Page 1

Volume CXIX No. 17

» INSIDE

www.dailycampus.com

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

UConn Global Medical Brigades to expand By Jess Hopper Campus Correspondent

WONG FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST Kristina Wong spreads suicide awareness through dark humor. FOCUS/ page 5

SMASHING GOOD TIME Huskies shine at Quinnipiac Women’s Invitational. SPORTS/ page 12

EDITORIAL: RYAN FAIRFIELD COUNTY VISIT HIGHLIGHTS NEED FOR POPULAR VOTE There is a need for reform in the presidential election system. COMMENTARY/page 4 NATO SCALES BACK AFGHAN PARTNERING AFTER ATTACKS NATO pulls back to lower the risk of insider attacks. NEWS/ page 2

» weather Tuesday Partly Cloudy

High 73/ Low 61 wednesday/ thursday

High 68 Low 48 High 68 Low 47

» index Classifieds 3 Comics 8 Commentary 4 Crossword/Sudoku 8 Focus 5 InstantDaily 4 Sports 12

Shreena Desai has traveled across the world to help strangers she’s never met. With UConn Global Medical Brigades, Desai, a 7th-semester biomedical engineering major, traveled to Ghana to provide medical relief to locals. The UConn Global Medical Brigades has sent UConn students to provide medical and dental care to local villages in Honduras, Ghana and Panama, and will be expanding with a trip to Nicaragua this year. “This January, UConn Global Brigade is going to travel to Nicaragua on a combined Medical and Public Health Brigade. We will also be returning to Ghana in May,” said 7thsemester molecular and cellular biology major Tom Presti, who added that the Nicaragua trip will take the place of the annual trip to Honduras. This year will be the first time the group travels to Nicaragua, reflecting the growth and expansion of the program to new countries. The group, which is entirely

SHREENA DESAI PHOTOS

Above are photographs from Shreena Desasi’s trip to Ghana in May, made possible by UConn Global Medical Brigade. Students will now have the opportunity to provide medical and dental help to locals in more countries, starting with Nicaragua.

student-run, spends just under two weeks in each country, setting up clinics and pharmacies in school classrooms where they see locals and provide muchneeded medical and dental care. UConn Global Brigades is part of the larger international parent organization, Global Medical Brigades, which has chapters all over the United States, Canada and handful of European countries. According to the group’s Facebook page, the UConn Global Medical Brigades “strive to bring quality, sustainable medical, public health, water

$1.1 million van will save nurses travel and time

By Jackie Wattles Campus Correspondent

It took $1.1 million, collaboration between three state organizations and inspired ingenuity to put a one-of-a-kind correctional nursing training van on the roads of Connecticut. Until now, nurses working in Connecticut’s 16 correctional facilities were forced to carve out valuable hours to travel to educational workshops. Now, the 40-foot, state-of-the-art vehicle provides on-site training using breathing, blinking dummies, replicas of prison cells and a group of professional educators. Denise Panosky, a clinical assistant professor in UConn’s school of nursing, is one of the health professionals doing on-site training. To her, the van is more than an advance in education; it is a chance to improve the overall health of Connecticut communities. “A lot of these patients haven’t been to doctors in years, and half of them have mental health issues,” Panosky said. “Most of them aren’t necessarily bad people, and very few of them are serving life sentences. When they come back into our communities, we want them to be healthy. The van gives our nurses the tools to give better patient care.” The van will hit eight locations throughout the state, serve all 16 correctional facilities and give at least one hour-long training session to all of the 439 correctional

nurses. The vehicle is the first of its kind, and its developers are hoping other states will follow suit. “We wanted to create a national model,” said Dr. Connie Weiskopf, the director of nursing and patient care services at UConn’s Correctional Managed Health Center. “These patients have very complex needs, [and] the van provides a specific training area that allows us to do comprehensive training in one place.” University officials say the van’s modern technologies and efficiency in delivering educational services will help to ensure Connecticut is compliant with the U.S. Supreme Court mandate to provide prisoners with health care commensurate to community standards. The School of Nursing, the University of Connecticut Health Center Correctional Managed Health Care and the Connecticut Department of Corrections worked in conjunction on the project, which is now more than two years in the making. The funding came from a $1.1 million grant from the United States Health Resources and Services Administration. The van’s ribbon cutting ceremony last week attracted significant press attention, with reports appearing from news outlets all over the country, including the San Francisco Chronicle.

Jacquline.Wattles@UConn.edu

and micro-finance initiatives to developing communities.” “We saw a lot of cases of malaria. Many of the workers are farmers and fishermen with body aches, and children who suffered from malnutrition. There just isn’t enough food,” said Desai. Students in Desai’s group worked alongside Ghanaian doctors seeing patients and providing prescriptions for medicine they brought with them from the United States. The students also walked door-to-door through the village asking residents about health

issues and educating them on proper nutrition, personal healthcare and hygiene. One of the challenging aspects of providing medical care in a country like Ghana, where local witch doctors still provide a trusted source of medical insight, is aiding and educating the local population without lecturing them or stepping on the toes of tradition. “You have to draw a fine line between their traditions while still teaching them how to take care of themselves,” said Desai. For Global Medical Brigades, providing locals with the

knowledge of personal hygiene is the most important way to combat the main issues. “The medicine we provide is just a temporary cure for the sickness. The fundamental root to providing long-term care is by sharing knowledge of a living an overall better holistic lifestyle,” said Desai. The accomplishments and impact of the UConn chapter of Global Brigades are especially impressive considering the group is entirely studentrun. “From planning the trip, to participating in the brigade, to even raising additional money for expensive procedures for patients we saw on a past brigade, students are the driving force,” said Presti. From booking flights to contacting foreign government officials, the group and their efforts are student-run from start to finish. Students participating in the volunteering trips work throughout the year to raise funds to cover travel expenses. For students looking to get involved with UConn Global Brigades, meetings are held at the Student Union at 9 p.m. on Tuesdays.

Jessica.Hopper@UConn.edu

Some UConn students find good life at campus inn

DAILY CAMPUS FILE PHOTO

The Nathan Hale Inn, pictured above, offers on-campus housing to UConn students for twice the price of a regular dorm room. The additional housing is helping to fill the need for additional rooms on the Storrs campus.

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — While most college students who have arrived back on campus this fall can look forward to communal bathrooms and bunk beds, Kaitlin Murphy anticipates nicer living arrangements at the University of Connecticut’s Storrs campus. Murphy is among nearly 20 students who will live this semester at the Nathan Hale Inn on campus. The rooms at Nathan Hale are available on a first-come, first-served basis for any student willing to pay double the normal housing cost. By offering rooms to students, the hotel helps UConn accommodate more students

needing on-campus housing in dorms. Unlike most off-campus housing facilities, the cost of a hotel room includes electricity, heat, water, Internet access, cable, and phone service. Students also have pool and gym access, cleaning available twice a week, and room service. “I’m most excited about the maid service, 24-hour room service, and the gym and pool areas,” said Murphy, a fifthsemester student. An extended stay at the Nathan Hale costs $79 a night, which is about 50 percent below the hotel’s normal rate, according to Brian Wells, the hotel’s general manager. Considering

that most students stay about 112 nights a semester, living at the Nathan Hale is about double the price of on-campus housing, which ranges from $3,048 to $4,987 a semester. “Students living here are entitled to all the services and opportunities other guests have,” said Wells. “We don’t call it housing, we call our students guests.” The Nathan Hale helps to fill a need for rooms on the Storrs campus, where the 18 undergraduate facilities housed 75 percent of its full-time students last year. That left about 4,000 students living off-campus, according to UConn’s housing website.

What’s on at UConn today... Field of Memories: Suicide Awareness Student Union Field All day

Intro to Knitting or Crocheting SU 304A/104 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.

Female Orgasm Lecture SU Theatre 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

The Be Aware Show You Care Flag Exhibit represents the suicides that occur on college campuses each year. Come and personalize a flag to show your support and awareness or honor a memory of someone lost.

The Rainbow Center will provide free coffee, tea, hot cocoa and other treats. Students are invited to hang out, meet new people and enjoy good conversation.

Dorian Solot and Marshall Miller are back for their sex education seminar. The seminar is both educational and comical as it answers your deepest, darkest sex questions in a safe and judgement free environment.

Men’s Soccer Game Morrone Stadium 7 p.m. UConn will play against Boston College. For admission information call 1-877-AT-UCONN.

– ELIZABETH BOWLING


The Daily Campus, Page 3

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

News

West Africa leader urges Mali intervention

Obama team tries to lower expectations for debates

AP

President Barack Obama speaks at a campaign event at Eden Park’s Seasongood Pavilion, Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, in Cincinnati, Ohio.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — President Barack Obama’s re-election campaign doesn’t want to talk about what the Democrat is doing to prepare for the fall debates with Republican Mitt Romney. But aides are readily setting expectations — and not surprisingly, they want to keep them low for Obama while raising the stakes for Romney. “While Mitt Romney has done 20 debates in the last year, he has not done one in four years, so there certainly is a challenge in that regard,” Jennifer Psaki, Obama’s campaign spokeswoman, said of the president

on Monday. With Obama edging slightly ahead of Romney in public polling seven weeks from Election Day, the three October debates could be one of the Republicans’ best opportunities to break through with voters. But the high-profile events are just as crucial for Obama, who was an uneven debater during the 2008 Democratic primaries. In that way, some of the Obama campaign’s tactical lowering of expectations is also rooted in the truth. Aides say the structured — and time-limited — nature of

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast (AP) — The president of the West African bloc of nations said Monday it “can no longer hesitate” to combat terrorism and criminality in northern Mali, which was overrun by Islamists. Earlier this month, Mali’s interim government requested military intervention, including aerial support and five battalions but leaders of a March coup, who retain considerable influence in Mali’s capital Bamako, have previously opposed foreign intervention. In his remarks, Desire Kadre Ouedraogo, president of the Economic Community of West African States, said it is important for political and military authorities in Mali to speak “with one voice” on the proposed intervention. Foreign and defense ministers opened a meeting in Abidjan on Monday to discuss details of the deployment, which has yet to be approved by the United Nations Security Council. Malian military and civilian authorities on Sept. 1 requested assistance from ECOWAS, the African Union and the U.N. in recovering the territory in the north. Speaking on behalf of ECOWAS at the Security Council in New York, Ivory Coast’s U.N. Ambassador Youssoufou Bamba said the Mali request was welcome but fell short of the regional bloc’s anticipated role. That’s because it ruled out an ECOWAS military presence in the first two phases of the planned deployment — assisting to secure institutions in Bamako during the transition and helping to reorganize and train the Malian forces, he said. “The request limited assistance to only the provision of equipment, logistics and intelligence in these phases, and allows for the deployment of troops only in Phase 3, the reconquest of the territorial integrity of Mali,” Bamba said. He told the Security Council that the request for military deployment in the last phase would be extremely difficult and strategically unwise without a coordinating center in Bamako. Bamba said Monday’s ministerial meeting supported the concept of operations agreed to by chiefs of the defense staff on Sept. 14-15 that calls for Mali

the debates isn’t a natural fit for Obama, who often is long-winded when answering questions during news conferences or town hall-style meetings. Obama’s campaign purposely has been vague about how he is getting ready for the debates and aides refused to discuss details of his preparations publicly. But those preparations are well under way. Obama has held multiple practice sessions, some with Massachusetts Democrat Sen. John Kerry, who is playing the role of Romney. One of the president’s practice spots is at the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters a short drive from the White House. Romney, on the other hand, has not hidden that he’s been in the midst of intense debate preparation since early September. That’s when aides announced that the GOP nominee would spend much of the week of the Democratic National Convention off the campaign trail huddling with advisers in private debate sessions. Romney got started early in part to help him get accustomed to the one-on-one format he’ll face next month. Most of his numerous debates during the GOP primary featured several other candidates. The Republican nominee is doing timed, mock debates with Ohio’s Republican Sen. Rob Portman playing Obama. Longtime adviser Peter Flaherty is standing in as the moderator, asking questions about both domestic and foreign policy.

More than 180 Occupy Wall Street arrests in NYC

NEW YORK (AP) — Occupy Wall Street protesters celebrated the movement’s anniversary on Monday by clogging intersections in the city’s financial district, marching to the beat of drums that were a familiar refrain last year. Protesters roamed around the lower Manhattan financial district all morning in groups of a few dozen each, from one intersection to another and back again, chanting loudly about the ills of Wall Street. In total, there were a few hundred protesters scattered throughout the city. More than 180 of them were arrested by early Monday evening, mostly on disorderly conduct charges. The day’s events lacked the heft of Occupy protests last year, when protesters gathered by the thousands. But Occupiers were upbeat as they spread out in their old stomping grounds, giddy at the prospect of being together again. They brushed off any suggestions that the movement had petered out. “This is a movement. It’s only been a year,” said protester Justin Stone Diaz, of Brooklyn. “It’s going to take many years for it to develop and figure out exactly who we are.” But the movement is now a shadow of its

AP

Occupy Wall Street protestor Chris Philips screams as he is arrested near Zuccotti Park, Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, in New York. Multiple Occupy Wall Street protestors have been arrested during a march toward the New York Stock Exchange on the anniversary of the grass-roots movement.!

mighty infancy, when a group of young people harnessed the power of a disillusioned nation and took to the streets chanting about corporate greed and inequality. A familiar Statue of Liberty puppet was back, bobbing in the crowd above protesters’ heads. Protesters in wheelchairs

Classifieds Classifieds Dept. U-189 11 Dog Lane Storrs, CT 06268

tel: (860) 486-3407 fax: (860) 486-4388

Office Hours: Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

For more information: www.dailycampus.com

for Sale

For rent

PAYING TOO MUCH for wireless service? Get unlimited voice, text and data for $59.99 monthly. No contracts. No credit check. No deposit. Earn FREE service by referring others. WirelessDealOfTheYear. com

Bedroom apartments for rent in Storrs. All within 2-3 miles from campus. For viewing email properties@ mindspring.com or call 860-429-8455

for rent

COVENTRY LAKE Nice six room single family house in private beach association. $1295/ month includes heat.. Family room, eat-in kitchen, 3 good sized bedrooms. Laundry/ utility room, deck, good storage. Sewer, city water, trash pick up. Three people maximum. No pets. 860-983-6016 FOR RENT 2, 3 & 4

WILLINGTON/STORRS Large 2 Bedroom Apartment, close to UConn, nice location, 24hr security system, A/C $975.00 per month H/HW included (NO PETS) (1) month FREE special 860-9741433 ON CAMPUS HOUSING The Nathan Hale Inn is now reserving Fall and Spring housing. Excellent location, housekeeping, private bath, pool & spa, fitness center, high speed internet, includes all utilities. Parking option available.

blocked a road and chanted “All day, all week, occupy Wall Street!” before they were steered off the road by police. Zuccotti Park, the former home of the encampment, was encircled by metal police barricades lined with police officers standing watch.

Rates:

Policies:

For ads of 25 words or less: 1 day............................................................................ $5.75 3 consecutive days........................................................ $15.25 5 consecutive days: ...................................................... $26.50 10 consecutive days:..................................................... $48.00 1 month:..................................................................... $88.00 Semester:.................................................................. $215.00 Each additional word: ..................................................... $0.10 Additional Features: Bold ..................................... ...........$0.50 for rent

Contact missy.diloreto@interstatehotels. com 860-427-7888 http://www.nathanhaleinn.com help wanted

Bartending! Make up to $300/day potential. No experience necessary. Training available, 18+ OK. (800) 965-6520 ext. 163 FEDEX GROUND Now Hiring Part-Time Package Handlers. All Shifts 5 days a week M-F: 2p-6p, 6p-10p,10:30p-3a, To Apply: Join us for a Sort Observation@350 Ruby Rd Willington CT 06237 Every M+T@3pm Every W+TH@5pm. 860-6841628

help wanted

to accept a minimum deployment of ECOWAS troops and police to secure logistic facilities and military and police staff from the new ECOWAS standby force to be deployed in Bamako. It says retaking the north will be jointly planned by the ECOWAS force headquarters and Malian defense and security forces. “This phase requires a lot of combat assets, including fighter jets for the conduct of the operations,” the defense chiefs said. Bamba said the ECOWAS decisions continue to encounter “fierce resistance” from some extreme elements in Mali. “The question of leadership in Mali remains unclear and this is sending confused signals,” he added. Meanwhile, Bamba said, rebel and terrorist groups in the north of Mali have taken advantage of the near political paralysis in Bamako to consolidate their positions. He said the security and humanitarian situation in the north of Mali is getting worse and continues to pose a major threat to regional and international peace and security. Germany’s U.N. Ambassador Peter Wittig, the current Security Council president, said that at Monday’s meeting members took note of the Malian request for assistance to ECOWAS and the U.N. and “underlined the need to exhaust all means of negotiation before considering other means.” He said Mali’s proposal to ECOWAS and its response will be discussed at a later date. In Geneva, U.N. human rights chief Navi Pillay said Monday that Islamists in northern Mali have committed serious human rights violations and possibly war crimes, including amputations, summary executions and the stoning to death of an unmarried couple. She strongly condemned the “attacks on the civilian population, sexual violence, recruitment of child soldiers and forced displacement, as well as the destruction of Mali’s world heritage sites.” A spokesman for one of the radical Islamist groups controlling northern Mali told The AP on Sunday that their fighters cut off a thief’s hand in Timbuktu. It was at least the seventh amputation carried out by the rebel Islamists. It comes after last week’s double amputation of five robbers in the northern city of Gao.

Classifieds are non-refundable. Credit will be given if an error materially affects the meaning of the ad and only for the first incorrect insertion. Ads will only be printed if they are accompanied by both first and last name as well as telephone number. Names and numbers may be subject to verification. All advertising is subject to acceptance by The Daily Campus, which reserves the right to reject any ad copy at its sole discretion. The Daily Campus does not knowingly accept ads of a fraudulent nature.

help wanted

MANCHESTER WINE & LIQUORS Parttime Cashiers/ Stock for busy store in the Buckland mall area. Ideal for students as we offer flexibility to accommodate school schedules & studies. Good starting pay in a fast-paced environment. Must be available during holidays and at least 18 years of age. Call Karen at 860-649-4750 or email us at mwl@snet.net

ter to ashfordsupport@ gmail.com --

Ashford Support Seeking Thursday 3 to 8 PM direct care support for active young woman with autism in the community and at home. Must have working car available car, and able to attend the gym and swim with young woman. Send resume and cover let-

activities

Help w/Home Office Organizing Busy Mom seeks female student(s) to assist in home organizing. 20 mins from campus. Help needed Mondays/Wednesdays 8:45am - 1:45pm. $15 cash per person, per hour. Great way to make quick $. Send email and reference with contact info. or call 860-268-3798

Book Sale Sept. 29 & 30. Mansfield Library 54 Warrenville Rd. (route 89) Mansfield. Close to bus route. Sat. 9-4, Sun. 9-3. Most books priced at $1.00. friendsofthemansfieldlibrary@hotmail.com

travel

SPRINGBREAK HEADQUARTERS! Early booking prices to CANCUN, PUNTA CANA, JAMAICA, CRUISES. Contact TRAVELPLANNERS, 9 Dog Lane, Suite B103, 860-487-2030. YOUR EXPERIENCE BEGINS WITH OURS! classes

ADULT DANCE CLASSES All levels, Tap, Jazz, Ballet, Belly Dance, Irish Step, Zumba, Yoga. MansfieldAcademyof Dance.com; 860-4770200; 12 Merrow Road, Storrs


The Daily Campus, Page 3

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

News

West Africa leader urges Mali intervention

Obama team tries to lower expectations for debates

AP

President Barack Obama speaks at a campaign event at Eden Park’s Seasongood Pavilion, Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, in Cincinnati, Ohio.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — President Barack Obama’s re-election campaign doesn’t want to talk about what the Democrat is doing to prepare for the fall debates with Republican Mitt Romney. But aides are readily setting expectations — and not surprisingly, they want to keep them low for Obama while raising the stakes for Romney. “While Mitt Romney has done 20 debates in the last year, he has not done one in four years, so there certainly is a challenge in that regard,” Jennifer Psaki, Obama’s campaign spokeswoman, said of the president

on Monday. With Obama edging slightly ahead of Romney in public polling seven weeks from Election Day, the three October debates could be one of the Republicans’ best opportunities to break through with voters. But the high-profile events are just as crucial for Obama, who was an uneven debater during the 2008 Democratic primaries. In that way, some of the Obama campaign’s tactical lowering of expectations is also rooted in the truth. Aides say the structured — and time-limited — nature of

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast (AP) — The president of the West African bloc of nations said Monday it “can no longer hesitate” to combat terrorism and criminality in northern Mali, which was overrun by Islamists. Earlier this month, Mali’s interim government requested military intervention, including aerial support and five battalions but leaders of a March coup, who retain considerable influence in Mali’s capital Bamako, have previously opposed foreign intervention. In his remarks, Desire Kadre Ouedraogo, president of the Economic Community of West African States, said it is important for political and military authorities in Mali to speak “with one voice” on the proposed intervention. Foreign and defense ministers opened a meeting in Abidjan on Monday to discuss details of the deployment, which has yet to be approved by the United Nations Security Council. Malian military and civilian authorities on Sept. 1 requested assistance from ECOWAS, the African Union and the U.N. in recovering the territory in the north. Speaking on behalf of ECOWAS at the Security Council in New York, Ivory Coast’s U.N. Ambassador Youssoufou Bamba said the Mali request was welcome but fell short of the regional bloc’s anticipated role. That’s because it ruled out an ECOWAS military presence in the first two phases of the planned deployment — assisting to secure institutions in Bamako during the transition and helping to reorganize and train the Malian forces, he said. “The request limited assistance to only the provision of equipment, logistics and intelligence in these phases, and allows for the deployment of troops only in Phase 3, the reconquest of the territorial integrity of Mali,” Bamba said. He told the Security Council that the request for military deployment in the last phase would be extremely difficult and strategically unwise without a coordinating center in Bamako. Bamba said Monday’s ministerial meeting supported the concept of operations agreed to by chiefs of the defense staff on Sept. 14-15 that calls for Mali

the debates isn’t a natural fit for Obama, who often is long-winded when answering questions during news conferences or town hall-style meetings. Obama’s campaign purposely has been vague about how he is getting ready for the debates and aides refused to discuss details of his preparations publicly. But those preparations are well under way. Obama has held multiple practice sessions, some with Massachusetts Democrat Sen. John Kerry, who is playing the role of Romney. One of the president’s practice spots is at the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters a short drive from the White House. Romney, on the other hand, has not hidden that he’s been in the midst of intense debate preparation since early September. That’s when aides announced that the GOP nominee would spend much of the week of the Democratic National Convention off the campaign trail huddling with advisers in private debate sessions. Romney got started early in part to help him get accustomed to the one-on-one format he’ll face next month. Most of his numerous debates during the GOP primary featured several other candidates. The Republican nominee is doing timed, mock debates with Ohio’s Republican Sen. Rob Portman playing Obama. Longtime adviser Peter Flaherty is standing in as the moderator, asking questions about both domestic and foreign policy.

More than 180 Occupy Wall Street arrests in NYC

NEW YORK (AP) — Occupy Wall Street protesters celebrated the movement’s anniversary on Monday by clogging intersections in the city’s financial district, marching to the beat of drums that were a familiar refrain last year. Protesters roamed around the lower Manhattan financial district all morning in groups of a few dozen each, from one intersection to another and back again, chanting loudly about the ills of Wall Street. In total, there were a few hundred protesters scattered throughout the city. More than 180 of them were arrested by early Monday evening, mostly on disorderly conduct charges. The day’s events lacked the heft of Occupy protests last year, when protesters gathered by the thousands. But Occupiers were upbeat as they spread out in their old stomping grounds, giddy at the prospect of being together again. They brushed off any suggestions that the movement had petered out. “This is a movement. It’s only been a year,” said protester Justin Stone Diaz, of Brooklyn. “It’s going to take many years for it to develop and figure out exactly who we are.” But the movement is now a shadow of its

AP

Occupy Wall Street protestor Chris Philips screams as he is arrested near Zuccotti Park, Monday, Sept. 17, 2012, in New York. Multiple Occupy Wall Street protestors have been arrested during a march toward the New York Stock Exchange on the anniversary of the grass-roots movement.!

mighty infancy, when a group of young people harnessed the power of a disillusioned nation and took to the streets chanting about corporate greed and inequality. A familiar Statue of Liberty puppet was back, bobbing in the crowd above protesters’ heads. Protesters in wheelchairs

Classifieds Classifieds Dept. U-189 11 Dog Lane Storrs, CT 06268

tel: (860) 486-3407 fax: (860) 486-4388

Office Hours: Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

For more information: www.dailycampus.com

for Sale

For rent

PAYING TOO MUCH for wireless service? Get unlimited voice, text and data for $59.99 monthly. No contracts. No credit check. No deposit. Earn FREE service by referring others. WirelessDealOfTheYear. com

Bedroom apartments for rent in Storrs. All within 2-3 miles from campus. For viewing email properties@ mindspring.com or call 860-429-8455

for rent

COVENTRY LAKE Nice six room single family house in private beach association. $1295/ month includes heat.. Family room, eat-in kitchen, 3 good sized bedrooms. Laundry/ utility room, deck, good storage. Sewer, city water, trash pick up. Three people maximum. No pets. 860-983-6016 FOR RENT 2, 3 & 4

WILLINGTON/STORRS Large 2 Bedroom Apartment, close to UConn, nice location, 24hr security system, A/C $975.00 per month H/HW included (NO PETS) (1) month FREE special 860-9741433 ON CAMPUS HOUSING The Nathan Hale Inn is now reserving Fall and Spring housing. Excellent location, housekeeping, private bath, pool & spa, fitness center, high speed internet, includes all utilities. Parking option available.

blocked a road and chanted “All day, all week, occupy Wall Street!” before they were steered off the road by police. Zuccotti Park, the former home of the encampment, was encircled by metal police barricades lined with police officers standing watch.

Rates:

Policies:

For ads of 25 words or less: 1 day............................................................................ $5.75 3 consecutive days........................................................ $15.25 5 consecutive days: ...................................................... $26.50 10 consecutive days:..................................................... $48.00 1 month:..................................................................... $88.00 Semester:.................................................................. $215.00 Each additional word: ..................................................... $0.10 Additional Features: Bold ..................................... ...........$0.50 for rent

Contact missy.diloreto@interstatehotels. com 860-427-7888 http://www.nathanhaleinn.com help wanted

Bartending! Make up to $300/day potential. No experience necessary. Training available, 18+ OK. (800) 965-6520 ext. 163 FEDEX GROUND Now Hiring Part-Time Package Handlers. All Shifts 5 days a week M-F: 2p-6p, 6p-10p,10:30p-3a, To Apply: Join us for a Sort Observation@350 Ruby Rd Willington CT 06237 Every M+T@3pm Every W+TH@5pm. 860-6841628

help wanted

to accept a minimum deployment of ECOWAS troops and police to secure logistic facilities and military and police staff from the new ECOWAS standby force to be deployed in Bamako. It says retaking the north will be jointly planned by the ECOWAS force headquarters and Malian defense and security forces. “This phase requires a lot of combat assets, including fighter jets for the conduct of the operations,” the defense chiefs said. Bamba said the ECOWAS decisions continue to encounter “fierce resistance” from some extreme elements in Mali. “The question of leadership in Mali remains unclear and this is sending confused signals,” he added. Meanwhile, Bamba said, rebel and terrorist groups in the north of Mali have taken advantage of the near political paralysis in Bamako to consolidate their positions. He said the security and humanitarian situation in the north of Mali is getting worse and continues to pose a major threat to regional and international peace and security. Germany’s U.N. Ambassador Peter Wittig, the current Security Council president, said that at Monday’s meeting members took note of the Malian request for assistance to ECOWAS and the U.N. and “underlined the need to exhaust all means of negotiation before considering other means.” He said Mali’s proposal to ECOWAS and its response will be discussed at a later date. In Geneva, U.N. human rights chief Navi Pillay said Monday that Islamists in northern Mali have committed serious human rights violations and possibly war crimes, including amputations, summary executions and the stoning to death of an unmarried couple. She strongly condemned the “attacks on the civilian population, sexual violence, recruitment of child soldiers and forced displacement, as well as the destruction of Mali’s world heritage sites.” A spokesman for one of the radical Islamist groups controlling northern Mali told The AP on Sunday that their fighters cut off a thief’s hand in Timbuktu. It was at least the seventh amputation carried out by the rebel Islamists. It comes after last week’s double amputation of five robbers in the northern city of Gao.

Classifieds are non-refundable. Credit will be given if an error materially affects the meaning of the ad and only for the first incorrect insertion. Ads will only be printed if they are accompanied by both first and last name as well as telephone number. Names and numbers may be subject to verification. All advertising is subject to acceptance by The Daily Campus, which reserves the right to reject any ad copy at its sole discretion. The Daily Campus does not knowingly accept ads of a fraudulent nature.

help wanted

MANCHESTER WINE & LIQUORS Parttime Cashiers/ Stock for busy store in the Buckland mall area. Ideal for students as we offer flexibility to accommodate school schedules & studies. Good starting pay in a fast-paced environment. Must be available during holidays and at least 18 years of age. Call Karen at 860-649-4750 or email us at mwl@snet.net

ter to ashfordsupport@ gmail.com --

Ashford Support Seeking Thursday 3 to 8 PM direct care support for active young woman with autism in the community and at home. Must have working car available car, and able to attend the gym and swim with young woman. Send resume and cover let-

activities

Help w/Home Office Organizing Busy Mom seeks female student(s) to assist in home organizing. 20 mins from campus. Help needed Mondays/Wednesdays 8:45am - 1:45pm. $15 cash per person, per hour. Great way to make quick $. Send email and reference with contact info. or call 860-268-3798

Book Sale Sept. 29 & 30. Mansfield Library 54 Warrenville Rd. (route 89) Mansfield. Close to bus route. Sat. 9-4, Sun. 9-3. Most books priced at $1.00. friendsofthemansfieldlibrary@hotmail.com

travel

SPRINGBREAK HEADQUARTERS! Early booking prices to CANCUN, PUNTA CANA, JAMAICA, CRUISES. Contact TRAVELPLANNERS, 9 Dog Lane, Suite B103, 860-487-2030. YOUR EXPERIENCE BEGINS WITH OURS! classes

ADULT DANCE CLASSES All levels, Tap, Jazz, Ballet, Belly Dance, Irish Step, Zumba, Yoga. MansfieldAcademyof Dance.com; 860-4770200; 12 Merrow Road, Storrs


Page 4

www.dailycampus.com

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

The Daily Campus Editorial Board

Elizabeth Crowley, Editor-in-Chief Tyler McCarthy, Commentary Editor Jesse Rifkin, Associate Commentary Editor Chris Kempf, Weekly Columnist John Nitowski, Weekly Columnist Sam Tracy, Weekly Columnist

» EDITORIAL

Ryan Fairfield County visit highlights need for popular vote

R

epublican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan will be visiting Connecticut on Sept. 30. Giving a speech to a sold-out gymnasium? Meeting and greeting ordinary voters? Not a chance. Ryan will be coming here solely to fundraise money for his campaign in Fairfield County, one of the wealthiest areas in the country. This is not solely a Republican phenomenon. President Obama stopped at Stamford and Westport in August for the same purpose, without anything resembling a mass campaign event. This just demonstrates the need for a serious reform of the American presidential election system, specifically the Electoral College. A state with over three million people is being utilized solely as a cash cow. Candidates meet with hedge fund managers and Wall Street investors here, taking their money and using it to run advertisements about how their own policies would benefit voters in Florida, Virginia and Ohio. This phenomenon is not limited to Connecticut. Fewer than 10 states are truly considered swing states in play this election year, according to many pollsters and election analysts. No presidential candidates seriously consider how their policies or proposals will affect Connecticut. Or California, or New York, or Texas, or any other state whose red or blue outcome can be solidly predicted in advance. What this country needs is a popular vote election, or at least a reasonable alternative to the current format, designed in such a way as to render the vast majority of states’ votes essentially meaningless. Four presidential elections have had a winner who failed to command the most popular votes, the most recent instance being the infamous Bush-Gore election in 2000. As a result, presidential elections become about winning the hearts and minds of fewer and fewer voters, with potentially disastrous results for the nation at large. David Leonhardt wrote recently in The New York Times about how candidates on both sides of the aisle support ethanol subsidies primarily to win the vote of ethanol-dependent swing state Iowa, even though much evidence actually argues against such subsidies. Connecticut used to be something of a swing state. Between 1960 and 1988, we voted Republican five times and Democratic three times for president. But since 1992, the state has voted Democrat five times in a row, creating a blue-state label which causes both major-party presidential candidates to count the state as “in the bag for the Democrats.” This has become true of most states in this country, not just us. It does not have to be this way. With an abolition or at least significant enhancement of the Electoral College, Connecticut’s primary role in presidential elections will no longer be as an ATM, but as a collection of over 1.6 million voters whose opinions truly matter. The Daily Campus editorial is the official opinion of the newspaper and its editorial board. Commentary columns express opinions held solely by the author and do not in any way reflect the official opinion of The Daily Campus.

High Times ranking should be touted, not ignored

W

e all know that UConn was ranked 21st in a list of the best public research universities in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, and that the Sierra Club ranked us fifth in their list of “cool schools” for our environmental efforts. Any time a national organization gives UConn a high ranking on some list they’ve compiled, UConn is quick to latch on to the news and publicize it far and wide. This is understandable, as we want to boost the reputation of our university, and the best way to do that is for third By Sam Tracy parties to vouch Weekly Columnist for our strengths. Alumni, prospective and current students, lawmakers and all Connecticut residents care about the reputation of our school and love to recognize our accomplishments. So, you may be surprised to hear that UConn recently topped the list of a decadesold national magazine with millions of readers. This hasn’t been publicized one bit by the UConn administration – no posts in UConn Today, no press releases, no anything. You may be less surprised about this when you hear the details of the ranking: UConn was rated the number one college in the country for marijuana law reform by High Times Magazine. However, despite the negative perception of the magazine, this ranking should be touted by UConn as incredibly positive news.

Most people know High Times Magazine for its praise of pot culture, centerfolds of marijuana buds and advertisements for smoking paraphernalia and gardening equipment. Yet since its creation in 1974, the magazine has also had a strong political streak. It has long been the leader of coverage and analysis of the marijuana policy reform movement, a topic that is finally beginning to be covered by mainstream media outlets. While it still has countless articles about how much its writers enjoy marijuana, it deserves recognition as a reputable source when it comes to the laws surrounding the drug. This ranking certainly falls into the category of politics, rather than drug use. The list published by High Times was for the top colleges in marijuana law reform, not the colleges with the most pot-smoking students or schools with the most relaxed rules. It is designed to recognize the high level of engagement in the political process by college students in one of the most pressing issues of our time. UConn secured its spot at the top of the list through the hard work of its chapter of Students for Sensible Drug Policy, which played a leading role in the passage of statewide marijuana decriminalization in 2011 and medical marijuana in 2012. Marijuana law reform is gaining popularity incredibly quickly, and actually has much more support than many other policy proposals. According to multiple polls by organizations such as Rasmussen and Gallup, over two-thirds of Americans now think that the War on Drugs has failed. For the first time since the beginning of prohibition, a majority of Americans are in support of regulating marijuana in a manner similar to alcohol. Drug laws should

not be a taboo subject, any more than environmental regulations or spending on public transportation. Of course, as a public educational institution, it is inappropriate for UConn to take sides on most political issues, even ones with widespread approval. I am not advocating for UConn to officially support marijuana law reform, but merely to showcase the incredible leadership on the issue that its students have taken. As young people are notoriously uninvolved in the political process, it is great to see them being recognized as national leaders on any political issue. If UConn was ranked the best college for pro-life activism or pro-choice activism, the most active campus for college Democrats or college Republicans or even the best college for anti-marijuana reform activism, that should be praised for its evidence of student political involvement. The University could easily phrase an announcement in a way that would acknowledge the achievement while making clear that it does not support or oppose the issues being discussed. As long as UConn explains that the ranking is about political activism and not drug use, and makes it clear that it is not taking a stance on the issue either way, it would be very beneficial for it to officially recognize this historic achievement. We should always take the time to acknowledge achievements by our students; whether they are academic, athletic, artistic or political.

Weekly Columnist Sam Tracy is a 7th-semester political science major. He can be reached at Samuel.Tracy@ UConn.edu.

Pope Benedict should be prosecuted for abuse handling

I wanted to get into the InstantDaily, so I did. The new iPhone is slimmer, lighter, has a bigger screen, and sounds like my Samsung. Sounds like another patent lawsuit. My professor tricked me into reading 172 pdf pages under the ruse that we were going to have a discussion and a quiz, and instead lectured for 2 1/2 hours. Well played. Popcorn is a problem. Making the internet even a little bit necessary for my work is a huge fail for productivity everywhere. The squirrels sure are getting portly. How does someone who borrows your brand-new vacuum cleaner not notice when one of his huge socks gets sucked up into it and it catches on fire? My roommate who spent a year in South Korea heard someone say “YOLO” and thought it was a greeting combining “yo” and “hello.” FroyoWorld, Insomnia Cookies and Sweet Emotions.... welcome back freshman fifteen. I asked my friend if DP Dough would still sell the “Coach Jim Cal-zone.” He says he’s crossing his fingers for the “Kevin Ollie-Ollie-Ox-n-Cheese.”

Send us your thoughts on anything and everything by sending an instant message to InstantDaily, Sunday through Thursday evenings. Follow us on Twitter (@ InstantDaily) and become fans on Facebook.

T

he time has come to stop letting the abusers and torturers of children, and their accomplices, escape justice. If you think that is an noncontroversial sentiment, you haven’t been paying attention. Take the case of Robert Finn. Recently found By Nate Herter guilty on the Staff Columnist charge of shielding pedophile priest, Shawn Ratigan, from the authorities. Finn’s case is unique in that he is the first sitting American bishop in the decades-long Catholic abuse scandal to face punishment. How many years, you may ask, will his Excellency spend behind bars for his craven and contemptible crime? Zero. You read that right. In what is being hailed by journalists and advocacy groups alike as a major step forward in confronting this evil problem, Finn was sentenced to two years probation. The sinister deviant did not even face a public trial. And yet, how can we be surprised? We have seen in recent years the terrible practice of moving pedophiles from parish to parish, allowing them to destroy young lives with impunity, by bishops and high church

QW

officials. The Church, pathetic public statements of regret aside, would rather pretend this problem didn’t even exist. Indeed, in 2005, it elected the man chiefly responsible for the cover-up to the highest office. Pope Benedict, when going by the less ostentatious name of Joseph Ratzinger, made it the mission of his long career to ensure stories of the rape and abuse of small children never saw the light of day, let alone were reported to the authorities. What we know is this: in 2001, in his role as the Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, formerly known as the Roman Inquisition, Ratzinger sent a letter to every bishop within the Church, outlining steps for dealing with claims of abuse, including strict punishments up to and including excommunication for (wait for it) officials who went to the authorities. Asserting the stupefying notion that the Church ought to be able to investigate matters such as the sexual assault of minors on its own, Ratzinger sought to shut down any further embarrassment of the Church at the expense of tormented children. But worse yet, in 1980, Ratzinger himself in his role of archbishop personally over-

“O ver

uick

it

saw the transfer, from Essen to Munich, Germany, of a priest accused of kidnapping and raping an 11-year-old boy. The priest was sent to “therapy” for his wicked crime, but not long after, returned to pastoral duty. He promptly resumed molesting children. I could go on. Various insipid defenses have been offered up for Ratzinger’s role in the affair, including an attempt by a subordinate to throw himself under the bus and accept full responsibility for the move back to the congregation. Even if this were true, and if Ratzinger were stupid enough to allow such a thing to happen right under his nose, he still bears responsibility for not informing the authorities in the initial case, and his much-touted record of working within the Church for reform cannot excuse his protection of pedophiles from criminal investigation. So, this is the state of things: a bishop, given a slap on the wrist for protecting a child molester, and a church run by the greatest friend to abusers of them all. Something must be done. Benedict and his bishops, despite their insistence, are not above the law. We must urge our state D.A.’s to investigate not just priests and

parishes but dioceses as well. We will undoubtedly net at least a few more of these villains this way. As for Benedict, we must, at the very least, put diplomatic pressure on the Vatican to answer these charges, which until now it has not satisfactorily done. In 2010, a proposal was put forth to consider detaining Benedict for questioning upon his pastoral visit to England. Such a proposal, with precedent in the house arrest of the vile dictator Augusto Pinochet in Britain in the 1980s, merits consideration. When the Sandusky abuse scandal broke out at Penn State earlier this year, it became clear very quickly that the sainted Joe Paterno had a hand in covering up for his lieutenant. Now Paterno’s name lies in infamy, his statues torn down, and only his well-timed death saved him from seeing his full and ultimate shame. Must we wait for this cowardly old man’s death as well, or will someone take up the call and, finally, stand up against the silence of this Church for the children?

Staff Columnist Nate Herter is a 5th-semester classics and ancient Mediterranean studies major. He can be reached at Chynna.Davis@UConn.edu.

the weekend M itt R omney made an appearance at a NASCAR race in V irginia . T here was an awkward moment when he asked a NASCAR driver why he didn ’ t just hire a chauffeur .” –C onan O’B rien


THIS DATE IN HISTORY

BORN ON THIS DATE

1793

George Washington lays the cornerstone to the United States Capitol building. The building took nearly a century to complete.

www.dailycampus.com

Lance Armstrong – 1971 Jada Pinkett Smith – 1971 Xzibit – 1974 Ronaldo – 1976

The Daily Campus, Page 5

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Kristina Wong spreads suicide awareness through dark humor Reading can be emotional

JON KULAKOFSKY/The Daily Campus

Kristina Wong performs in her one-woman play, “Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” a play that addresses suicide with both humor and sobriety.

By Zach Lederman Campus Correspondent This past Monday night in the Student Union theatre, artist Kristina Wong performed “Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” her nationally acclaimed one-woman show, as part of UConn’s Suicide Prevention Week. “Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” is a show written and performed by Wong that examines the issue of suicide among women of the Asian American community, of which Wong is a member. It premiered in 2006, and has since toured nationwide. The show consists of

Wong acting as a fictionalized version of herself, attempting to both understand and prevent suicide among Asian American women (“How is Kristina Wong going to save them all?”), as well as dealing with her own crisis. Though the show is primarily fictional, Wong admitted that some parts of it were based off her own life, though changed to add some humor. “Certain parts…like the scene where I was trying to get the free help…are based off of reality,” said Wong. “I did a lot of research while I was writing the show, and a lot of that stemmed from what I went through when I

was younger, and dealing with many of the same issues that I deal with in the show.” Although dealing with a serious subject, the show frequently employed humor. One moment, Wong was discussing stories of past suicide victims. The next, she would be encouraging everyone to stand up, hold hands and sing a jaunty, dark little tune, right before darkness re-enveloped the theatre. On the subject of injecting such aspects into the serious topic of suicide prevention, Wong said, “The show is really like a Trojan horse of comedy. I know how hard it is, especially in that demographic, to show up at

some information panel on suicide and look for help. It’s a lot easier to show up here and get the information you need…when you feel you’re going to a performance.” Pilar Zoffoli, a member of the UCAELI program, felt that the program was “good at helping us to deal with bad situations. I’ve had people in those situations, which is why I wanted to come and hear what Wong had to say about suicide. She was very dynamic.” Sheila Kucko, the assistant director of the Asian American Cultural Center and a member of the Suicide Prevention Committee, organized the

show, bringing in Wong as this year’s keynote speaker for Suicide Prevention Week. When asked why Wong was chosen as the speaker, Kucko said, “We originally watched a recording of the show, and after it finished, we just knew that we had to have her come to UConn.” After the show, a reception was hosted in the Asian American Cultural Center, where students were able to discuss the show with Wong, and ask any questions that they had.

Suicide awareness art exhibit iPad not just for opens for week-long viewing entertainment By Rahul Darwar Campus Correspondent

ZARRIN AHMED/The Daily Campus

Bandanas adorned with messages for those who have taken their own lives hang from the walls of the “Be Aware, Show You Care” interactive art exhibit in the Student Union.

Zarrin Ahmed Staff Writer Bandanas filled with hopeful and inspiring messages are displayed throughout the Student Union art exhibit as part of Suicide Awareness Week. “We lost a young lady a few years ago. She was beautiful and intelligent,” said Sheila Kucko, assistant director of the Asian American Cultural Center. “I would do anything I could to help any student.” The “Be Aware, Show You Care” interactive art exhibit is a community-sharing exhibit that encourages students to share their thoughts on suicide and whatever other messages they wish to convey to the community. “The quotes were really powerful to me,” said Alexander Eloi, a 7th-semester communications major. “I’ve been here for three years and I never knew how prevalent suicide was. But

I was glad to see such a show of help.” The Suicide Prevention Committee meets year-round and holds events throughout the academic year, inspiring students to demonstrate that UConn cares and that there is hope, help and healing for everyone. UConn has a suicide prevention website that lists facts about college and suicide. It states that suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students, resulting in over 1,100 deaths among college students alone. Twenty-four different UConn offices have joined together as a community of caring to develop a group response to suicide prevention. Capitalizing on this message, the art exhibit invites all students to create their own bandanas throughout the week. The gallery will be open between 12 p.m. and 4 p.m. every day this week. In addition to bandanas, there are

quilts with similar messages displayed in the Wilbur Cross Building, the Rowe Center for Undergraduate Education and the Counseling and Mental Health Center. In addition to the gallery, there are movie screenings on campus, an Out to Lunch series, a health and wellness fair and many other events throughout the week. Kucko explained how there will also be events yearround, specifically a suicide prevention week in the spring that includes an art gallery, movies, an outdoor concert, a memorial and a panel discussion. “Make sure your fellow student knows you’re there,” Kucko said. “Reach out and let people know that you’re there for help. The biggest thing is that everyone knows that they’re not alone and there are people out there who care.”

Zarrin.Ahmed@UConn.edu

On Monday afternoon, a group of students and UConn community members gathered in the Co-op conference room for the second of three workshops sponsored by the University of Connecticut Co-op on using the iPad to succeed. The informative workshop featured presentations by Apple Campus Representatives Ed Courchaine and Jake Sippel, along with Dr. David Miller, professor and associate department head of psychology. The workshop started off with Ed Courchaine debunking the fallacy that the iPad is only for watching videos. He stated that the, “iPad is more than a content viewer, it is a content producer.” He went on to demonstrate a great app for drawing and sketching called SketchBook Pro, which can be used to create drawings and sketches for art classes, engineering classes and for leisure drawing. He then talked about an app called the Omni Graph Maker that allows you make graphs for lab reports and other projects, and then to export the graphs to whatever program you need. Courchaine mentioned how useful that app is for science and engineering majors. The next speaker was Jake Sippel, who talked extensively about how useful the iPad is for research and information gathering. Sippel noted that several apps like Wolfram Alpha, Wikibot and iTunes U have iPad-specific versions and are useful to all UConn students, no matter their major or field. The final speaker Miller, a noted national expert on integrating technology and education. Dr. Miller began by talking about how he uses the iPad as a productivity tool to keep track of his busy schedule and documents. He then went on to talk about how he uses the

Zachary.Lederman@UConn.edu

iPad to enhance his classes. He talked about his nationally- and internationally-known podcast series for his PSYC 1100 and PSYC 3201 classes. He also uses Enhanced podcasts, created with the Apple software GarageBand, to make the podcasts more interactive and more educational for his students. He talked about apps that help students in the classroom and brought up the note-taking and audio-recording app Notability. This app allows students to type notes and record their professors simultaneously, allowing them to catch everything that happens during class. Miller finished by echoing Courchaine’s sentiments of the iPad being more than a content viewer by saying that the “iPad is a valuable tool from a student standpoint as a consumer, but also as a [content] producer.” Overall, the theme of the presentation was to incorporate the myriad functions and applications available on the iPad into your school life, thereby allowing you to be more efficient, productive and successful. Wi Xu, a 3rd-semester finance major who attended Monday’s workshop, said the workshop really, “opened my view and was really useful and helpful.” Xu suggests all students attend a workshop since she felt it was much “better to go to the speech” than to not use your iPad to its full potential. Students who could not make it to Monday’s workshop can still attend the third and final workshop, which takes place Monday, Sept. 24, at 4 p.m. in the Co-op Conference Room. Students can contact Ed Courchaine (ecourchaine@ apple.com) or Jake Sippel (jsippel@apple.com) with any questions.

Rahul.Darwar@UConn.edu

While I was aimlessly looking at various social media websites one day, an image caught my attention. It was a simple black background containing the sentence, “That moment you finish a book, look around, and realize that everyone else is carrying on with their lives as though you didn’t just experience emotional trauma at the hands of a paperback.” Given the amount of books I have read and my tendency to read semidepressing novels, I liked that sentence a lot and could relate to it. It made me think about how everyone reacts after they finish reading a book, depending on the emotions the book evokes in the reader. What especially struck me in that quote were the words “emotional trauma.” I like books that make me feel something. The more a book can make me cry, chances are, I’ll love it more just for that (ahem, “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green). I tend to really delve into a novel, temporarily adopting the emotions of the characters as my own feelings, so timing is everything when it comes to finishing a book. If I know a book is going to lead me down a river of tears, I’ll finish it at night before I go to bed. While it sounds depressing (and yes, it can be), the night is an ideal time to allow yourself to hop on an emotional roller coaster. The paperback can tear at your heart, and no one will be around to watch you. That’s when the real feelings come alive, if you let them. Location can greatly affect how you experience a book. If you’re surrounded by people, you may guard your emotions and not allow yourself to truly empathize with the characters. Not everyone is a fellow book lover that will believe your drastic change in behavior is caused by the novel you just finished. They might just think you’re crazy. Sadness isn’t the only side effect of reading either. Author killed off your favorite character? Bam. Anger and resentment with a side of loss. The book makes you relate to a past relationship? Cue the tears and the urge to punch something. Is the book really funny? Laughing in public to yourself might draw some attention. If you are traveling somewhere and you finish the book while in transit, how the book made you feel can carry on throughout the day and subsequently ruin it. At night, you can reflect on the pages you just turned and then pass out, ready to face the morning in a better mood. The type of book also affects what you do post-read. If you finish an exhilarating mystery novel, you don’t want to simply go to class afterwards. You want to contemplate the book, and think about what you saw coming and what you didn’t. Maybe you pieced the mystery together yourself and want to relish in that satisfaction for a little while. If a book makes you think, ruminate on those thoughts and let them sink in. After all, authors write not just for themselves but for their readers. Their job is complete when the reader takes the time to enjoy what they crafted and care enough to appreciate their words.

Alyssa.McDonagh@UConn.edu


The Daily Campus, Page 6

FOCUS ON:

Movie Of The Week

Interested in writing movie reviews?

The Lion King

Come write for Focus! Meetings at 8 p.m. on Mondays.

MOVIES Upcoming Releases By Joe O’Leary September 21 Focus Editor

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Focus

» POP OFF

» FILM REVIEWS

‘Retribution’ should stay dead Action not all explosions

Dredd 3D End of Watch House at the End of the Street Trouble With the Curve

By Brendon Field Campus Correspondent

September 28 Hotel Transylvania Looper Won’t Back Down October 5 Frankenweenie Taken 2

Over/Under Overrated: Inception (2010)

Photo courtesy of aceshowbiz.com

Milla Jovovich stars as Alice, pictured here standing over the bodies of the fallen in the newest installment of the Resident Evil series, Resident Evil: Retribution.

By Brendon Field Campus Correspondent

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: Christopher Nolan’s “Inception” (2010), hailed as an example of creative genius, is an inherently flawed creation. Like its characters’ mission, the movie is brilliant in concept, less so in execution. Nolan gets excellent performances out of DiCaprio, Joseph GordonLevitt and the ever-enigmatic Marion Cotillard. But the By Alex Sfazzarra movie ultimately impacts Campus Correspondent the head, rather than the heart. “Inception” puzzles, intrigues, even engages— but it never truly moves us.

Underrated: Stardust (2007)

Possibly the best movie of 2007 – and certainly the most enjoyable – is also a movie most people have never heard of. “Stardust,” based on the novel of the same name by Neil Gaiman, is this decade’s “The Princess Bride”: kooky, fantastical and laugh-out-loud funny. Young, naïve Tristan sets off in pursuit of a fallen star to win the heart of the woman he loves, and ends up in a magical realm of witches, princes and flying pirate ships. Robert DeNiro’s turn as a flamboyant, cross-dressing pirate king is alone worth a viewing. But the cast, including Michelle Pfeiffer as the beautifully evil witch Lamia and Claire Danes as the fallen star, are uniformly excellent. Hopefully posterity will do for this film what 2007 could not, and turn it into a classic.

I should not be writing this. “Resident Evil: Retribution” does not even qualify for a review. Mostly because “Resident Evil: Retribution” is not a movie; it is a video game that you do not get to play. It consists of nothing but dull cutscenes and action sequences that just make you wish there were a controller in your lap. “Resident Evil: Cliché Subtitle #4” does not tell a story at all. Alice (Mila Jovovich) and a bunch of other shallow characters I do not care about are trapped in a facility and have to make it out by traveling through a series of environments while fighting the monsters therein. Said shallow characters mostly consist of clones of characters from earlier films, brought back through cloning, or as I call

it, “lazy retroactive continuity.” What is amazing is that even with a plot thinner than tissue paper, the film still manages to contain numerous holes and raise a bunch of questions. They did at least try to incorporate some character drama by having Alice look after a girl who believes she is her mother, but the arc fails to create emotional weight. The interesting thing about the “Resident Evil” series is the acting has improved with each installment. Oh, I am not talking about the movies. I mean the games. The movies somehow have gone in the other direction. Jovovich is not what I would call a strong lead, but she is Bette Davis compared to the rest of the cast. The performances

are wooden, and the effort is practically nonexistent. The action scenes are uncreative, repetitive and unbelievably boring. Most of them amount to characters standing in one place and shooting at something. But occasionally they will switch it up and have them hide behind an object and shoot at something. This movie seems to forget that shooting galleries are only enjoyable when you are the one pulling the trigger. There are a few fights and driving scenes, but the dull cinematography and obnoxious overuse of slow motion ruin them. The 3D is pandering and feels incredibly gimmicky. This film does try for a few horror scenes, but they amount to cheap jump scares

Resident Evil: Retribution 1.5/10

that could be seen from a mile away. The music is also worth mentioning; it’s loud, clunky, screechy and annoying. There is one scene where Alice is tortured with what I assume are outtakes from the soundtrack. What the film fails to realize is while doing so, they are also torturing the audience. I have described a lot of bad movies as painful to sit through, but this is the first I have encountered that literally causes you physical pain as you watch it. “Resident Evil: Retribution” is best described as worthless. It is an unentertaining romp that is only meant to set up the next installment of a series that ran out of steam a long time ago. I desperately hope the next one is the last, because I do not how many more splitting migraines my head can take.

Brendon.Field@UConn.edu

‘Finding Nemo’ stunning in 3D

Photo courtesy of images.wikia.com/pixar

Marlin the clownfish, voiced by Albert Brooks, swims alongside Dory the regal blue tang, voiced by Ellen Degeneres, as they continue on their epic quest to find Marlin’s son, Nemo.

By Zach Lederman Campus Correspondent It’s hard to find a movie as cute as “Finding Nemo.” The 2003 tale of Marlin the clownfish and Dory the blue tang is one that likely has a special place in the hearts of anyone who grew up during the 2000s. This past Friday, it was rereleased in 3D. For those who are unaware, “Finding Nemo” focuses on Nemo, a young, disabled clownfish, who is captured by humans and taken to a dentist’s office in Sydney, Australia as a gift for the dentist’s niece, Darla. Marlin, Nemo’s overprotective father, is extremely cautious and frightened of the creatures of the ocean, due to a traumatic event involving a barracuda that cost him both his wife and all

of his children but Nemo. He steels himself and heads out into the water to search for his son. Along the way, he meets Dory, a sweet but memory-impaired fish, who serves as his companion in facing dangers such as schools of jellyfish, a whale and three “vegetarian” sharks. “Finding Nemo” is one of those movies where critics are hard-pressed to come up with much, if any, criticism. After hours of thought, the only thing that I can come up with is that some scenes might frighten young children. But then again, this is likely something that would only affect children under the age of five. But, everything

else about the movie is, to sum it up, perfect. The plot is imaginative, fun and had adults and children in the theatre laughing together. The quirky characters, each with their own, distinct personalities, will have you feeling like you’ve really gotten to know a new group of friends by the end of the film. Visually, the movie is one of Pixar’s best works. Everything from Nemo’s fins to the coral on the seabed is beautifully detailed. This is absolutely remarkable for a movie made almost 10 years ago. Most modern films still

Finding Nemo 3D 9/10

can’t hold up against “Nemo.” Unfortunately, the 3D aspect of the movie left a lot to be desired. This didn’t surprise me, as the movie was originally designed to be viewed only in 2D. Yes, the 3D allows for a different movie watching experience, but not necessarily a better one. I would have personally been fine simply watching a straight re-release in 2D and saving the extra money I spent to watch it in 3D. Anyone who remembers this from their childhood will want to go back to theatres for a fun, nostalgic experience, and anyone that hasn’t seen it will want to go for the movie experience of a lifetime. I recommend this film to anybody who enjoys any of the following: fun, laughter and joy.

Zachary.Lederman@UConn.edu

A while ago, a friend and I were discussing “Battle: Los Angeles,” an action-war film that came out last year. He loved it, I hated it. The reasons I gave was that it had no plot, featured dull characters and was fueled by never-ending explosions. His response was (and I’m paraphrasing here): “That’s the point. Movies like ‘Battle: Los Angeles’ are meant for you to turn your brain off and watch things blow up.” If his statement is correct, then so is my opinion. Films are made to be engaging: they are meant to draw you into the world they create, and let you observe the events as a curious bystander. If the only way I can engage myself with a film is to not think at all, then the movie is doing the exact opposite of the medium’s purpose. That is the precise issue with so many modern-day action films; they seem to think they can get by with special effects and a large budget. What does an action film need to succeed? Well, a solid story and characters, for starters. Many will say that those are not what film is about and therefore should not matter as much. That is true, but they still do matter a lot. Plot and character are the foundation of every story, and without them, the film collapses, no matter how great the action, which is why “Act of Valor” did not quite work. Most importantly, the characters need to have an arc, and we need to care about their fates. “Terminator 2” was as great as it was because we really wanted Sarah and John Connor to live. For the action to deliver, it needs to be innovative. With the advancement of computergenerated effects, the stakes are constantly being raised. Blowing up a line of cars does not cut it anymore, and neither does destroying famous monuments (that means you, Roland Emmerich). The first scene of “Casino Royale” was a parkour chase through a construction site and an embassy; it was creative, high energy, well-filmed and brilliant. Creativity is essential, since the action scenes need to be unforgettable. An action film also needs to be filmed well and have a sense of style. Many suffer from over-editing with so many jump cuts and so much camera movement that it becomes too difficult to absorb. Not to mention it is almost impossible to tell what’s going on. This is one of the many reasons the “Transformers” films are awful. Action is best when it is fluid and when it feels more like the characters involved are actually out to kill one another. This is best seen in the climax of “The Adventures of Robin Hood,” in a fencing duel between two characters that lasts for three minutes, using about half a dozen separate shots. As far as style, take a look at “Kill Bill.” The arrangement of the characters on screen, the combination of colors and the use of shadows are all intricate and contribute to each fight. Action movies are a staple of the film medium, and when done correctly, they can create a more exhilarating experience than any other type of film or form of artistic entertainment. But these films are best done through careful thought, creativity and attention to detail, not merely gunfire and pyrotechnics.

Brendon.Field@UConn.edu


The Daily Campus, Page 7

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Focus

French court to rule on Tuesday Colbert, ‘Modern about topless UK royal photos Family’ cast to

NANTERRE, France (AP) — A French court will rule Tuesday on a request by a lawyer for Prince William and his wife Kate to block further publication of topless photos of the Duchess of Cambridge taken while the couple shared what he described as a deeply intimate moment on holiday. The court in Nanterre, outside Paris, has said it will announce its ruling at noon as to whether it will to stop popular French gossip magazine Closer from reproducing the images. The royal couple’s lawyer, Aurelien Hamelle, said Monday that they were sharing a “healthy and profoundly intimate” moment when a photographer took the images. The situation was “deeply personal,” he added. Closer published 14 of the photos of a partially clad Kate in its pages on Friday. On Monday, Italian magazine Chi published a 26-page spread of the images. Chi, like Closer, is part of the Italian publishing house Mondador, owned by former Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi. Irish tabloid the Irish Daily Star published more topless photos of Kate over the weekend. The editor has since been suspended, and Ireland’s justice minister said Monday that he would revise privacy laws in the country. Hamelle told the court that he is seeking €5,000 ($6,550) in damages from Closer and an injunction forcing the magazine to stop publication elsewhere, including on the Internet. He also asked the court to fine Closer €10,000 ($13,100) a day for each day the injunction is not respected, and €100,000 ($131,000) if the photos are sold in France or abroad. The photos in question show the Duchess of Cambridge relaxing during a holiday at a private villa in Provence, in

guest host ‘GMA’

AP

Britain’s Prince William and his wife Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, smile as they watch a shark ceremony on Marapa Island, Solomon Islands, Monday, Sept. 17, 2012.

southern France, sometimes without her bathing suit top and, in one case, her suit bottom partially pulled down to apply sun screen. William’s St. James’s Palace called the publications of the photos a “grotesque” invasion of the couple’s privacy. The case centers in part on just how private the villa was and whether, in effect, Kate was to some extent flaunting herself. “It’s not an accessible (view) from the exterior,” Hamelle said of the site — a point contested by Closer’s lawyer, Delphine Pando who said the site is visible from a nearby road. “What is certain for her (Kate’s) close family as for herself is that it’s something extremely troubling,” Hamelle said. Pando, the lawyer for Closer, asked the court to throw out the royal demand, arguing that the rights to the photos belong to an agency — which sold their use to

Closer. She did not give the price. “We are not the owners of these photos,” she said. “The photos are out there. If a TV show wants to show an image of this (magazine) edition, it’s got nothing to do with us.” That argument echoed the stance of the editor of Chi, the Italian magazine. Alfonso Signorini told The Associated Press over the weekend that he didn’t fear legal action since the photos are already in the public domain following Closer’s publication. The case is but the first of two legal actions by the royals. In a reflection of just how intent they are on protecting their privacy — and likely dissuading paparazzi from future ventures, St. James’s Palace said Sunday the family lawyers would file a criminal complaint. The Sipa news agency reported that the Nanterre prosecutor’s office opened a preliminary investigation on Monday for breach of privacy, receiving and complicity. While no one was named, it would appear to cover the photographer or photographers involved in the case and possibly Closer. The palace said it would be up to French prosecutors to decide whether to investigate and pursue a criminal case for breach of

privacy or trespassing. That second judicial action was not mentioned in Monday’s proceedings, and there was no mention of the name of the photographer or photographers who took the offending pictures. There was only reference to an “agency.” Meanwhile, in Ireland, Justice Minister Alan Shatter said Monday that the country planned to introduce new privacy laws after the Irish Daily Star newspaper published the topless photographs of the princess. “It is clear that some sections of the print media are either unable or unwilling in their reportage to distinguish between prurient interest and the public interest,” said Shatter. “Sections of the print media believe that public figures are fair game and have no right to privacy in respect of any aspect of their lives,” Shatter added. Independent Star, the company which owns the Irish Daily Star, said Monday that Michael O’Kane had been suspended as editor and an internal inquiry had been launched. The newspaper printed some of the photographs on Saturday in editions available in Ireland, but not inside the U.K.

CUPERTINO, Calif. (AP) — Orders for the iPhone 5 topped 2 million in their first 24 hours, more than double the amount of its predecessor over the same period. Since Apple started taking iPhone 5 orders on its website at 3 a.m. EDT on Friday, buyers who have a two-year service agreement with AT&T, Sprint or Verizon Wireless have been able to order the phone for $199 (16 gigabyte model), $299 (32 GB) or $399 (64 GB model). Apple said Monday that while most orders will be delivered on Friday, demand for the iPhone 5 exceeds the initial supply. As a result, some of the devices are sched-

uled for delivery in October. The Cupertino, Calif. company’s stock added 1.2 percent, or $8.50, to close at $699.78 on Monday. The iPhone 5 represents the first major revision of the iPhone’s screen size since the first model was introduced in 2007. The new iPhone has an elongated screen —4 inches (10.16 centimeters) measured diagonally— that allows room for another row of icons and lets widescreen movies fit better. The calendar will now show five days at a time instead of just three. Previous iPhone models had 3.5-inch (8.89-centimeter) screens. The new phone is also thinner and weighs less than previous

NEW YORK (AP) — Stephen Colbert and the cast of “Modern Family” are next up as “Good Morning America” guest hosts for Robin Roberts, who is scheduled to undergo a bone marrow transplant this week. The surging ABC morning show hasn’t missed a beat since Roberts exited on Aug. 30. The co-host has MDS, a blood and bone marrow disease, and is out indefinitely for treatment that includes a transplant of marrow donated by her sister, SallyAnn Roberts. Robin Roberts had to undergo chemotherapy before the procedure, said Tom Cibrowski, the show’s senior executive producer. Cibrowski offered more details about the schedule of substitutes for Roberts, which is expected to include Oprah Winfrey and newswomen Barbara Walters, Katie Couric and Diane Sawyer sometime next month. Celebrities will be deployed in much the same way as Jessica Simpson was one day last week, appearing on the pop culture-heavy second hour alongside show regulars George Stephanopoulos, Josh Elliott, Lara Spencer and Amy Robach. “It shows them in a different light for a little bit and you get to see them do something different,” Cibrowski said. “It might be a little funny if they have to read the prompter and there’s some slip-up. It’s all spontaneous.” The show will feature a different cast member of “Modern Family” each day for a week as the new television season begins. Actor Rob Lowe is also scheduled, Cibrowski said. While the idea of celebrity guest hosts has been tried before in morning television, ABC’s rivals at the “Today” most recently showed its potency when Sarah Palin guested and got strong ratings one day last spring. With their experience in news, Walters, Sawyers and Couric will work for the full two hours when they come on “Good Morning America” for a day. Each has had extensive morning experience: Walters and Couric on “Today” and Sawyers on “GMA” and a CBS morning show.

“Good Morning America” has consolidated its gains in stunningly fast fashion in a morning television world where loyalties are hard to change. “GMA” beat the “Today” show in the weekly ratings for the first time in 17 years this spring. Except for the weeks that “Today” was in London with the Summer Olympics, “GMA” has won most of this summer. Viewers have punished “Today” for the awkward replacement of Ann Curry by Savannah Guthrie early in the summer. During the weeks starting Aug. 27 and Sept. 3, the ABC show won by more than 800,000 viewers. Even Cibrowski admitted to some surprise at how quickly the fortunes have changed and how loyal viewers have remained through Roberts’ absences. “It heartens us,” he said. “It really heartens us to know that the viewers are still with us because they enjoy ‘GMA’ and ‘GMA’ is so strong right now.” Simpson was brought in as the first celebrity host on Sept. 11, a decision that had the potential for looking tone deaf on the solemn anniversary of the terrorist attacks. Yet it was “Today” that got in trouble that day, airing an interview with Kris Jenner talking about her breast implants while its rivals paused for a moment of silence to honor attack victims. NBC News President Steve Capus reportedly apologized to affiliates for putting them in a difficult position. Cibrowski said there would be no guest hosts just before Election Day with a concentration on the campaign. A report by the conservative watchdog Media Research Center illustrated a sharp difference in how the morning news shows covered the Republican and Democratic conventions. During the two weeks when the convention was held, “CBS This Morning” aired 250 minutes of political coverage and the “Today” show had 152 minutes. “Good Morning America,” which emphasizes lighter fare, spent under 70 minutes on politics during those weeks, the MRC said.

models. It can operate on LTE cellular networks and sports a new processor and updated software. T. Michael Walkley, an analyst with Canaccord Genuity, said he believes the iPhone 5’s “differentiated form factor versus the iPhone 4S” and other improvements should drive strong iPhone 5 sales. The record advanced orders on Friday and through the weekend caused Walkley to revise his previous prediction that Apple would sell 6 million of the new iPhones by September 29. He now believes “Apple could ship 9 million to 10 million” in that time, he told investors in a note on Monday.

Janney Capital Markets analyst Bill Choi said Apple’s announcement Monday “suggests iPhone 5 is running well ahead of iPhone 4S.” In a note to investors, Choi reaffirmed his earlier expectation that Apple will sell 7 million to 10 million iPhone 5s by the end of September. It won’t be easy for Apple to top the breakneck sales pace set by previous iPhones. Apple said last year that it sold over 4 million iPhone 4Ss just three days after its launch on October 14. That launch occurred less than two weeks after the death of Apple’s iconic founder Steve Jobs and as the iPhone 4S went on sale, scores of Apple devotees were still mourning him with candlelight vigils and impromptu memorial ceremonies outside of Apple stores across the globe. The iPhone 5 will be available at Apple’s 356 U.S. stores starting Friday. Each customer who makes a purchase at an Apple store will be offered free personal setup service, which will help them customize their device. The phone will be available in more than 22 countries on Sept. 28. Aside from Apple stores, the iPhone 5 will be available at Apple’s website as well as through AT&T, Sprint, Verizon Wireless, some Best Buy, RadioShack, Target and Walmart stores and certain Apple authorized resellers. Earlier Monday AT&T Inc. said it set a sales record for the iPhone 5, with customers ordering more of them than any previous iPhone model on the first day of orders and over the weekend.

Apple: iPhone 5 orders topped 2M in 24 hours


Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Comics

The Daily Campus, Page 8

Kevin & Dean by Adam Penrod

Horoscopes by Brian Ingmanson Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 9 -- More possibilities appear over the next seven months. You make beneficial contacts and earn new security. Others appreciate your natural charm. Luck is on your side. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is an 8 -- Stash away treasures for later. Recordkeeping is getting easier with your flexibility. You’ll find plenty of uses for the money you save. Your confidence grows.

Shapes by Alex Papanastassiou

Gemini (May 21-June 20) -- Today is a 9 -- Seek balance and relax. A creative project is very rewarding, in many ways. Contact associates in other countries. For the next seven months, you’ll learn more about your partner. Cancer (June 21-July 22) -- Today is a 9 -- Change is becoming child’s play. Your work is easier, thanks to new technology and outside-the-box thinking. You are immensely popular now. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 9 -- Find extra inspiration by going outdoors or for a short hike. Let your ideas simmer overnight. You’re lucky in love now. You’re luckier than usual in general.

Classic I Hate Everything by Carin Powell

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is an 8 -- Note the destructive criticism, but don’t fall for it. Focus on the positive, and fire up the optimism. You’re a powerful financial engine. Promise the family you’ll be with them later. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 9 -- Abundance is available all around you. Open your eyes and soak up the love and support of your community. Learning is a snap. Meditate now. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 7 -- Work with a female prospers. You have more than expected now. Earn more money. Accept encouragement, especially when you most need it. It’s there. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is a 9 -- You’ll be more effective from now on. Grab the passion of the moment by the horns, and ride it like a bull. There may be more than you thought. Believe you can prosper. Abundance is available.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO DRAW OR MAKE GAMES FOR THE DAILY CAMPUS COMICS?!

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is a 9 -- Housework is particularly satisfying now, but so is office work. Find a balance, even if it requires venturing into new territory. A female makes it all work. It can be fun, depending on your attitude. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 9 -- Do the jobs that pay best first. Send your invoice right away, and get paid sooner rather than later. Group objectives are becoming more attainable for the rest of the year. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 7 -- You’re very cute now, so take advantage. For seven months, tie up loose ends in career training. Balance it by relaxing. Learn something new.

Email 3 of your best sample comics to Dailycampuscomics@gmail.com!


Tuesday, September 18, 2012

The Daily Campus, Page 9

Sports

UConn places third in Minutemen Invitational By Abby Mace Campus Correspondent The UConn men’s cross country team began their season in full stride Saturday, claiming third place at the Minuteman Invitational in Amherst, Mass. Host UMass Amherst took the top spot with 39 points, followed by Stonehill College (45 points), UConn (81 points), Amherst College (85 points) and Keene State (129 points). Junior Ryan McGuire led the charge for the Huskies with a

stellar second-place finish, with senior teammate Jordan Magath close behind in the sixth position. McGuire and Magath, who ran side by side for most of the race, worked together to gain ground on a pack of UMass runners who had separated themselves from the field at the halfway point. With one mile left in the fivemile race, McGuire made his move. He surged to the front of the pack, with Magath and runners from UMass and Stonehill in pursuit. McGuire’s surge wasn’t enough to overtake the Minutemen’s Antony Taylor, who

crossed the line in 24:20.90 for the win, besting McGuire by a mere 3.47 seconds. Magath finished in 24:31.59. Although McGuire and Magath fell short of the win, coach Richard Miller commended the athletes on their performances. “Ryan made a real push to win, which showed his development in running up front,” Miller said. “And Jordan has always been a solid competitor, and he’s looking to continue to get even better.” Rounding out Connecticut’s squad on Saturday was a pack of middle-distance specialists in

seniors Alex Bennatan, Joe Clark and Tim Bennatan, who finished 26th, 27th, and 31st, respectively. Sophomore Stephen Vento was the final Husky to cross the line, in 44th place. “Our middle distance guys showed a lot of improvement,” stated Miller. “They took real steps toward being able to stay strong and build a consistent race.” As the Minutemen distanced themselves from the Huskies, another race came into contention, as UConn barely edged out Amherst College. Amherst, a strong program ranked sixth in

» NFL

''I feel good,'' he said. ''I feel pretty good. The only way we can figure it out is the things that I'm doing test-wise, what the doctors are putting me through. From those results, they're showing up great, and I've just got to keep on passing those tests and move forward.'' Revis needs to be cleared by the team physician and an independent neurological consultant in order to first practice with full contact and then play. Because of the NFL protocol for players with head injuries, coach Rex Ryan can't definitely say he'll have Revis back in his secondary on Sunday. ''I don't think you can assume that,'' Ryan said. ''He has to - to the NFL standards - pass those tests right now. He looks to be doing well, so hopefully he will be playing.'' The team's characterization of the concussion as ''minor'' didn't matter to Revis, who is hoping to feel 100 percent soon. ''Any blow to the head, you have to take it serious,'' he said, adding that he never experienced any sensitivity to light or other usual side effects. ''Mild, severe, whatever it could be, it's still a head

AP

Donate to The Daily Campus at:

dailycampus.com/donate

Abigail.Mace@UConn.edu

Former US coach faces sex abuse charges

New York Jets corenerback Darrelle Revis gets up slowly after being injured against the Bills. Revis sustained a concussion after taking a hit in Week 1.

Love to read the DC?

Along with providing earlyseason racing experience, the Minuteman Invitational helped identify key weaknesses for the team to work on during practice. One of these areas for the Huskies to improve upon, Miller noted, was maintaining focus throughout the entire five miles of the race, particularly during the grueling third and fourth miles. But Miller was quick to talk about UConn’s success. “They had a solid start,” he said. “They did a real nice job.”

» SWIMMING

Jets cornerback Revis' uncertain for game against Miami as concussion lingers

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. (AP) – Darrelle Revis is feeling better these days, recovering from the concussion that sidelined him Sunday. The New York Jets' AllPro cornerback still isn't sure, though, if he'll be back in uniform for the team's next game at Miami. ''I'm going through the tests and things'' Revis said Monday, ''and doing what I need to get back and help my team.'' And the Jets sure could use him after they lost 27-10 to the Pittsburgh Steelers, with the AFC East-rival Dolphins up next. Revis suffered what the team called a ''minor concussion'' last Sunday in the season opener against Buffalo when he made a diving attempt to tackle the Bills' C.J. Spiller and then teammate Bart Scott accidentally kicked him in the head. He said he felt as though he was in ''a fog'' after he was first hurt, but has gotten progressively better since. He was cleared to participate in non-contact drills Friday, but ruled out for the game. He had been limited to light running and lifting weights earlier in the week.

Division III regionally, came within four points of UConn. In addition, the college’s total time of 2:05:28 was just nine seconds slower than the total time for the Huskies. “Amherst did a great job. I didn’t really know what to expect of their guys,” Miller said. The Jeffs’ strength lay in their depth, as they placed their second, third, fourth and fifth runners ahead of Connecticut’s third runner. But McGuire and Magath’s efforts at the front of the pack proved too much for Amherst, allowing the Huskies to secure their third-place finish.

(AP) – A swimming coach and philanthropist claims she was wrongfully fired by former U.S. national coach Mark Schubert after she became aware of abuse allegations within his Southern California club, another embarrassing turn for a sport that has taken steps over the last two years to combat widespread claims of sexual misconduct. The lawsuit, filed Monday in Orange County Superior Court, claims Dia Rianda was brought in by Schubert to work at Golden West Swim Club last year while he was dealing with personal issues. It says she became aware of sexual abuse allegations against his close friend, Bill Jewell, and strongly objected to him working at the club. The suit alleges Rianda was fired on July 11 after she tried to keep children from being around Jewell while he was being investigated by USA Swimming. ''The reaction from Mark was very confusing,'' she said. ''On the one hand, he was concerned that the behavior was not acceptable. On the other hand, he justified it by saying that's the way things have been at USA Swimming for a long time.'' Schubert didn't immediately respond to a text message and a voice mail seeking comment. USA Swimming said it doesn't comment ''on open investigations.'' ''As a matter of process, when USA Swimming initiates a coach investigation, it immediately notifies the employing club,'' the organization said in a statement. ''As per the Amateur Sports Act, membership status is not affected without the opportunity for a due process hearing. Employment decisions during investigations are the responsibility of the employing club.'' The lawsuit doesn't publicly name a dollar amount Rianda is seeking, but she stressed the main purpose of the lawsuit is to change the culture of the sport. She and her husband, Mike, have donated ''well over $100,000'' to the USA Swimming Foundation, along with more than $400,000 to purchase a pool for Carmel High School in California. ''There are rules to follow. They are there for a good reason,'' Rianda said. ''The rules are not that complicated and it shouldn't be that difficult to follow them. If someone is complaining about a problem, the problem should stop immediately.'' While she made a complaint to USA Swimming, she didn't report her concerns about Jewell to law enforcement.

''The behavior that I had observed was on the line as to whether it was criminal or not,'' she said. ''That's why I never went to the authorities.'' Her attorney, Robert Allard, has filed several prominent suits against USA Swimming, exposing dozens of coaches who were involved in inappropriate relationships with underage swimmers. The cases led to the national governing body grudgingly revealing in 2010 that 46 members had received lifetime bans, mostly for sex abuse allegations - including the former director of the national team. USA Swimming has since mandated training and set up an enhanced screening system for all coaches, officials and volunteers. At its national convention in Greensboro, N.C., last week, the organization revealed it has trained more than 31,000 nonathlete members, conducted background checks on nearly 36,000 and added 16 people to its banned list since the new program went into effect. Even though USA Swimming is not named in this lawsuit, Allard repeated his oft-stated call for a change in leadership. ''We see some change is being made by some good people. I don't think anybody denies that. This is predominantly a sport comprised of good people,'' he said. ''But at the very top of the organization, there is rampant corruption.'' The lawsuit claims Rianda received complaints about Jewell from both parents and swimmers, passing on the information to Chuck Wielgus, the executive director of USA Swimming, and Susan Woessner, the organization's director of safe sport. The investigation began in January. Schubert is a member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame and took over as U.S. national coach after the 2004 Athens Olympics. He guided the team through the Beijing Games, where Michael Phelps set an Olympic record with eight gold medals, but was mysteriously fired by USA Swimming two years ago. No reason has been given for his dismissal, though Rianda said she was told by Schubert that he was let go because he knew of a two-decades-old abuse case and wanted to go public. Now, he's accused of turning his back on a case closer to home. ''He just did not seem to have a concept of what the new rules were, what the new policies were,'' Rianda said. ''He would make excuses for (Jewell) and say he's innocent until proven guilty.''


The Daily Campus, Page 10

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Sports

Lions' getting better, but still struggling with NFL elite

AP

Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford is sacked Ahmad Brooks of the 49ers on Sunday night. San Fransisco beat Detroit 27-19.

ALLEN PARK, Mich. (AP) – For Matthew Stafford and the Detroit Lions, this was another missed opportunity. With a chance to take over sole possession of first place in the NFC North - and offer perhaps the strongest evidence yet that they belong among the NFL's elite - the Lions had a hard time putting the ball in the end zone against San Francisco's tough defense in a 27-19 loss to the 49ers on Sunday night. Last season, the Lions won 10 games, but none of their victories was against a team that finished above .500. This season seems to have started with a similar pattern: Detroit edged St. Louis in the opener before losing on the road against the playoff-tested 49ers. ''We didn't play our best game really in any phases,'' Stafford

said. ''I'm proud of our guys for fighting and staying in there, but we've got to put some effort into coming out and trying to play a little bit better.'' For a Detroit team hoping to take another step forward after making the playoffs a season ago, four field goals and a late touchdown wasn't much to brag about. Stafford went 19 of 32 for 230 yards with a touchdown and an interception. That was after throwing three interceptions against the Rams. Calvin Johnson caught eight passes for 94 yards, but San Francisco didn't allow him to make any game-breaking plays. In all, the explosive Lions looked ordinary on offense against the 49ers for the second straight year. San Francisco won at Detroit in 2011. ''They're a good defense.

They're well coached, well disciplined,'' Johnson said. ''They're doing what they're supposed to do out there. We just have to be patient. I feel like we were patient in the second half. We were doing some good things. We just have to get that ball in the end zone.'' The Lions play at Tennessee on Sunday. ''This felt as if it was a playoff game,'' Lions coach Jim Schwartz said after the loss to San Francisco. ''It's two teams that have high expectations that are good teams coming in, Sunday night game and everything else. But let's face it, it's not a playoff game. We have to play again next week. The teams that are going to do well are the teams that can negotiate the highs and lows in this league.'' The Lions might get a boost

with the return of running back Mikel Leshoure. It's actually not really a return, because Leshoure has never played an NFL game, but he's set to make his debut after missing all of last season with an injury and the first two games this season on a suspension. ''We've been waiting to see him for a long time. We drafted him in the second round,'' Schwartz said. ''He was showing us all things we needed before his rookie year when he got hurt.'' Leshoure missed his rookie season with a torn Achilles tendon. Then came the suspension for violating the NFL's substanceabuse policy. He's eligible to play now - just as Schwartz seems to be growing less enamored with his team's running game. Kevin Smith was held to 53 yards on 16 carries Sunday.

» NFL

Chargers fast start due to improvements in chemistry

SAN DIEGO (AP) – The San Diego Chargers aren't used to fast starts under Norv Turner, so they definitely like the feel of being 2-0 for the first time in the coach's mostly beleaguered six seasons. The Chargers used their depth to beat the Tennessee Titans 38-10 on Sunday. This is their first 2-0 start since 2006 under Marty Schottenheimer, who was fired despite the Chargers going 14-2 before losing their playoff opener to New England. Quarterback Philip Rivers said the Chargers are playing better than this time last year, when they were heading toward a somewhat disjointed 4-1 start. A six-game losing streak followed, which was just enough to keep the Chargers out of the playoffs for the second straight year. ''We're just in a little better sync, a little more rhythm,'' Rivers said Monday. ''You can

just feel it, you can see it on the practice field and all the way around. We're playing better and obviously it's about maintaining it and it's week to week. We won the first two games. That's all we've done and you have to keep doing it week after week. We have a tough one this week in Atlanta.'' Up next is a home game Sunday against Atlanta, which played Denver on Monday night. San Diego dominated Tennessee with some big performances by backups Dante Rosario and Jackie Battle. Rosario, the third-string tight end, caught a careerhigh three touchdown passes. Battle, seeing extensive time because Ryan Mathews hasn't returned from a broken collarbone, had two 1-yard scoring runs in the fourth quarter. Rosario and Battle are among several newcomers

brought in via free agency and the draft to plug the team's many holes. ''I think the newness hasn't necessarily worn off but I think there's a great deal of comfort with every guy,'' Rivers said. ''You look at the guys that played big roles yesterday and there are guys that it is their first year with us, in addition to everyone that played a hand in it. The best way I can describe it is that there is a group of guys who are hungry and love to play. Everyone has bought into what their role is and how they will do that role to help us win. It is a super unselfish team all the way through, it's just win. I just want to win and that's how every guy thinks: 'I just want to win, how can I help us win?''' In Rosario's case, ''From Day One, the thing I noticed with Dante is he's an easy guy to throw to,'' Rivers said.

''He's real smooth, real natural, an easy guy to feel.'' San Diego is one of five NFL teams to start 2-0. Whichever team wins Monday night between Denver and Atlanta will also be 2-0. The Chargers opened with a 22-14 win at Oakland. Oakland and Tennessee are a combined 0-4 and have been outscored a combined 129-50. Turner said he liked the Chargers' fast start and strong finish against the Titans. The Chargers ran the ball hard in the fourth quarter. ''We still have a number of issues we have to take care of and we will start addressing those today,'' Turner said. ''The game wasn't anywhere as clean as I'd like it to be. We have a physical group of guys up front on defense. We've added to that with our draft picks and some of the people we signed. We have great quickness and speed. That's a

AP

Chargers running back Jackie Battle hurdles Titans' defenders during their game on Sunday. San Diego improved to 2-0 on the season with a 38-10 win.

great combination and the fact that we've started off playing the run the way we have, is, to me, the biggest thing I see so far. ''We will be tested as heavily as you can be tested on Sunday, when we take on

Atlanta.'' The Chargers waived cornerback Greg Gatson and re-signed offensive lineman Reggie Wells. The Chargers had released Wells on Saturday in order to promote Gatson from the practice squad.

» MLB

Costly error gives White Sox win over Tigers; Chicago leads AL Central by three games

CHICAGO (AP) – Alex Rios went barreling into second base with a hard slide that teammate Gordon Beckham said might be the biggest play of the season for the White Sox as they try to win the AL Central. Rios was trying to break up a double play and when he went into Detroit second baseman Omar Infante, it caused an errant throw that allowed the tying and go-ahead runs to score Monday as the White Sox beat the Tigers AP 5-4 and went up three games in division. Chicago's Alex Rios breaks up a possible double play with a takeout slide against the Tigers.

''That's a situation where every second baseman knows we're coming in hard. And it was a clean slide, and we took advantage of that,'' Rios said. ''We scored two runs on that play and ended up winning the game, so it was a big play.'' The game had been postponed by rain last Thursday and Monday's makeup was the final meeting of the season between the two front runners in the division. Detroit won the season series 12-6 and captured nine of the

UConn shows they have potential Jerry Sandusky to be sentenced on for remainder of season Oct. 9 in sex abuse case from SMASHING, page 12

In the “A” flight of singles, Stošljević competed against Sacred Heart, winning 7-6 (3), 6-1. Then in the second round, she played Providence and fell 3-6, 1-6. Learmonth also competed in the “A” flight, starting off the first round with a bye but falling short in the second round to Quinnipiac 3-6, 0-6. In the “B” flight of singles, Weinberg, who received a bye in the first round, defeated Quinnipiac 7-5, 6-3 in the second round. Moving on to the semifinals, Weinberg cleaned up Seton Hall swiftly 6-3, 6-0. Concluding her epic run in the tournament, she decisively won the final match over yet another team from Seton Hall 6-3, 6-2. Weinberg was the only competitor to advance to at least the semifinals and not lose a single set. “I was honestly in shock that I was able to win my first competition,” said Weinberg. “I think it will give me some confidence going forward.” Nutting also performed well, defeating Hartford in the first round 6-2, 6-1. The second round was not so easy, where she fought a barnburner against Quinnipiac, winning 1-6, 6-4, 13-11. The semifinal match pitted her against Seton Hall, but she fell short in another close, three-set match 5-7, 6-3, 9-11. “It was very exciting,” said

Nutting. “There were a lot of great players, so I was happy to be able to pull through to the semis.” McKeon faced off with Providence and had a heartbreaking first-round loss, winning the first set 6-3, but losing the next two 4-6, 7-10. In the “C” flight of singles, Gargiulo defeated Providence in the first round, but fell to Sacred Heart in three sets, 2-6, 7-5, 8-10. Robson advanced through the first round, besting Quinnipiac in three sets 6-3, 3-6, 10-7 but lost in a close second round to Seton Hall 6-4, 3-6, 5-10. Burgess had a good showing in the first round, but ultimately, fell short to Sacred Heart 3-6, 5-7. Bergman also fought hard in the first round but was defeated by Providence 2-6, 2-6. In the “D” flight of singles, Allen defeated Providence in the first round 7-6, 6-1, but fell to Seton Hall 0-6, 2-6 in the second round. Griffin competed with Quinnipiac in the first round, but lost 3-6, 1-6. Baker faced off with Seton Hall in the first round but came up short 0-6, 3-6. The Huskies will look to continue their successes this weekend at the Army Invitational in West Point, NY. “Even though it’s only our second tournament, I think we all showed a lot of potential for the upcoming season,” said Nutting.

Kyle.Constable@UConn.edu

(AP) – There's little doubt former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky faces a long prison sentence. In a few weeks, he'll find out just how long. A judge announced Monday he will sentence Sandusky on Oct. 9, nearly four months after Sandusky was convicted in the child molestation scandal that brought shame to Penn State. Sandusky was convicted in June of 45 counts of sex abuse involving 10 boys. Prosecutors said some of the assaults took place on the Penn State campus. The 68-year-old Sandusky, given his age and the serious nature of the crimes, is likely to receive a sentence that will keep him in prison for life. He is jailed pending sentencing and maintains his innocence. Judge John Cleland scheduled a morning hearing at the courthouse in Bellefonte to determine if Sandusky should be classified as a sexually violent predator, a designation that subjects a convict to intense reporting requirements upon release. An assessment board has recommended Sandusky for the designation, though it's expected to have little practical effect since he stands to die in prison. Sandusky will be sentenced

immediately after the hearing. The judge ordered defense attorneys and prosecutors to submit written statements ''intended to aid the court in the imposition of sentence'' by Oct. 5. Sandusky's attorney Joe Amendola said his client might make a statement at the hearing. ''Jerry remains in relatively good spirits and has spent most of his time in custody preparing for his sentencing and his appeal,'' Amendola said via email. Attorney Tom Kline, representing a young man who testified during Sandusky's trial that he was fondled in a school shower in 2001, said Monday he expects his client either to testify at sentencing or to supply a statement to the court. ''We expect to provide what is requested by the attorney general's office to assure justice is achieved in Mr. Sandusky's sentencing,'' Kline said in an email. Attorney general's office spokesman Nils Frederiksen said prosecutors will make a sentencing recommendation to the judge. Also Monday, two former Penn State administrators facing charges related to the sex abuse scandal asked a judge to be tried separately.

final 11 games between the teams, including two of three last week before the four-game series finale was postponed. Each team has 16 games remaining. Chicago heads to Kansas City and Anaheim to finish out this week while Detroit goes home to face the Athletics and Twins. ''There is still a lot of time left for both teams. ... We just got to continue to grind and hope that what we do every day, day in and day out, is enough,'' Beckham said. ''This is prob-

ably still going to go down to the wire.'' Rios' fifth-inning slide was the talk of the locker room after the game as was Chicago's bullpen that pitched five scoreless innings after starter Jose Quintana struggled. ''That was a tough play for that second baseman to make that turn. I've been there before,'' Beckham said. ''It's everything you can do to just get it off. What a great slide and I just told him (Rios) that might be the play of the year so far. Pretty special.''

Colangelo: Not much went right for New England against Cardinals from PATRIOTS, page 12

Panic ensues. A game that was uncharacteristically too close for comfort just got worse. It is left up to the defense to force a turnover and let Tom Brady do what he does best; the two-minute drill. My prayers have been answered as Cardinals running back Ryan Williams fumbles and the Patriots recovered. Hallelujah; time for the Pats to go to work. With just under a minute to go, running back Danny Woodhead rushes it in for what appears to be the game-winning touchdown. As my buddies and I freak out and celebrate what should be a 2-0 start to the season, we see the dream crushing penalty flag on the field. Holding on Gronkowski, a ten-yard penalty. Woodhead’s touchdown is of no consequence. Ugh, thanks Gronk, just what we needed. On the following play, another penalty on Gronkowski. A false start results in a five-yard penalty. Really, Gronk, you get millions of dollars to play this game, and you commit two consecutive penalties in a two-point game with less than a minute to go, thanks man. Appreciate it. Now the Patriots drain the clock, setting Gostkowski up for the game-winning field goal. With six seconds left in the game, the most accurate kicker in Patriots history lines up for a 42-yard attempt.

Before this attempt he had made 34, 46 and 51-yard field goals in the game. He missed, wide left. Enter in unprintable curse words and men punching things here. Gostkowski pulled the game-winning field goal left. “Shankapotamus,” as he is now referred to in my house, had made his last 38 fourth-quarter field goals in a row. To add insult to injury, his predecessor and alltime Patriots great Adam Vinatieri had kicked a game-winning field goal for Indianapolis just minutes before that. It looks like accuracy does not have anything to do with being clutch. Oh, and did I mention that Aaron Hernandez got hurt earlier in the game and could miss up to six weeks with a possible highankle sprain? Just wonderful. I spent the rest of my terrible day watching my fantasy teams underperform. Sigh. I realize that it is week two and I will be catching a lot of flak for this, but I do not care. Sunday was miserable. I love football so much that it ruined an entire day for me. This is not just an excuse to complain, although it was fun. Instead, it is a testament to how much we love sports. Sports fans across the world can attest to this awful feeling. It is kind of ironic, but it is almost a beautiful thing how much a single game can affect your life.

Carmine.Colangelo@UConn.edu


TWO Tuesday, September 18, 2012

PAGE 2

What's Next Home game

Away game

Sept. 29 Buffalo Noon

Oct. 6 Rutgers TBA

Oct. 13 Temple TBA

Oct. 19 Syracuse 8 p.m.

Sept. 22 St. John’s 7 p.m.

Sept. 25 Yale 7 p.m.

» That’s what he said AP

Jonathan Vilma

» Pic of the day

Oct. 3 Georgetown 3p.m.

Women’s Soccer (5-3-1) Sept. 21 Sept. 23 Georgetown Villanova 1 p.m. 3 p.m.

Sept 28 DePaul 5:30 p.m.

Sept. 30 Notre Dame Noon

Oct. 5 South Florida 7 p.m.

Sept. 30 Boston University 5 p.m.

Oct. 3 UMass 6 p.m.

Sept 29. St. John’s 2 p.m.

Oct. 6 Notre Dame 2 p.m.

Field Hockey (7-0) Sept. 21 New Hampshire 7 p.m.

Sept. 23 Villanova Noon

Volleyball Sept. 19 Sacred Heart 7 p.m.

Sept. 28 Providence 7 p.m.

(8-6)

Sept. 21 Villanova 7 p.m.

Sept 23. Georgetown 2 p.m.

Men’s Cross Country Sept. 22 CCSU Invite 11 a.m.

Oct. 6 N.E. Champ. Noon

Oct. 13 Conn. College Invite TBA

Oct. 19 CCSU Mini-Meet 3:30 p.m.

Oct 26. BIG EAST Champs TBA

Women’s Cross Country Sept. 22 Sept. 29 CCSU Griak Invite Invite 11:00 a.m. 1:10 p.m.

Oct. 7 New England Championships Noon

AP

Oct. 12 Wisconsin Invitational 11 a.m.

Men’s Swimming and Diving Oct. 13 Oct. 20 Homecoming- Fordham And Alumni Meet Bucknell Noon TBA

Oct. 26 Army TBA

Nov. 3 Rutgers, Villanova and Georgetown 4 p.m.

Can’t make it to the game? Follow us on Twitter: @DCSportsDept @The_DailyCampus www.dailycampus.com

“Who was most to blame for the Patriots’ loss against the Cardinals?”

Newcastle United’s Demba Ba celebrates with a teammate after equalizing against Everton in the 90th minute on Monday. Ba netted a brace against the Toffees at Goodison Park.

» NHL

Field Hockey: The No. 5 Huskies defeated the Rutgers Scarlet Knights with a score of 5-0 this past Saturday afternoon. With this victory, the Huskies have now won their last six Big East regular season openers. Graduate student Louisa Boddy scored three goals and freshman Emily Walsh scored her first career goal. The Huskies also performed well defensively, and AllAmerican goaltender Sarah Mansfield notched her second shutout of the year. The Huskies then played the Yale Bulldogs and defeated them 3-0 this past Sunday afternoon at home. With this victory, the Huskies improved to a record of 7-0. They are off to their best start since the 2009 season. Junior forward Marie Elena Bolles scored a team-leading seventh goal of the season, and senior back Alicia Angelini scored her third goal of the season. Mansfield had another shutout. Football: The Huskies defeated their former coach Randy Edsall and his Maryland Terrapins with a score of 24-21 this past Saturday afternoon at Byrd Stadium in College Park, MD. With the victory, the Huskies improve to a record of 2-1 on the season. Redshirt sophomores Lyle McCombs and Scott McCummings ran for touchdowns, and senior Nick Williams returned a punt for a score. Redshirt sophomore linebacker Yawin Smallwood, redshirt sophomore Angelo Pruitt and others made great contributions on defense. Men’s Cross Country: The Huskies came in third place at their season opener at the Minuteman Invitational in Amherst, Mass. Junior Ryan McGuire finishing second to lead the team to a third-place finish. Men’s Soccer: The Huskies defeated the Harvard Crimson with a score of 6-0 this past Friday night at Harvard in Cambridge, Mass. With this victory, the Huskies improved to a record of 5-0-1 and scored their highest amount of goals in a game since their 2010 season. Preseason All-American Mamadou Doudou Diouf scored two goals and had an assist to lead the Huskies. Keeper Andre Blake had an excellent performance as well. Women’s Soccer: The Huskies defeated the St. John’s Red Storm with a score of 5-1 this past Sunday afternoon at St. John’s. With this victory, the Huskies improved to a record of 5-3-1 for the season and 1-1 in conference action. Senior forward Danielle Schulmann scored the first goal. Men’s Tennis: The Huskies performed in the Brown Invitational this past Sunday in Providence, R.I. Women’s Tennis: The Huskies performed in the Quinnipiac Invitational this past Sunday in Hamden. Women’s Volleyball: The Huskies performed well, splitting a pair of matches in the New England Classic at Northeastern University in Boston, Mass. this past weekend. The Huskies had a 3-0 victory against Harvard.

» COLLEGE FOOTBALL

AHL ready to reap benefits of NHL lockout SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) – As the owner of the American Hockey League’s Syracuse Crunch, Howard Dolgon isn’t enamored with another NHL lockout, even though it’s good for business. He’s torn, understandably. He loves the business. But he knows what the NHL means to the game he loves. “It makes it maybe easier to market our brand, but at the same time I think every owner in the league will tell you that we really don’t want a lockout,’’ Dolgon said Monday after perusing the NHL’s website. ‘’I think it is important to us for the NHL to be playing and the NHL to be healthy. “But that’s an issue that we don’t have any control over.’’ Join the club. The NHL locked the players out over the weekend when the collective bargaining agreement expired at 11:59 p.m. Saturday. It’s the NHL’s fourth work stoppage in 20 years. Day 2 of the NHL lockout on Monday saw no changes from either side as talks between the league and the NHLPA remain unscheduled. NHL Deputy Commissioner

Tweet your answers, along with your name, semester standing and major, to @DCSportsDept. The best answer will appear in the next paper.

James’ Quick Hits Weekend recap of UConn sports

Ba-Boom! Sept. 29 Notre Dame 7 p.m.

Next Paper’s Question:

–Mike Corasaniti, 3rd-semester journalism major

– Saints’ linebacker Jonathan Vilma after meeting with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell on Monday.

Men’s Soccer (5-0-1) Today Boston College 7 p.m.

The Daily Question many tackles will UConn linebacker Yawin Smallwood make this Q : “How season?” A : “20 more than last season.”

“We had a very frank, very truthful, very frank hearing.”

Football (2-1) Sept. 22 Western Michigan 1 p.m.

The Daily Campus, Page 11

Sports

Bill Daly and NHLPA special counsel Steve Fehr have spoken informally since the lockout began, and may do so again on Tuesday. But nothing official will resume until at least Wednesday between Commissioner Gary Bettman and NHLPA executive director Donald Fehr. The two sides haven’t met for face-toface talks since last Wednesday. Attention already has turned to alternative leagues like the AHL, where players will continue to train for the season and play the game. The AHL consists of 17 independently-owned franchises and another 13 owned by NHL clubs. It’s the primary minor league of the NHL - nearly 90 percent of today’s NHL players spent time in the A - and a safe haven these days for younger players on two-way contracts that remain eligible to play at the lower level. Another prolonged NHL lockout like the one that forced the cancellation of the entire 2004-05 season means better competition in AHL cities like Syracuse, increased attendance everywhere, and international media attention that it is simply not used to.

Urban Meyer has plenty of work to do this week

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – His team hasn’t lost and it has a quarterback who has stamped himself as one of the best in the nation. Yet as No. 16 Ohio State readies for its final non-conference game on Saturday against UAB, coach Urban Meyer knows he and his staff still have a lot of items to clean up. The very first thing, on the top of that list, is eliminating big plays on defense. “That is the most alarming thing,’’ Meyer said on Monday. “I’ve watched Ohio State’s defense for a long time, and I can’t remember a defense I’ve been around that’s given up this many (big plays). We’ve got to stop or we’ll lose a game.’’ Ohio State’s opponents have racked up 13 plays from scrimmage that picked up at least 20 yards. In Saturday’s come-frombehind 35-28 win over California, the Buckeyes cruised to a 20-7 lead at the half then surrendered gains of 36, 81, 30, 16 and 15 yards on the Golden Bears’ next five possessions to fall behind 21-20. After having no luck gaining yards or collecting first downs on their previous four possessions,

behind quarterback Braxton Miller the Buckeyes marched 75 yards to regain the lead. Then it took just two plays for Cal to come right back and tie it. Brendan Bigelow, who gained 160 yards on just four carries, ran for 16 yards and then raced for 59 more, with the extra-point kick tying it at 28 with 8:10 left. “That’s not acceptable,’’ Meyer said. So this week, rest assured, the defense will be going over every detail to try to find a solution. Part of the problem, of course, is that Bigelow made a couple of sensational runs, putting up the Ohio Stadium record for an opponent 82-yard run while twice putting his hand down on the turf for balance as he spun 360 degrees during contact before turning upfield and outrunning the defense. Beyond that, it’s a series of dominoes falling the wrong way. ‘’Believe me, I laid awake Saturday night trying to watch that thing while everybody else in the house slept,’’ said defensive co-coordinator Luke Fickell, who served as interim head coach a year ago. ‘’I couldn’t pinpoint one exact thing.’’


» INSIDE SPORTS TODAY

P.11: AHL preparing to reap benefits of lockout / P.10: Lions struggle with NFL elite / P.10: UConn XC takes third at Minutemen Invite

Page 12

Let’s shake it off

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

www.dailycampus.com

SMASHING GOOD TIME

Huskies shine at Quinnipiac Women’s Invitational

By Kyle Constable Campus Correspondent

Mike Corasaniti The melodrama surrounding handshakes has gotten a little ridiculous. In my recent memory, all of this hullabaloo started six years ago yesterday, when Bill Belichick’s Patriots toppled Eric Mangini’s Jets at the Meadowlands in the first game of the rivalry under Mangini’s tenure. The fourth quarter ended and the two sidelines engaged in the dry tradition of hugging the men they just spent three hours trying to hurt. Then Mangini and Belichick made their way over to each other, climaxing with an eye-contactless deadfish grip that only succeeded in making everyone watching at home feel a little more awkward. Since then, I’m sure you can remember the many more handshake headlines that unfolded around the league. The headline going into the Jets-Patriots 2007 playoff game was a handshake, Jim Harbaugh handed Jim Schwartz a strangely intense pat on the back leading to a strangely intense chasedown and just this Sunday, Tom Coughlin ignored any pretense of pleasantries and simply ripped Greg Schiano apart for his defensive line’s hit on Eli Manning during the final kneeldown of the game. It was after the latest chapter that I really started to think about the absurdity of the postgame handshake and why the mandatory nature of the tradition needs to die. Let’s look at how a few other sports do it. First up is basketball. If coaches want to keep exchanging pleasantries after games, that’s fine with me, mostly because it would be harder to ignore the other coach and walk away, then walk the seven feet down the line to shake his hand. It’s like dealing with the ex-girlfriend you’re forced to sit next to in class: it’s best to just address the elephant in the room, say good game and move on. But with the same analogy applied to football, if you’re standing across a football field from someone you have ill will toward (see Mangini and Belichick), it’s probably best to just ride the elephant all the way home. Next up is baseball, which in my opinion does it right. Not that I’m completely against manners, but if I were a manager, I wouldn’t want to have to climb out of the dugout and across the infield just to spank the man that just beat me. Baseball realized this is silly, and you know what the best part about all of it is? There are no subsequent baseball storylines about handshakes. There is a lot of good to be said about the history of NFL coaches with good manners. Men have gotten their butts kicked and looked the opposing coach in the eyes and said, “nice job.” Coaches destroyed opponents and respectfully wished their counterparts better luck next time. People enjoyed seeing it and it was good for the game, but pettiness isn’t good for anyone. If Jim Schwartz is tired of getting beaten by San Francisco, then he should just write Harbaugh an e-mail next week when he’s cooled off. If Belichick wants to punch the nearest Jet in the face after a loss, then he should probably save it for his punching bag. Nobody should be forced to show good manners. And if a new tradition starts, where head coaches aren’t shellacked for just walking off the field after a loss, then hopefully, people won’t mind. Because I’d honestly rather watch someone ignore their ex-girlfriend, than awkwardly stand by to see them shake hands, avoid eye contact and walk away (see Mangini and Belichick).

Michael.Corasaniti@UConn.edu

FILE PHOTO/The Daily Campus

The UConn women’s tennis team played in the Quinnipiac Women’s Invitational this weekend, winning the flight “B” singles.

The Huskies brought their top game to this weekend’s Quinnipiac Women’s Invitational, winning the flight “B” singles and advancing to the finals in flight “B” doubles. In what was a successful weekend for the women’s tennis team, sophomore Maxie Weinberg advanced to the final match of flight “B” singles, swiftly defeating Seton Hall in two sets to win the tournament. Junior Lucy Nutting and sophomore Emile Burgess advanced to the final match of flight “B” doubles and fell just short in an impressive performance against Quinnipiac. In the “A” flight of doubles, junior Jennifer Learmonth and Weinberg were given a bye in the first round. Advancing to the second round, they competed against Sacred Heart, winning 8-5. In a tough semifinal match, Learmonth and Weinberg fell to Quinnipiac 5-8. Also competing in the “A” flight was the team of senior Abby McKeon and freshman Srna Stošljević, who won their first match against Seton Hall 9-8 (6) but fell in the second round of play to Providence 3-8. In the “B” flight of doubles, Nutting and Burgess advanced to the final round, defeating Hartford 8-0 in the first round, Quinnipiac 8-2 in the second round and Seton Hall 8-5 in the semifinal match. Entering the final match, the duo competed well against Quinnipiac but ultimately fell, 3-8. Also advancing in the “B” flight, senior Julia Allen and sophomore Natalie Robson defeated Quinnipiac 8-2 in the first round and Seton Hall 8-4 in the second round. Competing in the semifinal match, Allen and Robson fell to Quinnipiac 2-8. Junior Marie Gargiulo and freshman Alex Bergman advanced through the first round, besting Providence 8-2, but fell in a close second round 6-8 to Seton Hall. Senior Sarah Griffin and sophomore Sarah Baker fell in a hard-fought first round match against Seton Hall 6-8.

» SHOWS, page 9

SEC suspends Gamecocks’ Swearinger for hit

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) – The Southeastern Conference suspended free safety D.J. Swearinger for a game after his hit on a defenseless UAB receiver. The announcement Monday means Swearinger will miss the seventh-ranked Gamecocks’ game this weekend against Missouri. A personal foul was called against Swearinger after he launched into UAB’s Patrick Hearn while breaking up a pass in the third quarter Saturday. The side of Swearinger’s helmet crashed into Hearn’s facemask. Both players stayed in the game. Swearinger’s immediate backup on the depth chart is walk on Jared Shaw, but the team hopes to get Akeem Auguste back on the field this weekend after surgery in August on his right thigh muscle. Swearinger had a 65-yard

fumble return for a touchdown against UAB and an interception against East Carolina along with 10 total tackles this season. The senior posted a video of the hit on his Twitter account, writing ‘’Big hit against uab!!!’’ The post was deleted just minutes after the suspension was announced. Gamecocks coach Steve Spurrier said he would talk about the suspension at his news conference Tuesday. Spurrier pointed out Sunday that a Vanderbilt player was given a 15-yard penalty but no suspension for a similar hit against Gamecocks tight end Justice Cunningham. ‘’It’s sort of interesting. If you hit him right in the knees when the ball gets there or right in the belly, I guess that’s OK. But anything above the shoulders is considered off limits right now,’’ Spurrier said.

The SEC responded with a statement saying that the Commodores Andre Hal didn’t lower his head and most of the contact was to Cunningham’s shoulder. The glancing blow to the helmet was what prompted the penalty, but wasn’t enough for a suspension. In Swearinger’s case, ‘’the contact was initiated by a slight launch of the defender into the receiver and the primary contact was targeted directly into the receiver’s facemask,’’ the SEC said in its statement. Spurrier also said he thinks the NCAA should protect quarterbacks after they release a pass. Gamecocks QB Connor Shaw was knocked out of the UAB game after a brutal hit reinjured his slightly fractured shoulder blade on his throwing arm right after he released a 20-year completion.

AP

South Carolina safety D.J. Swearinger celebrates with a teammate after scoring a touchdown against UAB on Saturday. Swearinger was suspended for a hit he made in the game.

Patriots, Gostkowski ruined my Sunday

By Carmine Colangelo Staff Columnist

Before I start this column, I would like to preface it by saying, I love the New England Patriots. I may even like them more than the average fan, maybe even to a fault. Sundays are sacred to me. It is a day to sleep in, allow your body to recover from the unhealthy things you did over this weekend, do your homework and, most importantly, watch the Patriots. I live to see Tom Brady and the boys take on the rest of the NFL week in and week out. That being said, the Patriots ruined my Sunday. Like 90 percent of the UConn population, I woke up Sunday with a head cold. The stupid combination of a stuffy nose and cough does not make you the sickliest person in the world. However, it is just sick enough to make your day that much more difficult. I woke up frustrated and grumpy, and

although it was not the Patriots’ fault that I was sick it certainly was not helping. After trying to remedy myself with meds, vitamin C and cough drops, I planned to watch my favorite team. As I turned to CBS, like I do for just about every Patriots game, I found another game going on in place of it. Instead of seeing my Patriots play Arizona, I was subjected to Baltimore and Philadelphia. Granted, as a football fan I understand that Ravens vs. Eagles is a great matchup and seeing Vick score that gamewinning touchdown was great to watch, but they still are not my Patriots. Maybe it is a little selfish, but I could care less, and I know I was not the only one with the same sentiment last Sunday. Not to mention this is New England, so play the New England team in the New England market. I do not have NFL Red Zone, so I could

not watch it there, and what do you know, ESPN 3 did not have it either. Awesome. After getting updates on my phone and checking the play by play on ESPN, which, for lack of a better word sucks, and being underwhelmed by the excitement of an arrow moving across a field graphic, yawn, my friend finds it on his laptop with about a quarter to go. God bless the internet. Early in the fourth quarter, the Patriots are trailing the Cardinals 20-9. I repeat, the Patriots are losing to the Cardinals, at home. With 6:45 left in the fourth quarter, Stephen Gostkowski nailed a 53-yard field goal to bring us within eight. This is the last time I mention his name without cringing. With 2:06 left in the game, Rob Gronkowski catches a fiveyard touchdown pass, making it a two-point game. The following two-point conversion fails.

AP

» NOT MUCH, page 10

A Patriots fan reacts after kicker Stephen Gostkowski missed a last-second field goal on Sunday. New England fell to the Cardinals 20-18.

The Daily Campus: September 18, 2012  

The September 18 edition of The Daily Campus.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you