Issuu on Google+

Volume CXIX No. 73

» INSIDE

Bluejays soar over Huskies in playoffs By Danny Maher Staff Writer

BOSTON POPS BRINGING HOLIDAY SPIRIT

Boston Pops delighted audience with 6th anual UConn holiday concert. FOCUS/ page 5

CLAWED BY THE BEARCATS UConn’s bowl hopes dashed by Cincinnati. SPORTS/ page 12 EDITORIAL: TRINITY COLLEGE CO-ED GREEK LIFE DECISION AN EMPTY SOLUTION AT BEST

www.dailycampus.com

Monday, December 3, 2012

The No. 12 Creighton Blue Jays came into Storrs and knocked off the No. 4 Connecticut Huskies 1-0 in the NCAA Quarterfinals. Creighton’s Christian Blandon scored with 90 seconds remaining in regulation to deny UConn a trip to the Final Four. After several desperation attempts were made in the last minute, UConn could not score the equalizer. When the last seconds ticked off the clock and Creighton sealed its trip to Hoover, Ala., seniors Carlos Alvarez, Flo Liu, Max Wasserman and junior Mamadou Diouf sat on the field of Morrone Stadium with blank stares. Sunday’s loss was an awful end to an incredible four years for the seniors, especially Alvarez and Wasserman. “I just wanted to score,” Alvarez said. “I’m sorry I couldn’t get the job done with my teammates.” “I never thought I’d feel this way,” Wasserman said. “This is the best group of guys I have ever been around. It’s a shame.” The senior class produced an incredible 59-13-14 record and will leave Storrs as one of the most talented groups ever

under Head Coach Ray Reid. After being favorites to win the national title the last two seasons, they never made it to the College Cup. UConn had several chances immediately after the opening kick. Just over a minute into the game, Alvarez flicked the ball from the right side to the left post for Diouf, who had snuck behind the Creighton defense. Diouf fought off Creighton goalkeeper Jeff Gal for possession but could not get a clean shot off. A minute later, the duo of Alvarez to Diouf teamed up for an even better chance. Alvarez hit Diouf with a through ball and the entire Creighton team stopped because they thought he was offside. Diouf was not and he had a one-on-one with Gal but his shot was deflected out of bounds for an eventual, unsuccessful corner kick. Creighton also had a couple of scoring chances in the first 45 minutes. In the 28th minute, Creighton senior Jose Gomez took a free kick from 25 yards out but his shot sailed above cross bar. Gomez along with Alvarez and Diouf are all candidates for MAC-Hermann Trophy given to the top men’s soccer player in the country. With 8:30 remaining in the

KEVIN SCHELLER/The Daily Campus

The No. 12 Creighton Bluejays beat the No. 4 UConn Huskies in a 1-0 Quarterfinals game, blocking UConn from participating in the Final Four. Creighton scored the game-winning goal with 90 seconds left in the game.

first half, Blandon received a through ball and had a clear shot at the net with only UConn goalkeeper Andre Blake to beat. As Blake leaned towards the wideopen net to his left, Blandon chose the opposite route and a shot a ball that appeared to inevitably put the Blue Jays on top. But with all his momentum

Smash a car, raise money

School’s forcing of co-ed Greek life means sororities and fraternities will not be recognized by national charters. COMMENTARY/page 8 INSIDE NEWS: U.S.AFGHAN BASE ATTACKED IN EASTERN AFGHANISTAN Suicide bombers detonated explosives at the base gate, 5 killed. NEWS/ page 2

» weather Monday

Partly cloudy High 53 Low 34 tuesday/wednesday

High 55 Low 46 High 49 Low 27

» index Classifieds 3 Comics 8 Commentary 4 Crossword/Sudoku 8 Focus 5 InstantDaily 4 Sports 12

The Daily Campus 1266 Storrs Road Storrs, CT 06268 Box U-4189

SANTIAGO PELEAZ/The Daily Campus

The car smash, an event in which people are allowed to hit a car with a sledgehammer, was funded by the North Area Council and was hosted by the biology fraternity, Alpha Beta Epsilon.

UConn awarded grant to start sports programming exchange with China By Olivia Balsinger Staff Writer The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) SportsUnited Division have awarded an International Sports Programming Initiative exchange grant to the University of Connecticut. As stated within the press release describing the program, “The purpose of the ‘Sports for Social Change’ two-way exchange program is to promote mutual understanding between the U.S. and China by increasing the professional capacity of individuals who design and manage community and school based youth sports programs to use sport to foster positive social change.” The program will allow Chinese and American youth sports administrators to share their experiences administrating within their respected countries. According to the press release, “UConn is also partnering with Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU), a prestigious higher edu-

cation institution located in Hong Kong. HKBU, in coordination with the U.S. Consulates in Hong Kong and Guangzhou, will select ten youth sport administrators and secondary school sports program administrators in an open, meritbased competitive process.” The University of Connecticut’s Global Training and Development Institute, known as GTDI, developed the program. The institute partnered with the Husky Sports program in order to created what came to be called the International Sports Program. The press release says that the exchange program emphasizes being reciprocal, so after the ten students from China return home, ten American youth sport administrators will travel to China and participate in a two-week exchange program, further emphasizing the cultural exchanges. “I think it is awesome that UConn takes such initiatives to let students experience another culture in this manner,” said 3rdsemester exploratory student Carly Anderson. “Though I am not a sports administrator, I would love

the opportunity to do an exchange like that and see the workshops and different cultural meetings.” Fifth-semester economics major Erin O’Brien agreed that sports programs have a positive effect on youth. “I think organized sports programs definitely have a positive impact on youth and I know from personal experience that they often teach valuable interpersonal skills and lessons about dedication, teamwork, perseverance and respect,” said O’Brien. “This sounds like an interesting collaboration and I think both countries will benefit from observing each other’s current programs and sharing experiences and ideas. Recently, I’ve heard a lot about budget cuts decreasing or completely cutting funding for these programs so it’s nice to see that people still recognize the importance of youth sports programs.” For more information about this exchange opportunity, visit the UConn Office of Global Affairs.

Olivia.Balsinger@UConn.edu

going the wrong way, Blake made a kick save to keep the score at 0-0. The Huskies remained aggressive throughout the first half as they were called for six offside penalties. Despite several promising scoring opportunities, UConn and Creighton went into halftime with a scoreless tie.

With 15 minutes remaining in regulation, the intensity inside Morrone Stadium reached its highest level of the season. Diouf sent in a cross from 30 yards out that was saved by Gal but the Creighton goalkeeper slipped and fell as he made the save. Luckily for him, he fell

By Loumarie Rodriguez Senior Staff Writer

articles will be found online. As for the print editions they plan to disperse copies all over campus and hope to get a few copies archived into the library. So far the journal has received many submissions to be printed including from other schools such as the Air Force Academy. Rowland says thanks to their club adviser, Hallie Liberto of the philosophy department, Liberto is very involved with the bioethics community and promoted the journal to different schools. The journal is currently being edited by trained students who learn how to comment on the content and are usually from the writing center. Typically, two students review the manuscripts that are sent in and check on the clarity and grammar of the content then the final decision is made to either accept or reject it. If there are multiple articles of the same content they will be sent to a technical review board of doctors and lawyers who will go over the article to see which is most accurate and a sound argument. Tymoteusz Siwy, a 3rd-semester animal science and pathobiology major makes the final decisions on what manuscripts and articles need revisions as the managing editor. The journal is currently in the layout phase and their final deadline for submissions is December 16. They are also looking for more people who are interested in manuscript reviewing and for more editors as well. Once the journal is launched next semester there will be a release party and a series of speakers to come in according to Emily Anne Raymond a 5th semester English major, who is in charge of arranging events. “We encourage people to check [the journal] out and the club as well,” said Alex Lawton 3rdsemester molecular and cell biology major and member of the club.

» MEN’S, page 2

Bioethics club to debut first UConn undergraduate peer-reviewed journal

The Bioethics club will be printing the first and only undergrad peer-reviewed journal at UConn called “The Ethical Biologist” focusing on bioethical issues for spring semester 2013. The club that consists of 25 to 30 members typically focuses on a variety of issues to discuss within their meetings such as stem cell research, cloning, animal testing, etc. However because certain topics cannot be discussed in length in meetings club members came up with the idea of creating the journal that students can write about topics they find interesting. It also creates an outlet to focus on various subjects that were not discussed in meetings. The peer-reviewed journal was an original idea that the past two presidents of the club had discussed however it wasn’t until this semester did the idea start finally coming together according to the president of the club Megan Rowland, a 5th semester psychology and physiology and neurobiology double major. “We originally thought about doing a newsletter but with lengthy submissions a peer review journal was better,” said Rowland. The club hopes that with the journal that students will be more aware of what bioethics is and how interesting and relevant it is to everyday life. They are also hoping to get more people in involved in the peer reviewing process. They also expect that the final product of the journal will be between 30 to 60 pages depending on the approved content. The club is USG funded and were also given money to hire a web developer in order to create a professional looking website. Once the website is launched, which is expected by the end of the semester, their peer review journal

Loumarie.Rodriguez@UConn.edu

What’s on at UConn today... Elie Wiesel Prize in Ethics Essay Contest Deadline Al Day Event The Elie Wiesel Prize in Ethics Essay Contest challenges college students to analyze the urgent ethical issues confronting them in today’s complex world. More information is available at http:// www.ethicsprize.org.

International Center-Intl. Women’s Group Food Drive 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. McMahon International Center The international Women’s Center is having a non-perishable holiday food drive help supply the Emergency Food Pantry at the Covenant Soup Kitchen, Willimantic, CT.

Women’s Basketball vs. Maryland 7 to 9 p.m. XL Center, Hartford Admission for this game is free. For more information, visit http:// UConnHuskies.com.

Wind and Brass Chamber Ensemble 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. von der Mehden Recital Hall Admission for this ensemble concert is free. For more information, visit http://www.music.uconn.edu. – KIM WILSON


The Daily Campus, Page 2

DAILY BRIEFING » STATE

Conn. neighbor: Wyoming killer was upset with dad

VERNON, Conn. (AP) — A man who police say killed his father, a woman and himself in Wyoming on Friday told a neighbor in Connecticut weeks before the killings that he believed his father gave him Asperger’s syndrome and said his dad should be “castrated” to prevent him from having more children. Neighbor Matt DiPinto of Vernon, Conn., told local reporters that Christopher Krumm made the comments while giving him a ride home a few weeks ago. “He’s like, ‘So my dad gave me Asperger’s ... and my dad should have never had any kids. He should have never had me and passed it on to me, and the government shouldn’t have let him have kids,’” DiPinto told Fox affiliate WTIC-TV. “It was just out of nowhere ... but he seemed pretty livid about it.” Police in Casper, Wyo., say Krumm shot an arrow into the head of his father, James Krumm, with a high-powered bow Friday while

Conn. to increase class time in some schools

WASHINGTON (AP) — Open your notebooks and sharpen your pencils. School for thousands of public school students is about to get quite a bit longer. Five states were to announce Monday that they will add at least 300 hours of learning time to the calendar in some schools starting in 2013. Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and Tennessee will take part in the initiative, which is intended to boost student achievement and make U.S. schools more competitive on a global level. The three-year pilot program will affect almost 20,000 students in 40 schools, with long-term hopes of expanding the program to include additional schools — especially those that serve low-income communities. Schools, working in concert with districts, parents and teachers, will decide whether to make the school day longer, add more days to the school year or both.

Capitol staffers find route to elected office

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Before Rep. Bryan Hurlburt, a Democrat from Tolland, was elected to the state House in 2006, he worked as an aide to House Speaker James Amann. The job led to what he calls his “first bill,” an effort to promote biofuel, a type of diesel fuel that is made from recycled vegetable oil and animal fat. Here’s how Hurlburt tells the story: He was a representative-elect in December 2006, and was eating lunch in Amann’s office when somebody showed up an hour early for a meeting. It was Richard Parnas, a biofuel advocate and director of the Biofuel Consortium at the University of Connecticut. Parnas and Hurlburt hit it off. And Amann liked Parnas’ pitch for subsidies for people to use biofuels. The measure became law in 2007. Hurlburt was an early backer of the proposal who helped shepherd it through the legislature.

NC driver dead, 2 injured in Fairfield crash

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (AP) — State police say a driver has lost control of his car, rolled over and catapulted off a Connecticut highway before crashing into a truck at a Fairfield rest stop, killing a North Carolina driver who was sleeping in the tractor-trailer. The Hartford Courant (http://cour.at/TBkg5q) reports that 52-year-old Mitchell Blankenship of Boomer, N.C., suffered fatal injuries and was trapped in the truck Saturday morning. The two people in the car that crashed into his tractor-trailer, Kevin Rojas of Stamford and Esther Gonzales of Bronx, N.Y., also were trapped in their vehicle. Firefighters used hydraulic rescue tools to pull the three from their vehicles. Blankenship was pronounced dead at St. Vincent’s Hospital.

Bridgeport mayor backs proposed marijuana farm

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Some Venezuelan pensioners are telling U.S. prosecutors they have not been able to get back money put at risk by a massive Connecticut-based fraud scheme, which has exposed investors to losses totaling potentially hundreds of millions of dollars. The biggest investment client of Venezuelan-American financier Francisco Illarramendi was a pension fund for state oil workers in the South American country. In a statement sent to federal prosecutors in October, a number of people wrote that they have not been compensated for their losses by their former employer or the Venezuelan government, according to a court filing. Illarramendi, who ran unregistered hedge funds out of offices in Stamford, Conn., pleaded guilty last year to several counts of fraud and conspiracy to obstruct justice in a scheme to conceal huge losses. He is under house arrest in New Canaan while awaiting sentencing in January.

The Daily Campus is the largest daily college newspaper in Connecticut, distributing 8,000 copies each weekday during the academic year. The newspaper is delivered free to central locations around the Storrs campus. The Daily Campus is an equal-opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, religion, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation. All advertising is subject to acceptance by The Daily Campus, which reserves the right to reject any ad copy at its sole discretion. The Daily Campus does not assume financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertising unless an error materially affects the meaning of an ad, as determined by the Business Manager. Liability of The Daily Campus shall not exceed the cost of the advertisement in which the error occurred, and the refund or credit will be given for the first incorrect insertion only.

News

Monday December 3, 2012

U.S.-Afghan base attacked in eastern Afghanistan

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Taliban suicide bombers attacked a joint U.S.-Afghan air base in eastern Afghanistan early Sunday, detonating explosives at the gate and sparking a gunbattle that lasted at least two hours with American helicopters firing down on the militants. The attackers and at least five Afghans were killed, officials said. Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid claimed responsibility for the assault. It was the largest attack on the Jalalabad air base since February, when a suicide car bombing at the gate triggered an explosion that killed nine Afghans, six of them civilians. In Sunday’s attack, two vehicles packed with explosives barreled toward the main gate of the base around 6 a.m. local time. The first vehicle, a fourwheel-drive car, blew up at the gate, said Hazrat Hussain Mashreqiwal, a spokesman for the provincial police chief. Guards started shooting at the second vehicle before it too exploded, he added. It was unclear whether the explosives were detonated by the attackers themselves or by shooting from the guards. Two Afghan students from a private medical school were caught up in the attack and killed, as were three other Afghans working at the base, Mashreqiwal said. He did not know whether the base workers were private guards, members of the security forces or civilian

Men’s soccer season comes to an end from BLUEJAYS, page 1

AP

Afghan security forces block the road where Taliban suicide bombers attacked a joint U.S.Afghan air base in Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan on Sunday, Dec. 2.

employees. Nine attackers took part in the assault in total, he said, three of whom were killed in the suicide blasts and another six gunmen who died in the ensuing fighting that lasted a few hours. Maj. Martyn Crighton, a spokesman for the international military force in Afghanistan, said that helicopters “were deployed and used.” The NATO military coalition described the attack as a failure. “We can confirm insurgents, including multiple suicide bombers, attacked Jalalabad Airfield this morning. None of the attackers succeeded in breaching the perimeter,” Lt.

Col. Hagen Messer, a spokesman for the international military coalition, said in an email. He said that the fighting had ended by midmorning and that reports showed one member of the Afghan security forces was killed. Several foreign troops were wounded, but Messer did not give any numbers or details. “The final assessment of what happened this morning is not yet complete, but initial reports indicate there were three suicide bombers,” Messer said. In the south, meanwhile, a NATO service member was killed in an insurgent attack, the international coalition said in a statement. It did not provide further details.

Strategy key to pot legalization

SEATTLE (AP) — In the late1980s heyday of the anti-drug “Just Say No” campaign, a man calling himself “Jerry” appeared on a Seattle talk radio show to criticize U.S. marijuana laws. An esteemed businessman, he hid his identity because he didn’t want to offend customers who — like so many in those days — viewed marijuana as a villain in the ever-raging “war on drugs.” Now, a quarter century later, “Jerry” is one of the main forces behind Washington state’s successful initiative to legalize pot for adults over 21. And he no longer fears putting his name to the cause: He’s Rick Steves, the travel guru known for his popular guidebooks. “It’s amazing where we’ve come,” says Steves of the legalization measures Washington state and Colorado voters approved last month. “It’s almost counterculture to oppose us.” A once-unfathomable notion, the lawful possession and private use of pot, becomes an American reality this week when this state’s law goes into effect. Thursday is “Legalization Day” here, with a tote-your-own-ounce celebration scheduled beneath Seattle’s Space Needle — a nod to the measure allowing adults to possess up to an ounce (28 grams) of pot. Colorado’s law is set to take effect by Jan. 5. How did people change their opinions from “say no” to “yes” in not one but two states? The answer goes beyond society’s evolving views, and growing acceptance, of marijuana as

AP

In this Monday, Nov. 26, 2012 photo, travel guide author and marijuana legalization supporter Rick Steves holds a campaign sign in his office in Edmonds, Wash next to a door covered with marijuana leaf-shaped notes from his staff congratulating him on the passage of a referendum legalizing marijuana in the state.

a drug of choice. In Washington state — and, advocates hope, coming soon to other states — there was a wellfunded and cleverly orchestrated campaign that took advantage of deep-pocketed backers, a tweaked pro-pot message and improbable big-name supporters. Good timing and a growing national weariness over failed drug laws didn’t hurt, either. “Maybe ... the dominoes fell the way they did because they were waiting for somebody to push them in that direction,” says Alison Holcomb, the campaign manager for Washington state’s measure. Washington state and Colorado, both culturally and politically, offered fertile ground for legalization advocates — Washington for its lib-

Elizabeth Crowley, Editor-in-Chief Brian Zahn, Managing Editor Brendan Fitzpatrick, Business Manager/Advertising Director Nancy Depathy, Financial Manager Michael Corasaniti, Associate Managing Editor Kim Wilson, News Editor Christian Fecteau, Associate News Editor Tyler McCarthy Commentary Editor Jesse Rifkin, Associate Commentary Editor Joe O’Leary, Focus Editor Kim Halpin, Associate Focus Editor Jeffrey Fenster, Comics Editor

Dan Agabiti, Sports Editor Tyler Morrissey, Associate Sports Editor Kevin Scheller, Photo Editor Jess Condon, Associate Photo Editor Cory Braun, Marketing Manager Amanda Batula, Graphics Manager Christine Beede, Circulation Manager Mike Picard, Online Marketing Manager

Business Hours 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday Reception/Business: (860) 486 - 3407 Fax: (860) 486 - 4388

eral politics, Colorado for its libertarian streak, and both for their Western independence. Both also have a history with marijuana law reform. More than a decade ago, they were among the first states to approve medical marijuana. Still, when it came to full legalization, activists hit a wall. Colorado’s voters rejected a measure to legalize up to an ounce of marijuana in 2006. In Washington state, organizers in 2010 couldn’t make the ballot with a measure that would have removed criminal penalties for marijuana. Since the 1970 founding of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, reform efforts had centered on the unfairness of marijuana laws to the recreational user — hardly a sympathetic character, Holcomb notes.

forward as his legs laid in the goal and he managed to keep the ball inches outside the goal line. Less than a minute later, Alvarez’s shot was denied thanks to an incredible diving save made by Gal but UConn was awarded a corner kick. Wasserman sent in a useful ball to freshman Nick Zuniga. Zuniga fired a shot that was blocked by a Creighton defender then another amazing save by Gal denied George Fochive his first goal of the season. With less than two minutes remaining and both coaches preparing for overtime, Gomez capitalized on a broken play in the UConn end. Gomez crossed to Blandon who darted towards the Connecticut net and scored the game-winning goal, sending Creighton to the College Cup for the second consecutive season.

Daniel.Maher@UConn.edu

JK Rowling ‘dismayed’ by response to press report

LONDON (AP) — Victims of press intrusion including writer J.K. Rowling on Friday urged Britain’s political leaders to fully implement a judge’s recommendations on regulating the country’s often unruly newspapers. Rowling, who was one of dozens of people who gave evidence about press intrusion last year during a media ethics inquiry, said that she was “alarmed and dismayed” by Prime Minister David Cameron’s lukewarm response to Lord Justice Brian Leveson’s report, published Thursday to conclude the probe. Leveson’s 2,000-page report concluded that Britain’s press sometimes “wreaked havoc with the lives of innocent people,” and recommended the print media be regulated by a new body enshrined in law. Cameron said he welcomed the proposal, but was reluctant to set down new laws to back a press regulator because such a move could threaten freedom of the press. Rowling wrote on the website of the Hacked Off group, which campaigns for victims of press intrusion, that she feared nothing will change to hold the press to account. “Having taken David Cameron’s assurances in good faith at the outset of the inquiry he set up, I am merely one among many who feel duped and angry in its wake,” she wrote. The 47-year-old writer had told of how journalists had driven her out of her home and targeted her 5-year-old daughter at school during the inquiry, triggered by a scandal over tabloid phone hacking that expanded to engulf senior figures in politics, the police and Rupert Murdoch’s media empire. Hacked Off on Friday launched an online petition urging Cameron and other politicians to implement Leveson’s recommendations in full.

Corrections and clarifications This space is reserved for addressing errors when The Daily Campus prints information that is incorrect. Anyone with a complaint should contact The Daily Campus Managing Editor via email at managingeditor@dailycampus.com.

Monday, December 3, 2012 Copy Editors: Katherine Tibedo, Olivia Balsinger, Tyler McCarthy, Joe O’Leary News Designer: Kim Wilson Focus Designer: Loumarie Rodriguez Sports Designer: Digital Production: Jon Kulakofsky

The Daily Campus 1266 Storrs Road Storrs, CT 06268 Box U-4189

eic@dailycampus.com, managingeditor@dailycampus.com, businessmanager@dailycampus.com, news@dailycampus.com, sports@dailycampus.com, focus@dailycampus.com, photo@dailycampus.com


The Daily Campus, Page 3

News

Monday, December 3, 2012

» BUSINESS

Program trains farmworkers to be organic farmers

SALINAS, California (AP) — Bending over beds of shriveled strawberry plants, former farmworker Domitila Martinez pulls pieces of black plastic row covers in preparation for next season’s planting. Except this time, she’s the boss. Martinez, who escaped the civil war in El Salvador three decades ago, used to pack tomatoes and harvest grapes for long hours and little pay in Central California. Then, one day, she heard an announcement on the radio: She could become a grower herself. She enrolled in a small farmer education program in Salinas that trains farmworkers to establish and manage organic farms. Today, she grows four acres (1.6 hectares) of organic strawberries in the Salinas Valley and sells them to Whole Foods markets. “I really like being out here working,” Martinez said, “because I’m working for myself.” The Agriculture and Land-Based Training Association, known as ALBA, helps bring minority, low-income farmworkers into a profession long dominated by Anglos. Since the program started in 2001, it has created more than 80 small farm businesses. With demand for locally grown and organic food skyrocketing, more people have become interested in farming in recent years, spurting a growth in farmer training programs. But few programs focus on immigrants, especially Latinos, who historically have had difficulty making it as farmers because of language and cultural barriers, lack of resources, and lack of government support. While the number of Hispanic farmers grew by 14 percent over the past five years, according to the 2007 Census of Agriculture, significantly outpacing the increase in U.S. farm operators overall, Hispanic farmers comprise only 2.5 percent of all farm operators. ALBA gives farmworkers, most of whom are first generation Latino immigrants, the opportunity to move up the job ladder, teaching them crop plan-

AP

In this photo taken on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012 in Salinas, Calif., Domitila Martinez instructs one of her workers how to prepare strawberry beds for next season’s planting.

ning, production, marketing and distribution skills. “A lot of farmworkers are working tirelessly to invest in their children’s futures, but ALBA gives them the opportunity to improve their lives within their lifetime,” said program manager Nathan Harkleroad. Other programs include the Oregon-based nonprofit Adelante Mujeres, which offers a 12 week Spanish-language sustainable farming class, as well

as access to land, technical assistance and a farmers market; and the Center For Latino Farmers in Washington state, which conducts workshops, provides resources and other assistance. At ALBA’s 90-acre (36-hectare) ranch in the Salinas Valley, an area known as “the Salad Bowl of the World,” participants attend bi-weekly classes during six-months of intensive training. They learn about pests and planting, beneficial insects and

Carbon pollution up to 2 million pounds a second

War rips apart families, neighbors in Syria

BEIRUT (AP) — BEIRUT — It’s at night that worries over her children hit the matriarch of the Khayyat family hardest, tormenting her as she tries to sleep. Four of her sons have joined the tens of thousands of rebels fighting to topple President Bashar Assad. The fifth is a sergeant in Assad’s army, a draftee. Worsening her troubles, her own brother no longer speaks to her because of her sons in the rebellion. “This is what it has come to in Syria,” said the 60-year-old Sunni Muslim woman as she sat in the family home on the outskirts of Damascus. “This is my son, and the other is my son, but each is fighting on a different side in this war. It burns my heart.” Because of fears of reprisals against any of her children, she spoke on condition she not be identified except by the name of her large, extended family. More than any of the other uprisings that toppled longtime dictators in the Arab world, the civil war in Syria has sharply polarized the country — ripping apart families and neighbors and bringing a bloody end to decades of coexistence. The war has riven Syria along sectarian lines. The Sunni majority forms the backbone of the revolt. The minority Alawite sect, an offshoot of Shiism, backs the regime of Assad, who is himself an Alawite and has stacked his leadership with members of the community. Other minorities like Christians largely support Assad or stand on the sidelines, worried that Assad’s fall would bring a more Islamist rule over them. But behind the broad outlines, even families within the same community have been wrenched apart. Some are torn by ideology: In a family, some remain fiercely loyal to Assad, alienating those who became regime opponents. Despite years of discrimination under the Assad family rule, even some Sunni Muslims back him, whether out of fear of

the alternative or belief in the regime narrative boasting of Syria as an oasis of secularism and stability in a turbulent region. Others families are divided by circumstances: Young army conscripts find themselves fighting for a regime they fear defecting from even as their brothers join the rebels. The violence, which activists say has killed more than 40,000 people since March 2011, has unleashed animosity and sectarian hatreds that many say they didn’t even know existed. Tit-for-tat killings between sects have swelled, as has segregation as Sunnis and Alawites flee each other. On social media web sites, venomous accusations and insults fly between regime opponents and Assad loyalists, who they often deride as “Minhibakjis” — Arabic for “we love you.” A third group of Syrians is opposed to both camps. “Syrian society has been deeply fragmented along multiple lines which may take generations to repair,” said Randa Kassis, a Syrian anthropologist opposed to Assad’s regime. “Anyone of a different opinion is immediately being cast as an agent or a stooge.” “It will take a lot of work to instill a culture of tolerance and acceptance, of give and take among people,” said the Parisbased Kassis, who founded the Movement for a Pluralistic Society, an organization working for a secular and united civil society in Syria. In that atmosphere, a difference of opinion within a family can swell into a bitter split. Mohammed, a former sergeant from the southern town of Daraa, where the uprising began, said he defected early on because he could not bring himself to open fire on protesters. He said he “felt like his heart was on the other side.” But his father and his brother, who serves in the air force security department in Daraa, remain hardcore regime supporters, convinced that those protesting

Classifieds Classifieds Dept. U-189 11 Dog Lane Storrs, CT 06268

tel: (860) 486-3407 fax: (860) 486-4388

Office Hours: Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

For more information: www.dailycampus.com

for sale

for rent

Paperback trader Comics, Used Paperbacks, Magic Cards, Old Records and CDs, Hero T-Shirts, and Gift Certificates. Paperback Trader, 522 Storrs Road, Mansfield Center. 860-456-0252

now reserving Fall and Spring housing. Excellent location, housekeeping, private bath, pool & spa, fitness center, high speed internet, includes all utilities. Parking option available. Contact missy.diloreto@interstatehotels. com 860-427-7888 http://www.nathanha-

for rent

ON CAMPUS HOUSING The Nathan Hale Inn is

cover crops. They meet with guest speakers ranging from local farmers to university biologists. They visit irrigation supply stores, compost suppliers, farms and farmers’ markets. “The idea is that the participants know how to access things, and that they develop relationships,” Harkleroad said. This year, the program added a three-month apprenticeship during which participants grow and sell crops as a class. Aspiring farmers then present a business plan. They fill out food safety and organic certification paperwork. And while most are farmworkers, a few spots are open to other aspiring farmers — the training is accredited by Hartnell College in Salinas. ALBA also offers a farm incubator program, allowing newly minted farmers to lease the organization’s farmland for up to six years — with access to tractors, equipment, irrigation and other support for a reduced fee. And it runs a licensed wholesale distribution program called ALBA Organics, helping the new farmers with storage, marketing and distribution. It sells to stores and institutions such as Google, Trader Joe’s, University of California at Santa Cruz, and Stanford University housing cooperatives. In fiscal year 2012, ALBA Organics brought in sales of $4.5 million. For Martinez, who graduated from the program a decade ago, assistance in finding land and the use of equipment proved crucial. “This program gave me the ability to start farming on my own,” said Martinez. “When you’re starting out, you have no money for tractors or other things.” The 60-year old Martinez now employs four people during harvest season and others throughout the year — but still does the bulk of the labor herself. She started out by selling her strawberries door to door, but later contracted with Whole Foods stores in the San Francisco Bay area and the central coast. Farmworkers say ALBA’s other benefits include reduced exposure to dangerous chemicals in the fields.

are foreign-backed terrorists. Mohammed spoke on condition he be identified only by his first name for fear his brother would be harmed for the connection to an uprising supporter. “The first few months were hell,” he said. “My father forbade any talk at home of the revolution. When I told him I intended to defect, he grabbed me and said: ‘If you want to defect, go do it somewhere else and don’t bring shame to this family.’” Mohammed said he joined friends in the central province of Homs and has been fighting there since. “I think my brother is a coward. But I don’t blame him, each person’s tolerance level is different,” he said. An opposition activist in Damascus said his family’s divisions are a generational struggle. He said his family has long opposed the regime but are of a generation that shunned activism, knowing it would bring harsh retaliation. So “when I quit my job as a magazine editor to dedicate my time to the revolution, they went crazy,” he said in an interview through Skype. “Sometimes they shut me off for days, they don’t talk to me, then they ease up,” he said. The rebel sons of the Khayyat family matriarch seemed unsure whether their brother was serving in Assad’s military willingly or out of fear if he defected. The brother was drafted six months before the uprising began and is serving in the eastern Deir el-Zour province. Tens of thousands of soldiers have defected over the past 20 months, many now fighting alongside the rebels. At the Khayyat family home in Kisweh, south of Damascus, the matriarch’s eldest son walks in slowly, dragging his foot because of a injury during recent fighting. He was the first of the brothers to join the Free Syrian Army rebels, after he became convinced armed resistance was needed against Assad’s brutal crackdown on peaceful protests.

AP

This July 3, 2010 image provided by Ian Joughin, shows two people looking at a 60-foot-deep canyon that was carved over the course of several years by turbulent water overflow from a large melt lake southwest of Ilulissat, Greenland. Polar ice sheets are now melting three times faster than in the 1990s, but so far that’s added just less than half an inch to already rising global sea levels, a new giant scientific study says.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The amount of heat-trapping pollution the world spewed rose again last year by 3 percent. So scientists say it’s now unlikely that global warming can be limited to a couple degrees, which is an international goal. The overwhelming majority of the increase was from China, the world’s biggest carbon dioxide polluter. Of the planet’s top 10 polluters, the United States and Germany were the only countries that reduced their carbon dioxide emissions. Last year, all the world’s nations combined pumped nearly 38.2 billion tons of carbon dioxide into the air from the burning of fossil fuels such as coal and oil, according to

Rates:

Policies:

For ads of 25 words or less: 1 day............................................................................ $5.75 3 consecutive days........................................................ $15.25 5 consecutive days: ...................................................... $26.50 10 consecutive days:..................................................... $48.00 1 month:..................................................................... $88.00 Semester:.................................................................. $215.00 Each additional word: ..................................................... $0.10 Additional Features: Bold ..................................... ...........$0.50 for rent

leinn.com CHAPLIN: Two bedroom apartments, 9 miles from campus, quiet area, coin-op laundry, $900 includes heat and hot water. No Pets; One year lease. 860-428-3243 house for rent Spacious 4 Bed 1.5 Bath house walk to cam-

for rent

pus $2500/mo plus utilities. 1st, last and security. Quiet neighborhood, not a party house. Available Jan. 1. 860-617-5396 Room for rent: Furnished room for rent, includes utilities, internet/cable. Washer/dryer. Walking distance on Hunting Lodge Road. Non-

new international calculations on global emissions published Sunday in the journal Nature Climate Change. That’s about a billion tons more than the previous year. The total amounts to more than 2.4 million pounds of carbon dioxide released into the air every second. Because emissions of the key greenhouse gas have been rising steadily and most carbon stays in the air for a century, it is not just unlikely but “rather optimistic” to think that the world can limit future temperature increases to 2 degrees, said the study’s lead author, Glen Peters at the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research in Oslo, Norway.

Classifieds are non-refundable. Credit will be given if an error materially affects the meaning of the ad and only for the first incorrect insertion. Ads will only be printed if they are accompanied by both first and last name as well as telephone number. Names and numbers may be subject to verification. All advertising is subject to acceptance by The Daily Campus, which reserves the right to reject any ad copy at its sole discretion. The Daily Campus does not knowingly accept ads of a fraudulent nature.

travel

for rent

smoking females only. Please leave message at 860-487-0590 help wanted

www. EarWarmerZ. com/jobs Bartending! Make up to $300/day potential. No experience necessary. Training available, 18+ OK. (800) 965-6520 ext. 163

SPRINGBREAK HEADQUARTERS! Early booking prices to CANCUN, PUNTA CANA, JAMAICA, CRUISES. Contact TRAVELPLANNERS, 9 Dog Lane, Suite B103, 860-487-2030. YOUR EXPERIENCE BEGINS WITH OURS!


The Daily Campus, Page 2

DAILY BRIEFING » STATE

Conn. neighbor: Wyoming killer was upset with dad

VERNON, Conn. (AP) — A man who police say killed his father, a woman and himself in Wyoming on Friday told a neighbor in Connecticut weeks before the killings that he believed his father gave him Asperger’s syndrome and said his dad should be “castrated” to prevent him from having more children. Neighbor Matt DiPinto of Vernon, Conn., told local reporters that Christopher Krumm made the comments while giving him a ride home a few weeks ago. “He’s like, ‘So my dad gave me Asperger’s ... and my dad should have never had any kids. He should have never had me and passed it on to me, and the government shouldn’t have let him have kids,’” DiPinto told Fox affiliate WTIC-TV. “It was just out of nowhere ... but he seemed pretty livid about it.” Police in Casper, Wyo., say Krumm shot an arrow into the head of his father, James Krumm, with a high-powered bow Friday while

Conn. to increase class time in some schools

WASHINGTON (AP) — Open your notebooks and sharpen your pencils. School for thousands of public school students is about to get quite a bit longer. Five states were to announce Monday that they will add at least 300 hours of learning time to the calendar in some schools starting in 2013. Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and Tennessee will take part in the initiative, which is intended to boost student achievement and make U.S. schools more competitive on a global level. The three-year pilot program will affect almost 20,000 students in 40 schools, with long-term hopes of expanding the program to include additional schools — especially those that serve low-income communities. Schools, working in concert with districts, parents and teachers, will decide whether to make the school day longer, add more days to the school year or both.

Capitol staffers find route to elected office

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Before Rep. Bryan Hurlburt, a Democrat from Tolland, was elected to the state House in 2006, he worked as an aide to House Speaker James Amann. The job led to what he calls his “first bill,” an effort to promote biofuel, a type of diesel fuel that is made from recycled vegetable oil and animal fat. Here’s how Hurlburt tells the story: He was a representative-elect in December 2006, and was eating lunch in Amann’s office when somebody showed up an hour early for a meeting. It was Richard Parnas, a biofuel advocate and director of the Biofuel Consortium at the University of Connecticut. Parnas and Hurlburt hit it off. And Amann liked Parnas’ pitch for subsidies for people to use biofuels. The measure became law in 2007. Hurlburt was an early backer of the proposal who helped shepherd it through the legislature.

NC driver dead, 2 injured in Fairfield crash

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (AP) — State police say a driver has lost control of his car, rolled over and catapulted off a Connecticut highway before crashing into a truck at a Fairfield rest stop, killing a North Carolina driver who was sleeping in the tractor-trailer. The Hartford Courant (http://cour.at/TBkg5q) reports that 52-year-old Mitchell Blankenship of Boomer, N.C., suffered fatal injuries and was trapped in the truck Saturday morning. The two people in the car that crashed into his tractor-trailer, Kevin Rojas of Stamford and Esther Gonzales of Bronx, N.Y., also were trapped in their vehicle. Firefighters used hydraulic rescue tools to pull the three from their vehicles. Blankenship was pronounced dead at St. Vincent’s Hospital.

Bridgeport mayor backs proposed marijuana farm

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Some Venezuelan pensioners are telling U.S. prosecutors they have not been able to get back money put at risk by a massive Connecticut-based fraud scheme, which has exposed investors to losses totaling potentially hundreds of millions of dollars. The biggest investment client of Venezuelan-American financier Francisco Illarramendi was a pension fund for state oil workers in the South American country. In a statement sent to federal prosecutors in October, a number of people wrote that they have not been compensated for their losses by their former employer or the Venezuelan government, according to a court filing. Illarramendi, who ran unregistered hedge funds out of offices in Stamford, Conn., pleaded guilty last year to several counts of fraud and conspiracy to obstruct justice in a scheme to conceal huge losses. He is under house arrest in New Canaan while awaiting sentencing in January.

The Daily Campus is the largest daily college newspaper in Connecticut, distributing 8,000 copies each weekday during the academic year. The newspaper is delivered free to central locations around the Storrs campus. The Daily Campus is an equal-opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, religion, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation. All advertising is subject to acceptance by The Daily Campus, which reserves the right to reject any ad copy at its sole discretion. The Daily Campus does not assume financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertising unless an error materially affects the meaning of an ad, as determined by the Business Manager. Liability of The Daily Campus shall not exceed the cost of the advertisement in which the error occurred, and the refund or credit will be given for the first incorrect insertion only.

News

Monday December 3, 2012

U.S.-Afghan base attacked in eastern Afghanistan

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Taliban suicide bombers attacked a joint U.S.-Afghan air base in eastern Afghanistan early Sunday, detonating explosives at the gate and sparking a gunbattle that lasted at least two hours with American helicopters firing down on the militants. The attackers and at least five Afghans were killed, officials said. Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid claimed responsibility for the assault. It was the largest attack on the Jalalabad air base since February, when a suicide car bombing at the gate triggered an explosion that killed nine Afghans, six of them civilians. In Sunday’s attack, two vehicles packed with explosives barreled toward the main gate of the base around 6 a.m. local time. The first vehicle, a fourwheel-drive car, blew up at the gate, said Hazrat Hussain Mashreqiwal, a spokesman for the provincial police chief. Guards started shooting at the second vehicle before it too exploded, he added. It was unclear whether the explosives were detonated by the attackers themselves or by shooting from the guards. Two Afghan students from a private medical school were caught up in the attack and killed, as were three other Afghans working at the base, Mashreqiwal said. He did not know whether the base workers were private guards, members of the security forces or civilian

Men’s soccer season comes to an end from BLUEJAYS, page 1

AP

Afghan security forces block the road where Taliban suicide bombers attacked a joint U.S.Afghan air base in Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan on Sunday, Dec. 2.

employees. Nine attackers took part in the assault in total, he said, three of whom were killed in the suicide blasts and another six gunmen who died in the ensuing fighting that lasted a few hours. Maj. Martyn Crighton, a spokesman for the international military force in Afghanistan, said that helicopters “were deployed and used.” The NATO military coalition described the attack as a failure. “We can confirm insurgents, including multiple suicide bombers, attacked Jalalabad Airfield this morning. None of the attackers succeeded in breaching the perimeter,” Lt.

Col. Hagen Messer, a spokesman for the international military coalition, said in an email. He said that the fighting had ended by midmorning and that reports showed one member of the Afghan security forces was killed. Several foreign troops were wounded, but Messer did not give any numbers or details. “The final assessment of what happened this morning is not yet complete, but initial reports indicate there were three suicide bombers,” Messer said. In the south, meanwhile, a NATO service member was killed in an insurgent attack, the international coalition said in a statement. It did not provide further details.

Strategy key to pot legalization

SEATTLE (AP) — In the late1980s heyday of the anti-drug “Just Say No” campaign, a man calling himself “Jerry” appeared on a Seattle talk radio show to criticize U.S. marijuana laws. An esteemed businessman, he hid his identity because he didn’t want to offend customers who — like so many in those days — viewed marijuana as a villain in the ever-raging “war on drugs.” Now, a quarter century later, “Jerry” is one of the main forces behind Washington state’s successful initiative to legalize pot for adults over 21. And he no longer fears putting his name to the cause: He’s Rick Steves, the travel guru known for his popular guidebooks. “It’s amazing where we’ve come,” says Steves of the legalization measures Washington state and Colorado voters approved last month. “It’s almost counterculture to oppose us.” A once-unfathomable notion, the lawful possession and private use of pot, becomes an American reality this week when this state’s law goes into effect. Thursday is “Legalization Day” here, with a tote-your-own-ounce celebration scheduled beneath Seattle’s Space Needle — a nod to the measure allowing adults to possess up to an ounce (28 grams) of pot. Colorado’s law is set to take effect by Jan. 5. How did people change their opinions from “say no” to “yes” in not one but two states? The answer goes beyond society’s evolving views, and growing acceptance, of marijuana as

AP

In this Monday, Nov. 26, 2012 photo, travel guide author and marijuana legalization supporter Rick Steves holds a campaign sign in his office in Edmonds, Wash next to a door covered with marijuana leaf-shaped notes from his staff congratulating him on the passage of a referendum legalizing marijuana in the state.

a drug of choice. In Washington state — and, advocates hope, coming soon to other states — there was a wellfunded and cleverly orchestrated campaign that took advantage of deep-pocketed backers, a tweaked pro-pot message and improbable big-name supporters. Good timing and a growing national weariness over failed drug laws didn’t hurt, either. “Maybe ... the dominoes fell the way they did because they were waiting for somebody to push them in that direction,” says Alison Holcomb, the campaign manager for Washington state’s measure. Washington state and Colorado, both culturally and politically, offered fertile ground for legalization advocates — Washington for its lib-

Elizabeth Crowley, Editor-in-Chief Brian Zahn, Managing Editor Brendan Fitzpatrick, Business Manager/Advertising Director Nancy Depathy, Financial Manager Michael Corasaniti, Associate Managing Editor Kim Wilson, News Editor Christian Fecteau, Associate News Editor Tyler McCarthy Commentary Editor Jesse Rifkin, Associate Commentary Editor Joe O’Leary, Focus Editor Kim Halpin, Associate Focus Editor Jeffrey Fenster, Comics Editor

Dan Agabiti, Sports Editor Tyler Morrissey, Associate Sports Editor Kevin Scheller, Photo Editor Jess Condon, Associate Photo Editor Cory Braun, Marketing Manager Amanda Batula, Graphics Manager Christine Beede, Circulation Manager Mike Picard, Online Marketing Manager

eral politics, Colorado for its libertarian streak, and both for their Western independence. Both also have a history with marijuana law reform. More than a decade ago, they were among the first states to approve medical marijuana. Still, when it came to full legalization, activists hit a wall. Colorado’s voters rejected a measure to legalize up to an ounce of marijuana in 2006. In Washington state, organizers in 2010 couldn’t make the ballot with a measure that would have removed criminal penalties for marijuana. Since the 1970 founding of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, reform efforts had centered on the unfairness of marijuana laws to the recreational user — hardly a sympathetic character, Holcomb notes.

forward as his legs laid in the goal and he managed to keep the ball inches outside the goal line. Less than a minute later, Alvarez’s shot was denied thanks to an incredible diving save made by Gal but UConn was awarded a corner kick. Wasserman sent in a useful ball to freshman Nick Zuniga. Zuniga fired a shot that was blocked by a Creighton defender then another amazing save by Gal denied George Fochive his first goal of the season. With less than two minutes remaining and both coaches preparing for overtime, Gomez capitalized on a broken play in the UConn end. Gomez crossed to Blandon who darted towards the Connecticut net and scored the game-winning goal, sending Creighton to the College Cup for the second consecutive season.

Daniel.Maher@UConn.edu

JK Rowling ‘dismayed’ by response to press report

LONDON (AP) — Victims of press intrusion including writer J.K. Rowling on Friday urged Britain’s political leaders to fully implement a judge’s recommendations on regulating the country’s often unruly newspapers. Rowling, who was one of dozens of people who gave evidence about press intrusion last year during a media ethics inquiry, said that she was “alarmed and dismayed” by Prime Minister David Cameron’s lukewarm response to Lord Justice Brian Leveson’s report, published Thursday to conclude the probe. Leveson’s 2,000-page report concluded that Britain’s press sometimes “wreaked havoc with the lives of innocent people,” and recommended the print media be regulated by a new body enshrined in law. Cameron said he welcomed the proposal, but was reluctant to set down new laws to back a press regulator because such a move could threaten freedom of the press. Rowling wrote on the website of the Hacked Off group, which campaigns for victims of press intrusion, that she feared nothing will change to hold the press to account. “Having taken David Cameron’s assurances in good faith at the outset of the inquiry he set up, I am merely one among many who feel duped and angry in its wake,” she wrote. The 47-year-old writer had told of how journalists had driven her out of her home and targeted her 5-year-old daughter at school during the inquiry, triggered by a scandal over tabloid phone hacking that expanded to engulf senior figures in politics, the police and Rupert Murdoch’s media empire. Hacked Off on Friday launched an online petition urging Cameron and other politicians to implement Leveson’s recommendations in full.

Corrections and clarifications

Monday, December 3, 2012 Copy Editors: Katherine Tibedo, Olivia Balsinger, Tyler McCarthy, Joe O’Leary News Designer: Kim Wilson Focus Designer: Loumarie Rodriguez Sports Designer: Digital Production: Jon Kulakofsky

The Daily Campus 1266 Storrs Road Storrs, CT 06268 Box U-4189


The Daily Campus, Page 3

News

Monday, December 3, 2012

» BUSINESS

Program trains farmworkers to be organic farmers

SALINAS, California (AP) — Bending over beds of shriveled strawberry plants, former farmworker Domitila Martinez pulls pieces of black plastic row covers in preparation for next season’s planting. Except this time, she’s the boss. Martinez, who escaped the civil war in El Salvador three decades ago, used to pack tomatoes and harvest grapes for long hours and little pay in Central California. Then, one day, she heard an announcement on the radio: She could become a grower herself. She enrolled in a small farmer education program in Salinas that trains farmworkers to establish and manage organic farms. Today, she grows four acres (1.6 hectares) of organic strawberries in the Salinas Valley and sells them to Whole Foods markets. “I really like being out here working,” Martinez said, “because I’m working for myself.” The Agriculture and Land-Based Training Association, known as ALBA, helps bring minority, low-income farmworkers into a profession long dominated by Anglos. Since the program started in 2001, it has created more than 80 small farm businesses. With demand for locally grown and organic food skyrocketing, more people have become interested in farming in recent years, spurting a growth in farmer training programs. But few programs focus on immigrants, especially Latinos, who historically have had difficulty making it as farmers because of language and cultural barriers, lack of resources, and lack of government support. While the number of Hispanic farmers grew by 14 percent over the past five years, according to the 2007 Census of Agriculture, significantly outpacing the increase in U.S. farm operators overall, Hispanic farmers comprise only 2.5 percent of all farm operators. ALBA gives farmworkers, most of whom are first generation Latino immigrants, the opportunity to move up the job ladder, teaching them crop plan-

BEIRUT (AP) — BEIRUT — It’s at night that worries over her children hit the matriarch of the Khayyat family hardest, tormenting her as she tries to sleep. Four of her sons have joined the tens of thousands of rebels fighting to topple President Bashar Assad. The fifth is a sergeant in Assad’s army, a draftee. Worsening her troubles, her own brother no longer speaks to her because of her sons in the rebellion. “This is what it has come to in Syria,” said the 60-year-old Sunni Muslim woman as she sat in the family home on the outskirts of Damascus. “This is my son, and the other is my son, but each is fighting on a different side in this war. It burns my heart.” Because of fears of reprisals against any of her children, she spoke on condition she not be identified except by the name of her large, extended family. More than any of the other uprisings that toppled longtime dictators in the Arab world, the civil war in Syria has sharply polarized the country — ripping apart families and neighbors and bringing a bloody end to decades of coexistence. The war has riven Syria along sectarian lines. The Sunni majority forms the backbone of the revolt. The minority Alawite sect, an offshoot of Shiism, backs the regime of Assad, who is himself an Alawite and has stacked his leadership with members of the community. Other minorities like Christians largely support Assad or stand on the sidelines, worried that Assad’s fall would bring a more Islamist rule over them. But behind the broad outlines, even families within the same community have been wrenched apart. Some are torn by ideology: In a family, some remain fiercely loyal to Assad, alienating those who became regime opponents. Despite years of discrimination under the Assad family rule, even some Sunni Muslims back him, whether out of fear of

AP

In this photo taken on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012 in Salinas, Calif., Domitila Martinez instructs one of her workers how to prepare strawberry beds for next season’s planting.

ning, production, marketing and distribution skills. “A lot of farmworkers are working tirelessly to invest in their children’s futures, but ALBA gives them the opportunity to improve their lives within their lifetime,” said program manager Nathan Harkleroad. Other programs include the Oregon-based nonprofit Adelante Mujeres, which offers a 12 week Spanish-language sustainable farming class, as well

the alternative or belief in the regime narrative boasting of Syria as an oasis of secularism and stability in a turbulent region. Others families are divided by circumstances: Young army conscripts find themselves fighting for a regime they fear defecting from even as their brothers join the rebels. The violence, which activists say has killed more than 40,000 people since March 2011, has unleashed animosity and sectarian hatreds that many say they didn’t even know existed. Tit-for-tat killings between sects have swelled, as has segregation as Sunnis and Alawites flee each other. On social media web sites, venomous accusations and insults fly between regime opponents and Assad loyalists, who they often deride as “Minhibakjis” — Arabic for “we love you.” A third group of Syrians is opposed to both camps. “Syrian society has been deeply fragmented along multiple lines which may take generations to repair,” said Randa Kassis, a Syrian anthropologist opposed to Assad’s regime. “Anyone of a different opinion is immediately being cast as an agent or a stooge.” “It will take a lot of work to instill a culture of tolerance and acceptance, of give and take among people,” said the Parisbased Kassis, who founded the Movement for a Pluralistic Society, an organization working for a secular and united civil society in Syria. In that atmosphere, a difference of opinion within a family can swell into a bitter split. Mohammed, a former sergeant from the southern town of Daraa, where the uprising began, said he defected early on because he could not bring himself to open fire on protesters. He said he “felt like his heart was on the other side.” But his father and his brother, who serves in the air force security department in Daraa, remain hardcore regime supporters, convinced that those protesting

Classifieds Classifieds Dept. U-189 11 Dog Lane Storrs, CT 06268

tel: (860) 486-3407 fax: (860) 486-4388

Office Hours: Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

For more information: www.dailycampus.com

for sale

for rent

Paperback trader Comics, Used Paperbacks, Magic Cards, Old Records and CDs, Hero T-Shirts, and Gift Certificates. Paperback Trader, 522 Storrs Road, Mansfield Center. 860-456-0252

now reserving Fall and Spring housing. Excellent location, housekeeping, private bath, pool & spa, fitness center, high speed internet, includes all utilities. Parking option available. Contact missy.diloreto@interstatehotels. com 860-427-7888 http://www.nathanha-

for rent

ON CAMPUS HOUSING The Nathan Hale Inn is

as access to land, technical assistance and a farmers market; and the Center For Latino Farmers in Washington state, which conducts workshops, provides resources and other assistance. At ALBA’s 90-acre (36-hectare) ranch in the Salinas Valley, an area known as “the Salad Bowl of the World,” participants attend bi-weekly classes during six-months of intensive training. They learn about pests and planting, beneficial insects and

cover crops. They meet with guest speakers ranging from local farmers to university biologists. They visit irrigation supply stores, compost suppliers, farms and farmers’ markets. “The idea is that the participants know how to access things, and that they develop relationships,” Harkleroad said. This year, the program added a three-month apprenticeship during which participants grow and sell crops as a class. Aspiring farmers then present a business plan. They fill out food safety and organic certification paperwork. And while most are farmworkers, a few spots are open to other aspiring farmers — the training is accredited by Hartnell College in Salinas. ALBA also offers a farm incubator program, allowing newly minted farmers to lease the organization’s farmland for up to six years — with access to tractors, equipment, irrigation and other support for a reduced fee. And it runs a licensed wholesale distribution program called ALBA Organics, helping the new farmers with storage, marketing and distribution. It sells to stores and institutions such as Google, Trader Joe’s, University of California at Santa Cruz, and Stanford University housing cooperatives. In fiscal year 2012, ALBA Organics brought in sales of $4.5 million. For Martinez, who graduated from the program a decade ago, assistance in finding land and the use of equipment proved crucial. “This program gave me the ability to start farming on my own,” said Martinez. “When you’re starting out, you have no money for tractors or other things.” The 60-year old Martinez now employs four people during harvest season and others throughout the year — but still does the bulk of the labor herself. She started out by selling her strawberries door to door, but later contracted with Whole Foods stores in the San Francisco Bay area and the central coast. Farmworkers say ALBA’s other benefits include reduced exposure to dangerous chemicals in the fields.

Carbon pollution up to 2 million pounds a second

are foreign-backed terrorists. Mohammed spoke on condition he be identified only by his first name for fear his brother would be harmed for the connection to an uprising supporter. “The first few months were hell,” he said. “My father forbade any talk at home of the revolution. When I told him I intended to defect, he grabbed me and said: ‘If you want to defect, go do it somewhere else and don’t bring shame to this family.’” Mohammed said he joined friends in the central province of Homs and has been fighting there since. “I think my brother is a coward. But I don’t blame him, each person’s tolerance level is different,” he said. An opposition activist in Damascus said his family’s divisions are a generational struggle. He said his family has long opposed the regime but are of a generation that shunned activism, knowing it would bring harsh retaliation. So “when I quit my job as a magazine editor to dedicate my time to the revolution, they went crazy,” he said in an interview through Skype. “Sometimes they shut me off for days, they don’t talk to me, then they ease up,” he said. The rebel sons of the Khayyat family matriarch seemed unsure whether their brother was serving in Assad’s military willingly or out of fear if he defected. The brother was drafted six months before the uprising began and is serving in the eastern Deir el-Zour province. Tens of thousands of soldiers have defected over the past 20 months, many now fighting alongside the rebels. At the Khayyat family home in Kisweh, south of Damascus, the matriarch’s eldest son walks in slowly, dragging his foot because of a injury during recent fighting. He was the first of the brothers to join the Free Syrian Army rebels, after he became convinced armed resistance was needed against Assad’s brutal crackdown on peaceful protests.

AP

This July 3, 2010 image provided by Ian Joughin, shows two people looking at a 60-foot-deep canyon that was carved over the course of several years by turbulent water overflow from a large melt lake southwest of Ilulissat, Greenland. Polar ice sheets are now melting three times faster than in the 1990s, but so far that’s added just less than half an inch to already rising global sea levels, a new giant scientific study says.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The amount of heat-trapping pollution the world spewed rose again last year by 3 percent. So scientists say it’s now unlikely that global warming can be limited to a couple degrees, which is an international goal. The overwhelming majority of the increase was from China, the world’s biggest carbon dioxide polluter. Of the planet’s top 10 polluters, the United States and Germany were the only countries that reduced their carbon dioxide emissions. Last year, all the world’s nations combined pumped nearly 38.2 billion tons of carbon dioxide into the air from the burning of fossil fuels such as coal and oil, according to

Rates:

Policies:

For ads of 25 words or less: 1 day............................................................................ $5.75 3 consecutive days........................................................ $15.25 5 consecutive days: ...................................................... $26.50 10 consecutive days:..................................................... $48.00 1 month:..................................................................... $88.00 Semester:.................................................................. $215.00 Each additional word: ..................................................... $0.10 Additional Features: Bold ..................................... ...........$0.50 for rent

leinn.com CHAPLIN: Two bedroom apartments, 9 miles from campus, quiet area, coin-op laundry, $900 includes heat and hot water. No Pets; One year lease. 860-428-3243 house for rent Spacious 4 Bed 1.5 Bath house walk to cam-

for rent

pus $2500/mo plus utilities. 1st, last and security. Quiet neighborhood, not a party house. Available Jan. 1. 860-617-5396 Room for rent: Furnished room for rent, includes utilities, internet/cable. Washer/dryer. Walking distance on Hunting Lodge Road. Non-

new international calculations on global emissions published Sunday in the journal Nature Climate Change. That’s about a billion tons more than the previous year. The total amounts to more than 2.4 million pounds of carbon dioxide released into the air every second. Because emissions of the key greenhouse gas have been rising steadily and most carbon stays in the air for a century, it is not just unlikely but “rather optimistic” to think that the world can limit future temperature increases to 2 degrees, said the study’s lead author, Glen Peters at the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research in Oslo, Norway.

Classifieds are non-refundable. Credit will be given if an error materially affects the meaning of the ad and only for the first incorrect insertion. Ads will only be printed if they are accompanied by both first and last name as well as telephone number. Names and numbers may be subject to verification. All advertising is subject to acceptance by The Daily Campus, which reserves the right to reject any ad copy at its sole discretion. The Daily Campus does not knowingly accept ads of a fraudulent nature.

travel

for rent

smoking females only. Please leave message at 860-487-0590 help wanted

www. EarWarmerZ. com/jobs Bartending! Make up to $300/day potential. No experience necessary. Training available, 18+ OK. (800) 965-6520 ext. 163

SPRINGBREAK HEADQUARTERS! Early booking prices to CANCUN, PUNTA CANA, JAMAICA, CRUISES. Contact TRAVELPLANNERS, 9 Dog Lane, Suite B103, 860-487-2030. YOUR EXPERIENCE BEGINS WITH OURS!


Page 4

www.dailycampus.com

Monday, December 3, 2012

The Daily Campus Editorial Board

Elizabeth Crowley, Editor-in-Chief Tyler McCarthy, Commentary Editor Jesse Rifkin, Associate Commentary Editor Chris Kempf, Weekly Columnist John Nitowski, Weekly Columnist Sam Tracy, Weekly Columnist

» EDITORIAL

Trinity College co-ed Greek life decision an empty solution at best

T

rinity College in Connecticut, in an effort to fix the school’s social and academic image, has recently decided to make a new rule that will force all Greek life on campus to go completely co-ed. The move is part of a strategic plan to help balance the school’s social life, which tends to have students running in cliques and has caused academic culture to become out of sync with non-academic life, according to those behind the change. Not being students at the school, we can only speculate as to whether or not this problem actually exists. However, assuming for the sake of argument that every reason for the change that the administration is giving is true, is completely changing the way sororities and fraternities work a solution? The result of the change is that a lot of these sororities and fraternities are in danger of being eradicated completely. Although the administration is not using this as an excuse to get rid of Greek life, by forcing them to be co-ed many are no longer going to be recognized by their national charters that stipulate that fraternities are for men and sororities are for women. The administration determined that low grades and high rates of drinking were synonymous with Greek life. They also were responsible for setting the social tone on campus. So, while they say that this isn’t an attack on Greek life, the response seems to run contrary to what they say. Students can apply to be a “society” which means that they will be recognized as a student group but not a nationally recognized sorority or fraternity. Therefore, the attack on Trinity college’s Greek life is an empty gesture at best, at least in terms of fixing the social order on campus, the main reason that it’s happening at all. The whole question apparently resulted in the administration trying to determine where they wanted the university to be in 2023, which is their bicentennial. However, eliminating the normal way that Greek life works seems more like it is merely the illusion of fixing the problems on campus rather than an actual solution to them. Not to mention that it is an unnecessary sacrifice on the part of the school because of all of the obvious benefits that organized, nationally chartered Greek life brings to student’s social life and campus life. Students who rely on the tradition and socialization that comes from sororities and fraternities can only hope that Trinity College will rethink this unnecessary foe solution to their problem. The Daily Campus editorial is the official opinion of the newspaper and its editorial board. Commentary columns express opinions held solely by the author and do not in any way reflect the official opinion of The Daily Campus.

Headphones in, music off. Listening to every word of your dumb conversation? You betcha! So the Jets finally put in their backup quarterback...and it’s not even Tebow. Are you kidding me? Time to pretend to study for finals. Thank you UConn football and soccer seniors for all your hard work to represent UConn in the great way that you did. This week can’t possibly be as bad as last week for UConn sports, right? RIGHT??? When I get the “your snapchats were absurd last night” text in the morning, I know I had a successful evening. So...I guess I’m the only one that doesn’t know that the fiscal cliff actually is. We’re gonna listen to one thing and one thing only: Charlie Brown Christmas. Did a girl really just walk into the dining hall with her own pack of ramen and sit down alone to eat it? I’ll tell you what, things got real this weekend. Real cold. R.I.P. UConn football’s and men’s soccer’s 2012 seasons. Rough week and weekend for UConn athletics. That Andrew Luck. He’s, he’s pretty good. There’s only thing to do after a week like this: watch highlights of the 2011 Big East and NCAA tournament...I miss you Kemba.

Send us your thoughts on anything and everything by sending an instant message to InstantDaily, Sunday through Thursday evenings. Follow us on Twitter (@UCInstantDaily) and tweet at us with the #instantdaily hashtag.

The Top 10 most fascinating people of 2012

W

ho were the 10 most fascinating people of 2012? Here are my selections. 10.) Jeremy Lin. In January, the New York Knicks even demoted Lin from NBA backup to the lowly Summer League, barely keeping his basketball career alive. Upon starters Carmelo Anthony and Amar’e Stoudemire getting injured, the Knicks grudgingly started Lin. Stunningly, he scored at least 20 points in his first six starts, turning a team losing 11 of its previous 13 games to winning its next seven straight. Within By Jesse Rifkin weeks the Harvard Associate Commentary Editor graduate, the first Asian-American in the NBA, was a Most Valuable Player award candidate (although the trophy ultimately went to LeBron James). 9.) Rick Santorum. The guy basically disappeared after April, but for two months Santorum was polling either first or second place for the Republican presidential nomination – skyrocketing from eighth place shortly before. Sure, he didn’t win. Yet, doesn’t it seem America talked more about Santorum during February and March than about Romney during September and October? 8.) Joseph Kony. Head of Lord’s Resistance Army and responsible for countless deaths and child enslavements, this fugitive warlord was virtually unrecognized outside his native country of Uganda. In March the nonprofit organization Invisible Children released the half-hour documen-

tary “KONY 2012.” The video surpassed 90 million online views, making his face internationally recognized, in a bad way. 7.) Miguel Cabrera. In 1967, Carl Yastrzemski led all baseball players in the three major offensive categories: hits, home runs and runs batted in. Nobody ever did again until Detroit Tigers third baseman Cabrera. At season’s end, Cabrera was at bat with the San Francisco Giants, one out away from winning the World Series. Surely baseball’s best player could spark a Tigers comeback? But Cabrera watched a called third strike blow past him, thus experiencing the highest high and the lowest low in sports – during the very same season. 6.) E.L. James. This middle-aged British housewife wrote “Fifty Shades of Grey” and it’s two sequels, the sexualized book trilogy everybody was buzzing about since its April hardcover release. Sales were staggering: it was No. 1 on the USA Today bestselling books list for 20 weeks, shattering the former 16-week record set by “The Hunger Games.” 5.) Sheldon Adelson. The Las Vegas casino owner and 12th richest American, worth $20.5 billion dollars, spent more than twice the cash on political causes and candidates as anybody else in the country. Hilariously, all the candidates Adelson spent the most on lost, notably Romney. Even though during Obama’s presidency, Adelson made more money than any other person in America. Seriously. 4.) Tim Cook. When visionary Apple CEO and founder Steve Jobs died last year, it seemed Apple would never recover. After Tim Cook took over, what happened shocked everybody: he did better than Jobs! In 2012, Apple sold more iPhones than in the previous two years combined and their market value soared to $625 mil-

lion, according to Financial Times. Now only one other company in the world is even worth half of Apple: oil company Exxon Mobil. 3.) Peter Higgs. In 1964, physicist Peter Higgs first proposed that an invisible field permeates the entire universe, and particles gain mass by interacting with the field. It’s the reason any physical thing is a “thing” and not just air or space. In July a Switzerland science team isolated the long sought-after “Higgs boson,” the smallest individual particle of the Higgs field – truly among the greatest scientific feats in history. And Higgs at age 83 was still alive to witness it. 2.) Psy. Real name Park Jae-sang, the South Korean rapper wrote this year’s most inescapable song “Gangnam Style,” almost entirely sung in Korean. The bizarrely entertaining music video became the most viewed YouTube ever on November 24, merely 132 days after upload. The video it surpassed – the music video for “Baby” by Justin Bieber and Ludacris – had been online for 1009 days, giving it more than a two year head start. 1.) John Roberts. The Supreme Court Chief Justice had been considered a reliable conservative for years, until he switched sides during the highest-stakes Supreme Court case since Bush v. Gore in 2000. By siding with the liberals in a squeaker 5 to 4 decision upholding the biggest, most expensive, and most significant law President Obama passed while president, Roberts cemented his status as America’s most important judge. At only 57, it’s a status he might potentially retain for decades to come.

Associate Commentary Editor Jesse Rifkin is a 5thsemester journalism and political science double major. He can be reached at Jesse.Rifkin@UConn.edu.

Microsoft tablet push detrimental to company overall

B

ack when Apple brought out the iPod, Microsoft figured they would get into the market of music players. This warranted the release of the Zune, which failed miserably. Microsoft suffered through five years of poor sales before finally calling it quits on the Kayvon Ghoreshi device, while Staff Columnist the iPod has grown into an enormous success. Microsoft is once again getting into the hardware market against Apple with the release of their Surface tablet. And while there are signs of it being different this time around, Microsoft’s hardware push will still flounder and hurt the company. One of the initial problems is the pricing. The basic model for the Surface tablet, keyboard not included, costs about $500. A basic model of the iPad is roughly the same. So why is the pricing such a problem? If consumers are going to shell out $500 for a tablet, they are going to go with the one that has been around for a while and has been refined as opposed to the unproven new kid on the block.

QW uick

Apple products will always have high markups, so any device trying to compete needs to be priced considerably lower. The pricing woes only continue as Microsoft readies to launch the second member of the Surface family in the Surface Pro. The tablet runs x86 Windows 8 which makes it compatible with all the Windows software that normally runs on a desktop. It costs $899 for a 64GB model and $999 for a 128GB model. Not only is this priced higher than most tablets, but also most PCs that could run Windows 8 just as well. The criticism of the hardware is only confirmed with the sales. On Black Friday, Microsoft’s massive spending on research, development and advertising proved futile in making a dent in Apple’s market share. At the Mall of America, research firm Piper Jaffray collected data on Black Friday in which Apple reportedly sold 17.2 items per hours while Microsoft only pushed out 3.5 items per hour. To add insult to injury, the majority of Microsoft sales that day came from Xbox games as opposed to the Surface tablet. Meanwhile, Apple was sitting pretty selling

“T his it

approximately 11 iPads per hour between their new iPad and the new iPad Mini. Poor sales aside, Microsoft’s push for hardware may also burn some bridges. The Surface tablet puts Microsoft in direct competition with many of its partners who also make tablets and PCs. One of the most vocal partners has been Acer. The company has stated their displeasure with Microsoft’s competition and believes the Surface has been a negative for the PC industry as a whole. Traditionally, Microsoft has been good at software. However, their push for hardware may be hurting their prowess in software as well. Microsoft designed Windows 8 to work across laptops, tablets, and smart phones. This however may only have hurt the operating system. The reactions to Windows 8 have been incredibly lukewarm, if not critical. Many users have complained about the learning curve and reviewers haven’t been much more positive. Microsoft is learning the hard way that operating systems for mobile devices and a computer work great separately, but flounder when combined.

The hardware push has come with the added need to create an app marketplace. Microsoft has also dropped the ball here. There has been no excitement for developers to create apps for Windows. And while Microsoft can showboat how it got 20,000 apps in the first month, it pales in comparison to the Apple App Store. To make matters worse, a majority of downloads were free apps. Microsoft has gone with a pricing model that starts at $1.49. In terms of how people spend money on apps, this is much more expensive than the average app in either the Apple or Android marketplace and will likely deter purchases. So, no matter what any colorful commercials may convene, Microsoft’s push for hardware is proving to not hold up once again. Sales wise, they have not been able to compete with the iPad. Instead they have alienated partners, hurt the software that was their bread and butter and have the makings of another hardware flub. Staff Columnist Kayvon Ghoreshi is a 1st-semester molecular and cell biology major. He can be reached at Kayvon.Ghoreshi@UConn.edu.

is why I agree with the gays when they say we should not allow heterosexuals in the military .” –B ill M aher


THIS DATE IN HISTORY

BORN ON THIS DATE

1947 “A Streetcar Named Desire” opens on Broadway where Marlon Brando made the famous cry “Stella!”

www.dailycampus.com

1969 - Brendan Fraser 1981 - Anna Chlumsky 1986 - Amanda Seyfried 1995 - Jake T. Austin

The Daily Campus, Page 5

Monday, December 3, 2012

Boston Pops bringing holiday spirit By Mike McGuigan Campus Correspondent On Saturday night, the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra preformed at the Jorgensen Center for the Preforming Arts under the direction of conductor Keith Lockhart in its sixth annual holiday concert at UConn. The Vocal Group Five by Design joined the Pops that evening. The Boston Pops Orchestra, affectionately referred to as “America’s Orchestra” by fans, is the most recorded orchestra in the country, and given the caliber of their performance at Jorgensen one of the best in the nation. Each year the Pops present a series of holiday concerts that, for the past six years, have been inaugurated at UConn. The Boston Pops Orchestra has come to be commonly referred to as the Pops by fans. Conductor Keith Lockhart joined the Pops in 1995, and has expounded upon the artistic tradition he inherited from his predecessors during his tenure. Prior to coming to the Pops, Mr. Lockhart was the associate conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony and Cincinnati Pops orchestras. The group Five by Design has been together since 1986 and focuses its repertoire on “all things swing.” The group consists of Lorie Carpenter-

Niska, Catherine Scott, Kurt Niska , Michael Swedberg, and Terrence Niska. Five by Design has traveled throughout the country, up north into Canada, and to far away places such as Istanbul. The Pops began the concert with the piece “Christmas Canticles.” Continueing with a stirring rendition of “Carol of the Bells” in conjunction with Five by Design. One of the highlights of the first portion of the show was an arrangement of Burl Ives’s Christmas classic “Holly Jolly Christmas,” which showcased Five by Design’s swinging style. The finale of the first portion of the show was a musical reading of “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” This reading included a performance of songs from the popular animated special of this Doctor Seuss’s. After this piece, a brief intermission followed. An early highlight of the second half of the concert was a reading of “Virginia, Yes, there is a Santa Claus” by Brid Grant the Dean of the UConn School of Fine Arts, which was musically accompanied by the Pops, originally written as an editorial reply in the The Baltimore Sun on September 21, 1897 by Francis Church to answer a young girl, Virginia and her question of whether

Showcase of talent through culture

The Indian Student Association hosted a night of food and dance in the Rome Ballroom on Friday night for their Annual Diwali Show, which showcased a variety of talents within the ISA. Dozens upon dozens of students and family dressed in traditional Indian garb filled the round tables for the show. Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights, is a fiveday celebration that typically takes places between October and November. It is one of the most important festivals of the year for Hindus and is celebrated by performing traditional activities together. “The food was really good; they kind of surprised me with the authenticity of it. Apparently they had an official chef who cooked all the food,” said Bless Gomes, a third-semester physiology and neurobiology major as well as a performer in UConn’s ThunderRaas. “The performances were great. People were really excited, you could tell they were. Overall it was very organized.” After a dinner that was served buffet style that included traditional Indian foods, the ISA began the entertainment portion of the night: They performed a skit between acts that depicted the story of two friends having a fun time at the ISA show and included all the members of the ISA. The performances for the night ranged from freshmen students dancing to a mix of Hindi and American songs to alumni that came back to put on a show. Dressed in red shirts, flowing

By Jamie Dinar Campus Correspondent

Photo courtesy of CMAI

Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra had their annual holiday concert at the Jorgensen Center of Performing Arts this past Saturday. The orchestra is the most recorded orchestra in the country.

Santa Claus actually exists. His touching response, read by Dean Grant, told Virginia that Santa Claus does indeed exist. This reading was followed up by a performance of the Pops classic “Sleigh Ride.” The grand finale of the show was a “Merry Little SingAlong” in which Santa Claus himself joined the Boston Pops

on stage to lead the audience in singing various Christmas classics such as Rudolph the “RedNosed Reindeer” and a “Winter Wonderland.” When the sing along finally ended the audience greeted the Pops with a thunderous round of applause. Student reaction to the Pops performance was very positive. First semester pre-pharmacy

major Stephanie Brady said, “ It was a great concert.” Firstsemester student Cate Kohn an accounting major said that her favorite part about the concert was “the old school style of Five by Design.” She also added that “the orchestra was amazing as well.”

Mike.McGuigan@UConn.edu

Special lecture for Women’s Center 40th Anniversary

Robert Wilson/The Daily Campus Kevin Scheller/The Daily Campus

The Indian Student Association performs a traditional dance for their annual Diwali Show that showcased the talents within the ISA.

By Zarrin Ahmed Staff Writer

Alternatives for staying awake for finals week

red skirts and jingling anklets, the three alumni danced to slow Indian songs that involved twirling. Husky Hungama, a singing group that consists of four male members and four female members, beat boxed and sang Hindi songs for the audience. They added their own Hindi twist to American songs like “Stand By Me” as well. Donned in colorful outfits, ThunderRaas performed to traditional Hindi songs and some English mixes as well. UConn’s Kuda Air, a break dancing group, showed off their skills on the dance floor and riled the crowd up with their hyped up movements. “I thought it was interesting, it was very beautiful to see all the dances,” said Amber Wolfgram, a third-semester human rights major. “I liked Surya, they included traditional dances and new modern dances.” Though the whole ballroom was filled with chairs and tables, there were many more people that came to watch the shows and stood along the edge of the room. The turnout was greater than the ISA expected. Gomes explained how this event took months of preparation. “There’s a lot that goes into it,” Gomes said. “There’s obviously the practices and then getting the signs ready. When it all comes together it made a big impact with how the show went. People stepped up and it was really nice to see that.”

Zarrin.Ahmed@UConn.edu

In celebration of the Women’s Center 40th anniversary hosted a special lecture by Gloria Steinem, an American feminist, journalist and social and political activist.

Jazz it up for the holiday season

By Zach Lederman Campus Correspondent On Saturday December 1, Associate Professor and Director of Jazz Studies, Earl MacDonald, presented the annual “Yule Be Swingin’” Christmas-themed jazz concert at von der Mehden recital hall. This show marks the beginning of the Christmas season for the university. The show, which has been performed annually for the past five years, featured a showcase of jolly, jazzy takes on classic Christmas tunes, from the more adult-oriented tunes like Joy to the World, God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen, and Mel Tormé’s Christmas Song, to the ones that inspire remembrances of childhood, like Santa Claus is coming to Town, Walking in a Winter Wonderland, and of course, the obligatory and ever popular Jingle Bells. The show featured Director MacDonald on Piano, but was otherwise entirely composed of students, with Tom Lee on trumpet, Matt Baum on saxophone, Nick Trautmann on bass, Michael Allegue on drum set, with Charles Eaton singing for a select number of songs. “I really wanted to use students for this show. These guys are fantastic, and in fact, I’ve used some of them in gigs prior to this one,” MacDonald said about his choice of players, “They’re all great to work with, and I’m incredibly proud and pleased with everything they’ve done. This has been such a fun time.”

Santiago Pelaez/The Daily Campus

Students perform for the Christmas theme jazz concert this past Saturday. The show featured many traditional adult Christmas songs.

The show was definitely centered towards families. Little kids squealed to the familiar merry melodies, and seemed astounded when old Saint Nick himself came out with his elven helpers to give out candy canes, take pictures, and give out a few hugs. Ms. Roxanne and her daughter Julia were at the show. “Loved it! So great for the family!” said Roxanna. “I thought it was good!” Julia said. Everyone was encouraged to stand up and sing along to Jingle Bells, Winter Wonderland, and others. Parents can rest assured that kids will love the sights and sounds of the show, and will be encouraged to get up and dance to the music, giving an opportunity to sit down and take a break, and enjoy some of your favorite Christmas-time classics. After each song, the entire recit-

al hall seemed to light up with uproarious applause. However, it wasn’t just families and Jazz students that came out to hear the music. Franklin Bravo, a third semester economics and finance major gave a raving review. “This whole thing was great. I loved how well done the music was. These guys obviously worked so hard. There’s such an awesome vibe from the music,” he said. “Great reception from the kids, obviously, so it’s cool to see the families from the area can come to see what UConn has to offer.” Students and Jazz fans that are interested in hearing more of Director MacDonald’s work can hear him perform every Thursday night alongside UConn students at Lu’s Café, located in the Family Studies Building.

Zach.Lederman@UConn.edu

As finals are quickly approaching, students are began to prepare for their extended hibernation at our favorite Homer Babbidge Library. Studying is hard. Sitting at a desk reading, memorizing and processing information for hours on end is certainly a difficult task. Many will search for helpful means of helping them along with this process. Adderoll and other “study boosters” are a popular option, but lets be honest, is that really healthy or necessary for those who are not prescribed? Students are forgetting about an obvious alternative, coffee! Some say that coffee isn’t enough to help them through finals week, but here’s some good news: coffee won’t just help you stay awake and focused, but it will also provide various health benefits. Scientists have been researching the topic for years hoping to prove that coffee is not good for your health. Well, that backfired. It is now widely accepted that our favorite cup of morning joe is, in fact, good for you and your health. Studies consistently prove that coffee drinkers, compared to non-coffee drinkers, are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, dementia, and will also reduce your risk of certain cases of cancers, heart rhythm problems and stroke. Of course, it is hard to project exact figures. There are numerous outside and personal factors that can affect health, such as diet, exercise and genetics. And also these studies never proved that coffee will completely prevent the aforementioned conditions. But, on a whole, scientists have come to the consensus that coffee is beneficial. According to the World Resources Institution, an average American consumed 4,168 ounce cups of coffee in 2009. Clearly the beverage is popular, but not everyone feels the same caffeine-related effects. Well here’s a tip: dark roast coffee beans are lower in caffeine than lighter roasts. But also on top of that, the darker roasts contain more beneficial compounds as well. In addition, drinking whole beans that are pesticide-free will aid in maintaining brain and muscle tissues. Coffee is a great drink to take advantage of during finals week. It has caffeine to help keep you up, and it has plenty of health benefits too. As long as you monitor the amount of sugar and cream you add, it is very healthy too. So just keep this in mind before deciding how you will focus in the library.

Jamie.Dinar@UConn.edu

Want to write for Focus? Come to our meeting, 8 p.m. at the Daily Campus building!


The Daily Campus, Page 6

FOCUS ON:

TV

Top 10 Broadcast

TV Show Of The Week

Once Upon a Time

Monday, December 3, 2012

Focus

Interested in writing movie reviews? Come write for Focus! Meetings at 8 p.m. on Mondays.

» TV REVIEWS

Darker exploration for inner demons

TV show that defines video game culture

1. Sunday Night Football (NBC) - 7.6 2. NBC NFL TH Special (NBC) - 7.1 3. SAT Night Football (ABC) 5.1 4. OT,The (FOX) - 5.0 5. Football NT America PT3 (NBC) - 4.3 6. The Voice (NBC) - 3.7 7. 2 Broke Girls (CBS) - 3.4 8. The Voice TUE (NBC) - 3.4 9. The Simpsons (FOX) - 3.3 10. Once Upon A Time (ABC) - 3.1 Ratings from TVbytheNumbers.com Week ending November 27

By Alex Sferrazza Campus Correspondent

1. NFL Regular Season (ESPN) 12472 2. Walking Dead (AMC) - 10472 3. iCarley: Goodbye (NICK) - 6430 4. Gold Rush (DISC) - 4689 5. Sons of Anarchy (FX) - 4231 6. Up (DSNY) - 3975 7. WWE Entertainment (USA) 3923 8. WWE Entertainment (USA) 3873 9. Pawn Stars (HIST) - 3855 By10.Alex Sfazzarra Spongebob: The Movie (NICK) Campus Correspondent - 3764

brother is attempting to kill her for something that she cannot change. To top it off, Stefan even help provide an outlet for Jeremy to take his aggression out on that was not healthy or helpful in the long run. Overall things became more complicated that now Elena is a vampire especially with her feelings for Damon having heightened; talk about awkward. With their split, it means that once again Stefan has decided to split as well because sometimes leaving a mess behind will make it better? Actually no, leaving a mess unclean will make things more complicated, which it did since “The Vampire Diaries” is almost comparable to a supernatural soap opera. It’s still a strange guilty pleasure.

X-Play, once touted as “tv’s most watched video game show” is in the twilight of its run. Arguably one of flagship programs of the G4 television network, the long running program, along with “Attack of the Show” and the entire G4 network, will cease to exist by 2013. In remembrance, I wanted to take a look back at a show, which has defined all that is video game culture for over a decade. The program known as “X-Play” began almost 15 years ago in 1998. Known then as “Gamespot TV,” the video game show introduced the world to Adam Sessler who would go onto co-host the program for the next 14 years. The modern incarnation of the program began in 2003 when Sessler was paired with a new co-host (and notorious Nintendo hater) Morgan Webb. For over the following eight years, “X Play” became a hub for video game fans. Extensive journalistic game previews were supplemented by comedic jokes such as a flashing banner that appeared on screen for “X- Play’s 1st Paris Hilton Joke of 2005”. Wildly entertaining comedy bits decorated the show throughout its run although they were far mor prevalent in the early years. Favorites include “Real Life Achievements,” “Crazy Adam (a salesman of knock off games,” as well as one-offs such as political style game talk show “Meet the Sess” and a fake “Gears of War” cereal commercial. My thoughts go out to all of the unfortunate interns abused in the name of humor by Adam and Morgan on the show over the years. The show has also become a target of critical bias in recent years, awarding “Game of the Year” 2008 to “Fable II,” despite some of the most critically acclaimed games of the past decade being released that year, most notably “Grand Theft Auto IV”. The fire was increased when the program awarded GOTY 2011 nominees to “L.A. Noire” and “Saints Row: The Third” in lieu of more universally acclaimed titles “The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword” and “Uncharted: 3.” Nonetheless fans have stuck by the show for years, and credit must be given to “X-Play” for never being afraid of voicing its own opinions. However following a contract dispute, Adam Sessler abruptly left the program in mid 2012. Many fans long considered himself the face of the show and the departure left ratings dropping further. Soon after Blair Herter permanently took Sessler’s job while cuts led to a scaled down set. All that was missing was the formal cancellation announcement. Still even without Sessler, it is upsetting to see the end of a program that for many years, represented a culture that video gamers such as myself are proud to be a part of. “X-Play” will soon be gone, but rest assured, to the fans it will be far from forgotten.

Loumarie.Rodriguez@UConn.edu

Alex.Sferrazza@UConn.edu

Photo courtesy of avclub.com

Season eight of “Dexter” has been making a lot bold movies lately as they are well into their final season. Characters that were once important are being brought in and killed off and meanwhile Dexter still fights his inner demons that elevated in season seven.

By Maurilio Amorim Campus Correspondent

Top 10 Cable

Dexter was once one of the greatest guilty pleasures on television. When the show first started the story was fresh, original and interesting. It certainly still is interesting, but it’s nothing like it used to be. Season Four was no doubt the best season the show has ever seen. After the first three seasons the show just could not live in its own shadow. Season Five was all right, but missing the genius that made the first four seasons better. Season Six was an improvement, but corny plot twists towards the end and a failure to complete the development of large themes like religion and morality throughout dragged it down. However, Season Six was special for its shocking cliffhanger ending that nobody could have predicted.

Season Eight will be Dexter’s him and other serial killers. final season. You can tell it’s While he only kills bad people, coming to an end because the he is not all that different from show is making the kind of bold the prey he puts on the table –­ he moves shows not ending are needs to kill the way a normal afraid to make. The approach person has a sex drive. Every towards the end, the intensi- season he begins to realize this ty that comes with it and the more and more. Season Seven return to darker subis bringing the ject matter and a much audience and him Dexter darker exploration of closer and closer Showtime Dexter’s inner demons to this full realSunday 9p.m. has elevated season ization. The show seven so far above shows us other five and six. However, killers and directly it still lacks the edge compares them to Dexter used to deliver Dexter with slight episode after episode. differences to hint Also, we can tell the show’s at that he will end up like them plot was not planned out in a someday. We’ve seen that one larger scheme ahead of time. every episode for seven seasons. Characters brought in last sea- However, we’ve seen this before. son and heavily developed are Dexter now has a girlfriend killed off this season serving no who he doesn’t have to hide importance. from, something he’s always Dexter has always questioned wanted in his life. We’ve also what the difference is between seen this before. The show is

B

recycling its plots, themes, motives and just about everything else with a fresher taste. The writing has gotten lazy. While the show may not be the guilty pleasure it once was, the story is finally headed somewhere towards and end and that in itself is making it interesting enough to watch. The only way to really end the show and do it justice would be to kill Dexter as he is one of the scumbags he hunts down every episode or to have his sister kill him. The themes developed certainly hint at it going there, but it won’t because nowadays it’s always got to be open for a sequel right? It’ll probably end with him running away and starting new in another city filled with killers. We can only hope the writers do us justice this time.

Maurilio.Amorim@UConn.edu

A new complicated vampire lifestyle

Numbers from TVbytheNumbers.com Week ending November 27 (Numbers of viewers x 1000)

What I’m Watching Once Upon a Time ABC Underrated: Sunday, 8:00 p.m.

“Once Upon a Time” is a fantastical drama that absolutely captures your imagination with all the references to mythical creatures and fairy tale characters coming to life. It’s the fact that they manage to create such a unique story line surrounding what happens to these fairy tale characters later in life or if there isn’t a happily ever after. Despite this past week’s episode typically the show brings in characters that will remind you of your childhood but with a twist where prince charming is not so charming or the evil queen actually looks hot. The modern twist to these classic characters is what makes this show very amusing but clever for its creativity. -Loumarie Rodriguez

» Stay Tuned

Photo courtesy of avclub.com

Things get complicated for Elena after breaking it off with Stefan however she is still determined to lead a semi-normal life despite being a full fledged vampire. Meanwhile her brother is out for blood against all vampires.

By Loumarie Rodriguez Senior Staff Writer As usual Mystic Falls is having yet another town event where everyone must participate in this week’s episode of “The Vampire Diaries.” It’s definitely not an episode of “The Vampire Diaries” without some random event happening that somehow brings everyone together and this time is the annual Mystic Falls beauty pageant. Our main heroine, Elena, is giving a helping hand, but not without some drama amongst her love triangle between the Salvatore brothers. Elena is now a fullfledged vampire and is still getting use to the vampire lifestyle, which has been messing with her emotions and she has broken up yet again with Stefan. Elena has always been a trooper

especially dealing with the series majority of his girlfriends are of unfortunate events that has always killed off. I suppose after a occurred ever since Klaus entered while that would build up, so now her life, and the funny business he is out for blood and has some of the doppelganger curse, even type of vendetta for vampires as when her aunt dies in front of he attempts to kill his own sister. her. So kudos to her The one thing I do for being a strong The Vampire Diaries appreciate about the female lead characshow is the fact that The CW ter and being able to they have always disThursday 8p.m. handle the crazy and played the brother sometimes depressand sister relationship ing events that between them as light have been thrown and simple. There was her way. She has never any bickering or always waded through it, except sibling rivalry that you usually now there is yet another curve- see in many other shows which ball, which involved her younger can be annoying and very redunbrother. dant. But their relationship is Her suddenly vampire-hating actually mature which is a nice brother Jeremy has always been a change of pace. Of course they complicated character, who some- had their off days when they how always manages to barely would argue but that is like any dodge near-death situations. Also normal brother and sister relait never seems he has much luck tionship so in this episode, it hits in the love department, as a good hard when you see that her own

B


Monday, December 3, 2012

The Daily Campus, Page 7

Focus

Letterman, Hoffman, Napoleon’s coded Kremlin letter sold for $243,500 Zeppelin honored by Obama

AP

Auction house associate Jean-Christophe Chataigniera holds up a letter dictated and signed by Napoleon in secret code that declares his intentions “to blow up the Kremlin” during his ill-fated Russian campaign is displayed in Fontainebleau, outside Paris.

FONTAINEBLEAU, France (AP) — A secret code letter sent by French emperor Napoleon boasting that his multinational forces would blow up Moscow’s Kremlin has sold at auction Sunday for €187,500 ($243,500) — 10 times its estimated presale price. A Paris museum, the Museum of Letters and Manuscripts, was finalizing its purchase of the Oct. 20, 1812, document with elegantly calligraphic ciphers. The sale price, which includes fees, far outstripped the pre-sale estimate of €15,000 ($19,500), according to Fontainebleau Auction House south of Paris. Experts say the letter is unique, written in a numeric code that Napoleon often used to throw off would-be interceptors — notably when he was conveying battle plans. The letter’s content also revealed the strains on Napoleon of his calamitous Russian invasion. “At three o’clock in the morning, on the 22nd I am going to blow up the Kremlin,”

the letter said, laying out his route of retreat and urging his minions to send rations to the towns to the west. “My cavalry is in tatters, many horses are dying.” Napoleon’s prolific correspondence has drawn aficionados from around the world in places like the U.S., Britain, Japan and Russia. Interest appears to be rising as museums like the Museum of Letters and Manuscripts prepare to mark the bicentennial of Napoleon’s final defeat at Waterloo in 1815. The Kremlin letter was but one piece in the vast auction Sunday. A 310-page manuscript for the “Essay on countryside fortification,” which Napoleon wrote while exiled on the remote island of Saint Helena in 1818-1919, was also bought by the Paris museum — for €375,000 ($487,000), including fees. Gerard Lheritier, director of the Paris museum, said it already has at least 1,500 letters, manuscripts or other writings linked to Napoleon Bonaparte. It recently

acquired one from Japan that Napoleon had written to the Empress Josephine; it fetched €600,000-€700,000, he said. “We have many letters that are much more important” than the Kremlin one, Lheritier said by phone. He was unfazed that the price was far above the presale estimate, and speculated that the letter could have fetched €250,000 ($325,000). “This is a nice letter because it’s in code, and he’s going to blow up the Kremlin — so it’s appealing,” he said. Vladimir Hofmann, a French artist of Russian descent who with his brother Andre also bid Sunday, said they’d wanted to purchase the letter for Russia’s famed Hermitage museum. “Why? You know, it’s a question of perhaps nostalgia, perhaps patriotism, to return the thing — very important for Russia and for Russian people — to them,” Vladimir Hofmann said. Referring to such Russian interest in the letter, Lheritier said with a chuckle: “I prefer that it stays in France.”

WASHINGTON (AP) — David Letterman’s “stupid human tricks” and Top 10 lists are being vaulted into the ranks of cultural acclaim as the late-night comedian receives this year’s Kennedy Center Honors with rock band Led Zeppelin and three other artists. Stars from New York, Hollywood and the music world joined President Barack Obama at the White House on Sunday night to salute the comedian, the band, and their fellow recipients: Actor Dustin Hoffman, Chicago bluesman Buddy Guy and ballerina Natalia Makarova. The honors are the nation’s highest award for those who influenced American culture through the arts. The recipients will be saluted by fellow performers in a show to be broadcast Dec. 26 on CBS. Obama elicited laughs from his guests when he described the honorees as “some extraordinary people who have no business being on the same stage together.” Noting that Guy made his first guitar strings using the wire from a window screen, he quipped, “That worked until his parents started wondering how all the mosquitoes were getting in.” The president thanked the members of Led Zeppelin for behaving themselves at the White House given their history of “hotel rooms trashed and mayhem all around.” “It’s fitting that we’re doing this in a room with windows that are about three inches thick and Secret Service all around,” he said to laughter from the diverse group of artists. Obama went on to note Letterman’s humble beginnings as an Indianapolis weatherman, who once reported the city was being pelted by hail ‘the size of canned hams.’” “It’s one of the highlights of

AP

2012 Kennedy Center Honoree Natalia Makarova, front row, second right, reacts to all the photos being taken during a group photo after the State Department Dinner Dec. 1.

his career,” he said. All kidding aside, Obama described all of the honorees as artists who “inspired us to see things in a new way, to hear things differently, to discover something within us or to appreciate how much beauty there is in the world.” “It’s that unique power that makes the arts so important,” he added. Later on the red carpet, Letterman said he was thrilled by the recognition. “It supersedes everything, honestly,” he said. “I haven’t won that many awards.” Meryl Streep first introduced the honorees Saturday during a formal dinner at the U.S. State Department hosted by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and attended by celebrities including comedians Stephen Colbert and Jimmy Kimmel, and Letterman’s longtime band leader, Paul Shaffer. Clinton noted the ballerina Makarova “risked everything to have the freedom to dance the way she wanted to dance”

when she defected from the Soviet Union in 1970. Makarova quickly made her debut with the American Ballet Theatre and later was the first exiled artist to return to the Soviet Union before its fall to dance with the Kirov Ballet. Clinton also took special note of Letterman, saying he must be wondering what he’s doing in a crowd of talented artists and musicians. “Dave and I have a history,” she said. “I have been a guest on his show several times, and if you include references to my pant suits, I’m on at least once a week.” The crowd gave Clinton a standing ovation as she hosted her final salute to the nation’s artists as secretary of state. Kennedy Center Chairman David Rubenstein gave her a subtle nudge to run for president in 2016, saying there’s another room at the State Department to name after a secretary who later becomes president.


Monday, December 3, 2012

The Daily Campus, Page 8

Comics

PHOTO OF THE DAY

COMICS Classic Happy Dance by Sarah Parsons

Classic Super Glitch by John Lawson

Robert Wilson/THE DAILY CAMPUS

Classic #hashtag by Cara Dooley

The Jorgensen Center for the Performing Arts was in full Christmas spirit this weekend as it was decorated in theme with it’s Winter Gala. Inside the center, audiences enjoyed the sounds of the Boston Pops.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO GET PAID TO DRAW OR MAKE GAMES FOR THE DAILY CAMPUS COMICS?! Classic Toast by Tom Dilling

Email 3 of your best sample comics to Dailycampuscomics@gmail.com! Horoscopes

by Brian Ingmanson

Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 6 -- It’s fine to find solace in solitude, but don’t get lost in the archives. New information opens up new possibilities. Put more into the household account. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is a 6 -- A dose of your friends is prescribed. Side effects include fun, distractions, playful conversation and optimism. You’re surrounded by love. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is a 6 -- Go ahead and daydream. Put your ideas to work for the betterment of your community and the world. Let your imagination take wing. Say “yes.” Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is an 8 -- Get ready for two days of adventure. Use what you learned recently for new income possibilities. There’s nothing wrong with a little ambition. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 9 -- The month begins with intensity where business is concerned. Use your charm and determination. Do what you already know works. Stay thrifty, but get what you need. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is an 8 -- Let your feelings of affection for another flourish. A partner relies on your smarts. It’s simple: Keep doing what works and stop doing what doesn’t. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 9 -- The impossible looks easy. Projects are coming at you fast, and you can handle them. It may require perfecting new skills. Explore new directions. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 7 -- Cast your own romantic spell. Your powers are particularly keen, and your mood is infectious. Friends offer encouragement. Go for it. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is an 8 -- Your spiritual practices clear your mind. Get into nesting at home. Discover something new and surprising about your family roots. Step into new leadership. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is a 6 -- To get to the next level, study with a master. You’re ready to learn the lesson. Practice as often as it takes until you get it. Then celebrate! Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 9 -- Let your schedule tell you what to do (and you’re the master of your schedule). Precision and profit are correlated. Follow an educated hunch. Friends surprise. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is an 8 -- The Moon is in your sign, and you are the star. Do the work, with loving support, and succeed. The practical plan works best. You’re building something.


Monday, December 3, 2012

The Daily Campus, Page 9

Sports

Women's hockey swept by Vermont By Scott Carroll Campus Correspondent The UConn Huskies dropped both of their games this weekend to the Vermont Catamounts. UConn was shutout in each effort as they lost 3-0 on Saturday and 2-0 on Sunday. Saturday’s game started out with a scoreless first period for each team. However, the second period would prove to be explosive for the Catamounts. Vermont would score three back-to-backto-back goals giving them a 3-0 lead. The first goal came off the stick of Senior, Forward Erin Wente. The other two were netted by sophomore, forward Meghan Huertas. The Huskies would be unable to make a comeback on Saturday

as the Catamounts 3-0 run would prove to be too much to overcome. UConn was able to successfully out shoot Vermont, 15-10. Elaine Chuli was able to stop 28 of the Catamounts 31 shots in the effort. “I thought we had a lack luster, poor performance,” said Coach Heather Linstad, “even though we outshot them.” The Huskies would get another shot at the Catamounts Sunday at Freitas Forum. Unfortunately the outcome would be very similar to Saturday’s effort. The Huskies were once again shutout, this time 2-0. After a scoreless first period that saw an intense scrappy performance on each side, the Catamounts broke the tie with a goal by Danielle Rancourt. The goal was assisted by Wente and came just after a UConn penalty

kill with 2:05 left on the clock in the second period. UConn continued to fight, but failed to net a goal in the contest. They would once again out shoot Vermont, this time 27-26. Vermont would score another goal midway through the third period. The goal was scored by Wente and was this time assisted by Rancourt. Vermont would hold the 2-0 lead for the remainder of the contest and sweep the Huskies on the weekend. Elaine Chuli was able to successfully stop 24 shots in the game, but took the loss. “Today I thought that systems wise, schemes wise, we made better things happen,” said Coach Linstad. “I think that were not having the success so that when we have their goalie on her butt, we need to burry those chances. Unfortunately they took advan-

tage of a couple oppurtunites.” Sunday’s game was marked by a very physical style of play that saw three penalties for each team and bodies flying everywhere. “I think we should be more physical,” said Coach Linstad. “One of our problems all year is that were very passive and we need to get into people’s faces, it’s the only way to steal the puck in women’s hockey”. The two losses drop the Huskies to 2-14-2 on the season and 1-7 in Hockey East. UConn will have another chance to break a their current losing streak again one month from now as they take on Princeton in Storrs after the Holiday break.

TROY CALDEIRA/The Daily Campus

Scott.Carroll@UConn.edu

UConn junior forward Stephanie Raithby fights off two Catamount defensemen in a recent game at the Mark Edward Freitas Ice Forum.

Huskies shake up fourth line after rough weekend By Tim Fontenault Staff Writer

TROY CALDEIRA/The Daily Campus

A UConn hockey player skates the puck up the ice in a recent game against Canisius at the Mark Edward Freitas Ice Forum. The Huskies were swept in both games of the series.

Sometimes, things work for a long time and then suddenly just stop working. That was the case this weekend for the UConn men’s hockey team. After winning four of the past five games, the Huskies dropped two in a row to Canisius in an Atlantic Hockey weekend series. Friday’s 3-0 loss made Assistant Coach David Berard rearrange his team a little bit. The interim head coach decided to change the entire fourth line, taking out Patrick Kirtland, Joe Budnick and Joey Ferriss and replacing them with Joe Birmingham, Brad Smith and Tyler Bouchard. The change paid off,

despite UConn losing the second game. The BirminghamSmith-Bouchard line played an impressive and aggressive game, putting five shots on net, one of them for a goal, with each of them posting a +1 rating. Berard saw them as one of the positive aspects of the weekend. “I think they played great tonight,” Berard said. “We talked to them today, that we wanted them to go in and play with energy, play with tempo for us and play well defensively for us and I think they did exactly what we asked them to do. They scored the one goal, but I think they had a lot of chances with a lot of puck possession. They created a lot of opportunity. They created a lot of momentum for us. They were tremendous tonight.”

Huskies let final game of the season slip away late from CLAWED, page 12 wall. On third down and 13 from the Cincinnati 33 yard-line, Chandler Whitmer’s pass was incomplete to Nick Williams The Huskies took their chances on fourth down, but another incomplete pass to Williams ended the drive.  When the Bearcats, took over for the first time in the second quarter with 11:31 remaining, the long play once again haunted the Huskies. Kay found tight end Travis Kelce wide open and 39 yards and just 11 seconds later, it was 14-0 in favor of the Bearcats.  “This was a game of big plays,” UConn coach Paul Pasqualoni said after the game. UConn was able to narrow the lead just a bit when freshman kicker Bobby Puyol, in for the injured Chad Christen, kicked one through the uprights from 40 yards out. Puyol, the North Palm Beach Florida, native said it was by far the coldest temperature in which he has kicked. “It was so cold, you have no idea,” Puyol said of Saturday night after the game.

Prior to Saturday night’s game, the coldest weather he had ever seen kicking field goals was in Tampa, Florida where the temperature once plummeted to 46 degrees. Just over two minutes later, the big plays which had killed the Huskies all season went in UConn’s favor. On a first down from its own 26, Whitmer found tight end Ryan Griffin open and Griffin did the rest, taking the ball into the endzone for a 74-yard touchdown pass. UConn was only down by four points and despite being outplayed by the Bearcats, looked like they were in this game. Everything went downhill from there. No other points were scored in the second half, but during the 30 minutes of second half, play the Bearcats outscored the Huskies 20-7. It didn’t take long in the second half for the Bearcats to score. Just 3:36 after the opening kickoff, the score was 21-10 in favor of the Bearcats after Kay found Kelce again for a 21 yard touchdown pass. In the Bearcats’ first three touchdown drives, it took them

only a combined 5:50 to score. All night, Whitmer was either rushed or sacked and with about seven minutes left in the third quarter, it finally caught up to him. After taking a big hit from Cincinnati’s Dan Giordano, Whitmer remained in the game. But not long after that, the Huskies bafflingly left Whitmer exposed on a reverse trick play and he got crushed once again. He left the game and did not return. Afterward, Pasqualoni said that he had no reason to take Whitmer out after the first hit despite the concussion—Whitmer himself was the only one to call it that— symptoms he had been feeling earlier this week after a big hit against Louisville last week. Pasqualoni said that if the doctors weren’t concerned, then he shouldn’t be. On that drive, the backup Johnny McEntee marched the Huskies down the field for a touchdown, it was UConn’s first touchdown of the season to come in the second half against a Big East opponent. Going into the fourth quarter, the score was 21-17. Some how, the Huskies were still within four

points of the Bearcats. To start the fourth quarter, the Bearcats made a field goal, making it 24-17 and then McEntee threw an interception, which resulted in a quick touchdown for the Bearcats. In just 3:42, the Bearcats scored ten points, making it 31-17. The Bearcats added one last field goal with 6:03 left making it 34-17. The Huskies ended the season 5-7 and Pasqualoni is now 10-14 in his tenure at UConn. Over the course of the second half, as UConn saw its chances at a win slipping away, fans—in typical Rentschler Field fashion— began leaving. When the final whistle blew ended the game, Rentschler Field was a ghost town. Even the student section which had been somewhat full, was all but empty. This 5-7 season ended in front of an almost empty stadium. Such is the state of UConn football; not enough points and not enough fans.

Dan.Agabiti@UConn.edu

Midway through the second game, Berard, who was leading the team for the seventh straight game due to the medical absence of Bruce Marshall, had to make the biggest in-game change of his stint. After relinquishing a second goal on only eight shots, goaltender Garrett Bartus was pulled in the place of Matt Grogan. Grogan had not played all season and was only making the 11th appearance of his career, but the senior did not disappoint, stopping Canisius’ last six shots in 22 minutes of work. “I think [Bartus] was a little off tonight,” Berard said. “We talked to him today. He’s used to playing, when he was younger he would get 45-50 shots on him. It’s a lot different when you’re always get-

ting peppered with shots. The way that we’re playing in the last seven games we’re probably giving up on average 22-24 shots. It’s a whole different mentality and he has to get used to playing with that. [Bartus] is obviously a great goalie. He was just a little off tonight. [Grogan] played well and that was good for him.” UConn takes the ice next on Friday at home against Army in AHA play. The week of practice will be critical for Berard as he evaluates his team and decides what is best for his team moving forward. What lines will play Friday? Will there be any shuffling? All of these questions will be answered this week.

Tim.Fontenault@UConn.edu

NHL owners, players set to meet without leaders as lockout continues NEW YORK (AP) — Traditional labor talks have made little progress in the ongoing NHL lockout, so the league and the players' association are going to try something different in an attempt to save the season that is slipping away. A crew of six owners will meet with a handful of players on Tuesday in New York — one day before the league's board of governors meeting — without Commissioner Gary Bettman and union executive director Donald Fehr. Bettman proposed the unique meeting on Wednesday when talks broke off following two days of negotiations with federal mediators, and it wasn't agreed to until Sunday. Originally the thought was no one other than owners and players would be in attendance, but each side will have staff and counsel there. Deputy commissioner Bill Daly will likely participate for the NHL, along with union special counsel Steve Fehr. Ron Burkle (Pittsburgh Penguins), Mark Chipman (Winnipeg Jets), Murray

Edwards (Calgary Flames), Jeremy Jacobs (Boston Bruins), Larry Tanenbaum (Toronto Maple Leafs) and Jeff Vinik (Tampa Bay Lightning) will take part in the talks for the league, Daly said. "No further details have been confirmed at this point," Daly said in a statement announcing the meeting. "We will provide further details when available and as appropriate." Six players will be picked for the meeting, but that list wasn't expected to be announced on Sunday, a union spokesman said. Neither the NHL nor the players' association had input on who would attend on the opposite side, Daly said in an email to The Associated Press. All games through Dec. 14 have already been wiped off the schedule, along with the outdoor Winter Classic on New Year's Day and All-Star Weekend that was slated for January in Columbus, Ohio. The lockout reached its 78th day on Sunday, and at best, there will only be a shortened season if there is any hockey at all.

Georgia rally falls short in 32-28 loss ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia was one play away the end of a 30-year wait for a shot at another national championship. Instead of a celebrating a comeback to remember, Aaron Murray and the No. 3 Bulldogs will have to live with coming up 5 yards short. "It came down to one play to win the SEC championship and play for the national championship," Murray said. Georgia's last-minute rally ended on the Alabama 5-yard line as time expired, giving the No. 2 Crimson Tide a 32-28 win in Saturday's Southeastern Conference championship game. Alabama (12-1) advances to the national championship game against Notre Dame. Georgia (11-2) was denied its first national championship game since the 1982 season. Only 1 minute, 8 seconds remained when Georgia took

possession at its 15. It seemed to be too much field and too little time. Still, Murray said the Bulldogs were confident. "We have run four or five successful one-minute drives this season already," he said. "We did more the ball extremely well, and we had a chance to win it." Murray completed four passes, three to tight end Arthur Lynch and one to Tavarres King. The offense remained on the field when an apparent interception by Alabama's Dee Milliner was overturned when video review determined the ball hit the ground. The last completion, a 26-yarder to Lynch, gave the Bulldogs a first down at Alabama's 8. Murray believed Georgia could run two plays with 15 seconds remaining. He said he sensed Alabama's defense wasn't prepared if he

could pull off a quick snap, so instead of spiking the ball the ball to stop the clock, he tried a fade pass intended for Malcolm Mitchell in the back corner of the end zone. "It's either a catch and a touchdown or it's an incomplete pass and we still have time for a play, to take a quick shot with it," Murray said. Instead, the ball was tipped. George receiver Chris Conley caught the deflection and was tackled at the 5. With no timeouts remaining, Georgia couldn't run another play. "It probably would have been the greatest comeback in Georgia history," Murray said. "It was exciting, that's for sure." Exciting and deflating. Georgia players collapsed on the field. Some remained down on one knee, staring in stunned disbelief, as confetti began to fall on Alabama's celebration. King called the last play

"insane." "It's just something crazy that happens like that," King said. "It's just crazy. A crazy moment." Murray had another description. "It stinks," the quarterback said. Murray completed 18 of 33 passes for 265 yards with one touchdown and one interception in the game that carried the potential to define his career. Instead, the game belonged to AJ McCarron and the Crimson Tide. McCarron threw a 45-yard touchdown pass to Amari Cooper with 3:15 remaining. McCarron was 12 of 21 for 162 yards with an interception. Georgia took its last lead at 28-25 on a 10-yard run by Todd Gurley, who had 122 yards rushing with two touchdowns, early in the final quarter. Gurley couldn't match


The Daily Campus, Page 10

Monday, December 3, 2012

Sports

UConn's season ends on a disappointing note the third overtime. This weekend it was McEntee once again who went under center when Whitmer was forced to leave the game again For the seniors on the UConn with a head injury. football team, their season ended The results were much different with a whimper instead of a this weekend than last weekend. bang, as the Huskies lost to the McEntee finished the day with just Cincinnati Bearcats 73 yards passing and he 34-17 in the final threw two interceptions game of the season. in his final appearance in UConn ended the a UConn uniform. season with an overall Senior Ryan Griffin record of 5-7, falling finished his career as a one win short of earnHusky on a high note. ing a post season bowl had 85 yards Notebook Griffin bid. The Huskies receiving on the afterposted a disappointnoon, including a 74 yard ing record of 2-5 in conference touchdown run, where Griffin outplay and finished tied with the ran the entire Cincinnati defense to Temple Owls for sixth place. For put up seven points on the board 20 seniors on this UConn team, it for UConn. Senior linebacker Sio was the last game they will ever Moore made three tackles includplay at the collegiate level. ing one sack in his last game, One of those seniors is quar- anchoring a line backing core that ter back Johnny McEntee, who has stayed consistent all season. served as the backup to sophomore Head coach Paul Pasqualoni was quarterback Chandler Whitmer. proud of his senior class for everyAfter Whitmer suffered a head thing they have done while wearinjury in the last weekend’s game ing a Husky uniform. against Louisville, McEntee came “We proud of our guys, I think into the game in the fourth quarter this senior group is a very good and led the Huskies to a victory in senior group,” said Pasqualoni.

“They have been tremendously loyal to the University of Connecticut and the football program. I think their leadership allowed us to be here tonight to try to get to a bowl game and I wish that we could have worked out for us but it didn’t.” Whitmer plays despite head injury Whitmer was closely evaluated throughout the week and the medical staff determined that he was healthy enough to play against Cincinnati. According to Pasqualoni, Whitmer looked good on Monday and Tuesday. On Wednesday, he practiced every snap with the team and Thursday Whitmer seemed ready to go. Before he was forced to the sidelines with another head injury, Whitmer completed 16 of the 31 passes he attempted and threw one interception. After the game Whitmer said that playing against the Bearcats was the right decision and that the medical staff did a good job in monitoring “I passed all my tests, there were a lot of expensive tests I had to do all week and I took some days off and the headaches and I was

able to subside the headache,” said Whitmer. “After that I was good and they did everything they needed to do. I was good to play, I’m competitive and I wanted to get back out there but they were going to do what was best and smart.” Recruiting in the offseason Since the Huskies did not win six games, they will not play in the postseason, which means recruiting is the next step for UConn. Pasqualoni said that the Huskies have a big recruiting weekend next weekend as his team prepares for the future. According to Pasqualoni, the key to the Huskies posting an eight of nine win season will be recruiting more skill players, as well as more offensive linemen. The quotable Paul Pasqualoni “My confidence level, my outlook has not changed one iota. I just feel we need to get another recruiting class in here and have a great offseason,” said Coach Pasqualoni on his outlook for the future of this program.

By Tim Fontenault Staff Writer

corralled a puck near the blue line off of a faceoff and pushed it towards goal, where it deflected off multiple skates past Bartus, who could not predict where it will end up. Bartus went to the bench with 62 seconds left as the Huskies elected for an extra skater with the hope of getting back in the game, but Canisius’ Preston Shupe put the game away with an empty net goal, giving the Golden Griffins a 3-0 win. On Saturday, UConn dominated play, but sometimes that is not enough, and the Golden Griffins completed the sweep with a 3-1 win. Assistant Coach David Berard decided to make a change in the team after Friday’s loss, replacing his entire fourth line, with Joe Birmingham, Brad Smith and Tyler Bouchard, replacing Patrick Kirtland, Joe Budnick and Joey Ferriss.

The two teams exchanged a flurry of shots within the first two minutes, but ultimately went into the dressing rooms scoreless after one period. 11 minutes into the second, Canisius found the breakthrough. Cody Freeman got through alone against Bartus and went from left to right to slide in a backhander under the glove to give the Golden Griffins the lead. For Freeman, it was only the second goal of his career, but the first one also came against UConn on March 3. Shupe then got his second goal of the weekend, on only Canisius’ eighth shot. Shupe was able to beat Bartus on the stick side on what looked like an easy save for UConn’s all-time wins leader. The goal resulted in Berard replacing Bartus with Matt Grogan, who was making his

By Tyler Morrissey Associate Sports Editor

FOOTBALL

JESS CONDON/The Daily Campus

Tyler.Morrissey@UConn.edu

UConn senior tight end Ryan Griffin advances the ball up the field. Griffin broke a 74 yard run for his sixith touchdown of the season.

Men's hockey suffers set back against Canisius

The UConn men’s hockey team’s momentum was halted this weekend as the Huskies were swept in a weekend series with Atlantic Hockey Association foe Canisius. The Huskies (4-7-1, 3-60) were the victims of stunning goaltending from Canisius junior Tony Capobianco. UConn scored only one goal, despite outshooting the Golden Griffins 82-39. The game on Friday started off much like the series last weekend against Air Force. This time around, it was Canisius who were looking for revenge, as UConn eliminated them in the first round of last season’s AHA Tournament, and the Huskies had won each of the previous four meetings.

The play was fast and physical right from the start, and it looked like the game was heading towards a back and forth defensive battle where one goal could decide it. But Canisius found the breakthrough 16 minutes into the first period. After Capobianco denied UConn’s Cody Sharib, the Golden Griffins were able to get down to the other end and defenseman Logan Roe was able to beat UConn goaltender Garrett Bartus for his first career goal. UConn controlled most of the game after that and had several chances to get on the board, but Capobianco was a man possessed in the Canisius net this weekend, making a case to be the AHA Goaltender of the Week for the second straight week. The Golden Griffins got their second goal with about threeand-a-half minutes to play in the third period, when Kyle Gibbons

first appearance of the season and 11th of his career. “I think we needed a little boost,” Berard said. “I don’t think it was a great goal and, you know, [Grogan] deserves an opportunity. He’s a senior who works hard. We’ll give him a chance. At that point it’s 2-0 and they have eight shots on net, and we’re down 2-0, so why not give him a chance?” Less than a minute later, UConn put the game back within reach as Bouchard scored his first goal of the season with assists from his line mates Birmingham and Smith. That was as close as UConn would get, however, despite some great chances towards the end of the third period. Defensive pairing Alex Gerke and Tyler Cooke played an uncharacteristically long shift with about a minute to play as they continuously peppered the net, with

Gerke slamming a puck off the crossbar, but UConn could not catch a break all weekend. The Huskies went empty net for the last 35 seconds and Gibbons put in the third Canisius goal with five seconds to play, resulting in a 3-1 loss for UConn. “We tried to get traffic in front of [Capobianoc] and tried to get a crowd in front and work it down low. Everything we talked about the guys did,” Berard said. Berard also said he was impressed with the Smith, Birmingham and Bouchard on the fourth line on Saturday and he said it is very likely that they will keep their spot in the team for next Friday’s game against Army at the Freitas Ice Forum.

Tim.Fontenault@UConn.edu

Huskies looking to come back strong By Joe Crisalli Campus Correspondent

TROY CALDEIRA/The Daily Campus

UConn freshman forward Michela Cava skates around a Vermont player in a recent game at the Mark Edward Freitas Ice Forum. The Huskies were swept in both games by UVM.

Despite being swept 2-0 and 3-0 by Vermont this past weekend, the UConn women’s ice hockey team does have something to look back on and forward to; the holidays. “The holiday spirit will come back with us in January,” head coach Heather Linstad said. “We’re in a drought and the only ones that can fix it is us. They have to make it happen.” UConn played two physical games against Vermont, and came out firing with high intensity in both contests. The physicality in the second game of the series led to six total penalties, as well as numerous disciplines that went unseen.

“As long as it’s always consistent with the refs, I don’t have a problem with it,” Linstad said. “We should be more physical because one of our problems is that we are very passive. We need to get in people’s faces.” The Huskies also out-shot the Catamounts in both games, 36-31 and 27-26. UConn found ways to create turnovers and create opportunities on net coming off those turnovers. The opportunities going unconverted have been an issue for the Huskies over the past few games and over the course of the season. “Systems wise, schemes wise we made better things happen, but we’re not having the success,” Linstad said. “When we have the goalie on her but we need to bury those chances.”

UConn, at times, has excelled at producing chances and controlling the puck in their offensive zone on their fore check as well as transitioning from their back check to their breakout. Taking shots from the point while controlling the puck in the zone opened up plenty of chances from the slot for UConn this weekend, but they were, unfortunately, unable to put any in net. The Huskies had no problem putting pressure on the opposition. Pressure typically leads to turnovers, which leads to chances and the red light shining bright. UConn was unfortunately unable to take that next step from chances to reindeer games. The Huskies have been outscored 15-4 in their previous

4 games, and have had trouble lighting up Rudolph’s nose. Freshman forward Michela Cava currently leads the Huskies with six goals to go along with six assists on the season. Behind Cava, sophomore forward Rachel Farrel has five goals on the season for UConn. The Huskies will face off with Princeton at the Mark Freitas Ice Forum on January 7th at 1:00 p.m. in their next matchup, following the holiday festivities. “One of my gifts will be a win against Princeton,” Linstad said. “Every gift I get I will save it and open it on a gameday.”

Joe.Crisalli@UConn.edu

Chiefs beat Carolina Panthers at a somber Arrowhead Stadium KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Romeo Crennel stood in the middle of the Kansas City Chiefs' locker room Sunday, the emotion threatening to overcome the good-natured coach. Chiefs owner Clark Hunt was at his side, offering support. Members of the team hugged each other, the mud smearing with tears on their cheeks. And over along the wall stood the empty locker that once belonged to Jovan Belcher, his jersey still hanging from a hook. Just one day after the linebacker killed his girlfriend and then turned the gun on himself, the Chiefs banded together to play their finest game of the season, an inspired 27-21 victory over the Carolina Panthers that ended an eight-game losing streak suddenly rendered trivial. "As far as playing the game, I thought that was the best for us to do, because that's what we

do," Crennel said, tears forming in the corners of his eyes. "We're football players and football coaches and that's what we do. We play on Sunday." According to authorities, Belcher shot his girlfriend multiple times early Saturday at a residence near Arrowhead Stadium, then sped to the team's practice facility and turn the gun on himself as Crennel and general manager Scott Pioli watched in the parking lot. Pioli walked through the press box before the game and said he was doing "OK." "It's been an incredibly difficult 24 hours for our family and our entire organization," Hunt said. "We have so many guys on our team and our coaching staff who are really, really hurting." Chiefs players gathered in the tunnel leading to the field for a brief prayer before their pregame stretching. A few fans in

the half-empty stadium held up signs referencing the shootings, and there was a moment of silence to remember all victims of domestic violence. Kansas City police have not released a motive for the shootings, which claimed the life of Belcher and 22-year-old Kasandra M. Perkins, and left a 3-month-old girl, Zoey, an orphan. "I'm just trying to get through the rest of today," said the Chiefs' Brady Quinn, who threw his first two touchdown passes in three years. "The emotions of what has taken place will probably hit home for a few guys the next few days, when they realize what's taken place." Cam Newton threw for 232 yards and three touchdowns for the Panthers (3-9), who were informed the game would be played as scheduled while they were heading to Kansas City on

Saturday. DeAngelo Williams added 67 yards rushing, carrying the load with Jonathan Stewart out with an injury. Steve Smith, Greg Olsen and Louis Murphy caught Carolina's TD passes. "You definitely feel for them. What they are going through is tragic," Olsen said. "But we have a job to do. Our job is to come here and prepare to win. They wouldn't expect any less." Peyton Hillis had a touchdown run for Kansas City (2-10), while Tony Moeaki and Jon Baldwin had touchdown catches. Ryan Succop hit a pair of field goals, including a 52-yarder with 4:54 left that forced the Panthers try for a touchdown to steal the win. Instead, they went three-andout, and the Chiefs were able to run the clock down to 31 seconds before giving back the ball. Newton completed two quick

AP

A Kansas City Chiefs fan holds a sign during the first half of an NFL football game against the Carolina Panthers at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Mo.


TWO Monday, December 3, 2012

Stat of the day

PAGE 2

What's Next Home game

Dec. 7 Harvard 7 p.m.

Dec. 17 Maryland Eastern Shore 7 p.m.

Dec. 6 Penn State 7 p.m.

Dec. 19 Oakland 7 p.m.

Dec. 21 Fordham 7 p.m.

Dec. 29 Washington 7:30 p.m.

Dec. 22 Hartford 1 p.m.

Dec. 7 Jan. 4 Jan. 5 Dec. 29 AIC Army Penn State Penn State 7:05 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:05 p.m. 7: 05 p.m.

Dec. 29 Stanford 4 p.m.

Jan 11 Robert Morris 7:05 p.m.

Women’s Hockey (2-12-2) Jan. 3 Princeton 7 p.m.

Jan. 8 BU 7 p.m.

Jan. 12 McGill 3 p.m.

Jan. 15 Harvard 17p.m.

Men’s Track and Field Jan. 9 Jan. 10 URI URI Heptathlon Heptathlon All Day All Day

Jan. 5 Winter Opener All Day

Jan. 18 Jan. 12 Great Dane Yale Invite Classic All Day All Day

Women’s Track and Field Jan. 12 Armory Invite Alll Day

Jan. 18 Jan. 25 Great Dane Terrier Invite Classic Alll Day Alll Day

Feb. 1 Armory Collegiate All Day

Men’s Swimming & Diving Feb. 2 Dartmouth 1 p.m.

Jan. 26 Seton Hall 1 p.m.

Women’s Swimming & Diving Jan. 26 Seton Hall 1 p.m.

tightend Ryan Griffin has scored for the Huskies.

» That’s what he said -Kansas City Chiefs owner Clark Hunt after his teams emotional win over the Panthers.

Men’s Hockey (4-7-1)

Jan. 2 Princeton 7 p.m.

The number of carrer touchdowns senior

» NCAA FOOTBALL

Northern Illinois meets

“It’s been an incredibly difficult 24 hours for our family and our entire organization.”

Women’s Basketball (6-0) Today Maryland 7 p.m.

9

Away game

Men’s Basketball (6-1) Dec. 4 N.C. State 9 p.m.

The Daily Campus, Page 11

Sports

Feb. 2 Dartmouth 1 p.m.

Softball Feb. 15 FIU Tournament 11 a.m.

Can’t make it to the game? Follow us on Twitter: @DCSportsDept www.dailycampus.com

FSU in Orange Bowl AP

MIAMI (AP) — What a weekend for Northern Illinois: Win a conference championship, lose a coach and bust the BCS. The Huskies are headed to the Orange Bowl, set to make their Bowl Championship Series debut against Florida State. Northern Illinois won the Mid-American Conference title on Friday, lost coach Dave Doeren to North Carolina State on Saturday, and then spent Sunday anxiously waiting to see if it cracked the top 16 in the final BCS standings. By 0.0404 points, the Huskies did just that and will play in Miami on Jan. 1 as their reward. The MAC champions (12-1) were 15th in the final BCS standings. Finishing in the top 16 and ahead of the champion of a qualifying conference — they actually finished ahead of two, Big East winner Louisville and Big Ten titlist Wisconsin — meant the Huskies were automatically BCS-bound, earning them this date with the Atlantic Coast Conference champion Seminoles (11-2). Northern Illinois is the first MAC school to reach the BCS. The Huskies were 21st in last week’s BCS standings, meaning they not only needed to beat Kent State — which entered championship week as another BCS hopeful — in the MAC title game to have a shot, they also needed some help to reach the top 16. And enough help came, particularly with Nebraska losing badly in the Big Ten title game, along with UCLA and Texas both falling over the weekend. So it’s the Huskies and Seminoles, a matchup that surely very few people would have expected when the season began. And while Northern Illinois will be a fun story line throughout bowl season, the Huskies earned their way into the conversation. Since last Oct. 2, Northern Illinois is 21-1, the best record in the country. For comparison’s sake, that’s two more wins than Alabama and four more than Notre Dame — the Crimson Tide and Fighting Irish are this year’s title-game qualifiers — over that stretch. In fact, all that separated Northern Illinois from being perfect this season was one measly point. If it wasn’t for an 18-17 loss against Iowa on Sept. 1, the Huskies might have been coming to Miami with an undefeated record. Northern Illinois led Iowa by eight points with 10 minutes to play, then gave up the game-deciding touchdown with 2:15 left. Otherwise, who knows? Maybe NIU would have found some way to bust into the BCS title game, also to be played in Miami this season. JESS CONDON/The Daily Campus Florida State earned its Orange Bowl trip UConn football head coach Paul Pasqualoni reacts to a questionable call in Saturday’s game against the Cincinnati by topping Georgia Tech 21-15 in the ACC Bearcats. title game on Saturday night. Colin Kaepernick

» Pic of the day

Are you kidding me?!

» NFL

Andrew Luck leads Colts on final drive; Indianapolis beats Lions in Detroit 35-33

DETROIT (AP) — Andrew Luck was down to his last shot and his final option to lead the Indianapolis Colts to victory. Luck dropped back, then moved up to avoid pressure and buy time for a teammate to get open, tossed a short pass to Donnie Avery, and the receiver did the rest — racing untouched for a 14-yard touchdown and giving the Colts a 35-33 comeback win over the Detroit Lions on Sunday. “You always hesitate throwing the ball not in the end zone, for fear of the clock running out with a guy in bounds,” Luck said. “Took the calculated risk that Donnie could get there in the end zone, and he did.” Luck made all the right moves when it mattered most, making his transition from Stanford to the NFL look relatively smooth to help Indy win a game in a way it hasn’t since just after his 1st birthday. The last time the Colts scored a game-winning TD with no time remaining on the clock was Sept. 30, 1990, according to STATS LLC, to beat Philadelphia 24-23. Luck has won more games (eight) than any rookie quarterback drafted No. 1 overall in the Super Bowl era. He broke the mark by Sam Bradford, who helped St. Louis win seven games two years ago, and also surpassed Jim Plunkett in New England during the 1971 season. The Colts (8-4) stayed in control of the AFC wild-card race by winning for the sixth time in seven games. Luck helped them move a step closer toward being in the playoffs for the 10th time in 11 seasons, only this time without Peyton Manning. “Some teams find ways to win,” Indy interim coach Bruce Arian said. “Others don’t.” The Lions (4-8) lost for the fourth straight time, including three in a row at home after leading in the final quarter. They’re the first team to lose three straight games when leading with 2 minutes left in regulation since San Diego did it in 2000, according to STATS LLC, and the first since at least 1983 to blow leads that late in three home games in a row. “This is a tough league for tough people, and we’ll find out now who is tough,” Detroit coach Jim Schwartz said. Luck is — that’s for sure.

Ndamukong Suh, who was fined $30,000 for kicking Houston quarterback Matt Schaub last week, sacked Luck on his first snap and he was hit and hurried many more times by a hard-rushing front On the game-winning play, though, Detroit let Luck run through a slowly collapsing pocket as the final seconds ticked away and he took advantage. “If the pass rush does their job, he doesn’t get free the scramble and he never finds that receiver,” Schwartz said. “All game, we focused on taking away his step-up lanes, and then on the last play, we don’t do it.” Luck, who was 24 of 54 for 391 yards with four TD passes, made up for matching a season-high three interceptions by doubling his previous season high with his final TD on the winning, fourth-down play that started with 3 seconds left. He had two interceptions in the first half and threw a third in the fourth quarter. He has thrown 13 of his 16 interceptions on the road. Fellow rookie T.Y. Hilton had six receptions for 100 yards and Avery had five catches for 91 yards and two scores, the first of which gave the Colts their only lead — until his second one won the game. “I had no choice but to score,” Avery said. “It was the slowest 11 yards that I ever felt like I ran.” Calvin Johnson had a career-high 13 receptions for 171 yards, including a 46-yard touchdown that gave Detroit a 30-21 lead late in the third quarter. Johnson made a one-handed grab that set up Mikel Leshoure’s TD in the second quarter. Johnson had at least 125 yards receiving for the fifth straight game, matching an NFL record set in 1966 by Pat Studstill with the Lions. “Calvin Johnson is always a bright spot,” Schwartz said. “Maybe I should have had him on defense for the last play.” Matthew Stafford, the No. 1 pick overall in 2009, was 27 of 46 for 313 yards with two TDs and an interception late in the first half that hurt his team’s chances of adding to its 24-13 lead. Stafford also missed Johnson at times late in the game, including on the Lions’ last scoring drive when he threw behind him in the end zone and that led to Jason Hanson’s fourth field goal that gave them a 33-21 lead with 8:41 left.


» INSIDE SPORTS TODAY

P.11: Northern Illinois meets FSU in Orange Bowl / P.10: UConn’s season ends on a disapointing note /P. 9: Women’s hockey swept by UVM

Page 12

» TRI-STATE SPORTS

New York left out of realignment

Monday, December 3, 2012

www.dailycampus.com

CLAWED BY THE BEARCATS UConn’s bowl hopes dashed by Cincinnati

By Matt Stypulkoski Staff Writer When you think conference realignment, what schools come to mind? Probably UConn. After all, we are students here. After that? Perhaps Louisville or Cincinnati, maybe Syracuse or Pittsburgh, even Texas A&M. Somehow, I doubt you think St. John’s. Seton Hall probably isn’t the posterboy of realignment either. And yet, those are the schools that are being hit hardest by this mess. As we all know, UConn is between a rock and a hard place right now, trying desperately to find a way to leave the Big East and into a more secure conference. But the nice part about being a student here and a fan of the Huskies is that even though the sky may have fallen in Storrs this week, we’ll likely end up watching the sun rise from a stable conference sometime soon. East Orange, N.J. and Queens, N.Y. however, aren’t so lucky. The real losers in all of this mess aren’t the UConns or the Cincinnatis that have been left in the cold to this point. In fact, the only reason those schools are in the conversation to begin with is because they have built themselves up to a point where they’re capable of making a move. That also means they’re capable of standing on their own. Even if UConn doesn’t get into the ACC or the Big Ten, the athletics department will almost certainly survive. Perhaps it won’t be quite as strong as it is today, but by scheduling tough out of conference opponents, the Huskies can stay relevant in the national discussion. The Pirates and Red Storm? Well, they’re just dead in the water. How exactly is a school like Seton Hall supposed to recruit in the new, realigned world of college sports? The schools themselves are tough sells – small campuses in less than perfect areas with less than stellar athletics departments. But today, they can pitch the conference and make it mean something. Recruits love the ability to play against the top tier teams that the Big East can currently boast. Two years from now, a conference with Tulane and Boise State – assuming they don’t find a new home too – will be a heck of a lot harder to sell. And unfortunately for them, they don’t have a place to move. Unlike UConn, Seton Hall can’t go out and pedal its athletic prowess and market reach. Unlike UConn, St. John’s won’t be pitching their national championships and statewide fan base to a bigger, better conference anytime soon. For schools like Seton Hall and St. John’s, conference realignment means death. The death of an era when they stood a chance of rising up and becoming relevant, even if just for a few years. In the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, Seton Hall made two Elite Eights and a national championship game. In 1985, St. John’s made a Final Four. Maybe in the coming decades the Pirates and Red Storm can win some Big East titles and make a few NCAA Tournaments. But without the ability to sell a powerhouse conference, the chances of either of these schools becoming nationally relevant again is dying with each falling realignment-domino. Unfortunately for them, there is no life raft. Unfortunately for them, there is no reason for hope. Be glad, UConn fans, that we still stand a chance.

Matt.Stypulkoski@UConn.edu

By Dan Agabiti Sports Editor

The season was in the balance for the UConn football team and in a microcosm of this entire season, the Huskies were an hour late and a dollar short. The Cincinnati Bearcats beat the Huskies 34-17. In front of a crowd of supposedly 33, 112—many said it was in all reality nowhere close to that—UConn saw its season come to an end. The Huskies started the game with the ball and after going three and out, had to punt to the Bearcats. 2:03 after that, UConn was already in a tight position.  Cincinnati torched UConn through the air to start the game. On the Bearcats’ first drive, quarterback Brendon Kay threw passes of 27, 26 and 25 yards to three different receivers. Before the Huskies’ pass defense had seen what hit it, UConn was down 7-0.  On Cincinnati’s next drive, the Bearcats were moving the ball once again with ease. It took only three minutes for Cincinnati to drive 40 yards down the field.  But in a rare moment of good fortune for UConn, the Huskies caught a break. Jory Johnson stripped wide receiver Kenbrell Thompkins of the football and recovered it. 

FOOTBALL

34 17

UConn running back Lyle McCombs avoids a Cincinnati tackle in the Huskies’ 34-17 loss at Rentschler Field.

JESS CONDON/The Daily Campus

» HUSKIES, page 9

» MEN’S SOCCER

Huskies fall one win short of the Final Four By Miles DeGrazia Staff Writer The University of Connecticut men’s soccer team fell just one hurdle shy of a Final Four appearance Sunday, as Creighton defeated UConn 1-0 courtesy of an 89th minute goal. “Like I said last week, the game is a cruel game,” said UConn Head Coach Ray Reid during a somber press conference following the tough loss. “If we had more time, with the character of this team, we probably get the goal back. With only a minute and a half, that’s tough. We almost did it though,” said Reid. On the pitch UConn started the match extremely efficiently and had good chances to open the scoring in first the 20 minutes, but careless finishing cost them the opening goal. During the remaining time in the first half Creighton found their feet and became more active in

UConn’s defensive third, and play was more evenly split between the two teams. “I thought we started really well. It was almost too easy. The first 20 minutes. I thought we missed a few we should have finished.  We took our foot off the gas, that breathed a little life into them the rest of the half,” said Reid. The second half was more of the same as UConn started well but failed to convert and Creighton slowly got more and more into the match, and just before the final whistle they found the game winner. With just two minutes left, both coaches began planning for the two extra time periods, with Coach Reid adjusting his team to go 4-4-2 and Creighton Head Coach Elmar Bolowich adjusting his midfield to be more defensive. But just as Coach Bolowich got his plans to assistant Coach Johnny Torres, Creighton midfielder Timo Petter broke down UConn’s right side sending in a cross past UConn

right back Max Wasserman. The cross was over hit but Creighton’s Jose Gomez collected the ball on the left side on the six-yard box and fired in a cross back in the face of goal, where Creighton substitute forward Christian Blandon blasted it in off the crossbar and past an outstretched Andre Blake, giving Creighton the 1-0 lead. With just 90 seconds left, UConn had no choice but to throw all bodies forward and, despite a few flashes of hope, never really earned a clear-cut chance in the frantic final moments. With the loss UConn snapped a school record 38-match home unbeaten streak, third all time in NCAA history and left the seniors with an all time record of 59-13-14, outscoring teams 147-39 and winning the 2009 and 2012 BIG EAST Regular Season Championship.

KEVIN SCHELLER/The Daily Campus

Miles .eGrazia@UConn.edu

UConn junior midfielder George Fochive plays the ball in a recent playoff game at Joseph J. Morrone Stadium. The Huskies were eliminated from the postseason by Creighton.

Women’s basketball set to face Terps By Matt Stypulkoski Staff Writer

JESS CONDON/The Daily Campus

UConn center Stefanie Dolson looks to take a shot in a recent game against Colgate at the XL Center in Hartford.

The UConn women’s basketball team has cruised through the first six games of its schedule with a 48.7– point average margin of victory. But Monday night’s game will be their first against a top 10 opponent and should prove a tougher test for the No. 2 Huskies, as they welcome No. 10 Maryland to the XL Center. Coach Geno Auriemma thinks that raising the competition level will be a good thing for his team. “We’ve got enough players that have played in a lot of games and they know what’s coming next Monday and they know what’s coming next Thursday [against Penn State],” Auriemma said after his team’s game against Colgate Wednesday. “And they know it’s not going to be like it was [Wednesday] or like it was against

College of Charleston “It’s going to be different, and they know that. What sometimes people forget is that players welcome that.” In their only other game against a top 25 opponent, UConn rolled over No. 14 Purdue in a 91-57 rout at the Paradise Jam. The Terps are fresh off their own battle with a ranked opponent; a 90-71 win against No. 21 Nebraska on Wednesday night. But Maryland lost one of their starters, junior guard Laurin Mincy, for the season when she tore the ACL in her right knee. The Huskies, on the other hand, will be returning one of their starters to the lineup as Kaleena MosqueadeLewis has been cleared to play after sustaining a concussion on Nov. 25. One of the keys to the game should be the inside battle. Crashing the boards has been a strength of the Huskies so far this season; they’re outrebounding their opponents

by an average of 14.5 rebounds per game. But Maryland presents UConn with a different challenge, as they haven’t yet faced a team with their size. Six Terps are 6-foot-2 or taller, including 6-foot-7 senior Essence Townsend. The Huskies boast five players of at least that height. “Maryland is a great rebounding team, so we’re going to have to do a good job of being present in the paint,” said UConn junior center Stefanie Dolson. The game, which is a part of the annual Jimmy V Classic, will be shown on ESPN2, marking the first nationally televised contest of the year for the Huskies. Tip-off is set for 7 p.m. and can also be heard on WHUS and WTIC.

Matt.Stypulkoski@UConn.edu


The Daily Campus: December 3, 2012