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EVERGREEN THE DAILY

E V E RY S T U D E N T. E V E RY S TO RY. E V E RY DAY. S I N C E 1 8 9 5 .

VOL. 125 NO. 136

TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2019

New training session strives to prevent opioid addiction WSU Spokane received about $88,000 this year to expand, train facilitators for drug course By Cheryl Aarnio Evergreen reporter

A new two-hour seminar at WSU Spokane focuses on communication about opioids in the healthcare field. The seminar emphasize how

to recognize someone who has an opioid addiction and how to look online to find out if people have received multiple opioid prescriptions, said Marian Wilson, WSU College of Nursing assistant professor.

The first class occurred in August. In January and February, the class was offered to more students, and WSU plans to continue with it, she said. This gives WSU nursing, pharmacy and medical students an opportunity to work with each other, said Barbara Richardson, director of interprofessional

education and research in the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. WSU also worked with Eastern Washington University students in its Master of Social Work program, as well as students in EWU’s chemical dependency program, Richardson said. WSU received a $70,000

grant from the Washington State Department of Health in 2018 to develop and try out the interprofessional session, Wilson stated in an email. This year, another grant from the Washington State Department of Health gave WSU $87,668 to advance the program, distribute the See Seminar Page 6

COMMUNITY

BUSINESS

Rollys looks for help after flood

Flood sparks GoFundMe for damages From staff reports

A Snap Fitness employee set up a GoFundMe page in response to damage caused by flooding on April 9. Snap Fitness Manager Kyle Jorgensen said the flood destroyed all the fitness equipment and shut down their business. He set up the GoFundMe page on April 12 and they have already received about $1,500.

It wasn’t a gym I was trying to save...it was a community. Kyle Jorgensen manager

COURTESY OF CRYSTAL GAYLES

The aftermath of the flood left Rollys ice cream on Grand Avenue flooded with water and mud. Co-owners crossed dangerous, fast-moving water in the street making sure to escort their employees to safety.

Co-owners of ice cream shop hope to raise $18,500 to cover cleanup, replace equipment By Dylan Greene Evergreen deputy sports editor

A

drian Gayles stared through the broken window. Mud and debris covered the floor and chairs and tables were turned upside down. He couldn’t believe what he saw.

“It’s just heartbreaking,” he said. The 37-year-old is the co-owner of Rollys ice cream shop on Grand Avenue along with his wife Crystal Gayles. Last Tuesday night, he watched the Missouri Flat Creek flood devastate his store, Kool Nail Design and Spa next door and the rest of the businesses housed within the building at 745 N. Grand Ave. Heavy rain on April 9 caused the creek to flood and spill onto Grand, turning the street into a raging river.

The flood caused significant damage to the ice cream shop and, on Saturday. Rollys started a GoFundMe page to help raise money to pay for the cleanup and replacement of equipment. Crystal said the cleanup cost is around $11,000, and they will have to foot about a $5,000 bill to replace the ice cream equipment that was lost. “It’s totally up to us to get the place back to usable space,” she said. See Rollys Page 6

HISTORY

Documentary released on unratified treaty Students, professors used historical newspapers, documents for research By Daisy Zavala Evergeen reporter

A WSU documentary, filmed over the course of eight years, showed research on an unratified treaty between the U.S. and the mixed-band of Shoshone Bannock and sheep eater people. Alicia Woodard, a part-time history graduate student, said the documentary brings to light how the federal government treated the unratified treaty and the 32,000 square mile land

cession by Chief Tendoy of the mixed-band as law. “When a treaty is not ratified, it’s null and void,” she said. “It’s not a legal document at that point because it was not ratified, but the federal government treated it as if it were.” Jared Chastain, a WSU history graduate student, said the history program’s Public History Field schools allow undergraduate and graduate students to conduct research. Chastain participated in the 2011 field school as an undergraduate and in the 2016 field school as a graduate student instructor. He said he filmed all See Treaty Page 6

News | 3

news@dailyevergreen.com

(509) 335-2465

Reporting

by cody schoeler

Sports | 4

Opinion | 5

WSU honors professor

Track heads to California

Lower WSU parking price

Long-time educator is recognized for his dedication to statistic majoring students.

WSU track and field will compete in three meets starting with the Bryan Clay Invitational Wednesday.

Price of parking on campus should be lowered by including it in all students’ tuitions.

News | Page 3

Sports | Page 4

Opinion | Page 5

In this issue: News tip? Contact news editor Angelica Relente

COURTESY OF JARED CHASTAIN

“It’s my hope and theirs that the federal government will provide a remedy that is fair to history,” Orlan Svingen says.

He said although the gym is severely damaged by the flood, he is most concerned about the people. “It wasn’t a gym I was trying to save,” Jorgensen said, “it was a community.” He said the bond between members at the gym and employees at Snap Fitness inspired him to make the GoFundMe. “They don’t miss the equipment or the workouts,” Jorgensen said. “They miss the people.” They are still assessing the damages caused by the flood. They don’t know how long they will be out of business, Jorgensen said. The last time the place flooded was three years ago, he said, during the same month. They were out of business for over two months and they expect a longer recovery this time because it was more severe. “I was getting tired of waiting,” Jorgensen said. “I jumped the gun a little bit on the GoFundMe.” Jorgensen said he set the goal at $50,000 because that is about how much it costs to open a gym, which is what ownership will have to do.


PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2019

Community Calendar Tuesday 4/16 Latah Sanitation and Moscow Recycling will buy your aluminum cans from you, starting today. During this week, Moscow Recycling be paying you for aluminum cans at a higher amount than normal. Price per pound will be determined before the event and updated on Moscow Recycling Facebook’s page. Moscow Recycling is located at 401 N Jackson St. in Moscow. Call (208)-882-0590 if you have any questions.

Tuesday 4/16 Help celebrate local poetry at the April Poetry Relay tonight. Starting at 5:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers of Moscow City Hall, the city will celebrate National Poetry Month with a “relay” of poets. Bloom will provide appetizers, dessert and a no-host bar. The event is free and open to the public. Poets include opener Susan Hodgin and Robert Wrigley, event closer. To submit, email events to meditor@dailyevergreen.com. Preference will be given to events that are free and open to the public or are hosted by an RSO, and must include time, date and place.

DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

PAGE TWO

Police log Sunday Missing Person SE McKenzie Street, 7:32 a.m. Officer responded to the report of a missing person. Subject was located.

Stray Animals SE McKenzie Street & SE High Street, 1:06 p.m. Officer responded to the report of a stray dog. Accident Non-Injury NW Arcadia Drive, 1:44 p.m. Officers and fire responded. One subject was warned for hit and run of an unattended vehicle.

Malicious Mischief NE Kamiaken Street, 9:45 a.m. Officer responded to the report of vandalism. Noise Complaint NE Merman Drive & NE Westwood Drive, 3:12 p.m. Suspicious Person/Circumstance Officer responded to a noise complaint and SW Fountain Street, 11:01 a.m. checked the area. Unable to locate. Officer responded to the report of a suspicious person. Business or License Problem 3200 Airport Complex North, 3:21 p.m. Accident Hit and Run Officer responded to the complaint of an NE Skyview Drive, 11:46 a.m. unauthorized ride share vehicle. Unable to locate. Officer responded to the report of a hit and run collision. Litter/Pollution/Public Health NW Park Wood Drive, 3:34 p.m. Noise Complaint Officer responded to the report of a couch NW Ventura Drive, 12:21 p.m. Officer responded to a noise complaint. being dumped. Officer was able to contact Officer was unable to locate upon arrival. the suspect and have it removed.

In the Stars | Horoscopes Today’s Birthday —— Raise your skills and expertise through travel and education this year. Dedicated focus builds your career status and influence. Domestic joys delight your family this summer, inspiring new professional directions. Your work and career flourish next winter, inspiring changes at home. Develop an exciting possibility. Aries (March 21 - April 19) —— Disciplined practice matters with a physical goal. You’re exceptionally clever with communication over the next three weeks, with Mercury in your sign. Express your creativity. Taurus (April 20 - May 20) —— Build a romantic relationship through steady participation. With Mercury in Aries, review the past. Consider what worked and didn’t, and update plans. Plot a new course. Gemini (May 21 - June 20) —— Participate with an energetic team over three weeks, with Mercury in Aries. Your friends are a source of inspiration. Provide leadership, support and diplomacy. Cancer (June 21 - July 22) —— Stay involved with your community and networks. Share valuable professional opportunities. Mercury in Aries emphasizes career gain through communications. Monitor a larger conversation.

Leo (July 23 - Aug. 22) —½— Can you mix business with pleasure? Travel beckons, with Mercury in Aries for several weeks. Make longdistance connections. Study and research are favored. Virgo (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) —½— Use your power for good. It’s easier to organize shared finances, with Mercury in Aries. Pay bills and figure out how much you can spend. Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) —½— Communication between partners, lovers and allies flowers, with Mercury in Aries. Compromise and negotiate terms. Delegate more. Remind someone what you appreciate about them. Scorpio (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21) —— Coordinated teamwork leads to success. What you’re learning energizes your work, health and fitness, with Mercury in Aries. Discover efficiencies and best practices.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 Dec. 21) —— Charm benefits your career. Express your affection and heart. Put your love into words. Romantic communication flowers over three weeks, with Mercury in Aries. Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19) —— Begin a home renovation phase, with Mercury in Aries. Set family goals. Clean house and organize. Release stuff that no longer “sparks joy.” Hold a garage sale. Aquarius (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) —½— Learn voraciously, with Mercury in Aries. You’re especially creative, and words flow with ease. Write, record and report. Create beautiful images, sounds and movements. Pisces (Feb. 19 - March 20) —— Discover new income sources. Track your cash flow for growth. Make profitable connections, with Mercury in Aries. Benefit through communications, collaboration and networking.

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News

The Daily Evergreen @DailyEvergreen TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2019 | PAGE 3

Professor devotes career to on-campus causes

JACQUI THOMASSON | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

WSU Professor Ron Mittelhammer talks about the unique relationship between faculty and students at WSU and why he chose to attend graduate school here Monday at Hulbert Hall. “My first love and my last love is teaching and research,” he says. He is highly respected for all that McCluskey said Mittelhammer he has done for the university. is a smart researcher and figures “I don’t think I’ve done any- out solutions to problems that thing in my life to win awards, make things better. Mittelhammer worked to estab- I am thrilled to receive it, but I “He’s an enthusiastic suplish a program in statistics, so stu- think ... [I won because] I was porter of Washington State dents could simultaneously get a always dedicated to [WSU],” University. He has had season master’s and doctorate. “I got my undergraduate Every single day he has one piece of from Rutgers University in New Jersey,” Mittelhammer said. “For Cougar gear on; I don’t think he owns graduate school, I could have gone one piece of clothing without WSU. to Penn State, Cornell, Purdue or here — and I decided here, it was WSU professor Ron Mittelhammer the best decision of my life.” He said he admires V. Lane Mittelhammer said. “It wasn’t football tickets ever since he’s Rawlins for being a great WSU just a paycheck to me, I wanted gotten here,” she said. “If you see president, and the fact that it was to contribute to the community.” him, you’ll see that every single his award meant a lot to him. Mittelhammer was the direc- day he has one piece of Cougar McCluskey said faculty and tor for the School of Economic gear on; I don’t think he owns students admire his dedication Sciences for six years and was an one piece of clothing without and how he interacts with people. interim co-provost for one year. WSU on it.”

Awardee chose attending WSU over Motown record deal, says it was best decision of his life

A WSU regents professor in the School of Economic Sciences, Ron Mittelhammer, received the V. Lane Rawlins President’s Award for Distinguished Lifetime Service for his dedication to bettering the university. “I am thrilled to win this award,” Mittelhammer said. “I never expected it, but it happened, and I am so glad to have it.” Jill McCluskey, professor for the School of Economic Sciences, said Mittelhammer always wants to make things better at WSU.

By Cheryl Aarnio Evergreen reporter

McCluskey said Mittelhammer paid his way through college by playing in a band and was offered a record by Motown records before he decided on going to graduate school. “It was fascinating getting offered a record deal, but WSU is truly where my heart was, and I know that this was the right decision for me,” Mittelhammer said. He said after four years of his graduate degree at WSU, he was thrilled to stay. “When I got [to WSU] I found a special nature of Washington State University, the studentprofessor relationship is really close,” Mittelhammer said. “You’re not a number, you’re a name, it’s just a very warm, community feeling.”

Research shows road chemical damages street health Chloride causes unseen negative consequences for city infrastructure By Hannah Welzbacker Evergreen reporter

A WSU researcher found that a chemical used on the roads during snowy weather has dangerous, and hidden, effects on the health of roadways and bridges. Xianming Shi, WSU civil and environmental engineering associate professor, found that samples of concrete exposed to magnesium chloride with repeated freeze and thaw cycles lost more strength than samples exposed to rock salt. Deicers work by reducing the freezing temperature of water, Shi said. “There is a good reason why we use salt,” he said. “We want winter safety and we want to drive fast on winter roads. But that leads to a lot of unintended consequences.” Shi said the most concerning finding was the fact that the samples with damage showed no visual signs of it. “One alarming finding is that our traditional inspection methods are failing the purpose,” Shi said. JOSEPH GARDNER | THE DAILY EVERGREEN He said this finding is similar Xianming Shi, associate professor for the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, to humans being sick. If there are visible symptoms someone can go discusses the use of magnesium chloride as a deicer Friday in Sloan Hall.

to the doctor before the problem gets out of hand. This work was funded by the U.S. and Oregon Department of Transportation. Shi said Oregon is unique because they rely primarily on magnesium chloride deicer instead of a combination of methods. He said magnesium chloride is thought by some to be more environmentally friendly; however, this is still debated. It is difficult to quantify the risk because it can vary based on the receiving environment. Art Garro, City of Pullman maintenance and operations superintendent, said Pullman currently uses magnesium chloride, but the amount used has been reduced over time. “We have cut back on what we use, but there are certain things that magnesium chloride — you just can’t beat it for what you are trying to do,” Garro said. Magnesium chloride works well for getting rid of black ice, in particular, Garro said. If the city uses solid rock salt there is nothing to bind it to the road and the salt gets pushed to the side of the road. Shi’s worked on deicer research previously, but his study in 2003 only examined whether certain deicers affect water quality adjacent to roads.


Sports

Sports Editor Taylor Dunlap Deputy Sports Editor Dylan Greene desports@dailyevergreen.com PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2019

The Daily Evergreen @DailyEvergreen DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

STEPHEN MURNANE | DAILY EVERGREEN FILE

WSU Track and Field Director Wayne Phipps talks about the team’s strengths and challenges looking forward on March 9 at the WSU Mooberry Fields. The Cougars will compete in three different meets starting on Wednesday.

WSU heads to Cali for three-meet week Track team competes at Bryan Clay, Mount SAC Relays, Beach Invites, Phipps expresses excitement for competition By Sam Grant Evergreen reporter

W

SU track and field will travel down to the Los Angeles area to compete in multiple invitational meets this week.

The week will include three different venues including the Bryan Clay Invitational in Azusa, California, the Mount SAC Relays in Torrance, California, and the Beach Invitational hosted in Long Beach. The team will be traveling as a whole when they go to Southern California,

said WSU Track and Field Director Wayne Phipps. “This is a big weekend for us,” Phipps said. “It is one of the few opportunities we get to have our entire travel roster in the same place at the same time in good conditions. This is always a weekend that we look forward to and, traditionally, have a lot of good results.” The Cougars have run into multiple

meets with poor weather, including the Pelluer Invitational hosted by Eastern Washington University and a dual meet with the University of Washington in Seattle. However, WSU had a solid outing at the Pelluer Invitational, with five athletes finishing first in their respective events. “We’re excited, the last couple See Track Page 8

Cougars finish in seventh after first round of Pac-12s Washington State - Women's Golf (Round 1) Hole

1

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OUT 10

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IN

TOT

Yardage 355 179 374 193 502 330 531 147 369 2980 342 362 263 418 416 145 474 330 401 3151 6131 Par

4

3

4

3

5

4

5

3

4

35

4

4

4

4

4

3

5

4

4

36

71

Marie Lund-Hansen

5

3

5

4

6

4

5

3

6

41

5

4

4

5

4

3

5

5

4

39

80

T46 +9

4

4

5

6

7

7

7

7

9

+6

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

3

3

+3

+9

Madison Odiorne

4

3

5

3

5

5

5

2

4

36

5

3

5

7

3

3

5

4

4

39

75

T25 +4

3

3

4

4

4

5

5

4

4

+1

1

E

1

4

3

3

3

3

3

+3

+4

Darcy Habgood

4

3

4

3

5

4

4

3

4

34

5

5

4

4

6

3

5

4

4

40

74

T20 +3

4

3

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

-1

1

2

2

2

4

4

4

4

4

+4

+3

Amy Chu

4

3

4

3

5

4

5

3

3

34

4

3

4

4

4

3

5

4

4

35

69

T2 -2 -1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

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-1

E

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-2

Emily Baumgart 4 T51 +10 4

3 4

4 4

6 7

5 7

4 7

6 8

5 10

4 10

41 +6

3 -1

6 1

4 1

5 2

6 4

3 4

5 4

4 4

4 4

40 +4

81 +10

Stats provided by golfstat.com OLIVER MCKENNA | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

This is a scorecard showing the results of the first round of the Pac-12 Championships on Monday.

Cougars end Monday with combined 298 (+4), Chu leads team with score two under par By Sigmund Seroka Evergreen reporter

WSU women’s golf completed the first day of the Pac12 Championships on Monday where they finished in seventh place with a total of 298 (+14). Leading the PAC currently is

Southern California finishing with a combined 283 (-1). Leading the way for the Cougars after the first round is freshman Amy Chu who carded 69 (-2), followed by freshman teammate Darcy Habgood who finished with 74 (+3). As of Monday, Chu is tied for

second place, making her the only Cougar to start in the top-10 for the championships. Senior Madison Odiorne completed round one with 75 (+4) placing her in a tie for 25th, right behind Habgood’s 20th place. To round out the pack for the Cougars are junior Marie LundHansen with 80 (+9) and redshirt junior Emily Buamgart, who carded 81 (+10). Lund-Hansen placed 46th and

Baumgart finished just outside of the top-50 in a tie for 51st place. Chu will be looking to carry over her impressive day one performance to the next two days, while her other teammates will be looking to make up for the high stroke count. With two more days left in the Pac-12 Championships, the Cougars still have plenty of ground to cover but are sitting in a good position after one round.

The Cougars are placed one position higher than where they finished last year and are one position above UW. While the team collectively is positioned higher, so are each of the players that are returning from last year’s championships with the lowest ranking Cougar this year starting at No. 51. The Pac-12 Championships will resume all day today followed by the final round on Wednesday.


Opinion

Opinion Editor K ade Russom opinion@dailyevergreen.com DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

The Daily Evergreen @DailyEvergreen TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2019 | PAGE 5

COURTESY OF PIXABAY

Those who need to arrive daily to the Pullman campus by car are charged hundreds of dollars just to be able to park. The WSU buses are an option for some, but where they run and for how long limits their effectiveness and some students need cars just to get to school.

Include partial WSU parking prices in tuition

have to pay for the privilege but them those with work or study sessions that being the sole source of funding is too run late into the night. much of a burden on those who need What’s worse for these students is that the price for parking is rising construction project and maintenance to use it. The cost of parking passes at WSU is and there’s no negotiating where it’s plan are covered through assessed a serious detriment to those who need a going to come from. fees, Transportation Director John Shaheen said. In this case, self-supporting means Every student already pays a set fee each semester to the student who uses this service are fund Pullman Transit for its buses, it is only reasonable the sole providers of the service’s that a similar system should be put in use for parking. funding. This leaves rather large sums to be covered. The estimated cost over the next five years to build, maintain personal vehicle just to get to campus. “When people pay for parking, and repair parking facilities are WSU offers buses for those living they are paying to support the existing $2.6 million, according to the WSU off campus, but they aren’t always a good option. The routes do not reach facilities and at different times to Transportation Services website. construct new ones,” Shaheen said. everywhere in Pullman or run at times It’s fair that those who use the See Parking Page 7 that fit a student’s schedule, like for Pullman campus’ parking should

High price of parking passes should be lowered by including part of the cost in tuition, eases financial burden for some By Deyanira Tovar

Evergreen columnist

S

imilar to WSUs buses, WSU parking services should be partially paid for by all students, not just those who pay for a parking pass. WSU Transportation Services is entirely self-supported. Every

Guest column: Gas tax insufficient, needs global response costs. The cost of doing nothing isn’t considered, and they are already mounting. They include increases in droughts, floodThe bill requires utilities By Peter Haug ing, extreme heat, wildfires and Guest columnist to obtain 100 percent of their other weather extremes driven electricity from carbon-free n April 4 column in by climate change. These, in energy sources. It also comThe Daily Evergreen, pels utilities to be 80 percent turn, exacerbate costs to human “Gas tax bill too cost- carbon-free by 2030. The two health and property. ly for minor effects,” highlights bills now must be reconciled A main point in the and approved by both legislative Evergreen op-ed is that a single some excellent issues with bodies before going to Gov. Jay state’s efforts to reduce carbon Washington state’s proposed Inslee for signature, according carbon tax, House Bill 1110. emissions will do little on a to Environment Washington. But it misses the big picture. The senate bill was immedi- practical level. Other states are In fact, that tax is no longer proposing similar legislation, ately attacked because of proproposed. It passed the House with the same myopic limitajected costs. on April 11 after a similar bill tions. The heart of the problem Most objections to climate passed the Senate in March. is that we need a national plan; change legislation emphasize

Climate change needs to be addressed on a global level; more action should be taken

A

Editorial policies Positions taken in staff editorials are the majority vote of the editorial board. All editorials are written and reviewed by members of the editorial board. The Daily Evergreen is the official student publication of Washington State University, operating under authority granted to the Student Media Board by the WSU Board of Regents. Responsibilities for establishing news and advertising policies and deciding issues related to content rest solely with the student staff. The editor and advertising manager provide reports to the Student Media Board at its monthly meetings. The views expressed in commentaries and letters are those of the individual authors and not

necessarily those of The Daily Evergreen staff, management or advertisers, or the WSU Board of Regents. The Daily Evergreen subscribes to the Code of Ethics set forth by the Society of Professional Journalists. News planning meetings of The Daily Evergreen are open to the public. Persons interested in attending news planning meetings may email editor@dailyevergreen.com or call 335-3194 to arrange an appointment. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peacably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Editorial board Luke Hudson, editor-in-chief Sydney Brown, managing editor Angelica Relente, news editor Madysen McLain, deputy news editor Kade Russom, opinion editor Email opinion@dailyevergreen.com to share issue ideas with the editorial board.

ultimately efforts must be global. Such efforts are underway. Most European nations are implementing agreements from the 2015 Paris agreement. China has been aware of environmental problems for decades. In the fall of 1998, traveling northwest of Beijing I saw wind farms in the distance through black clouds of coal dust. The following year in Dalian, solar energy provided our apartment’s hot water. Last September, a plan for what Fortune magazine called “the most ambitious carbon price enacted by any major emitter nation” was released

by the Climate Leadership Council. That plan, by former Republican Secretaries of State James Baker and George Shultz, would significantly exceed the U.S. Paris commitment, according to a report by the Climate Leadership. Many ideas in this plan have morphed into national bipartisan legislation HR 763 — The Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act. This act, supported by Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL), is projected to reduce emissions throughout America by at least 40 percent during its first 12 See Climate Page 7

Letters to the editor Typed letters to the editor may be mailed or brought to Murrow East room 122 or emailed to opinion@dailyevergreen.com. All letters 250 words or fewer are considered for publication. The Daily Evergreen also welcomes guest commentaries of 550 words or fewer addressing issues of general interest to the WSU community. A name, phone number and uni-

versity affiliation (if applicable) must accompany all submissions. Letters and commentaries should focus on issues, not personalities. Personal attacks and anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. The Daily Evergreen reserves the right to edit for space, libel, obscene material and clarity. The views expressed are solely those of the individual authors.


PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2019

DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

NEWS

Rollys | Continued from Page 1 The property owner has flood insurance, but only certain areas of the building are covered per their policy, Crystal said. The couple has business insurance for the shop, which covers water damage, but not from a natural disaster like a flood, so they have to pay for all the damage on their own. Crystal said the estimated damage so far is way more than they expected and doesn’t include the cost to repair the walls which she expects to be around another $5,000. They have a goal of raising $18,500 on their GoFundMe page and as of 5 p.m. Monday they had received $350 in donations. Crystal said if people get behind them and start donating, they could be back up and running in no time. Members of the Sigma Pi fraternity helped the Gayles’ clean up the outside and inside of their shop the morning after the flood. Crystal said she plans to set a date for a cleanup day later this week so people can come help. She hopes if enough people come out, they won’t have to pay the $11,000 bill to clean up the business. Crystal will announce the cleanup day through the Rollys Facebook page. Crystal said she was at home on the day of the flood when she received a call from the building owner around 5 p.m. informing her that there had been reports of water flowing into businesses. She had just left the shop 15 minutes prior and everything was perfectly fine. Crystal called the two employees working at the shop at the time, Mikayla Palmer and Alyssa Friel, and they informed her that water was coming through the front door. She rushed to the store and when she arrived, she called her

husband and told him there were 1.5 inches of water on the floor. Adrian brought sandbags around 5:30 p.m. and they attempted to push the water out. They were able to get the water level down to about a quarter inch by 5:45 p.m. before Adrian and his wife stepped out the back door. Adrian said they were only outside for a few seconds before they heard their two employees start yelling. When they walked back inside, there was now a foot of water inside their store and within three minutes there were 3 feet. “It was unbelievably fast,” Adrian said. “If you were walking down the sidewalk at that time, there would have been absolutely nothing you could’ve done to get out of it. You would have gotten swept away no question.” Once Adrian realized how bad it was getting, he ran out to his truck minutes later and pulled it out of the parking lot. He parked his truck on a hill next to the Normandy Apartments, got out and knew he had to go back for his wife and two employees immediately or else they would be trapped. Adrian got to back to the store and the four of them began a dangerous trek. When they got out-side the front of the building, the sidewalk was filled with rushing water. But Adrian noticed the bushes off to the side were breaking up the rushing water and clearing them a safer path. They reached a concrete wall barrier on the outside of the northwest corner of the building and Adrian could see his truck. All they had to do was cross a parking lot filled with raging water. “I was just like, ‘you guys just keep following me, we’ll make it, I promise,’ ” Adrian said. Wading through waist-deep water, Adrian went for it. Before

OLIVER MCKENNA | DAILY EVERGREEN FILE

Rollys Owner Adrian Gayles talks about damage to his business from the flood last week and how he worked to evacuate other employees. he knew it he was swept off his feet and underwater. He got up and looked back toward his wife. His two employees got scared once they saw Adrian fall and decided to cross Grand and head for the Mobil Gas Station. Adrian quickly grabbed his wife’s hand and pulled her through the current to his truck after fighting through the water for about 40 minutes. He drove her home around 6:30 p.m. and then returned to make sure his employees were safe. “They’re my responsibility until they get home and I couldn’t just leave them,” Adrian said. From 7 p.m. until about 9:30

p.m., Adrian attempted to get his employees from the gas station. Luckily, a front loader was able to pick up his employees and get them to safety and Adrian drove them home from there. Adrian said what happened to him, his wife and employees were something he’s only ever seen on TV and never expected to witness firsthand. “It was not a game, it was real life,” Adrian said. Adrian and Crystal returned to the ice cream shop the following morning to assess the damage. Adrian said firefighters had to shatter one of the front windows on the nail salon next door in order to save people trapped

inside, including a 7-year-old and an infant. “It was a nightmare,” he said. Adrian isn’t worried about the damage to the shop, which opened in October, and is just happy everyone got out safely. “I mean [the damage] is replaceable, lives aren’t,” he said. The Gayles saved money for years to open the ice cream shop originally and poured an estimated $42,000 to get it up and running. They are now focused on cleaning up and getting Rollys reopened as soon as possible. “We’ll get her back up and running,” Adrian said. “We’re going to pull through this, it’s what we do.”

Seminar | Continued from Page 1 curriculum and train facilitators, she stated in an email. A team of WSU professors worked on the class curriculum: Richardson, Wilson, Brenda Bray and Connie Remsberg, clinical assistant professor in pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences. Wilson said students from different programs must learn how to work together because one provider alone can treat someone based on their knowledge, but collaboratively, they have a lot more expertise. A provider, Wilson said, is a medical doctor, physician, nurse practitioner, physician assistant or even a pharmacist, if the pharmacist writes prescriptions. Wilson said physicians should consult with pharmacists to know the best medication to give a patient. They should work with social workers to help patients who have an issue that might need counseling. Richardson said students work on their communication skills and talk about roles and responsibilities in the class. The main goal is to learn how to communicate with other health professionals on this topic, she said. “The nurse might assume that COURTESY OF ROBERT HUBNER the pharmacist is going to do Students from several universities, like WSU and Eastern Washington University patient education around taking opioids, and a pharmacist might discuss with each other about opioid addiction and how they can prevent it.

assume that a nurse has already taken time to sit down with a patient and help them understand the risks of taking opioids,” Richardson said. One problem with pain management, Wilson said, is providers give patients opioid pre-scriptions because many of them do not have the education to know what else to do. This issue is exacerbated because people with an opioid addiction may get medication solely because they are addicted, not because they are in pain, she said. “Patients alone are not responsible for their addictions. Sometimes, healthcare, I think, allows people to become addicted because we don’t address their underlying causes,” Richardson said. She said the class also focuses on the importance of not using stigmatizing language. As an example, Richardson said providers should not say that someone has “dirty urine.” They should say that a patient’s urine tested positive for a drug. “Even saying that anyone is addicted can sound stigmatizing to some because that makes it sound like addiction is a choice.

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Treaty | Continued from Page 1 of the drone footage for the documentary. The research conducted by field school participants was shown in the documentary, Chastain said. Woodard said she participated in the 2016 field school, looked at seminar papers and researched four unratified treaties including the mixedband treaty. “To be able to be a part of their story and be a part [of] their history and their push for

recognition in terms of ‘this was a wrongdoing’ — it’s an incredible experience for a historian,” Woodard said. Chastain said the mixedband had territory in southwest Montana, northwest Wyoming and northeast Idaho. The Indian Claims Commission consulted with the Shoshone Bannock tribe in 1970 to find what territories were taken, he said. Orlan Svingen, WSU history professor, said the commission

failed to uncover the cession docu-ment in 1970, and so the mixed-band tribe was not compensated for all their land. Svingen said he went through multiple newspapers on microfilms and documents until he found a story about the treaty written by The Montana Post in 1868. He said Lynette Scriver, a former graduate student, was going through documents from the Na-tional Archives on microfilm at WSU around 2007, and called

him when she came across a document that mentioned Chief Tendoy. She was unsure of what it was, Svingen said, and when he read it continuously, he realized that it was the treaty signing. “When I found this document I was kind of sleepless for three or two nights, just out of excitement,” he said. Historians and tribes claimed the southwestern part of Montana and Three Forks region was a common hunting ground,

Svingen said, but Chief Tendoy claimed the land as his in the cession document, and his claim is signed by four others. The research is being used to negotiate for land restoration or a land claim set-tlement between the mixed-band and the federal government, Svingen said. “It’s my hope and theirs that the federal government will provide a remedy that is fair to history, and fair to the mixed band,” he said.


DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2019 | PAGE 7

OPINION/CLASSIFIEDS

Climate | Cont. from Page 5 years, according to the Citizens’ Climate Lobby. It is considered revenue neutral; money collected through a carbon fee will be allocated equally to all Americans. It’s simpler to administer than other carbon pricing plans, so costs would be minimal. No money would go to the government. Interested readers can learn about these efforts and many more this weekend at Bridging the Climate Divide, a regional conference April 19 and 20 in Moscow, sponsored by the Palouse Chapter of CCL. Climate change isn’t limited to Washington State, nor to North America. It doesn’t respect political boundaries. We can move America to join the rest of the world by encouraging our representatives to support HR 763 regardless of political affiliation. With bipartisan support, the policy has a good chance of passage, with lasting, long-term effectiveness. Together, we can address climate change in unprecedented COURTESY OF PIXABAY ways, and at the same time protect and benefit most sectors of New plans for managing climate change are underway, but a national plan needs to be implemented in order for them to be as effective as possible. The Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act is one possible solution to this issue. our economy.

READER REACTIONS | ASWSU discusses graduation regalia costs, opens cultural appropriation talk Readers react to an article discussing one ASWSU senators proposal to reduce regalia costs to increase graduation attendance. A resolution to prevent cultural appropriation during this event was also approved. Tia Monzingo: “I definitely chose not to walk because the experience wasn’t worth that extra price of the cap and gown and it was an unnecessary expense. If it were free or cheaper I would have liked to walk.” Jacob Montana Plasters: “@Tia Monzingo Because I didn’t walk my roommate didn’t know I had graduated like six months prior. ‘Off to classes?’ ‘Dude. I graduated like six months ago’ ” Daniel Stuart Hoffman: “Oh come on. What’s an extra 75 tacked onto tens of thousands on the way out the door? It’s not like this place claims to be the people’s university or anything.” Bryan Beckley: “@Jake Mandislough people of all nationalities adopt hip hop culture/attire and nobody says a word. Wear a grass skirt from a party supply store and suddenly you’re the white devil slave master.” Jake Mandislough: “@Bryan Beckley uhhh plenty of people said many words about people adopting hip hop culture/attire. You just weren’t listening. Which is not surprising at all.”

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“State funds and tuition money cannot be used for parking and there’s no grant money for parking, so there’s no other source.” The price for parking is set by strict necessity, only charging what’s needed to run its facilities. Students must pay for parking or transportation in some way no matter what, but if the school changes how many students pay for it, it could ease the load put on the shoulders of those who need affordable parking passes. If we switch the primary funding source from individuals who purchase a pass to all students at WSU and include it in the tuition, it would aid students who only have one option. Every student already pays a set fee each semester to fund Pullman Transit for its buses, it

is only reasonable that a similar system should be put in use for parking on campus. The brunt of the cost would still be paid by those who choose to use it, but if even less than 5 percent of the price of a parking pass was spread through the tuition costs of WSU students, the effect would be deeply felt by those struggling with the price of parking. It would require a significant change in the structure of how WSU’s parking services are handled, but it would give those who need a personal vehicle on campus a break from the hundreds they might pay for this service already. Deyanira Tovar is a junior digital technology and culture major from Bellevue, WA. She can be contacted at 335-2290 or by opinion@dailyevergreen.com.

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PAGE 8 | TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2019

DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

SPORTS

Track | Continued from Page 4 weekends we have ran into some pretty miserable weather,” Phipps said. “So I think that everyone’s excited to run down to Southern California and get some good weather.” Each venue this week will highlight different events. The Mount SAC Relays will feature some of WSU’s long-distance

runners and the throwers will be featured in both invitationals. Phipps is excited for the upcoming meet as many schools travel to California for the event. “This weekend is probably the biggest weekend in the collegiate season,” Phipps said. “This is where everybody heads to on this weekend, so the competition

is going to be awesome at all of the meets.” The Cougars will be competing Wednesday through Saturday, which may be a challenge. Phipps says he is looking forward to having the opportunity to compete in such a fast-paced week, as it sets up what the postseason will look like for the ath-

letes who compete well enough to make it there. “I think this is a weekend that simulates what we’re going to run into when we run into the Pac12 [Championships],” Phipps said. “Then to first rounds, then hopefully ultimately to NCAA finals where student-athletes are required to go back-to-back days.

We’ll balance it out a little bit so that we won’t do too many events on any one day for any person.” The first meet will start on Wednesday at the Bryan Clay Invitational, transitioning to the Mount SAC Relays on Thursday and topping off the week with the Beach Invitational starting on Friday.

Athlete of the Week: Michaela Bayerlova

LEAD CEREMONY

2019

Honoring those who advance leadership and engagement at Washington State University and beyond.

Undergraduate Students

Endalkachew Abebaw • Teagan Aune • Justin Berger • Bailey Caruso Isaac Castaneda • Andrew Cooper • Catherine Dunn • Dalia Hernandez Farias Rhea Christine Gonzaga • Kristian Gubsch • Zachary M. Harper • Sophia Hilsen Jordan Hummel • Harald Hyllseth • Michael Jaramillo • Jude Knife Savanna Navarro Kresse • Thomas LeClair • Austin Loomis • Debbie R. Majano Haley McCabe • Adriana McKinney • Devinae McNeil • Michelle Mendoza Madeline Michaud • Lillian H. Miller • Hailey Modin • Bogdan “Theo” Mynka Mayalin Nakasone • Francisco J. Ochoa Limon • Ryan O’Dea • Ayanna Pope Nallely Sanchez • Lindsay Schilperoort • Sarah Montana Sherrod • Jordan Smith Alec Solemslie • Anna Somerville • Rachael Spear • Anika VanDeen Linda Vargas Villanueva • Orion Welch • Matthew Winchell • Hilary Xcaret Zuniga

Graduate Students

Amber Leah Duldulao • Joanna Gourley • Yongmin Ko • Mehrzad Mehrabipour Hongda Ren • Chantel Elizabeth Robinson • Brandy R. Seignemartin Shima Bahramvash Shams • Cameron R. Yang

Student Organizations

Health Sciences Student Advocacy Association Indian Student Association • Student National Pharmaceutical Association

Faculty & Staff

Katie J. Banks • Dr. Nairanjana Dasgupta • Dr. Janet Peters

Community Organizations

College Hill Association Community Action Center of Whitman County

Dear Cougs, Many in our community may be aware of communications from a student group organizing an event on the Glenn Terrell Mall on the Pullman campus on or before April 16. We are writing to express our unwavering support and commitment to our WSU community members who may be adversely affected by such a symbolic action. One of our institutional core values is freedom of expression; however, we view this possible action with concern as it deviates from what it means to be a member of the Coug community. We aspire and work towards being a community where all Cougs feel a sense of belonging and can succeed in their learning, living and working. We can support Freedom of Expression and re-commit to affirming unity and solidarity with one another by working together and applying all that we have learned and are learning to advance a community that welcomes, validates, celebrates, and embraces everyone. Here are some suggestions on ways we can take action to promote unity: If you would like to avoid the event, consider taking an alternative path through campus. Check out a wide range of other university events and educational programming at studentaffairs.wsu.edu/unity-events Let’s remind ourselves that WSU stands against bigotry and hatred, even as we hold freedom of expression as a core value. – Your Coug Community

#CougsAffirm

#CougUnity

OLIVER MCKENNA | DAILY EVERGREEN FILE

Sophomore Michaela Bayerlova serves the ball during her match against Boise State March 24 at Hollingbery Fieldhouse. Bayerlova is the No. 1 singles player for WSU. WTA singles poll and has been ranked as high as 579th. Bayerlova’s numbers in the ITA Singles rankings are even more impressive. She is currently the 73rd women’s player in the ITA Singles rankings By Shawn P. and has seen rankings as high O’Connor as 69th. Evergreen columnist Michaela has already set records at WSU. As a freshman, Bayerlova set the program record for highest ITA DI rank. She also saw unprecedented Michaela Bayerlova had a success at the NCAA Singles flawless weekend, collecting two wins in the No. 1 singles spot for championship. Bayerlova, then-ranked No. 23 in the the Cougars. nation, knocked off No. 49 One 3-6 and two 6-4 set of Natalie Novotna of Virginia victories over No. 10 UCLA Tech in straight sets. The win on Friday helped seal WSU’s was the first tournament win biggest women’s tennis upset by a WSU singles player in in program history. Bayerlova program history. picked up a 6-1, 6-3 straightBayerlova would put up a sets victory on Sunday against valiant effort in the second No. 13 USC and was the only round, but fell 7-6(4), 3-6, 6-4 Cougar to grab a victory. to Ashley Lahey of Pepperdine Bayerlova, a sophomore University, the eventual NCAA from Germany, is an accomNational runner-up. plished tennis player. She is Michaela Bayerlova is in currently ranked No. 52 in the midst of a special career at the ITA DI Women’s Singles WSU. Her wins this weekend Rankings. Last September, she helped propel WSU to its largest received her highest ever rank upset victory in program hisand the highest in school history and earned her this week’s Evergreen Athlete of the Week. tory when she sat at No. 17 on the list in September. Shawn P. O’Connor is a junior journalism Michaela is also highly and media production major from Oak ranked on the world stage. Michaela is currently the 719th Harbor. He can be contacted at 335-1140 ranked women’s player in the or by desports@dailyevergreen.com.

Sophomore picked up two wins elevating team to upset No. 10 UCLA

Profile for The Daily Evergreen

April 16, 2019  

April 16, 2019  

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