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sweeps week: Cal loses two games during perilous road trip up north.

Source of feaR: Study locates the sites that control fear and anxiety within the brain.

THONG AND DANCE: Cal Performances hosts vibrant ‘Eonnagata.’ Established 1871. Independent Student Press Since 1971.

Berkeley, California

Monday, February 14, 2011

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Three Campus Varsity Teams Reinstated, Two Remain Cut by Emma Anderson and Jack Wang Three of the five athletic teams that had been slated to be cut will be preserved, UC Berkeley officials announced Friday, despite efforts to raise enough money to save all five teams. Rugby — which had been slated to become a varsity club sport — as well as women’s lacrosse and women’s gymnastics will remain varsity teams, while baseball and men’s gymnastics will not continue for the 2011-12 year because these teams did not raise sufficient funds, campus officials said. After Chancellor Robert Birgeneau announced in September that the five teams would be cut following financial strains and criticism of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics’s spending, supporters of the teams began seeking donations, aiming to reach the $25 million designated by the campus. According to UC Berkeley officials, the campus has received $12 million to $13 million in pledged donations from the organizers of efforts to reinstate the teams. Of those pledges, the campus is “confident” that $8 million will be available to support the teams, adding that the donations also give the campus assurance that the teams will be able to cover their costs for at least the next seven to 10 years. “This was always about our ability to fund the program,” said Athletic Director Sandy Barbour during a phonein press conference Friday morning. “This was about getting our expenses down to a point where we had a financial model that fit with what the university was providing us in terms of institutional support.” However, members of the athletics community said they were led to believe that the $25 million goal was set for the potential recovery of all teams on a long-term basis, not a partial reinstatement. Cal baseball coach David Esquer said the campus told him this morning that $8 million was required to save his team, a figure he had never heard before. “Quite honestly, we were led to believe that it was all or none,” Esquer said. “That’s what we were told, that was our goal. Our supporters and our leadership group — they were not out to save just Cal baseball. They were out to save all five sports.” Officials said baseball had raised about $1.5 million to $2 million and

would have needed about $10 million total. The combined funding raised for men’s and women’s gymnastics came to just under $1 million. Men’s gymnastics would have needed to raise an additional $4 million. The money currently raised by baseball and men’s gymnastics would have supported the teams for two years, but officials said they wanted a more long-term and sustainable plan. Though baseball and men’s gymnastics did not meet fundraising targets, Vice Chancellor Frank Yeary said the campus may consider reinstating the teams if they raise more money, but not for next year. Yeary serves on an advisory board for The Daily Californian that does not have control over editorial content. Concerns arose after the September announcement about how the campus would be able to comply with gender equity law Title IX if they went forward with eliminating the teams. Cutting the teams put Cal at risk of falling out of compliance with Title IX. The school did not meet the first prong of Title IX even before the cuts, which requires the male-to-female ratio of athletes to match that of overall campus enrollment. The second and third prongs respectively stipulate that a program must demonstrate a history of continual expansion for women’s sports or provide full and effective accommodation of the interests and abilities of women athletes. If the original plan in September to make cuts had been maintained, roster management would have been required for Cal to abide by the first prong. By not cutting any women’s teams, the campus remains in compliance with the law, but Barbour said if they had cut the teams, they would have expanded women’s rosters and reduced men’s. She added that the campus was aware of this when they made the announcement in September, although the exact figures for roster adjustments were uncertain. “That is a moving target in terms of the more women you have, the less men you have to manage,” Barbour said. “That is fluid up and down.” Some have questioned why the campus did not provide the opportunity for teams to raise money before making the decision last fall to cut them. Birgeneau said during the press conference that he had warned donors of the campus’s financial crisis over a year ago and that

>> athletics: Page 3

by Jack Wang Senior Staff Writer

Taryn Erhardt/staff

David Esquer, the head coach of Cal Baseball, speaks to his varsity men’s team about the campus’s latest decision to preserve certain sports cuts at Evans Diamond on Friday.

David Esquer has his realtor on speed dial. The Cal baseball coach was halfjoking, trying to lighten up the gravest news the program has ever faced, but it’s ONLINE VIDEO clear he’ll have Cal second baseman to start looking Tony Renda offers his elsewhere. When the reaction to athletic cuts. campus announced the reinstatement of rugby, lacrosse and women’s gymnastics last Friday, it conversely sealed the elimination of baseball and men’s gymnastics. The news was a surprise in at least one way: Teams had been under the impression that the possibility of saving themselves was an all-or-nothing proposition. They say they were never given an indication that there were individual goals set for each team, just the $25 million figure required as a grand sum for all five. A CSN Bay Area report a day earlier that all five sports were set to return also provided false optimism. “I sort of felt betrayed by the university, just because they said it was a sort of packaged deal,” said men’s gymnastics captain Daniel Geri. “They were either going to reinstate all five sports or reinstate none ... It was definitely a lot worse (than the initial announcement).” Initially reaching out to donors back in June, the team had begun their efforts when the cuts were only a low murmur. Now, it will end its season just short of its 100-year anniversary. Gymnasts have applied to schools such as Michigan and Stanford to keep their options open, all while working to make their last season their best. The baseball team, in its 118th year, faces the same challenges. Still, teams had hope as an official announcement neared in recent weeks. “A lot of my colleagues have said, ‘Well, we don’t want to recruit your players,’” Esquer said. “‘You’re coming back. There’s no way they’re going to uphold this. We don’t want a commitment from a player that’s eventually going to stay at Cal.’” The notification process appeared clouded as well. In September, members of the press heard news of the cuts before some of the players themselves. Last week, campus officials notified coaches in the morning, who subsequently

>> reactions: Page 7

A Jazzy Ending

adam romero/staff

A crowd of around 20 people gathered in front of Blake’s on Telegraph Saturday afternoon at a “wake,” mourning what many described as the end of an era. While some community members said the establishment, which closed Feb. 4, had changed drastically over its past 71 years of service — including what some said was a decline in food quality and a shift in the music scene — the crowd Saturday focused on celebrating its history. Berkeley resident Lynn Danielle Sugayan, 67, said she had been coming to Blake’s since she was a child and remembered celebrating her eighth birthday at the club, when owner Larry Blake gave her a cake with cap guns and sparklers. “Larry Blake’s was the real home where you could run into friends,” Sugayan said. “It was an atmosphere that you couldn’t beat.”

Other people in the crowd remembered Blake’s for the bands that played there. Richmond resident Ron Galen, a guitarist for the band the Spirit of ’29, which played in front of the boarded up club Saturday, said he listened to some of the best blues bands in his life at Blake’s. “There was always something happening at Blake’s,” Galen said. “Styles changed, music changed, but they always had good stuff.” Yet amid the music and reminiscent crowd, some felt that the change in the music scene was a shame and ultimately led to Blake’s closing. Steve Williams, a manager of Blake’s in the seventies, said both the city and the young music scene were to blame. “It’s like part of your body’s gone,” Williams said. “We grew up here, and this was an institution.” —Mary Susman


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On dailycal.org/blogs the Blogs These Boots Areâ&#x20AC;Ś It is a time for mourning for both tow-truck drivers and seekers-of-parking-spaces. It seems that instead of towing vehicles with excess parking tickets, cars will be given a â&#x20AC;&#x153;boot,â&#x20AC;? preventing them from driving off or ever freeing up that parking space ever again until the tickets are paid off. Because the parking situation in this city wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bad enough already.

clog.dailycal.org

Love Me Just Enough Blog.dailycal.org/ARTs Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day! Celebrate by planning a trip to see a queer production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marry Me a Little.â&#x20AC;? If musicals arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t your thing, the arts blog also has coverage of the latest in visual art and movie trailers.

Land of the Rising Crepe Sara Hayden this week explores Japanese street food, fashion and attitudes toward sex education. Between custard and cheesecake crepes and cell phone charm vibrators, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something for everyone.

Blog.dailycal.org/travel

Efforts to Establish New Goodwill RESEARCH & IDEAS Location Sparks Local Controversy Study Finds Sites That Control Fear and Anxiety in Human Brain by Jessica Gillotte Staff Writer

Amid contention from local business owners, Goodwill Industries of the Greater East Bay is looking to establish a new location on Solano Avenue in Berkeley, though a definitive plan to open may rest on the non-profitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to navigate the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permit process. Among other potential locations in the East Bay, Goodwillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s retail team is exploring two vacant spaces that comprise an 1831 Solano Ave. address. But whether or not the city will see a new store depends on many factors, including the potential consequences of the non-profit choosing to tear down the dividing walls between the two spaces. Allen Cain, executive director and events manager of Solano Avenue Association, said a Goodwill representative looked at a 5,000 square foot property previously occupied by World of Dance studio, an L-shaped lot that has been vacant for nearly six years. Goodwill applied for an operating permit for this location around six months ago, and it was approved by the city on the condition that the nonprofit establishes its donation station

You can send any comments, requests or cell phone charm vibrators to blog@dailycal.org.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the water: A group of UC Berkeley graduate students teamed up to create a cell phone notification program that tells residents of an Indian city when running water will be available.

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Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s op-ed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Responding to Sexual Violence at Cal,â&#x20AC;? misspelled the name of UC Berkeley. The Daily Californian regrets the error.

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contacts: office: 600 Eshleman Hall mail: P.O. Box 1949 Berkeley, CA 94701-0949 phone: (510) 548-8300 fax: (510) 849-2803 e-mail: dailycal@dailycal.org online: http://www.dailycal.org This publication is not an official publication of the University of California, but is published by an independent corporation using the name The Daily Californian pursuant to a license granted by the Regents of the University of California. Advertisements appearing in The Daily Californian reflect the views of the advertisers only. They are not an expression of editorial opinion or of the views of the staff. Opinions expressed in The Daily Californian by editors or columnists regarding candidates for political office or legislation are those of the editors or columnists, and are not those of the Independent Berkeleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;Student Publishing Co., Inc. Unsigned editorials are the collective opinion of the Senior Editorial Board. Reproduction in any form, whether in whole or in part, without written permission from the editor, is strictly prohibited. Š Copyright 2011. All rights reserved. Published Monday through Friday by The Independent Berkeley Student Publishing Co., Inc. The nonprofit IBSPC serves to support an editorially independent newsroom run by UC Berkeley students.

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corrections/clarifications:

inside the store and only accepts donations during its operating hours. After Front Row Video closed at the end of 2010 and vacated the property that filled out the L-shaped lot, Goodwill made a proposal to break down the dividing wall and combine the spaces into a single square area. Since the storefront of the World of Dance property is only about 10 feet wide, the combination of the two spaces would significantly expand the locationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visibility, Cain said. Should Goodwill choose to combine the two spaces, it would be â&#x20AC;&#x153;triggering a permit process that most would find unappealing,â&#x20AC;? Cain said. Before such a project could be approved, the city would have to provide ample opportunity for public discussion. To bypass the permit process but still occupy both spaces, Goodwill could preserve the dividing walls and operate out of both locations with two separate addresses, according to Cain. Cain said one of the points of contention among business owners with Goodwillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible opening is there are six clothing stores â&#x20AC;&#x201D; two of which sell used clothing for children â&#x20AC;&#x201D; within one block

>> Goodwill: Page 3

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 447182 The name of the business: KH Straps, street address 6509 Dana Street, Oakland, CA 94609, mailing address 6509 Dana Street, Oakland, CA 94609 is hereby registered by the following owners: Era Balestrieri, 6509 Dana Street, Oakland, CA 94609. This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant began to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on Jan. 15, 2011. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 25, 2011. KH Straps Publish: 1/31, 2/7, 2/14, 2/22/11 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 447100 The name of the business: Persuasive Pages, street address 6114 LaSalle Avenue #625, Oakland, CA 94611, mailing address 6114 LaSalle Avenue #625, Oakland, CA 94611 is hereby registered by the following owners: Sheila Chandrasekhar, 6114 LaSalle Avenue #625, Oakland, CA 94611. This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant began to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on Jan. 1, 2011. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on January 24, 2011. Persuasive Pages Publish: 1/31, 2/7, 2/14, 2/22/11 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/ are: Berkeley City Club The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 2315 Durant Ave Berkeley, CA 94704-1606 Type of license(s) applied for: 47 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; On-Sale General Eating Place Date of Filing Application: December 15, 2010 Publish: 2/7, 2/14, 2/22/11

Diane Rames, General Manager Dante Galan, Advertising Manager John Zsenai, Finance Manager Brad Aldridge, Production Manager Tom Ott, Tech Manager Jill Cowan, Staff Representative Karoun Kasraie, Online Manager Davey Cetina, Distribution Manager The Daily Californian strives for accuracy and fairness in the reporting of news. If a report is wrong or misleading, a request for a correction or clarification may be made.

Mn^l]Zr% Ma^=Zber<Zeb_hkgbZg The Daily Californian NEWS & LEGALS

Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSA-Purchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, 9th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 MANDATORY ON-SITE PRE-BID CONFERENCE N. County Project #CPP09C903100000 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Hazardous Materials Abatement and Interior Demolition, Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland, California, Wednesday, February 23, 2011, at 9:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2901 Peralta Oaks Court, Oakland, CA Attendance at the Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference is required Responses Due by 2:00 pm on March 10, 2011 County Contact: Jason Garrison at (510) 208-9520 or via email: jason.garrison@acgov.org Information regarding the above may be obtained at the Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. Publish 2/14/11 CNS-2040708#

by Adelyn Baxter Staff Writer

A recent study by UC Berkeley researchers in collaboration with researchers at the University of Cambridge reveals specific sites in the brain ONLINE PODCAST that control how humans develop, Adelyn Baxter provides and subsequent- a summary of the study ly overcome, fear on fear and anxiety. and anxiety. In a study published Thursday in the science journal Neuron the researchers presented their evidence that two separate conditions within the brain are key factors in whether people are more prone to develop fear and anxiety â&#x20AC;&#x201D; overactivity in the amygdala and underactivity in the ventral prefrontal cortex. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know quite a lot about the brain mechanisms involved in fear from looking at the brains of rats and people, but in this case we were trying to understand which of these mechanisms create a risk for the onset of anxiety,â&#x20AC;? said Sonia Bish-

DAILY CALIFORNIAN Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted at the Alameda County Social Services Agency, 2000 San Pablo Avenue, 4thFloor, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING/NORTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE Request for Proposals (RFP) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ES for Refugees, LEP CalWORKs, SA 2011/2012, Monday, February 28, 2011, 1:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Alameda County Social Services Agency, 2000 San Pablo Avenue, 3rd Floor, Berkeley Room, Oakland, CA NETWORKING/ SOUTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE Request for Proposals (RFP) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ES for Refugees, LEP CalWORKs, SA 2011/2012, Tuesday, March 01, 2011, 9:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Alameda County Social Services Agency, 24100 Amador Street, 2nd Floor, Poppy Room, Hayward, CA Responses Due by 3:00 pm on March 23, 2011 County Contact : John Tran at (510) 267-8632 or via email: Jtran@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. Publish 2/14/11 CNS-2041500# DAILY CALIFORNIAN Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSA-Technical Services Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, 9th Floor, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 MANDATORY PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE AND SITE VISIT SOUTH COUNTY Project #10020 Ashland Youth Center, Tuesday, February 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ashland Village Apartments, 1300 Kentwood Lane, San Leandro, CA MANDATORY PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE - NORTH COUNTY Project #10020 - Ashland Youth Center, Wednesday, February 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lakeside Plaza Building, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Room 1107, 11th Floor, Oakland, CA Attendance at the Mandatory PreProposal Conference is required. Responses Due by 2:00 pm on March 14, 2011 County Contact : Howard Johnson at (510) 208-9648 or via email: howard.johnson@ acgov.org Information regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. Publish 2/14/11 CNS-2041549# DAILY CALIFORNIAN Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSA-Purchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING/ NORTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #900803 for INMATE COMMISSARY, Tuesday, March 01, 2011, 2:00 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; General Services Agency, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Room 1107, 11th Floor, Oakland, CA NETWORKING/ SOUTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFP #900803 for INMATE COMMISSARY, Wednesday, March 02, 2011, 10:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Castro Valley Library, 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Chabot Room, Castro Valley, CA Responses Due

op, an assistant professor of psychology at UC Berkeley and the main author. The methods used by the researchers involved a classical conditioning experiment. Volunteers were shown computergenerated images of a person standing in one of the three rooms. In the first room, an ear-splitting scream would sound, preceded by the on-screen figure placing their hands over their ears prior to hearing the scream. The scream was not predicted in the second room, and it did not occur at all in the third. After conditioning participants to anticipate the scream in the first room, the other scenarios were also shown to test the participantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; responses. Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, oxygen levels in the brains of volunteers were monitored throughout the process in order to pinpoint the areas triggered by the stress-inducing scream. Researchers also kept track of subjectsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; physiological reactions to the stimulus by measuring the electrical conductance of the skin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the predictive context, the cue was

by 2:00 pm on March 30, 2011 County Contact : Ann Marie Romero (510) 208-9742 or via email: A n n M a r i e . R o m e r o @ a c g o v. o r g Attendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. Publish 2/14/11 CNS-2041564# DAILY CALIFORNIAN Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSA-Purchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING/ SOUTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFQ #900834 for Chip Seal Program Road Screening - Rock, Thursday, February 24, 2011, 10:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Public Works Agengy, 4825 Gleason Drive, Conference Room 410B, Dublin, CA NETWORKING/NORTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFQ #900834 for Chip Seal Program Road Screening - Rock, Friday, February 25, 2011, 2:00 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; General Services Agency, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Room 1105, 11th Floor, Oakland, CA Responses Due by 2:00 pm on April 1, 2011 County Contact: Kai Moore (510) 208-4882 or via email: kai.moore@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Non-mandatory. Specifications regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County GSA Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. Publish 2/14/11 CNS-2041920# DAILY CALIFORNIAN Trustee Sale No. 6815 Loan No. 20-204 Title Order No. 4702371 APN 053-1591-011 NOTICE OF TRUSTEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 04/14/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 03/07/2011 at 12:00PM, GOLDEN WEST FORECLOSURE SERVICE, INC. as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 04/26/2006 DOC#2006168024 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Alameda County, California, executed by: ADLAI KARIM, as Trustor, BRUCE HERMAN, TRUSTEE OF THE CLAY HERMAN REALTOR, INC, PROFIT SHARING PLAN FBO BRUCE HERMAN, AS TO AN UNDIVIDED 200,000/400,000 INTEREST; LETHA N. SMALL, TRUSTEE OF THE SMALL FAMILY TRUST DATED 10-10-91, AS TO AN UNDIVIDED 100,000/400,000 INTEREST; NANNETTE MOFFETT, TRUSTEE OF THE MOFFETT LIVING TRUST, AS TO AN UNDIVIDED 100,000/400,000 INTEREST, as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful

>> Brain: Page 3 money of the United States, by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). AT THE FALLON STREET EMERGENCY EXIT TO THE ALAMEDA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1225 FALLON STREET, OAKLAND, CA, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California describing the land therein: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST. A.P.N. 053-1591-011 The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2047 ASHBY AVENUE, BERKELEY, CA 94703. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $381,532.63 (Estimated) Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. The undersigned mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent for the mortgagee or beneficiary pursuant to California Civil Code § 2923.5(b)(c) declares that the loan which is the subject of this notice is not subject to the provisions of California Civil Code § 2923.5. Regarding the property that is the subject of this notice of sale, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;mortgage loan servicerâ&#x20AC;? as defined in Civil Code § 2923.53(k)(3) declares that it has not obtained from the Commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Civil Code section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date this notice of sale is recorded. The time frame for giving a notice of sale specified in Civil Code Section 2923.52 subdivision (a) does not apply to this notice of sale pursuant to Civil Code Sections 2923.52 or 2923.55. DATE: 2/9/11 GOLDEN WEST FORECLOSURE SERVICE, INC., AS TRUSTEE 805 Veterans Blvd., Suite 218, Redwood City, CA 94063-1736 (650) 369-2150 (Phone), (916) 939-0772 TRUSTEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALE INFORMATION By: Michael D. Orth, Secretary NPP0175504 PUB: 02/14, 02/22, 02/28/11


OPINION, NEWS & MARKETPLACE

A New Egypt, a New World

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here won’t many days in your lifetime when you will look at the news and find millions of people celebrating. Friday, Feb. 11, was one of those days. A few weeks ago, I wrote a column expressing my amazement at the news from Lebanon, Palestine and Tunisia. Now, the story is Egypt, Egypt, Egypt. It turns out that regular people do have agency, that there is a limit to the power of money, military might, intimidation and state terror. On Feb. 11, with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s resignation, everything changed for Egypt, for the Middle East and for the world. It’s a few days later now, and everybody is wonderfully confused. The U.S. government didn’t know how to handle this revolution, and now the U.S. media doesn’t know how to report it. And the beautiful thing is this: It didn’t matter what the U.S. wanted. It doesn’t matter what the press is saying. As blogger and CSU professor As’ad AbuKhalil explained to a crowd of Berkeley students the night before Mubarak fell, some events in history demand not to be viewed through the lens of U.S. interests. It’s unfortunate that some are so quick to diminish this unbelievable victory. It is as if the key to sounding intelligent on TV in America is to reveal a deep cynicism, an omniscient knowledge that only bad news comes out of the Middle East. Americans don’t know how to handle good news for Arabs, for Muslims. It’s so much simpler to feel afraid of this revolution. Stephen Colbert summed the feeling up a week ago: “What about the Muslim Brotherhood? I hear that name. I know nothing about them — but I am terrified.” Unfortunately for Glenn Beck and his predictions of a coming caliphate (among his 31 flavors of the Islamic apocalypse), the Muslim Brotherhood were not even close to leading this revolution, and they have said they will not run a candidate for president. So is it a military takeover? The military has said they will honor (most of) the demands of the protesters. But if they don’t keep their promise — well, we can see now what Egyptians can do when they don’t get what they want. Another gem of U.S. coverage — the unrest will drive up gas prices as much as 10 cents a gallon! Oh, sweet mother of pearl! (I wish I were making this up.) o there are skeptics. Let’s ignore them for now. Either they are on TV, being paid to be skeptical, or they don’t understand that the Egyptians have already achieved the unthinkable. It’s tempting to look for individual heroic characters in this remarkable story. Asmaa Mahfouz could be that hero, the 26-year old woman who put out a YouTube video (at great personal risk) calling for people to join her on

S

ONLINE PODCAST Hannah expands upon the recent occurrences in Egypt.

HANNAH JEWELL

Jan. 25, the first day of the movement in Egypt. Or Wael Ghonim, the Google executive who was detained by the secret police but returned to the streets and became an inspirational figure. “If you want to liberate a society,” Ghonim told CNN, “just give them the Internet.” The story is beginning to emerge about how Ghonim and other young leaders birthed and guided this revolution from behind the scenes. Someone call Hollywood and get Aaron Sorkin on the line, I smell a blockbuster. It’s inspiring to watch people like Mahfouz and Ghonim and bask in their mystical heroism. But it is more inspiring to conceive of this revolution as one not guided by any single defining personality. This was the work of millions of people, crossing boundaries of age, class and creed to form a single voice of resistance. ere’s what I plan to do now: absolutely nothing. The Arab people are doing this themselves, which is exactly how it should be. I hope that Americans will lose their discomfort over not being in charge of a situation. There’s not much more to say. Trying to predict what happens next is mere speculation. So instead we must celebrate. We must drink mint tea and listen to the songs of Umm Kulthum, Egyptian diva of a bygone era. Rather than asking “what next,” trying to guess how long it will take for the Egyptians to plunge themselves into chaos and despair, we should ask, “where next?” Algeria? Yemen? Names of Arab countries are flooding the tweet-osphere, accompanied by hash tags marking their own coming revolutions (Libya is Feb. 17). How wonderful it must be to be Egyptian now and to know that people around the world are pointing to their victory as proof that change is possible under impossible circumstances. And what about us, here in Berkeley? How will we be inspired by Egypt?

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Sit back and watch the world change with Hannah at hjewell@dailycal.org.

goodwill: Many Businesses Oppose Proposed Store from page 2

of the proposed location. Although Cain said the litmus shows the majority of businesses currently on Solano would not be in favor of Goodwill moving to the avenue, Kimberly Scrafano, vice president of development and community affairs for Goodwill Industries of the Greater East Bay, said people who oppose the potential opening may not be familiar with the non-profit’s mission and purpose — to serve as a training place for people who “might be coming off of welfare, coming out of prison, and they’ve never worked before,” she said. Some business owners voiced their concerns that Goodwill may attract a different consumer base than the com-

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mercial strip is accustomed to. “I don’t think Goodwill will promote more business, per se,” said Christine Mewha, owner of Sotto Voce, a women’s clothing store in the adjacent building. “A lot of homeless people come through — they go through (the donations), and that’s why there’s debris left all over the street.” However, some local business owners, such as Hannah Hernandez of Hannah’s Children’s Resale — a children’s used clothing store a couple of buildings down from the proposed Goodwill location — said Goodwill may bring direct and timely benefits to the economically unstable commercial area. “I am kind of supportive of anything

brain: Study Could Be Applied to Anxiety Disorders from page 2

always predictive of the scream,” said Anwar Nunez-Elizalde, a 2008 UC Berkeley alumnus and current research assistant at UC Berkeley who assisted Bishop in analyzing the data, in an e-mail. “In the unpredictive context, the cue is never predictive of the scream; the scream happens randomly during the duration of the unpredictive context. In the safe room, there is never a scream, so people know it is safe. The context predicts safety in this case.” FMRI scans were taken in Cambridge while the analysis of the data was carried out at UC Berkeley. Higher levels of oxygen in certain areas allowed researchers to pinpoint the location of stress-related activity.

athletics: Coach Decries

Method of Campus Cuts from front

they would need more funding. “My message engendered essentially no response for an entire year,” he said. “Until the actual reality was on the table, we didn’t get this wonderful response that we’ve gotten now ... These sports had a full year in which to raise funds.” However, team members said they did not receive the same message. “In no direct terms was baseball ever pointed out that, ‘Hey listen, there’s some problems here that could come down the road to sports being cut and you in particular,’” Esquer said. “Yeah, there were general messages, but there were no red flags raised to any sports. No development officers came to us and said, ‘Hey, there’s a problem here.’ ... I think it wasn’t specific enough. At least, it didn’t trickle down to the head coach of the baseball team.” Contact Emma Anderson and Jack Wang at newsdesk@dailycal.org.

It’s Career Day, every day.

Monday, February 14, 2011

The Daily Californian

The findings of the study conclude that heightened activity in the amygdala — the part of the brain that controls the response to fear — leads to the development of fear. At the same time, failure to activate the ventral prefrontal cortex — which enables the brain to overcome fear and anxiety through the process of regulation — can hinder an individual’s ability to conquer a conditioned fear. Participants who were able to utilize both of these areas during the experiment were most successful in overcoming the conditioned fear response. “Put another way, the differences in levels of activity in these two areas do a good job at predicting our subjects’ anxiety levels,” Nunez-Elizalde said. Millions of people suffer from anxiety disorders ranging from OCD to

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that gets rid of all of our vacant space,” she said. “I sell used clothes, but I think I provide a different service than Goodwill does — I welcome them.” Typically, when a new Goodwill location opens, between eight and 13 job positions become available in the community, according to Scrafano. Cain said members of the Solano Avenue Association will be polled this week about whether or not they are in favor of Goodwill’s potential move-in. The majority decision will be released by the end of February or the middle of March, according to Cain. Neetu Puranikmath of The Daily Californian contributed to this report. Jessica Gillotte is the lead business reporter. Contact her at jgillotte@dailycal.org.

post-traumatic stress disorder. Bishop said she hopes this research will provide insight into better treatment for people with these afflictions. By monitoring these two areas, scientists can predict the likelihood of success of a given treatment within an individual. “This may eventually help us to determine why some people respond to cognitive therapy while others do better with drug therapy,” Bishop said. Contact Adelyn Baxter at abaxter@dailycal.org.

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Five Promising Works Vie for the Academy Award for Live Action Short at the Upcoming Oscars. by Jawad Qadir Staff Writer

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Crus

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he Crush” recaptures those embarrassing infatuations some of us had on our teachers during our elementary school days. Set in Ireland, the film follows eight-year old Ardal, who yearns for the affection of his second-grade teacher — only to learn that she’s engaged to someone he dubs a “dickhead.” Unwilling to witness her impending mistake, Ardal sets out to prove that she deserves someone better by testing the fiancee’s courage with a duel. Of course, Ardal isn’t your normal eightyear-old. He lacks the shyness that many children his age exhibit, and displays his quick wit and penchant for debate. Much of this can be attributed to writerdirector Michael Creagh’s witty screenplay and a subdued performance from the young star of the film. “The Crush” illustrates the emergence of a technically solid filmmaker. It’s just too bad it all ends in a cliche that most audiences can easily predict.

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Na W

G od

e of Lov

ritten by, directed by and starring Luke Matheny, “God of Love” comically explores the problems of unrequited love. Ray ­— a dart-throwing lounge singer — finds himself hopelessly in love with the drummer of his band, Kelly. The only problem is that she’s got her heart set on Ray’s best friend, Fozzie. After calling on God for over a year, Luke’s prayers are finally answered. He receives a box of magic darts, which will force any woman he chooses to fall in love with the first person she sees. The catch is that the effect only lasts for six hours. Although he utilizes a gimmick that can often be seen in other student films, Matheny sets “God of Love” apart with impressive camerawork and stark black-and-white images. He employs the use of moving long takes, allowing the viewer to build an organic relationship with the exaggerated characters and their over-the-top world.

ewe

Confes

sion

anel Toom’s “The Confession” centers on the Catholic upbringing of two nine-year-old boys as they nervously prepare for their first formal penance. Sam acts as the moral compass of the friendship, whereas Jacob represents the immoral and dangerous behavior that can become habitual at such an early age. Unfortunately for naive Sam, this resolute virtue means that he'll have nothing to confess, and cannot be considered a practicing Catholic. Thus, in order to earn some sins, the two boys devise a seemingly innocent prank that leads to the death of three innocent people. At this point, what originally starts off as an innocent and fun-spirited look at the drastically different moralities of the pair quickly transforms into a seriously bleak examination of murder and deception. Fast-paced dialogue and bike rides through the sunny countryside are literally replaced by cloudy overcast skies and silence, leaving the viewer somewhat bewildered.

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argely seen as the favorite to win the Oscar this year, “Na Wewe” focuses on the social upheaval brought on by the Rwandan Genocide. Films that gravitate towards political issues have a way of swaying Oscar voters in their favor. This tendency is especially true when moral judgments have already been made and no one runs the risk of being controversial. The story revolves around a group of Rwandan travelers who are pulled over by militiamen and separated according to ethnic classification. We’ve all seen this scene a hundred times before in movies that deal with the Holocaust or genocide in general. However, “Na Wewe” breaks away from most politically-charged films by illustrating a universal element of ethnic genocide without feeling the need to preach about the obvious horrors of violence. Instead, the film is more of a practice in the art of building, maintaining and releasing tension.

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Jawad Qadir is the lead film critic. Contact him at jqadir@dailycal.org.

143 Wish

ish 143” revolves around a 16-year-old terminally ill cancer patient, who’s given the opportunity from a charitable foundation to wish for anything he wants. As with any quirky comedy, he takes the unconventional route by wishing to have sex for the first time. Of course, his request is denied, but that doesn’t stop him from pursuing it on his own. The film attempts to pull on your heart strings, while also serving as a schmaltzy public service announcement about love and sex. The execution is all technically fine, and bright moments of genuine emotion definitely present themselves. About halfway through, however, one can’t help but feel trapped in another predictable rudimentary story, where the directing also seems to be on cruise-control.

Duels and Dualities Take Precedence in Cal Performance Show ‘Eonnagata’ by David Getman Staff Writer

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or his Fall 2009 Collection, Alexander McQueen’s models circled an industrial trash heap on a catwalk of shattered glass, their lips absurdly swollen and stained a ghastly crimson. McQueen’s shows and pieces always had a flair of spectacle, yet they were never orchestrated at the cost of thoughtfulness or simply for the sake of being provocative. His body of work challenged conventions of the human form and of beauty. Yet it seemed that his pieces sometimes stood dormant, hanging on rail-thin models who staggered in torturous heels that were structurally striking but so difficult to walk in that he was routinely accused of misogyny.

&Entertainment >> EONNAGATA: Page 5

Arts

the daily Californian

2.14.2011

erick labbe/courtesy

by Hannah Jewell Senior Staff Writer

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heatre Rhinoceros’ production of Stephen Sondheim’s “Marry Me a Little” has a lesson in it for the “loose” men and women of the world. The players and womanizers and harlots; the libertine men and scarlet women. The sluts. The lesson is this: You can be shamelessly lascivious and gratuitous while maintaining an air of sweetness and tact. Under the direction of John Fisher, San Francisco’s own queer theater company has somehow managed this feat: to put on a show that includes (but is not limited to) onstage blow jobs and frequent air-humping, but that somehow leaves its audience with a feeling of “Aw, that’s so … that was really nice.” For all its unabashed horniness, “Marry Me a Little” keeps up its reputation as a sweet little thing. (Full disclosure: I, the author, am being co-directed in another play by this show’s assistant director, Keshuv Prasad.) Perhaps its small size — a little theater with a little cast and a short running time — is what leaves the audience feeling warm and fuzzy. Or maybe that’s the feeling left over from when actor Caleb Draper physically caresses several audience members. In any case, this is not the “big gay musical” of the year. It’s not even technically a musical — “Marry Me a Little” is actually a revue, a collection of songs spanning Sondheim’s long career, many of which were discarded. They were originally strung together by Craig Lucas and Norman Rene to create a dialogue-free storyline about the trials of two single people trying to be in love. Theatre Rhinoceros is imitating a Los Angeles same-sex production, but with a politicized twist. Fisher mixes parts of the musical with news

images of the same-sex marriage debate and Gavin Newsom, he of the perfectly-molded hair and heart of gold. These happy scenes accompany optimistic love songs, while pessimistic ones are framed by footage of various Yes-on-8 villains. Just two-and-a-half characters grace the stage, with Caleb Draper as Ben and Bill Fahrner as Mark, and the occasional participation of the pianist, Tom Orr. Orr deserves a tip of the hat for his ability to keep playing the score despite flirtation from the other characters and much spinning-about of his piano. Other notable moments include Fahrner’s expressive rendition of the title song, standing simply by the piano. The titular song is followed by Draper singing “Happily Ever After,” in which Ben expresses his doubts about the happily-ever-after narrative of love and marriage, despite having just proposed to Mark. Because the show includes no dialogue, relying instead on pantomime to weave together technically unrelated songs, it’s easy to become confused about who’s mad at whom — and why. This isn’t much of a distraction, however, as each song can be appreciated in its own right while only somewhat carrying the plot along. Draper and Fahrner’s voices entwine as naturally as their bodies do onstage, repeatedly. It’s hard not to wonder if these songs intended as duets for a man and a woman don’t sound better with two male voices. You know, like God intended. Is this show camp? Allow me to answer with another question: Does a bear shit in the woods? Expect to see jazz hands, flashy smiles, exaggerated reactions, corny Sondheim lyrics, the works. But fear not, “Marry Me a Little” avoids feeling gimmicky. Because throughout the show, “Marry Me a Little” is not a “gay love story”—it’s just a love story. Blow on that. Hannah Jewell is the lead theater critic. Contact her at hjewell@dailycal.org.

Gratuity Meets Tact In Theatre Rhinoceros’ New Musical Revue, ‘Marry Me a Little’

KENT TAYLOR/COURTESY


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT The Daily Californian

Monday, February 14, 2011 

album review

eonnagata: Dance-Theater Hybrid Displays Intriguing Form from PAGE 4 “Eonnagata,” a dance-theater fusion costumed by the designer and staged days before the anniversary of his death, is the perfect coda to the career of one of the greatest fashion visionaries of our time: These are the bodies that were meant to fill McQueen’s masterpieces, and this is the way they were meant to move. Though not explicitly a McQueen tribute piece, the production conveys the spirit that pervaded his work. It explores fascinating dualities with a dark playfulness — mainly those between the sexes, but also between ancient eastern and western traditions, the past and future, identity and ambiguity. Presented by Cal Performances and performed by Ex Machina, “Eonnagata” delves into the history of 18th century cross-dressing spy Chevalier d’Eon and makes diplomatic intrigue so sensual that WikiLeaks and its scandals are positively tame in comparison. D’Eon transitions seamlessly from male to female, and so it is fitting that the role is alternately played by Sylvie Guillem, director Robert Lepage and choreographer Russell Maliphant. “Eonnagata” stages the precarious interactions of the spy and is cut into sequences of monologue and dance, ranging from onnagata (a kabuki form in which men pose as women) to classical ballet. Sylvie Guillem’s movements are wonderfully fluid and assured. Her body is so expertly sculpted as to be androgynous. Her moves defy perceived limits of the human form as she transitions from the vernacular to classical ballet, from kabuki movements to martial arts. This versatility also reflects upon the spy, who perfectly navigates gender poles. In one scene, Guillem and her counterpart writhe in front

of a series of mirrors, so that century staples like the farwe see an enchanting symmethingale, frock coat and even try between man and woman kimonos, by drawing clear aland the optical illusion that lusions to the silhouettes that they are one body. In another, pervaded his past collections. Russell Maliphant (who looks Mainly, these changes are like a more limber Lord shown through his fixation Voldemort) emerges from the on absurdly exaggerated hips folds of what had been a roand billowing fabrics that tating gigantic bunraku doll. flare outward from the loins, He controls and dances with designs that resonate with the the structure until his next production’s gender themes. sequence, in which he joins The show’s imperial-red Guillem in sexually charged satin capes and impeccably ballet. These erotic scenes tailored coats nod to Mcare juxtaposed with those of Queen's Fall 2008 Collection, martial arts fighting the billowy cap and more playful syn- Sylvie Guillem’s sleeves to his Spring chronized dances that 2009 Collection, the use wooden tables movements are Japanese costumes as frames, balance to his couture work wonderfully with Givenchy. beams, and stages. Occasionally, there The most striking fluid and are monologue interpieces of the show ludes that sketch the assured. Her are the skin-colored historical background body suits of the of the dance sequencdancers, which body is so es. These moments of have artfully placed expertly sculpt- lines that draw the (for example) letters read between d’Eon to the genitals, ed as to be eye and Louis XV, are perhaps inspired by witty and not too morbid androgynous. McQueen’s esoteric. The country fascination with the of Russia is notably skeleton. The desexualized as a “she,” and we signer interprets the farthinchuckle when the spy is told gale as an elastically moving to “Man up!” form always at the whim of Yet this transition from the dancer’s body: a woven spoken word to dance can be skirt at one moment, a second jarring because of the odd later snapping back into interplay between more abwhat resembles a structured stract dances and more literal birdcage. The costume itself anecdotal monologues, and becomes a performer. vice versa. This sometimes With these costumes as comes at the cost of cohesion, aids, the dancers must wordbut it is easy to just enjoy the lessly convey which sex they vignettes and then fall back are embodying in a particular into the moments of dance. scene, which is fascinating At times, the dancer’s to behold. “Eonnagata” is movements don’t perfectly truly transcendent because it sync up with the percussive manages to express its themes soundtrack of the production, of gender perception subtly and this can be distracting, — through dance, dancer, especially amid the electronic dialogue, and costume — clangs of waving Japanese and unfolds into a tribute to swords. But perhaps d’Eon the visions of Mr. McQueen had troubles manipulating himself. his voice too. In terms of costumes, See David’s sculpted body McQueen interprets 18th at dgetman@dailycal.org.

album review

Bright Eyes THE PEOPLE’S KEY [Saddle Creek]

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coff all you want, but the Bright Eyes album Fevers and Mirrors stole my heart at 13 in a way that no other album ever will. I basically built a shrine to it, only to grow ONLINE PODCAST up and watch Conor Erin Donaldson reflects Oberst make mediocre country music. Alas, like on Bright Eyes’ latest a heartbroken schoolgirl studio album. attempting to reignite an old flame, I approached the final Bright Eyes album with caution. I was pleasantly surprised, however, to discover a matured return to their melancholy roots. The People’s Key meshes the best qualities of each of Oberst’s past projects into something that fans and foes alike can appreciate. The People’s Key is essentially the sequel to Fevers and Mirrors. Fevers and Mirrors was the tale of a self-deprecating adolescent boy trying to escape the shackles of suburbia, and The People’s Key is the memoir he shares after his return from sabbatical. He sings of loneliness and a lack of unconditional love and criticizes the futile search for spiritual guidance. It seems his quest for self-realization has left him empty-handed, only craving the love and simplicity of the home he was once so eager to get away from. In this regard, The People’s Key is Oberst’s own apology for being such a smug, pretentious teenager. What is most impressive about the album, though, is its stylistic maturity. Predictable crooning over acoustic guitar has been replaced with rich peddle-steel guitar and catchy pop rock. Though his recent ventures into country music lacked creativity and seemed a bit forced, his work alongside other established musicians appears to have been a valuable learning experience. Bright Eyes has thus far been engaged with Oberst’s youth, and now with The People’s Key we finally watch him grow up. ­— Erin Donaldson

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PJ Harvey LET ENGLAND SHAKE [Vagrant Records]

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J Harvey’s eighth studio album Let England Shake is certainly the singer/songwriter’s most politically minded to date, yet such an exclamation does not take away from ONLINE PODCAST its accessibility. Still, she Ryan Lattanzio weighs doesn’t let up on the poin on tracks from PJ etry of war and violence. Harvey's new album. A transgressive ’90s rock icon, Harvey has since rounded the corners and softened the edges, but she remains a commanding presence. Simply put, there’s no one like her. From the start, England’s got her trademark spooky style down pat. The beachfronts and battleships here are ethereal, too. The songwriting is top-notch: Standout track “The Glorious Land” is a battle dirge. Its percussion sounds like armor clanging as you’re trudging through a war zone. Even a trumpet sneaks its way in. “The Words That Maketh Murder” boasts Harvey’s sliding vocal register, that almost-yodel she’s so good at. In “On Battleship Hill,” she lets it all out, singing from a mountain of alt-fem-rock. “All and Everyone,” the album’s conceptual centerfold, recalls vintage PJ, that warbling waif of Rid of Me (1993) and To Bring You My Love (1995). It’s as if the track was recorded in the most depressing bathroom ever. The lyrics are like the callow diary entries of a schoolgirl trying her hand at poetry — “A bank of red earth, dripping down/Death is now” — but it works for her. Though saying so does a disservice to the album’s grand ambition, it must be noted that Let England Shake is short. Most songs clock in around three minutes, so it never feels like you’re trying to “get through” this album. Harvey prefers precise melodies to rambling and rollicking, but like always, there’s still the rocking-out. This may be just another PJ Harvey album, but England is the rare case where that’s a good thing. ­— Ryan Lattanzio


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Monday, February 14, 2011

The Daily Californian

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Welcome to the weekly full-page from the Associated Students of the University of California (ASUC)! The ASUC is your student government here to serve you. If you have an upcoming ASUC event that you want publicized fill out the form: http://tiny.cc/asuceventform. Add the official ASUC Facebook page for upcoming events sponsored by the ASUC: http://tiny.cc/facebookasuc.

Don’t miss TEDx at Berkeley! This Saturday, February 19, from 10am-7pm, 1400 remarkable people will gather at Zellerbach Hall for a full-day immersion of TEDtalks and live presentations by some of the Bay Area’s most accomplished people. TED is an annual event where some of the world’s leading thinkers and doers are invited to share what they are most passionate about. “TED” stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design – three broad subject areas that are, collectively, shaping our future. All potential attendees must first apply. Go to http://tedxberkeley.org for ticket prices and to apply. Looking for a summer job or internship? The Internship and Summer Job Fair is a great way to network with employers and get yourself noticed! Come to Pauley Ballroom on the 3rd floor of the MLK Student Union from 12-4 on Thursday, February 17th. The Undergraduate Political Science Association will be hosting a forum on abortion Wednesday, February 16th, from 7-8pm in 202 Barrows. Come by and express your opinion on the topic and possibly learn from your peers. UPSA Political Forums are a fruitful way to meet new politically minded people and acquire new knowledge about a subject. Food will be provided.

Students in the Interdisciplinary Human Rights Minor are partnering with madécasse and the Student Food Cooperative to sell slave-free chocolate on Sproul Plaza on Monday, February 14th, from 10am-2pm. Join the movement and pick up some sweets for your Valentine! The Nikkei Student Union is hosting a Day of Remembrance education program on Thursday, February 17, from 6:30-9:30pm in 200 MLK Student Union to honor the incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, as well as the struggles of those who fought for the civil rights of the Japanese. This program is co-hosted by the Muslim Student Association and parallels the history of Japanese American Internment.

Ready to run for the 2011 ASUC Elections? Become a Candidate first by filing your application during the Filing Period! Applications are out already and can be submitted Feb 28th to Mar 11th. Find the application and more info on our Facebook Page: 2011 ASUC Elections. A Day in the Life is a program that provides Cal students with the opportunity to shadow a professor or administrator for a day. The intention of A Day in the Life is to allow students to experience university life through the perspective of our faculty members and to bridge the gap in student-faculty relations here at Cal. Apply at asuc.org and click on "get involved." Email Nanxi Liu at evp@asuc.org for more any questions.

The 10th Annual Perspectives Multicultural Showcase is this Friday, February 18th in Pauley Ballroom, MLK at 8pm. Watch performance groups from across campus demonstrate how talented students are at Cal!

Kevin Huynh is the founder of the Common Camera Project, a social art project that distributes hundreds of disposable cameras in a take-a-pic-and-pass-it-on campaign in search of inspiration. Common Cam has introduced 300+ disposable cams that are now in circulation around the world. The cameras! journeys can be viewed at www.commoncam.org. Name: Kevin Huynh Major: Mechanical Engineering Hometown: Niwot, CO Favorite place to eat in Berkeley: Cheeseboard Favorite movie: Either Pitch Black or The Pacifier Favorite class taken at Cal: Breakdancing Decal If you could have any superpower: Open doors without touching them. The ASUC wants to acknowledge student leaders on campus. If you or a friend are interested in being spotlighted email mcd@asuc.org.


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SPORTS The Daily Californian

Monday, February 14, 2011 

Ariotoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Absence Alters Arizona Tourney Sunday. Calâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three runs secured in the first two innings forced strong defensive All-American pitcher and first base- play for the rest of the game. Accordman Valerie Arioto was not on the field ing to sophomore pitcher Jolene Henfielding balls and hitting home runs derson, it was a fight to stay on top in every inning. for the Cal softball The Bearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; win came after Texas Tech team this weekend. Softball cut short their dreams of a perfect preInstead, she was Cal 3 season in a 5-4 decision on Saturday. DUMMY Ma^=Zber<Zeb_hkgbZg taking stats on the Indiana 0 The Red Raiders capitalized on mosideline due to a leg mentum in the fifth inning, securing all injury. Catcher Lindsey Ziegenhirt agreed of their runs off of blooper hits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was one of those games where we that Ariotoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s void played a role in the No. 12 Bearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 3-1 weekend performance were going, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Ziegenhirt said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hitting Jolene well at the Kajikawa Classic in Tempe, Ariz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was the first game that we but when they did, it was in the soft played without her,â&#x20AC;? Ziegenhirt said. places on the field â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the awkward placâ&#x20AC;&#x153;She is a key to both offense and defense. es. Nothing was going our way.â&#x20AC;? Up three runs, Texas Techâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jordan We were practicing without her, but we Palmer and Emily Bledsoe scored off hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t played a game without her.â&#x20AC;? The four-game slate resulted in a roll- Logan Hallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advance to second on an er coaster ride with a blowout, two shut- error to cap the five-run inning. Cal crawled back in the sixth with outs and a loss. According to Ziegenhirt, the last two games featured the highest four runs. Freshman shortstop Britt caliber of competition, comparable to Vonk led off with a walk to plate the first runner for the team. that of the Pac-10 or postseason. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Getting (Vonk) on was key,â&#x20AC;? ZiegenTo close the chapter on the weekend, the Bears played a tight game with In- hirt said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shut down because diana, shutting the Hoosiers out 3-0 on we still had chances.â&#x20AC;?

by Kelly Suckow

# 2 Staff Writer

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M. HOOPS: Thompson Held in Check in Victory from Back

proved his usually suspect 53-percent free throw shooting, sinking seven of figures. nine freebies, in his longest outing Cal effectively limited star Klay since December 19th. Thompson, who torched the Bears for Though the Bears managed to hold 36 points when he came to Haas Pavil- both starters Marcus Capers and Abe ion, holding the star junior to 13 points. Lodwick scoreless, Washington State To make up for Thompsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s limited received significant bench contribuproduction, four other Washington tions from both Motum and Faisal State players scored in double figures Aden, who chipped in 18 points. and put in the rest of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s points. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all fought very hard, and put ourselves in a position to win,â&#x20AC;? PowThe leader in the five-player opera-Mankl]Zr%FZr,%+))0 tion was Motum, who has shown tre- ers said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were just worn out by the mendous promise in his second year end. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll recuperate here in Berkeley, in Pullman. The Brisbane, Australia itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for us to come back and renative is shooting 65-percent from the charge the batteries.â&#x20AC;? floor and has become as a solid reserve Gabriel Baumgaertner covers menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for coach Ken Boneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s squad. Motum basketball. Contact him at shot 60-percent from the floor and im- gbaumgaertner@dailycal.org.

W. HOOPS: Free Throw Shooting Off Target for Cal from back

the pass.â&#x20AC;? Washington State guard April Cook was at the free throw line with 3:09 to go and a 62-62 score. After draining the first shot, she missed the second, Kelly Suckow covers softball. Conact but teammate Carly Noyes grabbed the her at ksuckow@dailycal.org. offensive rebound and laid in the putback to complete the unconventional 3-point play. West Coast after the cuts â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but basePoint guard Layshia Clarendon ball holds more promise. scored a layup to cut the deficit to one Save Cal Sports is disputing the point and center Talia Caldwell was tions right now,â&#x20AC;? said womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gymschoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fundraising figures for baseball fouled on Calâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next offensive possesnastics coach Cari DuBois. I am so and appears ready to pursue further ac- sion but the sophomore missed both of happy that there is the opportunity for tion. There also isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a history of base- her free throws. The Bears were 12-forfuture young girls to come to Cal and ball programs folding, as there is for 21 overall from the charity stripe. compete while attending one of the nagymnastics, and Cal will be left as the Besides the free throw shooting, tionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top academic institutions. At the only Pac-10 school without a squad. Boyle pointed to the fact that Cal fouled same time, it saddens me that all five ACROSS â&#x20AC;&#x153;To be honest, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Washington State (8-17, 6-7) on every 13. Kennedy and Koppel programs are not coming back.â&#x20AC;? going to be writing the obituary of possession in the last two minutes. Yet 1. Subject Evans Diamond still stands in the 19. Garlic eater!s giveaway Cal baseball at this time,â&#x20AC;? Esquer said. there were defensive lapses throughout 6. Beverage southwest corner of campus, and the T R A 22. Grant to â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is obviously a huge setback, but I permission the game. administration does not have plans 10. Paper-shredder? continue to believe that at 24. someCelebrity point â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we need to be talking more,â&#x20AC;? E R E C to dismantle the 78-year-old stadium. 14. Shame in time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; maybe not in my time here Clarendon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we know what 25. Distressful sounds The potential restoration of the two F I S H Cal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but there will be Cal baseball we are supposed to do to match up, but 15. Feminine atname sports in as quickly as two years also 26. 10th-century explorer again. I believe that.â&#x20AC;? O T E we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say it. We seem T to disconnect Abnormal chest sound exists. That possibility 16. appears grim 27. Bags and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t talk enough and just assume for menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gymnastics â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 17. only CafĂŠ Stanford __; latte variation Jack Wang is the sports editor. Contact 28. Group attitudes we all know what we are supposed to be will still maintain a program on the him at jwang@dailycal.org. 18. Dozed S P A

1reactions: 7 Future Return of Baseball Possible 1 from front 7 3 2 3 6 9 1 27 4 2 8 87 relayed the message to their team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To make this kind of announcement again, (they are) not dealing with the kids directly on it,â&#x20AC;? said Ann Flemer, one of the leaders of the Save Cal Sports campaign and mother of pitcher and first baseman Matt Flemer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They again got an e-mail letter saying â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh, bittersweet result. Saving three of you. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re # 2getting rid of two.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right.â&#x20AC;? The bright side, of course, is that some sports are still retained for the forseeable future, but even those teams feel some ambivalence. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is hard. I have such mixed emo-

Earlier on Satuday, the Bears got on top early in the game, blanking Cal State Northridge 8-0 in a mercy win. It was junior left fielder Jamia Reid who led off in the bottom of the first with a knock to straight away center for her first homer of the season and the first run of the tilt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every game where we score first is a turning point,â&#x20AC;? Henderson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we score first, it is an automatic air of confidence and our defense is stronger and ready to go.â&#x20AC;? The Bears crushed Cal State Bakersfield in another five-inning win 14-1 Friday afternoon to open the weekend. Henderson took the circle as the starting pitcher in Ariotoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leave in the first four innings. Freshman Arianna Erceg relieved her in the fifth and final inning. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It think reflecting on the weekend, we showed we can play together and come back in times when we had to,â&#x20AC;? Henderson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are things we need to work on but we are at a strong place.â&#x20AC;?

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

in and what we are going to do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we need to start in practice and it needs to pick up a little more.â&#x20AC;? Cal was up nearly the entire second half but the Cougars chipped away at the lead. Washington State was 5-of-12 from 3-point range in the period after missing nine of its 11 attempts in the first half. Those first 20 minutes were characterized by scoring runs. The Cougars went on a 7-1 streak early, but the Bears responded with a 16-4 stretch to take the lead. The whole first half, particularly the last few minutes, was plagued by miscues and poor shot selection. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were pushing the ball really well but we were taking quick shots â&#x20AC;&#x201D; quick threes, long rebounds,â&#x20AC;? said Clarendon, who finished with 16 points and six rebounds. All six of her assists came in the first half. J A R who played A M almost M O Stallworth, T the entire A Rgame, E AscoredPa game-high O O F E20 R points M A and N Spulled W Hdown A Rseven F boards. RJonathan S BKuperberg E T H I womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s N K S covers Contact him at Rbasketball. T E R O D jkuperberg@dailycal.org.

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Berkeley, California

Monday, February 14, 2011

CHECKONLINE

SPORTS

www.dailycal.org

opening days Cal softball team goes 3-1 in opening weekend tournament in Arizona. See page 7

For Coverage Of M. TENNIS W. TENNIS M. GYM TRACK W. SWIM LACROSSE www.dailycal.org/sports

Limited Depth Hands Cal Another Loss Injury to Crabbe Forces Powers Into First Career Start and Bears Lose Third Consecutive Game by Gabriel Baumgaertner Senior Staff Writer

Taryn Erhardt/Staff

Searching for Answers Tony Renda answers questions from reporters on Friday after the announcement that baseball would not be continued in the 2011-2012 season. Rugby, lacrosse and women’s gymnastics were reinstated while baseball and men’s gymnastics were not.

The Cal men’s basketball team is tough, scrappy and relentless. Those qualities have kept the Bears in games against tough opponents and drawn praise from other M. Hoops coaches, but hustle and heart do not Cal 71 always produce vicWashington St. 75 tories. Saturday afternoon’s 75–71 loss to Washington State at Beasley Coliseum gave Cal a threegame losing streak and dropped them into a tie for fifth place in the conference, while also highlighting the Bears’ lack of depth and general inexperience. Coach Mike Montgomery referred to the approach as “all hands on deck” at the beginning of the season, and a mild concussion to Allen Crabbe immediately tested the entire team. Missing the player that scored 30 points against this same team one month ago, Montgomery turned to seldom-used reserve Jeff Powers, who had a career night with Crabbe shelved for his injury. Before Crabbe hit the floor early Thursday night, Powers had played a total of 13 minutes all season. In Thursday’s blowout loss to Washington, the Denver transfer was the only Cal player to hit a 3-pointer in his 11 emergency minutes of play. “When Allen went down, I wasn’t expecting to come in and play,” said Powers, who was only placed in the starting line up the day before playing in Pullman. “It was kind of unexpected. Playing in that kind of atmosphere, the space is a lot bigger than I’m used to playing in.” Making his first career start on Saturday, Powers scored 14 points — including 3-of-6 from 3-point territory — and grabbed four rebounds in 31 minutes on the floor.

Karen Ling/File

Brandon Smith dished out seven assists in Saturday's loss at Washington State. Smith has been one of Cal's top players in minutes played, logging 67 minutes in two games. “There were a ton of butterflies in my stomach, but after the first five minutes they were gone,” Powers said. “I think I filled in admirably ... It was a lot of fun, I just wish we could have gotten the win.” Unfortunately for the Bears (13-12, 6-7 in the Pac-10) Cougars’ reserve Brock Motum had a bigger career night. The lanky Australian sophomore scored a career-high 19 points helping key a critical victory over the Cougars

(17-8, 7-6), who were coming off of a 13-point home loss to Stanford. Jorge Gutierrez overcame a scoreless first half to lead the Bears with 19 points, misfiring on a potential gametying 3-pointer in the final seconds. Harper Kamp scored 17 and pulled down nine rebounds, while Powers was the only other Bear to score in double

>> M. Hoops: Page 7

Cougars Pounce on Bears in Second Half Ruggers Wear Out Competition With Three Routs in Las Vegas

by Jonathan Kuperberg Staff Writer

It wasn’t pretty but it was definitely in pink. The Cal women’s basketball team turned the ball over 17 times and w. hoops missed nearly half Washington St.68 of its free throws Cal 66 in its 68-66 loss to Washington State on Saturday night. The Bears had a potential gamewinning shot, but power forward DeNesha Stallworth’s short jumper fell short in the waning seconds, much to the dismay of the active Haas Pavilion crowd, draped in pink for the annual Pink Zone Game for breast cancer awareness. With 14 seconds, Cal (14-10, 6-7 in the Pac-10) tried to run a high ball screen and Stallworth was able to attempt a shot just inside the free throw line but could not covert. “We just tried to get to the rim at that point and get fouled,” coach Joanne Boyle said. The team had plenty of opportunities to win, but was prone to errors all night long. With the score tied at 66, the Cougars’ Jazmine Perkins split a pair of free throws to give her team the lead. The Bears called a timeout to set up a play under the basket, but Eliza Pierre’s inbounds pass was intercepted by Perkins. “We didn’t know if they were gonna be in man or zone out of bounds so we have a play that we can run against either one,” Boyle said. “And we just stand in the box and think that someone is just gonna haphazardly get open, and no movement and we just chuck

>> w. hoops: Page 7

by Christina Jones Staff Writer

michael Gethers/staff

Talia Caldwell scored 10 points and grabbed six boards in Cal’s loss to Washington State. The sophomore center went to the free throw line 11 times but only converted six times.

Coach Jack Clark announced in a team meeting on Friday morning that the Cal rugby team had been spared from losing its varsity standing after Football this season. While Cal 90 the team was assur0 edly pleased by the Air Force news, its focus this past weekend was not on the goings-on in Berkeley, but what the Bears could control on the pitch in Las Vegas. On fields adjacent to Sam Boyd Stadium, Cal (14-0) proceeded to crush Utah State and Wyoming by a combined score of 206-12. Both of the Bears’ opponents on Friday were held to one try apiece, with Wyoming making its conversion and Utah State missing its opportunity to tack on an extra two points. On Saturday at the same venue, Cal renewed acquaintances with Air Force. In the two squads’ last duel in 2003, the Zoomies defeated Cal in the national semifinals and went on to win the championship that year. The 2011 version of the Bears exacted revenge on an Air Force team that featured some of those past champions as current assistant coaches. Not only did Cal come away with a convincing win, but the Bears held the Zoomies scoreless in a 90-point rout. Though it obliterated Air Force, Clark’s battalion admired the driven performance. “They don’t give up, they’re military guys,” senior flanker Tom Rooke said. “They’re not going to let us walk all over them.”

Added senior Dustin Muhn: “The military academies are always really tough teams to face. We’re happy to test against them just because of the physicality that they bring.” Four Cal players notched two tries each in the game. Sophomore center Seamus Kelly opened the first and second half with his scores, and junior Danny Barrett also split his two trips to the try zone between the two halves. Only 13 minutes passed between senior Drew Hyjer’s two first half tries, but his speed in scoring was topped by junior Anthony Lombardo who scored in the 60th and 62nd minute. “It was 15 guys playing to Cal systems that we try to learn, and things were clicking,” Muhn said. “I think overall we just played well together and brought a good level of energy that we needed.” Clark sprinkled his starting lineup with players that will make up the First XV down the stretch and some of the less experienced players. Then, he pulled some of his starters in the second half, allowing more players the opportunity to compete. “It was great to see (the non-starters) were integrated well into the system,” Muhn said. “The young guys stepped in and they maintained the level of performance that we brought into the game.” Junior flyhalf Alex Aronson made the most of his chance to start, assuming the conversion responsibilities of senior scrumhalf James Bailes. Aronson converted all six of the Bears’ tries and notched a 25-meter penalty kick in the 11th minute. The De La Salle High product made another five conversions in the second half. Christina Jones covers rugby. Contact her at cjones@dailycal.org.


Daily Cal - Monday, February 14, 2011