giving the sports peoBy Kuria Pounds ple usually don’t get to read Sports editor about, athletes you didn’t know about, updates on all the latest breaking news and columns that give the hottest takes in sports. But first, allow me to introduce myself. Hello, I’m Kuria, and I will be the sports editor for The Daily Evergreen this spring semester. I am from Bellevue, Washington and I am a sophomore broadcast news major. This is my first time being an editor at The Daily Evergreen and I have been writing for The Daily Evergreen for a year. We are fortunate enough to be a Division I school, and to have plenty of women’s and men’s sports throughout the school year for students, staff and anyone in the Pullman community to attend. I get it, there are the main sports everyone knows, like football and men’s basketball, but did you see how well women’s soccer did in the fall? Did you see how one of our athletes for women’s basketball has broke the scoring record for both women’s AND men’s basketball? I know, right! You can email me at desports@dailyevergreen.com for any tips on our website, the Facebook page, Twitter, or even if you just want to say hi! Go Cougs!

NOW HIRING COPY EDITORS

email your resume editor@dailyevergreen.com or apply in Murrow 113

Hello Cougs! I am this semester’s Managing Editor. This means that though I don’t have a single section to By Grace Arnis run, I keep track of the entire Managing editor paper like it’s my section. However, it mostly means that I spend most of my time in the newsroom. Before joining the Daily Evergreen staff this fall I spent four years as a rower on the Women’s Rowing team here at WSU. My experiences on the team gave me an appreciation and love for olympic sports and the journalism that surrounds it. Since I have to spend an extra year at WSU to complete my degrees in Risk & Crisis Communication and Broadcast News, I decided to use all of my new found free time working at the paper. Before this semester, I worked as the Deputy Sports Editor in the fall and hope to eventually pursue a career in sports journalism after I graduate in May.

Hi, my name is Rachel. If you haven’t read my letter from yesterday, I’ll be the editor for Roots this By Rachel Sun semester. Roots editor A little about me: I’m a senior journalism and media production major with a minor in creative writing. I grew up here, about a 15-minute drive from the same campus where my dad works. I never really thought I’d end up here in college, but I’m glad I did. Since I started at The Daily Evergreen in late 2016, I’ve had a hand in pretty much every part of the paper at some point. Most I’m proud of, and the rest, well, were good learning experiences. This is my last semester, so I’ll be working to pack a punch. You can spot my name on the Roots pages Tuesday and Thursday, but also the occasional byline for news and photos. If you’ve got a story, I’d love to tell it. You can email me at life@ Everyone has an opinion, dailyevergreen.com or leave a news tip on our website. I’m grateful for the opportunity, and for you taking the time to read. I’m just lucky enough to let people make money for If you’re reading this, writing opinions. By Bruce Mulmat welcome to my letter from My name is Bruce MulOpinion editor the editor. If you’re not readmat and I am the opinion ing this, well, this doesn’t editor for spring 2020. By Emma Ledbetter apply to you. My job is to make readSocial media coordinator My name is Emma ers of The Daily Evergreen Ledbetter and I am the social read a variety of opinions on media and engagement topics that affect the commueditor for spring 2020. I nity and give people an area to voice their concerns. held this same position last My goals for this semester are to keep opinion columns focused on semester and before that I was Mint editor. activities, events and other happenings on the Palouse. My job is to make sure you, a reader of The Daily Evergreen, are as I am a second semester senior, so I hope to leave this section set up engaged as possible with the content we are producing. well for my successor. I am informally known at the Evergreen as the “clickbait” editor or Feel free to let me know what you want to see more of by commentthe gal who really cares about getting likes and comments. Despite this ing or emailing me at opinion@dailyevergreen.com. nickname, my job is not to mislead you with headlines or social media posts. I feel a little out of my In fact, it is exactly the opposite. I want to make sure you see the depth as Mint editor after important and interesting parts of a story up front so you can decide just one semester of writing whether it is worth your time to read it. for the Daily Evergreen. By Mindy Malone What comforts me is knowI know that every type of media in existence is fighting for real Mint editor ing Mint’s vague description estate in your brain and I want to help you prioritize what is going to be of “arts and culture” gives me most applicable to your life. If we happen to get a lot of “clicks” on a story, that’s great. Howeva lot of leeway in my editorial er, what I really care about is knowing what content is important to the choices. majority of people who read our paper so we can produce more of it. This semester I’m planning to do more with the “arts” umbrella – introducing fashion, skincare, architecture and inteI’m Oliver McKenna. rior design. I want to continue Mint’s coverage of physical art, cultural I am the current web and groups and creative content submissions from readers like you. graphics editor, a position I dream of the return of booze news, but as of now it seems that’s I’ve held for three semesters. By Oliver McKenna destined to remain a dream. My goal this semester is to Web editor create a better foundation The following quote for multimedia content from comes from a University the Evergreen, so expect Interscholastic League Copy to see more multimedia Editing Contest sample test projects this semester, such By Jakob Thorington from 2016-2017. as videos and photo galleries. Chief copy editor “AA flight 3339 departs As a photographer, I focus largely on sports and action photogfrom the metroplex airport raphy. I’ve been lucky to photograph the 2017 Boise State and USC at 9:41 pm Wednesday and games, as well as the 2018 Alamo Bowl. arrives in the air space above I look forward to creating some cool content this semester! Wichita Falls Regional Airport at 10:04 pm But what happened next depends on whom you ask.” I am in a newly created That was a little hard to read, right? Almost makes you just want to position for this semester: put the paper down or navigate to a different webpage. the Evergreen chief layout If you’re still here, hi. I’m Jakob, and I’ll be the copy chief for The editor. The Evergreen has Daily Evergreen this semester. The other copy editors and I will do our By Jacqui Thomasson offered a copy chief position best to ensure the paper never looks like the previous quote. Chief layout editor for as long as I can rememThat being said, mistakes in grammar are found at even the most ber, but the goal of this new professional and top tier publications across the world. Catching every position is to combine a little detail with thousands of words being published on a tight schedule variety of skills from indieach night is harder than you would think. vidual layout editors while That’s not meant to be an excuse for when it happens, but I hope that reading a grammatical disaster of a paragraph and knowing that we maintaining basic Evergreen style rules. With the help of other editors, I spent several days designing the are working at a rapid speed every night to publish does not turn you new look of The Daily Evergreen. I am currently a sophomore, seeking away from the paper when you see a typo. double degrees in Business Management and Multimedia Journalism. We catch a lot and sometimes we miss some errors. That is the nature of the business. We know our work is at its best when you do not I worked in an accounting firm for eight years and am now finishing my second year at the Evergreen. I’m excited to continue to work at realize the structure and grammar of what you are reading. bringing the newspaper into the new decade. I wish you all the best this semester, and I sincerely hope you never What began as a photography hobby blossomed into a love for have to think about my name again. journalism, and the reason for that second degree. My career goal is a job in publishing that combines my skill sets and To my legions of fans: two degrees. In the meantime, however, I plan on working at The Daily hello. To my mother, if she Evergreen until the day I graduate. reads this: please send me my phone charger that I By Jacob Hersh left in the car during winter My name is Mary RusCopy editor break. My name’s Jacob sell, and I am a new layout Hersh, I’m one of the Eveditor on the Daily Everergreen’s new copy editors, green staff. I am a freshman By Mary Russell and I’m also an opinion at Washington State UniverLayout editor columnist. sity, and I am majoring in My opinions are unmatched in their constant correctness, and my International Business and propensity for spell-checking and grammar correcting has lost me many minoring in Spanish. I have a friend in my 18 years alive. Rather than change my behavior, I decided been involved in journalism to take it to the next level, and became a copy editor, spell-checking for three years. For my high and style-correcting to make some extra cash, which I turn around and school’s newspaper, I was a section editor during my junior year and spend on cool pens. I prefer the 0.5 mm G2 Pilot rolling-ball, if anyone’s editor-in-chief during my senior year. curious. Apart from journalism, some of my interests include swimming, I’m excited to write more columns, to do more work for the paper baking, and exploring new places. As a layout editor, I am excited to create and to further my ultimate goal: establishing a rival campus newspaper called the Daily Nevergreen, that is functionally the same as the current interesting designs and make the readers excited to read what we publish! one, but every fact is just slightly wrong.

Hi! My name is Joel Kemegue, I’m one of the new copy editors this semester, meaning that when the By Joel Kemegue articles are written, I’ll be Copy editor checking them for grammar, spelling, plagiarism and all that fun stuff. This is my first time doing copy editing but if you notice any mistakes, it wasn’t me. I started out writing a lot of satire for the Daily Evergreen, and I still write articles for Roots and Mint, so if you notice anything especially good in those sections, it was me. I’m a freshman English major with a creative writing concentration. I like reading, writing, watching movies and procrastinating. I am either hilarious or atrociously unfunny and never in between. Usually the latter.

My name is Martha Jaenicke, and I am a transfer student from Olympia, Washington. In the past By Martha Jaenicke two years, I attended South Layout editor Puget Sound Community College as a part of the Running Start program. I am a Fine Arts major at WSU and started at the Daily Evergreen as an illustrator in fall 2019. As a layout editor for this semester, I hope to improve my skills in design and contribute to the composition of the paper. During this semester, I will be working on the layout of the Roots section. After graduating I hope to go to graduate school for animation or illustration. In my spare time, I like to collect books and movies, as well as concept design books for film.

I’m Katie Archer, but you can call me Archie. I am from Corvallis, Oregon. I came to WSU because Oregon State By Katie Archer University did not have what Sports copy editor I wanted to study, and I refused to go to be a Duck. I am a senior strategic communication major. I am the sports copy editor this semester. I have worked at The Daily Evergreen for a year and a half. I started out as a reporter covering sports for a year and was the sports editor fall semester. I love sports, and my favorites are baseball, football and soccer. Outside of the Evergreen and sports, I enjoy spending time outside, reading and traveling. My goal is to visit all the states before I am 30. I am 26 and have visited 28 states. One of my favorite trips was going to the baseball NCAA College World Series in 2018.

Hello to all you lovely people, I am happy to introduce myself to you personally. My name is Kelly By Kelly Williams Williams and I am a freshLayout editor man in college finding my way through life right now. My major is communications with a concentration in journalism and media production. I hope to let my passion for creating and displaying my ideas flourish through not only our Cougar community, but possibly even the world. I am a layout editor for the front page and an illustrator for The Daily Evergreen newspaper. I get to strategically design and produce eye catching visuals for all viewers of our newspaper. Our minds are drawn to whatever attracts our eyes first, and that is my goal when laying out my section of the newspaper.


DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

SPORTS

PAGE 7 | WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15, 2020

Cougars return to challenge No. 8 Oregon

WSU then-junior guard Jervae Robinson dribbles past Oregon then-junior guard Payton Pritchard on March 6 at Beasley Coliseum.

Cougars look to avoid a third straight conference loss on Thursday

control early on, and the team is not spending much time focusing on the loss. “We’re learning what we can from it and moving forward,” Elleby said. “We’re building on what we can and correcting where we need to.” Elleby led the team in points against Cal and junior guard Isaac Bonton led the Cougars in points against and Stanford. Elleby remains the team’s leading scorer this season with 18.4 points per game. The Oregon Ducks (14-3, 3-1) have won the past four matchups against WSU with their most recent victory coming from the first round of last year’s Pac-12 Championship. The Cougar’s last victory dates

By Ryan Root Evergreen men’s basketball reporter

The men’s basketball team returns to the Palouse to take on No. 8 University of Oregon at 6 p.m. Thursday at Beasley Coliseum. WSU (10-7, 1-3) comes off two straight Pac-12 losses for the first time this season to the California Golden Bears and the Stanford Cardinal. Stanford’s victory posted the largest margin of defeat for the Cougars this season. Sophomore forward CJ Elleby said the game got out of

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Pullman Transit has a list of lost and found items (found on our buses and vans), including such articles as Cougar Cards, gloves, wallets, credit cards, cell phones, etc. For a complete list of all items in our lost and found, please see our website: www.pullmantransit.com

IMMIGRATION-US Naturalization Fiancé, spouse or family visas. Green Cards. Call the Law office of Michael Cherasia. (208)883-4410; 220 E. 5th St., Room 311, Moscow.

Items can be claimed at Pullman Transit, NW 775 Guy St. (509-3326535) until January 13, 2020. After that date items can be claimed at the Pullman Police Department.

against one of the best players in the country, Smith said. WSU’s last home victory this season was an overtime thriller against UCLA on Jan. 4. Freshman guard Noah Williams said he hopes the fans will continue to show out and show love for the team as the crowd atmosphere has been ideal. “I hope the fans come and show some more support,” Williams said. “We’re trying to change the culture over here and bring some more wins.” WSU will tip off against the Oregon Ducks at 6 p.m. on Thursday at Beasley Coliseum. The game will air your local FS1 channel.

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Head coach Kyle Smith acknowledged Oregon’s shooting talent in his weekly press conference. He said he believes that will be the difference maker in Thursday’s game. “Obviously they can score the ball, so it will be a test for us to make them earn their buckets, and we cannot give up easy [points],” Smith said. Oregon’s senior guard Payton Pritchard leads the Ducks in scoring with 19.2 points per game, ranking third in the Pac12 and 43rd in the nation. This will be an interesting matchup for Bonton as he and Pritchard played AAU basketball in the Portland area, making it a good challenge for both Elleby and Bonton to play

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to March 2018 in Pullman, which was just the third win from the past decade. The largest statistical difference between these two teams this season are in the shooting percentages. WSU ranks 331st in field goal percentage with 39.7 and 317th in 3-point percentage with 29.6. Oregon ranks 12th in field goal percentage with 48.4 and 10th in 3-point percentage with 39.4. The team looks to focus on playing more solid and taking less “gambles” on defense on Thursday, Elleby said. “We’re not emphasizing playing the passing lanes. We are emphasizing being solid and staying in front,” Elleby said.

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PAGE 8 | WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15 2020

OPINION

DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

Meet your makers: Spring 2020 Evergreen editorial staff

In August 2017, a freshman version of myself wandered into the dim By Sydney Brown basement of Murrow Hall, Editor-in-chief lured by the promise of free cookies at an open house. I had no intention of writing for the school newspaper. I’d been editor-in-chief of my high school paper and decided it wasn’t for me. My mind changed after that open house. The lack of light here in this basement — especially while enduring dark snow days — in no way reflects the passion here at The Daily Evergreen for journalism. The 2017 editor-in-chief Gabbie Ramos was cool and funny, and I aspired to be exactly like her. I remember sitting in one of those decades-old chairs and thinking: “I’m going to do that one day.” Nothing really prepared me for the surreality of attaining this position, though. The editor-in-chief role is an intimidating one, as it requires both managerial and journalistic experience. I’m tasked with finding the best editors, reporters, columnists, photojournalists and graphic illustrators; then I have to curate a newsroom that is both productive and fun, a newsroom that is both relevant and consistent. So what’s new with the Evergreen? Recently we took on redesigning our entire front, which has been around since before I came to WSU. We’ve been more ambitious with story ideas, utilizing solutions journalism to find real-life examples of community involvement and connection. We also added Roots, a business news-oriented section that has replaced Life (a section I edited in 2018). Sports will run five days a week, Mint is back to Thursdays and Opinion will now have a spot in our paper three days a week (Monday, Wednesday, Friday). News will continue to reach toward inclusivity and diversity both in-field and behind the scenes. None of this will be easy, nor has it been so far. I’ve spent a long time here at the Evergreen — writing, photographing and editing — but it’s hard to say I feel totally prepared for this new role. However, with the help of an amazing team, I am genuinely excited for this new era of the Evergreen we find ourselves building. Past editors have progressed this WSU staple in ways we current editors must acknowledge and be thankful for, but it’s our duty now to keep pushing boundaries of what the Evergreen can do for WSU and Pullman. We thank you for reading, for being patient when we have made mistakes, for understanding that this is an independent student-run publication that must constantly prove its worth to WSU administration and our own student media board. It’s hard, and sometimes depressing, to keep up with a newspaper in the middle of a dying newspaper industry. We thank you for supporting us and the investigative journalism we’ve done, for finding value in the uncomfortable truths of those stories. I’m only here for the semester, so I can’t promise we’ll be perfect all the time, but I can promise that for these next few months, we will make concerted efforts to reconnect to our roots — as Cougs. Working at The Daily Evergreen allows me to feel. At risk of sounding disgustingly emotional, the journalBy Jayce Carral ism I have produced in that News editor mildly dingy basement has shaped me in a way I did not know was possible. I had the opportunity to interview elementary school children who gleefully spoke about a national competition they participated in. I was pulled away from my desk during production late one night to interview a former employee of a beloved drive-in. At the time, I was unaware the story would blow up the way it did. I poured over numerous documents describing horrendous crimes while swallowing back bile. I completed a nearly six-hour police ride along which began Halloween night. I attended a beautiful celebration of light in an ashram. I knew I would eventually become The Daily Evergreen News Editor. I have worked so incredibly hard to gain the skills and experience for the position. I am too spiteful and selfish of a person to let it all go to waste. I have so much respect for my Managing Editor and Editor-In-Chief. I have the utmost trust in my Deputy News Editor who I know will have my back. We all have amazing staff this semester and together, I know we can create some amazing things. My main goal for this semester is to diversify our content. I want to ensure underrepresented communities find representation in our newspaper. I want to gain back the trust of the students. I want to try to actually have our newspaper be the voice of the students. As a journalist, my most important job is to listen. For the past few semesters at the Evergreen I felt By Luke Hudson myself growing deaf to the Deputy news editor most important voices in the community and this semester I promise to change that. By doing more than what is expected, talking to more people and setting a high standard for the writers who work in the News section, I hope to build new relationships with the WSU and Pullman communities. No newspaper is going to get every story right. Many struggle to get even half right. My hope is that our best gets better and that you never see our worst. We’ll see how it goes. So what’s new with sports nowadays? Well, I’m glad you asked. This semester, it’s all about giving the sports peoBy Kuria Pounds ple usually don’t get to read Sports editor about, athletes you didn’t know about, updates on all the latest breaking news and columns that give the hottest takes in sports. But first, allow me to introduce myself. Hello, I’m Kuria, and I will be the sports editor for The Daily Evergreen this spring semester. I am from Bellevue, Washington and I am a sophomore broadcast news major. This is my first time being an editor at The Daily Evergreen and I have been writing for The Daily Evergreen for a year. We are fortunate enough to be a Division I school, and to have plenty of women’s and men’s sports throughout the school year for students, staff and anyone in the Pullman community to attend. I get it, there are the main sports everyone knows, like football and men’s basketball, but did you see how well women’s soccer did in the fall? Did you see how one of our athletes for women’s basketball has broke the scoring record for both women’s AND men’s basketball? I know, right! You can email me at desports@dailyevergreen.com for any tips on our website, the Facebook page, Twitter, or even if you just want to say hi! Go Cougs!

NOW HIRING COPY EDITORS

email your resume editor@dailyevergreen.com or apply in Murrow 113

Hello Cougs! I am this semester’s Managing Editor. This means that though I don’t have a single section to By Grace Arnis run, I keep track of the entire Managing editor paper like it’s my section. However, it mostly means that I spend most of my time in the newsroom. Before joining the Daily Evergreen staff this fall I spent four years as a rower on the Women’s Rowing team here at WSU. My experiences on the team gave me an appreciation and love for olympic sports and the journalism that surrounds it. Since I have to spend an extra year at WSU to complete my degrees in Risk & Crisis Communication and Broadcast News, I decided to use all of my new found free time working at the paper. Before this semester, I worked as the Deputy Sports Editor in the fall and hope to eventually pursue a career in sports journalism after I graduate in May.

Hi, my name is Rachel. If you haven’t read my letter from yesterday, I’ll be the editor for Roots this By Rachel Sun semester. Roots editor A little about me: I’m a senior journalism and media production major with a minor in creative writing. I grew up here, about a 15-minute drive from the same campus where my dad works. I never really thought I’d end up here in college, but I’m glad I did. Since I started at The Daily Evergreen in late 2016, I’ve had a hand in pretty much every part of the paper at some point. Most I’m proud of, and the rest, well, were good learning experiences. This is my last semester, so I’ll be working to pack a punch. You can spot my name on the Roots pages Tuesday and Thursday, but also the occasional byline for news and photos. If you’ve got a story, I’d love to tell it. You can email me at life@ Everyone has an opinion, dailyevergreen.com or leave a news tip on our website. I’m grateful for the opportunity, and for you taking the time to read. I’m just lucky enough to let people make money for If you’re reading this, writing opinions. By Bruce Mulmat welcome to my letter from My name is Bruce MulOpinion editor the editor. If you’re not readmat and I am the opinion ing this, well, this doesn’t editor for spring 2020. By Emma Ledbetter apply to you. My job is to make readSocial media coordinator My name is Emma ers of The Daily Evergreen Ledbetter and I am the social read a variety of opinions on media and engagement topics that affect the commueditor for spring 2020. I nity and give people an area to voice their concerns. held this same position last My goals for this semester are to keep opinion columns focused on semester and before that I was Mint editor. activities, events and other happenings on the Palouse. My job is to make sure you, a reader of The Daily Evergreen, are as I am a second semester senior, so I hope to leave this section set up engaged as possible with the content we are producing. well for my successor. I am informally known at the Evergreen as the “clickbait” editor or Feel free to let me know what you want to see more of by commentthe gal who really cares about getting likes and comments. Despite this ing or emailing me at opinion@dailyevergreen.com. nickname, my job is not to mislead you with headlines or social media posts. I feel a little out of my In fact, it is exactly the opposite. I want to make sure you see the depth as Mint editor after important and interesting parts of a story up front so you can decide just one semester of writing whether it is worth your time to read it. for the Daily Evergreen. By Mindy Malone What comforts me is knowI know that every type of media in existence is fighting for real Mint editor ing Mint’s vague description estate in your brain and I want to help you prioritize what is going to be of “arts and culture” gives me most applicable to your life. If we happen to get a lot of “clicks” on a story, that’s great. Howeva lot of leeway in my editorial er, what I really care about is knowing what content is important to the choices. majority of people who read our paper so we can produce more of it. This semester I’m planning to do more with the “arts” umbrella – introducing fashion, skincare, architecture and inteI’m Oliver McKenna. rior design. I want to continue Mint’s coverage of physical art, cultural I am the current web and groups and creative content submissions from readers like you. graphics editor, a position I dream of the return of booze news, but as of now it seems that’s I’ve held for three semesters. By Oliver McKenna destined to remain a dream. My goal this semester is to Web editor create a better foundation The following quote for multimedia content from comes from a University the Evergreen, so expect Interscholastic League Copy to see more multimedia Editing Contest sample test projects this semester, such By Jakob Thorington from 2016-2017. as videos and photo galleries. Chief copy editor “AA flight 3339 departs As a photographer, I focus largely on sports and action photogfrom the metroplex airport raphy. I’ve been lucky to photograph the 2017 Boise State and USC at 9:41 pm Wednesday and games, as well as the 2018 Alamo Bowl. arrives in the air space above I look forward to creating some cool content this semester! Wichita Falls Regional Airport at 10:04 pm But what happened next depends on whom you ask.” I am in a newly created That was a little hard to read, right? Almost makes you just want to position for this semester: put the paper down or navigate to a different webpage. the Evergreen chief layout If you’re still here, hi. I’m Jakob, and I’ll be the copy chief for The editor. The Evergreen has Daily Evergreen this semester. The other copy editors and I will do our By Jacqui Thomasson offered a copy chief position best to ensure the paper never looks like the previous quote. Chief layout editor for as long as I can rememThat being said, mistakes in grammar are found at even the most ber, but the goal of this new professional and top tier publications across the world. Catching every position is to combine a little detail with thousands of words being published on a tight schedule variety of skills from indieach night is harder than you would think. vidual layout editors while That’s not meant to be an excuse for when it happens, but I hope that reading a grammatical disaster of a paragraph and knowing that we maintaining basic Evergreen style rules. With the help of other editors, I spent several days designing the are working at a rapid speed every night to publish does not turn you new look of The Daily Evergreen. I am currently a sophomore, seeking away from the paper when you see a typo. double degrees in Business Management and Multimedia Journalism. We catch a lot and sometimes we miss some errors. That is the nature of the business. We know our work is at its best when you do not I worked in an accounting firm for eight years and am now finishing my second year at the Evergreen. I’m excited to continue to work at realize the structure and grammar of what you are reading. bringing the newspaper into the new decade. I wish you all the best this semester, and I sincerely hope you never What began as a photography hobby blossomed into a love for have to think about my name again. journalism, and the reason for that second degree. My career goal is a job in publishing that combines my skill sets and To my legions of fans: two degrees. In the meantime, however, I plan on working at The Daily hello. To my mother, if she Evergreen until the day I graduate. reads this: please send me my phone charger that I By Jacob Hersh left in the car during winter My name is Mary RusCopy editor break. My name’s Jacob sell, and I am a new layout Hersh, I’m one of the Eveditor on the Daily Everergreen’s new copy editors, green staff. I am a freshman By Mary Russell and I’m also an opinion at Washington State UniverLayout editor columnist. sity, and I am majoring in My opinions are unmatched in their constant correctness, and my International Business and propensity for spell-checking and grammar correcting has lost me many minoring in Spanish. I have a friend in my 18 years alive. Rather than change my behavior, I decided been involved in journalism to take it to the next level, and became a copy editor, spell-checking for three years. For my high and style-correcting to make some extra cash, which I turn around and school’s newspaper, I was a section editor during my junior year and spend on cool pens. I prefer the 0.5 mm G2 Pilot rolling-ball, if anyone’s editor-in-chief during my senior year. curious. Apart from journalism, some of my interests include swimming, I’m excited to write more columns, to do more work for the paper baking, and exploring new places. As a layout editor, I am excited to create and to further my ultimate goal: establishing a rival campus newspaper called the Daily Nevergreen, that is functionally the same as the current interesting designs and make the readers excited to read what we publish! one, but every fact is just slightly wrong.

Hi! My name is Joel Kemegue, I’m one of the new copy editors this semester, meaning that when the By Joel Kemegue articles are written, I’ll be Copy editor checking them for grammar, spelling, plagiarism and all that fun stuff. This is my first time doing copy editing but if you notice any mistakes, it wasn’t me. I started out writing a lot of satire for the Daily Evergreen, and I still write articles for Roots and Mint, so if you notice anything especially good in those sections, it was me. I’m a freshman English major with a creative writing concentration. I like reading, writing, watching movies and procrastinating. I am either hilarious or atrociously unfunny and never in between. Usually the latter.

My name is Martha Jaenicke, and I am a transfer student from Olympia, Washington. In the past By Martha Jaenicke two years, I attended South Layout editor Puget Sound Community College as a part of the Running Start program. I am a Fine Arts major at WSU and started at the Daily Evergreen as an illustrator in fall 2019. As a layout editor for this semester, I hope to improve my skills in design and contribute to the composition of the paper. During this semester, I will be working on the layout of the Roots section. After graduating I hope to go to graduate school for animation or illustration. In my spare time, I like to collect books and movies, as well as concept design books for film.

I’m Katie Archer, but you can call me Archie. I am from Corvallis, Oregon. I came to WSU because Oregon State By Katie Archer University did not have what Sports copy editor I wanted to study, and I refused to go to be a Duck. I am a senior strategic communication major. I am the sports copy editor this semester. I have worked at The Daily Evergreen for a year and a half. I started out as a reporter covering sports for a year and was the sports editor fall semester. I love sports, and my favorites are baseball, football and soccer. Outside of the Evergreen and sports, I enjoy spending time outside, reading and traveling. My goal is to visit all the states before I am 30. I am 26 and have visited 28 states. One of my favorite trips was going to the baseball NCAA College World Series in 2018.

Hello to all you lovely people, I am happy to introduce myself to you personally. My name is Kelly By Kelly Williams Williams and I am a freshLayout editor man in college finding my way through life right now. My major is communications with a concentration in journalism and media production. I hope to let my passion for creating and displaying my ideas flourish through not only our Cougar community, but possibly even the world. I am a layout editor for the front page and an illustrator for The Daily Evergreen newspaper. I get to strategically design and produce eye catching visuals for all viewers of our newspaper. Our minds are drawn to whatever attracts our eyes first, and that is my goal when laying out my section of the newspaper.

Profile for The Daily Evergreen

Jan. 15, 2019  

Jan. 15, 2019  

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