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THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

“Little good is accomplished without controversy, and no civic evil is ever defeated without publicity.”

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Friday August 24, 2012

Volume 126, Issue 6

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Pharmacy students can add MBA by cody schuler managing editor

In a multi-billion dollar industry that operates at the crossroads of science and business, West Virginia University School of Pharmacy students will now have the opportunity to prepare themselves for success in the best of both worlds of the pharmaceutical sector. Last week, the WVU School of Pharmacy and

College of Business and Economics forged an agreement to create a Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Business Administration (Pharm. D./M.B.A.) dualdegree program – the first of its kind in West Virginia. The dual-degree program will be open to students next year, and it is the 47th such program of this type; a little more than one-third of the approximately 130 schools of pharmacy in the nation

offer such a program. Jose Sartarelli, Milan Puskar Dean of the WVU College of Business and Economics, has extensive experience as a pharmaceutical executive, previously serving as the Pharmaceutical Group Chairman for Asia-Pacific, Japan and Latin America for Johnson & Johnson. He said pharmacy students of today will greatly benefit from the newly offered curriculum pairing.

SRC helps fight ‘Freshman 15’ by shelby toompas correspondent

For years, college freshman have tried to avoid the “Freshman 15” – extra weight resulting from students’ first experiences with college food. This year, West Virginia University’s Student Recreational Center will be helping students keep that weight off. For the fourth year, the SRC is hosting the annual ‘Freshman 15’ fit program, in which students can compete over the course of 10 weeks for prizes. By acting as a contest and making students earn points over the next several weeks, they have the opportunity to win prizes, including a $100 gift card from The Book Exchange and an overnight stay at Hotel Morgan. When the program first started, freshmen were the only students able to participate. Now the program is open to any WVU student looking to maintain their weight. Nancy Oliverio, manager of fitness and wellness at the Student Rec Center, said the program also targets student nutrition.

“The WVU School of Pharmacy and the College of Business and Economics share the philosophy that student pharmacists will be much better-equipped to meet the demands of the industry today with the creation of the Pharm. D./ M.B.A. degree,” he said. “There is a very real expectation that pharmacists have knowledge of business principle,” he said. “This degree program will give par-

city editor

The West Virginia University Center for Black Culture and Research took to the street Thursday for its annual Back to School barbecue picnic. The picnic was as an opportunity to welcome back those students for the new school year, inform students of the center’s upcoming events and to reach out to new students. “Every year, we try to have a barbecue where we try to bring everyone back together and reconnect,”said director of the center Marjorie Fuller. “It’s an opportunity to find out what’s going on, sign up for our events and reach out to students who may not know about the center.” Located on Spruce Street, the center strives to provide critical support to WVU Students, particularly African American students and students of color who have issues concerning recruitment and retention, and to provide the University commu-

“We try to educate students on how to work out on their own, how to use the equipment and give them suggestions on how to eat healthy in a dorm and make healthy food choices during the year,” she said. Some of the required activities involve group exercise classes and intramurals so students can take advantage of everything the Rec has to offer. “In recent years, we have had a great turnout,” Nancy said. “And most of the time the variety of students range from freshmen who don’t want to gain weight to those grad students who would like to lose a few pounds.” Oliverio said to stay healthy one should drink a lot of water and do physical activity 6 days a week,whether that’s coming into the Rec Center, taking a walk around the downtown campus, going for a jog or even doing a doing a dorm room workout. Oliverio also said avoiding fried and carb-loaded foods, such as pizza, calzones and French fries. The SRC will continue the exercise program into the spring as well.

Katie Flowers/THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

City Council approves budget cuts to Sunnyside revitalization program By Carlee Lammers City Editor

nity with cultural and social events that are unique to the African World experience. The center also provides students with a quiet place to study and complete school work. Freshman engineering student Kevin Pierce said the center has helped him see a new light in his transition to WVU. “We really want to bring everyone together and have a chance to introduce the center to all students,” he said. “That way, they are not in the dark, and we can bring them into the light.” This summer, Pierce along with other freshman students involved with the center took part in the Students Achieving and Reaching for Success program. The five-week program is designed to help students build a solid academic foundation, develop self awareness and enhance their leadership potential. Pierce said the STARS program helped him

The Morgantown City council recently cast a four-three vote to cut funding for the local Sunnyside Up program. Sunnyside Up is neighborhood revitalization program that strives to develop and implement improvement plans to the Sunnyside neighborhood. After cutting the funding in half to $50,000, the council and director of Sunnyside Up Jim Hunt concluded to terminate the katie flowers/THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

WVU Fulbright scholar to teach in Germany by evelyn Merithew correspondent

West Virginia University graduate Jeremy Munza is a recipient of the Fulbright Scholarship, a prestigious award that will allow him to teach English in Germany. It allows students with an interest in traveling abroad and making a difference to hone in on their greatest skills and assist others through a research grant. The Fulbright program pro-

vides approximately 8,000 awards yearly to students in more than 155 countries worldwide. Born and raised in Idamay, W. Va., Munza did not originally plan to attend WVU. He first looked into the University of Maryland until he learned more about the College of Business and Economics at WVU. Munza said he knew he wanted to major in business and potentially go to law school, and WVU seemed like a

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program’s full-time director position. West Virginia University has vowed to match the City’s contribution to the project dollar-for-dollar. “I support the council’s decision to make the position part time,” Hunt said. “Having a full- time director with that budget would be awfully difficult.” Hunt declined the City’s offer and did not accept the part- time position at Sunnyside Up. Deputy Mayor Ron Bane said budget cuts were made as an effort to cover

see sunnyside on PAGE 2

One of the dumpsters sponsored through Sunnyside Up.

88° / 62°

Sunny

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The Morgantown City Council has approved a variety of changes to the Sunnyside Up program, including the termination of its full-time director.

see SRC on PAGE 2

see cookout on PAGE 2

of Pharmacy Institute for Pedagogical and Curricular Change. “Providing our student pharmacists with this new degree offering will open the door to career opportunities where financial planning and business acumen are qualities that are needed in certain health care and pharmaceutical industry positions,” she said.

SUNNYSIDE DOWN

Black Culture Center hosts annual barbeque By Carlee Lammers

ticipants a competitive edge as they graduate from a pharmacy school that has already established itself as one of the best in the country.” Patricia Chase, the Gates Wigner Dean of the WVU School of Pharmacy, has performed research on a variety of topics including innovative curriculum development. She also serves as a facilitator for the American Association of Colleges

good choice. When his freshman year came and Munza tried to enroll in a GEC Spanish class, all classes were completely full and he had to choose another foreign language. “My friend encouraged me to give German a try, and I really enjoyed the first class I sat in on,” Munza said. “That class turned into two, and then I decided to enroll in German as a GEC. That turned into a minor and then a major.”

ON THE INSIDE Sophomore running back Dustin Garrison and freshman inside receiver Jordan Thompson bonded as opponents in high school. SPORTS PAGE 7

Munza said he enjoyed his German classes and professors at WVU and studied abroad two years ago in Fulda, Germany. His trip solidified his love for the culture, language and people., and he would do anything he could to return to the country. Munza gives much credit to WVU’s professional staff. “The entire German department at WVU is

see fulbright on PAGE 2

THE START OF SOMETHING The No. 18 West Virginia men’s soccer team will kick off the 2012 season against Hartford Saturday. SPORTS PAGE 8


THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

2 | NEWS

Friday August 24, 2012

Romney promises energy independence by 2020

Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney rolled out his energy independence strategy Thursday.

cookout

Continued from page 1 connect to other students in the center and was beneficial to his transition to the University. “STARS really helped me before school. It helped me get a background about the University and the center and allowed me to meet more people,” he said. “We’re all like a big family now.” Fuller said as the director of the center, she strives to build a support system for its students.

sunnyside Continued from page 1

the costs of other programs throughout the city. “Sunnyside has about $600,000 sitting in the bank,” he said. “We have to be able to cover other programs in the city, such as giving money to the bus line system.” Mayor Jim Manila said he believes the cuts made to Sunnyside Up were necessary in the city’s initiative to spend cautiously. “The director’s full-time salary was probably about $93-96,000 – that’s a lot of money,” Manila said. “We really just want to be more frugal with our money.” Hunt, who has worked in community development for the past 25 years, will leave Sunnyside Up in mid-September. At this time, he said, no part-time director has been appointed. “I spent five years working for Sunnyside Up and many of the programs that exist today – I developed,” he said. “I’ll certainly be

AP

“We really want to be giving students support in any way we can. Whatever they need – we are their advocate,” she said. “We feel the Center for Black Culture and Research is the hub for our students. Not only for academic help anytime the University has research or studying on Black history or culture, we help them.” Fuller said she was excited for the school year to get underway and to be able to expand the center by hosting a variety of activities. “I’m really looking for-

ward to just about everything,” Fuller said. “I mean, just in the past 10 years with this picnic we’ve grown. We had to block off a section of the street so we could fit another table.” Fuller said the center was excited to introduce new programs this school year including a gospel choir and a Male Empowerment Network. For more information about the Center for Black Culture and Research, visit www.cbc.wvu.edu/.

open and willing to work with them and offer information and advice.” Despite budget and administration changes, Hunt said he sees potential in the neighborhood. “This is the most exciting place and time in Morgantown – there’s an awful lot of potential,” he said. “I was at a meeting the other day, and one of the things we discussed was the prospect of getting wireless into the Sunnyside neighborhood. It’s growing. There’s a lot of activities, projects and developments.” In March, city officials were outraged by student behavior throughout St. Patrick’s Day weekend. “I would love to see this city send a bill to WVU for all the time you put into these efforts to keep these fires under control and finally make them start paying, because this is not their playground,” Bane said in a March City Council meeting. “This is my home and your home, and these kids don’t care. They don’t care that this is our home, and

it’s time that we send them a bill.” However, Manila and Bane said the cuts affecting the Sunnyside Up program are not correlated with student behavior in the neighborhood. “Those events are not at all correlated,” Manila said. “We have continuously worked on developing on some type of solution to cutdown and cutback on our spending.” Hunt said he believes the success of Sunnyside is crucial to the success of other local residential neighborhoods. “A lot of times people will say ‘oh, I can’t believe we’re spending all that money on those doggone students who don’t care,” he said. “That’s not the case. If Sunnyside sees more growth is nicer and safer, other neighborhoods will be too.” For more information on Sunnyside Up and the program’s revitalization projects, visit www. sunnysideupwv.org.

carlee.lammers@mail.wvu.edu

carlee.lammers@mail.wvu.edu

The

Cellar

HOBBS, N.M. (AP) — Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney promised on Thursday to aggressively expand offshore oil drilling along Virginia, North Carolina and the Gulf of Mexico, changing the subject from social issues like abortion and Medicare that have dominated the debate in the days before the critical Republican National Convention. Speaking to voters in the heart of New Mexico’s oil and gas industry, Romney declared that his energy plans – which include drilling for oil in a federal Alaskan wildlife reserve – would create 3 million jobs and

mba

Continued from page 1 Students who wish to enroll in the program can do so in the spring semester of their first year of study in the Pharm. D. Professional Program. After gaining acceptance, students can begin taking M.B.A. courses the following year. “Student pharmacists will complete requirements for the M.B.A. degree program during the course of their four years of study in the Pharm. D. professional program,” Chase said. “This collaboration shows the potential that can be achieved when two top-notch programs work together. We are proud to be able offer these programs to our students.” Current CVS employee Shane Beam, a 2012 graduate of the School of Pharmacy who simultaneously obtained an M.B.A., expressed how valuable having a business background was for him upon entering the job market. “The degree itself is beneficial; I feel like that was one reason I was able to get a job faster than some other people – just because I had that

fulbright Continued from page 1

incredible. The professors, teaching assistants – everyone. My professors were helpful during the application process to help me win this award, which was not an easy process,” he said. The process to apply for the Fulbright Scholarship ran from early October until April and included numerous essays, letter recommendations, resumes and proof of proficiency in the German language. Though Munza had taken Spanish all of his life, his time spent in his WVU German classes helped him learn to fluently speak German. “WVU was vital in help-

more than $1 trillion in new revenue. And he predicted complete “North American energy independence by 2020, a never-realized goal claimed by presidential candidates for decades.” “That means we produce all the energy we use in North America,” Romney said, emphasizing an expansion of oil and gas over wind and solar production. “This is not some pie-inthe-sky kind of thing. This is a real achievable objective.” President Barack Obama did not face voters on Thursday. Instead, he deployed a popular former president, Bill Clinton, to help convince a divided electorate

that he simply needs more time to fix the nation’s struggling economy. Clinton is expected to speak at the Democratic National Convention next month and play a prominent role in the final months before Election Day. “We need to keep going with his plan,” Clinton says of Obama in a new television ad set to run in eight battleground states. The push to re-frame the debate comes at a delicate time, sandwiched between the sudden resurgence of abortion in the race and Monday’s opening of the Republican National Convention.

degree,” he said. “CVS and Rite-Aid in (my) interviews mentioned that they have no problem with schools’ pharmacy knowledge of the students, but they feel like the business side is a little lacking or could be improved.” Beam, who got approval from both Colleges to pursue the curriculum surrounding both degrees, said he figures students who enter the new program will have the added benefit of a solid structure. “I did (about) the exact same thing (as the new program) except they just didn’t have it yet,” he said. “I think the skill set is very good; the way they have the program set is going to work well. “I had 25 hours a couple of semesters; it was very time consuming, but I feel like it helped me understand the business side a lot more than somebody that may not have had the classes.” On top of the managerial skills, Beam learned a lot of basic financial tips that the typical pharmacy curriculum does not cover. “One of my favorite classes from my last semes-

ter was personal finance; it’s not necessarily all about investing but having good insurance coverage, a will – a lot of things that I never would have thought about,” he said. For Beam, the benefits surrounding pursuing both degrees was a no-brainer. “In the end, I feel like it definitely gave me more looks for job prospects than other people that didn’t have that,” he said. “It always looks good if you’re equal in everything else and have another degree; employers will notice that.” The Pharm. D./M.B.A. degree is the College of Business and Economics’ fourth dual-degree program on campus. It has also partnered with the College of Law, the School of Medicine and the College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences. The West Virginia School of Pharmacy was named No. 26 in the Beast Health Schools – Pharmacy ranking from the U.S. News & World Report’s 2013 edition of “America’s Best Graduate Schools.”

ing me succeed. They read my rough draft essays and told me how to make them stronger. They encouraged me the whole way,” he said. Munza plans to travel internationally with his career. “Speaking German is going to give me a skill that (not everyone) else has. I hope to go to law school as soon as I get back from Germany,” he said. Munza gives credit for his success to his family. “I find inspiration in many things including, God and my family. My family is hardworking; my father doesn’t have a college degree but works harder every day and is always trying to better himself,” he said. “I try to find inspiration in everything that I do and every-

where I go.” Munza said his plan upon arriving in Germany is to better himself and his students. “The award means so much to me. It means that I get to go back to the country I’ve come to love and get a chance to grow from a normal college student into a professional,” Munza said. “I have the opportunity to learn about Germany’s country, people and try to further help the United States’ and Germany’s relations.” For more information about the Fulbright Scholarship program, visit www. cies.org/us_scholars/ us_awards.

charles.schuler@mail.wvu.edu

danewsroom@mail.wvu.edu

Morgantown, WV

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Students work out at the Student Rec Center Thursday.

SRC

Continued from page 1 “The spring program always tends to be more of a body transformation contest that lasts for 7 weeks,” Oliverio said. “It’s amazing what people can do in that amount of time.” Even though 10 weeks isn’t long enough to see a huge change in body fat or

physique, Olivero promises students will feel healthier. “The minimum time span you should spend on this type of program is 12 weeks, but given our resources and our time constraint, we have to go with what we feel best and what’s going to keep the attention up among our students,” Oliverio said. The SRC offers a variety of classes to choose from throughout the entire year.

Katie Flowers/THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

Besides an indoor basketball court, track and rock climbing, the Rec currently has Zumba, yoga, core fusion, spinning, and will be adding a Body Pump class in September, which is a trademark class not offered at any gym other than one in Martinsburg, W.Va, Oliverio said. “Students don’t realize that they’re quality instructors and quality classes for free, which is a really great thing we do to get students emerged in fitness,” she said. On average, there are approximately 3,500 to 4,000 students entering the SRC each day. To check out more information about getting involved with the ‘Freshman 15’ fit program or other offered classes at the SRC Center, visit www.studentreccenter.wvu.edu. danewsroom@mail.wvu.edu


THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

Friday August 24, 2012

NEWS | 3

Isaac could shake up security for GOP convention

Ap

This NOAA satellite image taken Thursday shows Tropical Storm Isaac is now located about 165 miles south of San Juan, Puerto Rico. TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Tropical Storm Isaac could force a shakeup of the security plans for the GOP convention in Tampa, because about half of the expected officers come from other parts of Florida and some could be forced to stay home for the storm, authorities said Thursday. More than 3,500 officers from 59 law enforcement agencies from around the state are scheduled to come to Tampa to patrol the streets as the convention opens Monday. About half would come from outside Hillsborough County and the city of Tampa. About 1,700 National Guard troops were already expected to help with patrols. Hillsborough County Sheriff David Gee said the number could increase

if other law enforcement agencies don’t end up sending officers. The storm is forecast to start affecting South Florida on Monday and could reach the Tampa area by Tuesday. “We’re in a situation right now where we don’t know what’s going to happen,” Gee said. “My primary concern right now is that we will lose resources.” Gee said some agencies, especially in South Florida, might decide not to send officers to Tampa if the storm threatens their areas. “As things change, they might have to prioritize,” he said. Gee’s agency is in charge of the county where the convention will take place. The Hillsborough Sheriff’s Office is providing the bulk of the staffing for the event because it is the larg-

est agency in the area and also oversees the county jail. The Tampa Police is the other main agency handling security outside of the convention hall. The Secret Service is in charge of everything inside the convention hall. The sheriff joined Tampa Police Chief Jane Castor and representatives from the FBI and Secret Service at a media event Thursday. As they spoke to reporters, a large TV screen tuned to a cable news channel showed colorful radar images of Isaac swirling in the Caribbean. Convention officials said they were working closely with state and federal authorities on monitoring the storm. “We continue to move forward with our planning and look forward to a suc-

cessful convention,” convention CEO William Harris said in a statement. Florida Gov. Rick Scott said RNC officials were on a call Thursday with state, local and federal authorities and there were no plans to cancel the convention. Scott pointed out that the storm is still trending westward, and he hoped it would not have a major impact on Florida. “It’s a forecast and all the forecasts are prone to error, but fortunately it has gone a little bit west,” Scott said. “Hopefully it will dissipate by the time it gets over Cuba.” Scott also said Florida “is more prepared than any state in the country for hurricanes.” “The National Guard will be ready for any contingency,” he said. “So if that

happened then the logical backup would be the National Guard.” Jeff Masters, director of meteorology for Weather Underground, said the storm’s current forecast indicates Tampa is unlikely to take a direct hit from a potential hurricane. When the storm passes the Bay area, it’s likely to have an eastwest motion, meaning it could sideswipe Tampa, causing rain and flooding, but not directly strike the city. Chief Castor said she wasn’t worried about redeployment of officers; when she initially asked other agencies to help, she told them they should only send people that they could spare. She said the security team factored in the possibility of another event, such

as a storm, happening during the RNC. “We’ll adjust our plans,” she said. “We’re used to that in law enforcement.” Steven Ibison, the special agent in charge of the Tampa division of the FBI, said he wasn’t concerned about the number of officers on the ground. “The FBI isn’t involved in weather casting,” he said. “But we have plans in place. We always do here in Tampa.” Castor and Gee stressed it was too early for any agency to dramatically change plans. Castor said that no one would really know where Isaac was headed until late this weekend. “The only predictable element about a tropical storm or hurricane is its unpredictability,” she said.

Without typical big donors, Akin Paris backs Syria no-fly zone seeks small handouts JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Abandoned by deeppocketed national groups, Missouri Rep. Todd Akin is passing a collection plate among his remaining supporters, asking for a few dollars at a time in hopes of sustaining a Senate campaign threatened by his remarks about women’s bodies and “legitimate rape.” Akin claimed Thursday to have taken in more than $100,000 during a two-day online fundraising drive that he portrayed as a grassroots effort to circumvent “party bosses” who demanded that he drop out. But the six-term congressman will need much more than that to replenish a campaign account already diminished by a hotly contested primary. “It’s very difficult, when you have the limited base we have in Missouri, to send emails out asking for $3 at a time,” said Pat Thomas, secretary of the Missouri Republican State Committee who has worked as a coordinator for numerous candidates. “I don’t know how to build a war chest to do that.” Akin now has to go forward without the firepower of well-funded political groups that had planned to pummel Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill with negative television ads. If his money runs dry, Akin could confront a difficult choice: whether to end his candidacy or adopt a bare-bones strategy relying on social media and socially conservative activists to counter the millions of dollars of mass media advertising expected from McCaskill and her allies. First, Akin has to repair his reputation with fellow conservatives and, according to Thomas, “get back to the point where people think you’re credible.” Federal records show Akin has purchased enough air time to run apology ads in Missouri’s biggest TV markets through at least Monday.

Although his campaign has not disclosed how much he is spending, ad trackers for his Democratic opposition describe it as a $277,000 effort. He’s also working to mend fences. On Thursday, Akin attended a meeting of the conservative Council for National Policy in Tampa, Fla., site of the Republican National Convention, which he has agreed not to attend. He tweeted

that his Wednesday fundraising goal had been met. “Thousands of people stepped up and helped us raise over $100,000! The message is clear ... voters should pick candidates, not party bosses,” Akin said. He then sent out a new fundraising email asking supporters to chip in $5 toward a goal of raising an additional $25,000. Earlier in the week, he pleaded for $3 donations.

Todd Akin, R-Mo., celebrates winning his primary election Aug. 7.

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Ap

BEIRUT (AP) — France signaled Thursday that it was prepared to take part in enforcing a partial no-fly zone over Syria, piling pressure on President Bashar Assad’s embattled regime as it widens a major offensive against rebels in Damascus and surrounding areas. French Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian urged the international community to consider backing a no-fly zone over parts of Syria, but cautioned that closing the Arab nation’s entire air space would be tantamount to “going to war” and require a willing international coalition that does not yet exist. He told France 24 television that Paris would participate in a full no-fly operation if it followed international legal principles. But for now, he suggested that a partial closure – which U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Washington was considering – should be studied. Syria’s chief backer, Russia, meanwhile, said it was working closely with the Damascus government to ensure that its arsenal of chemical weapons stays under firm control and has won promises that it will not be used or moved.

In Syria, troops backed by tanks and helicopters broke into the Damascus suburb of Daraya, the scene of intense fighting over the last two days. At least 18 people were killed. Across the country, at least 100 people died Thursday in shelling and clashes, according to the Britainbased Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and the Local Coordination Committees. The bloodshed coincided with the departure from the Syrian capital of the last of the United Nations military observers after their mission failed. The observers were part of a six-point peace plan by outgoing envoy Kofi Annan. As the country slides deeper into civil war, activist groups now routinely report the deaths of anywhere between 100 and 250 people on a daily basis, but it is virtually impossible to verify these figures. Residents of Damascus said troops were bombing Daraya and nearby Moadamiyeh from the Qasioun mountain overlooking Damascus. “It’s just another regular day in Damascus,” said a resident of the city of 1.7 million, who spoke on con-

dition of anonymity for fear of reprisals. “I woke up to the sound of explosions and it hasn’t stopped since.” In the eastern part of the country, Syrian rebels fought with regime troops in the town of al-Bukamal, across the border from the Iraqi town of Qaim. The border crossing has been in rebel hands since last month, but wresting control of al-Bukamal itself from regime troops would expand the opposition foothold along the frontier. The opposition already controls a wide swath of territory along the border with Turkey in the north, as well as pockets along the frontier with Jordan to the south and Lebanon to the west. Together, they have proven key to ferrying people and supplies into and out of the country. Rebels have been fighting troops for days in al-Bukamal and early Thursday took over several checkpoints, the main police station and the local command of the Political Security Directorate, one of Syria’s powerful intelligence agencies, according to Rami Abdul-Rahman, who heads the Observatory. “There is an attempt to take full control of al-Bukamal,” Abdul-Rahman said.


OPINION State must invest in broadband 4

Friday August 24, 2012

According to a newly released Federal Communications Commission report, West Virginia has a lower percentage of residents with access to a broadband Internet connection than any other state in the country. The FCC report found that 46 percent of West Virginia’s population, which amounts to around 840,000 people, does not have highspeed internet access. Across the country, only six percent of Americans

CONTACT US 304-293-5092 ext. 4 | DAperspectives@mail.wvu.edu

do not have high-speed Internet access. This shocking disparity caught state officials by surprise and it highlights the need for West Virginia’s legislators to take action on this critical issue. Widespread high-speed Internet access is an essential component of any state’s efforts to develop a successful 21st century economy. The benefits of expanding broadband Internet access are numerous and they are essential for this state’s progress.

First and foremost, the Internet is an invaluable tool for disseminating information. This information can serve a variety of important functions, ranging from keeping the citizenry informed on key political issues to providing online educational opportunities that otherwise would be unavailable in a particular area. The fact that the FCC report found West Virginia’s rural areas to be suffering from the most severe high-

speed Internet shortages is an important one to consider. Our state’s rural areas suffer from a plethora of social ills, many of which can be mitigated by the free flow of information the Internet provides. This flow of information has empowered individuals, especially those on the fringes of society, in a truly unprecedented manner. For this reason, the United Nations has designated Internet access as a basic human right. It is thus

unquestionable providing this powerful tool to West Virginia’s languishing rural communities will help them reverse their fortunes It is almost unfathomable – and inexcusable – that almost half of our state’s population lacks access to high-speed internet. Our state government must take action to ensure we do not continue to lag behind the rest of the country in this vital area. daperspectives@mail.wvu.edu

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For more information, send an email to omar.ghabra@mail.wvu.edu

‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ success illustrates societal depravity celeste lantz copy editor

E. L. James’ “Fifty Shades” trilogy is the most recent novel that has sexually repressed housewives flocking to booksellers everywhere. Originally written as a “Twilight”-based fan fiction, James saw rapidly rising interest, changed the names of the characters and sold the e-book rights to a virtual publisher in Australia. Due to a limited budget, the first book, “Fifty Shades of Grey,” was sold on an on-demand basis. Religious followers pounced on this release, and the print book quickly became popular through word-of-mouth. As of this month, “Fifty Shades” has become the no.1 best-seller in Australia and has grossed more in the UK than the Harry Potter series. So what, then, is the appeal of this so-called “mommy porn”? It has been stated that the intended demographic is married women over 30, though it has trickled down into a few women in their early-tomid-20s. The writing is subpar at best and only provides a watered-down picture of BDSM. The characters are hardly well-developed, and Anastasia is as flat as the character she was originally written as, Bella Swan. It clearly isn’t the diction that is attracting tens of thousands of women to this “Twilight” wannabe. There certainly has been a shift in what is considered “appropriate” reading. Ten years ago, even five years ago, no self-respecting woman would have been

http://t.opne.ws

‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ author signs copies of her book during her U.S. book tour. caught dead with a book like “Fifty Shades” in their hands in public. Today, it is sold in our very own WVU Barnes and Noble bookstore. When did it become acceptable to read erotica in public? I must have missed the memo, though I do admit to being a prude. This series sends a very difficult message to generational readers. First, the publishing industry is beginning to give the impression that anyone can write

a piece of fiction and become famous through blogs and self-publishing sites. Just because my 50-yearold mother can write about her fantasies on the internet and publish them doesn’t mean she should. This sort of self-publishing is tainting the once-prestigious name of the original book publishing industry. Second, E. L. James sends out the message that women no longer need to think for themselves and be strong

or independent. No, for a woman to be truly happy, she must literally sign her life away to a man who will then take care of but fully control her. For years, women have fought for equality, only to make these regressive novels popular. Yet there are countless Internet memes expressing an interest in a Christian Greylike character to swoop in and handcuff them. Could it be that women are so equal to men that they de-

sire that submissive nature? Or is it possible that James has stumbled upon a hidden comment on women’s enduring lack of rights? Despite the influx of novels and movies that depict a strong female lead, female audience members still want to see the cliched romance unfold between a vulnerable young woman and brooding older man. As wonderful as it would be to see women burn their bras and roar about their self-re-

liance, it’s difficult to ignore the masses of women who spend hours crying over emotionally distant and unavailable men. In March, Universal Pictures announced it would produce the film adaptation of “Fifty Shades of Grey,” a decision that has women guessing the actor who will play Mr. Grey. The excitement continues to build for what is sure to be 90 minutes and 50 shades of uncomfortable.

Pussy Riot verdict and Assange extradition reveal US hypocrisy ishan raval technician n.c. State

In February, the Russian feminist punk band Pussy Riot performed an impromptu “punk-prayer” in Moscow’s hallowed Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in protest against President Putin’s controversial reelection and the Russian Orthodox Church’s political sway. For more than six months, their case has become a global cause célèbre. This past Friday, three members of Pussy Riot were sentenced to two years imprisonment for “hooliganism” motivated by “religious hatred.” Both within and beyond Russia, their treatment has been regarded as oppressive, their trial frivolous, and the verdict a grossly unfair, politically-motivated attack on free speech. Following worldwide shows of solidarity from human rights groups, artists and citizens, the U.S. Department of State has also voiced its support for Pussy Riot, saying that it is “concerned” by the “disproportionate” verdicts. Spokesperson Victoria Nuland has called for Russian authorities to “ensure that the right to freedom of expression is upheld.”

DA

Feminist punk group Pussy Riot members show the court’s verdict as they sit in a glass cage at a courtroom in Moscow. Indeed, Russia should do that. However, we here should pay attention to the almost laughable contradiction of the U.S. government snatching for itself the moral high ground of being the purveyors of democracy. Ironically, though perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S. is making such statements when due to its own pressure exerted overseas, British police have surrounded the Ecuadorian Embassy in

London, and the U.K. has unethically threatened to remove both the diplomatic standing of the Embassy building and the news publisher who has been granted political asylum in it. Julian Assange, founder of Wikileaks, has been legitimately granted asylum in Ecuador because the U.K. is having him extradited to Sweden, from where he validly fears extradition to the U.S. In Swe-

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den, he is wanted for questioning over allegations of rape. He has not been formally charged, as there simply is not enough evidence for that, and the allegations are shrouded in controversy because of the credibility of the accusing parties and the extremely broad definition of rape in Sweden. He has offered Swedish authorities the chance to interrogate him in London, which is normal procedure in transna-

tional legal proceedings, but they have declined him. He has also offered to go to Sweden for questioning with the assurance that he would not be extradited to the US, which too has been declined. Because of his work with Wikileaks, a secret grand jury in the U.S. has already been reported to have issued a sealed indictment against Assange. Prominent U.S. politicians of both parties have called for his assassination or life imprisonment as a spy or a terrorist, which could happen if he is convicted under the 1917 Espionage Act (an adjudication which some commentators hold would violate the First and 14th Amendments). The same Victoria Nuland quoted previously has insinuated toward his probable prosecution in the U.S. However, any of this happening will too be an attack on free expression and democracy. Even if Wikileaks’ activities are judged illegal by American courts, their legitimacy from a holistic democratic perspective is unambiguous. Wikileaks exposed misuses of power, by the U.S. government and others, to an extent never before seen in history. The news media is called the Fourth Estate of democracy – its role is

to report the misdeeds of and keep a check on the government, and that is what Wikileaks has been doing. The documents released by Wikileaks details offenses, including the mass-murder of civilians, and displays the cavalier attitude held by diplomats regarding the same. Such information should not be secret to begin with, and so, its dissemination is not just an exercise of free expression, but a service to democracy. The U.S. government has not prosecuted the publication of classified information in all instances. In fact, the government itself has leaked extremely sensitive material which showed potential as propaganda, such as the recent New York Times revelations about President Barack Obama’s killlists and cyberwarfare. Thus, the crusade against Wikileaks and Assange is not only an assault on press freedom, but viewed in conjunction with Washington’s own leaks and its statements regarding Pussy Riot, highlights an ugly fact about the U.S. government: It supports free expression and democracy when they are useful to its own image and power, but will do anything to restrict them when they are not.

Letters to the Editor can be sent 284 Prospect St. or emailed to DAPERSPECTIVES@mail.wvu.edu. Letters should include NAME, TITLE and be no more than 300 words. Letters and columns, excluding the editorial, are not necessarily representative of The Daily Athenaeum’s opinion. Letters may be faxed to 304-293-6857 or delivered to The Daily Athenaeum. EDITORIAL STAFF: LYDIA NUZUM, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF • CODY SCHULER, MANAGING EDITOR • OMAR GHABRA, OPINION EDITOR • CARLEE LAMMERS, CITY EDITOR • BRYAN BUMGARDNER, ASSOCIATE CITY EDITOR • MICHAEL CARVELLI, SPORTS EDITOR • NICK ARTHUR, ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR • JEREMIAH YATES, A&E EDITOR • HUNTER HOMISTEK , ASSOCIATE A&E EDITOR • MATT SUNDAY, ART THEDAONLINE.COM DIRECTOR • CAROL FOX, COPY DESK CHIEF • VALERIE BENNETT, BUSINESS MANAGER • ALEC BERRY, WEB EDITOR • JOHN TERRY, CAMPUS CALENDAR EDITOR • ALAN WATERS, GENERAL MANAGER


THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

5 | CAMPUS CALENDAR

FRIDAY AUGUST 24, 2012

PHOTO OF THE DAY

SUDOKU

DIFFICULTY LEVEL MEDIUM

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

CROSSWORD

DAILY HOROSCOPES BY JACQUELINE BIGAR BORN TODAY This year you’ll skip over confusion through a desire to really see the facts. Misunderstandings will become less common if you are willing to confirm the conversation, interaction or plans. You’ll empower yourself through this clarification, and others will respond in a most enthusiastic manner. If you are single, you could meet someone significant at any given moment. In fact, you might have two opportunities to encounter a potential sweetie. If you are attached, your relationship benefits from your clarity and optimism. Let the warmth evolve between you. CANCER accepts you as you are.

might not want to commit just yet. Tonight: Count your change. Be careful. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) HHHHH You can overcome nearly any obstacle. Your instincts will point you to the correct action or decision. Sort through mixed messages with a little skepticism, and you will know what to do. Tonight: You are the lead actor. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) HHH Observe everything you want. Make judgments if you like, but still be discreet at this point. Follow your instincts with regard to a respected figure in your life. This person will be more than pleased by your actions. Tonight: Not to be found.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) HHHH Confusion earmarks a personal matter. You are able to sort fact from fiction with relative ease. An investment involving your home and/or your finances might be necessary. Check out your options carefully. Tonight: Home is where the heart is.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) HHHH Friends surround you. Even people you consider to be acquaintances will demonstrate unusual understanding and support. Seek out an expert or someone who knows more than you when trying to make a decision. Tonight: Only where people are.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) HHHH Keep asking, if you do not get your question answered. You’ll need to choose different words or a different entry point. Your ability to solve problems emerges. Positive thinking emanates from you and will draw strong results. Tonight: Visit with friends over munchies.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) HHHH Everyone asks for your support or opinion. Opportunities emerge from out of the blue, but you might not want to jump on the bandwagon just yet. Discuss an important financial matter or someone’s involvement in an important matter. Tonight: A force to behold.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) HHH Your instincts guide you with your finances. Your ability to move past issues earmarks your interactions. When someone is as confident as you are, flubbing up becomes less likely. Listen to an offer, but you

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) HHHH Keep seeking out more information. You actually might have to visit a loved one to gain the perspective you seek. Someone close to you demonstrates a great deal of caring. You do not need to say or

DOWN 1 Literary nickname 2 The Phoenix of the NCAA’s Southern Conference 3 Forfeited wheels 4 Exercise unit 5 Pilgrimage destination 6 “Wait, Wait ... Don’t Tell Me!” airer 7 Relative of mine 8 Yes-or-no decision method 9 Original home of the Poor Clares

10 Raise canines? 11 Ready to swing 12 Sarkozy’s wife __ Bruni 13 Put on a pedestal 18 Low life? 22 “The Garden of Earthly Delights” artist 24 Teen Spirit deodorant brand 26 Kyrgyzstan border range 27 Bawdy 28 Series of rings 29 Played around (with) 30 Letter-shaped shoe fastener 34 Like some garage floors 35 Almost never, maybe 36 Pea jackets 38 Amber, for one 40 Caroling consequences 43 Pressing needs? 46 Twisting force 47 Stimulate 48 First stage of grief 49 Serious players

50 Like Mount Rushmore at night 51 High-maintenance 54 Many ages 55 Dict. entries 57 Food fought over in old ads 58 “Man, it’s hot!” 59 Red gp. 62 Rejection

THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Downtown Grocery Store Open M-F 10am - 8pm, Sat 9am - 5pm www.mountainpeoplescoop.com Downtown Campus <- Downtown Library

MountainLair Woodburn Hall

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University Ave

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visit www.mrscna.org. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets daily. To find a meeting, visit www.aawv.org. For those who need help urgently, call 304-291-7918. CARITAS HOUSE, a local nonprofit organization serving West Virginians with HIV/ AIDS, needs donations of food and personal care items and volunteers to support all aspects of the organization’s activities. For more information, call 304-985-0021. SCOTT’S RUN SETTLEMENT HOUSE, a local outreach organization, needs volunteers for daily programs and special events. For more information or to volunteer, email vc_srsh@hotmail.com or call 304-599-5020. CONFIDENTIAL COUNSELING SERVICES are provided for free by the Carruth Center for Psychological and Psychiatric Services. A walk-in clinic is offered weekdays from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Services include educational, career, individual, couples and group counseling. Please visit www.well.wvu.edu to find out more information. WOMEN, INFANTS AND CHILDREN needs volunteers. WIC provides education, supplemental foods and immunizations for pregnant women and children under five years of age. This is an opportunity to earn volunteer hours for class requirements. For more information, call 304-5985180 or 304-598-5185. LITERACY VOLUNTEERS is seeking volunteers for one-onone tutoring in basic reading and English as a second language. Volunteer tutors will complete tutor training, meet weekly with their adult learners, report volunteer hours quarterly, attend at least two in-service trainings per year and help with one fundraising event. For more information, call 304-296-3400 or email trella.greaser@live.com.

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304-296-7538. WVU HILLEL offers a Bagel Brunch at 12:30 p.m. at the Hillel House at 1420 University Ave. For more information or a ride, call 304-685-5195. MOUNTAINEERS FOR CHRIST hosts a supper at 6 p.m. and a bible study at 7 p.m. at the Christian Student Center at 2923 University Ave. CHRISTIAN STUDENT FELLOWSHIP hosts free dinner at 6:15 p.m. followed by a worship service at 7 p.m. at 2901 University Ave. For more information, email Gary Gross at grossgary@ yahoo.com. SIGMA THETA EPSILON, a National Christian Service Fraternity, would like to invite any men interested in the fraternity to attend its meeting at 5 p.m. at the Campus Ministry Center. For more information, email sigmathetawvu@gmail.com. CATHOLIC MASS is held at St. John University Parish at 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. All are welcome. SINGLE ADULT DINNER for EVERY SATURDAY OPEN GYM FOR VOLLEYBALL the never-married, widowed is from 2-4 p.m. at the Student and divorced is held at 5 p.m. Recreation Center. No commit- More information, call 866-948ment or prior experience is nec- 6441 or visit www.SingleFocusessary. Just show up and play. Ministries.org. For more information, email CONTINUAL Mandy at mhatfie3@mix.wvu. WELLNESS PROGRAMS edu. CATHOLIC MASS is held at St. on topics such as drinkWELL, John University Parish at 5 p.m. loveWELL, chillWELL and more TRADITIONAL KARATE are provided for interested stuCLASS FOR SELF-DEFENSE dent groups, organizations or meets at 10:30 a.m. in Multi- classes by WELLWVU: Wellness purpose Room A of the Student and Health Promotion. For more information, visit www. Recreation Center. well.wvu.edu/wellness. W E L LW V U : STUDENT EVERY SUNDAY TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH HEALTH is paid for by tuition offers services at 8 a.m. and and fees and is confidential. For 10:30 a.m. The church is located appointments or more informaon the corner of Spruce and Wil- tion, call 304-293-2311 or visit www.well.edu.wvu/medical. ley streets. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS offers meets nightly in the Morgana service for students at 10 a.m. town and Fairmont areas. For at the chapel on Willey Street. more information, call the For more information, call helpline at 800-766-4442 or

W E H AR ER E E

EVERY FRIDAY

LUNCH FOR A BUCK takes place at the Campus Ministry Center on the corner of Willey and Price streets. For more information, call 304-292-4061. THE CHABAD JEWISH STUDENT CENTER offers a free Shabbat Dinner every Friday at 7 p.m. at the Chabad House. For more information, email Rabbi@JewishWV.org or call 304-599-1515. WVU HILLEL offers a Shabbat Dinner at 6:30 p.m. at the Hillel House at 1420 University Ave. For more information or a ride, call 304-685-5195. CAMPUS LIGHT MINISTRIES hosts its weekly meeting and Bible study at 7 p.m. in the Bluestone Room of the Mountainlair. GLOBAL INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP AT WVU, a hospitable community for international students and scholars, meets at 6 p.m. for community dinner and Bible discussion. For more information, email sarahderoos@live.com.

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CAMPUS CALENDAR

Be e

KRISTEN BASHAM/THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

The West Virginia University Marching Band performs its famous pregame show during Thursday evening’s practice.

ACROSS 1 Where a canary sings 6 Loser’s catchphrase 11 Blackjack variable 14 Last Olds model 15 Living proof 16 Test to the max 17 Trendy ski slope? 19 Front-end protector 20 Assumed name 21 Diamond offense 23 Skelton’s Kadiddlehopper 25 Tried to hit 26 Monogrammed neckwear? 31 Levi’s alternative 32 Mini successors 33 Henhouse 37 Scout’s honor 39 Pub. with more than 100 Pulitzers 40 Serengeti heavyweight 41 Nonproductive 42 More than strange 44 Watch face display, briefly 45 Red, blue and green food colors? 49 Lesser partner 52 Southern cuisine staple 53 Trucker’s view 56 “Same old, same old” 60 Airport 100+ miles NW of PIT 61 Indicators of royal contentment? 63 Tease 64 GI’s home 65 Ready and then some 66 Mud bath site? 67 Itty-bitty 68 Impedes

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COMICS Get Fuzzy

by Darby Conley

Cow and Boy 

by Mark Leiknes

do anything. Tonight: An odd invitation or idea works. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) HHHH Someone you associate with clearly knows what he or she wants. Figure out a way that you both can have what you want. Your ability to move past complications is enhanced. Use some of your excess energy or stress to start exercising more. Tonight: With someone special. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) HHHH Defer to others, and recognize that everyone needs his or her time in the limelight. You can afford not to be on center stage all the time. Free up your schedule for an inspiring brainstorming session or other creative venture. Tonight: Let the weekend start in style. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) HHHH You might be hardpressed to stick to routine, which is not your strong suit anyway. Others seem to tap into your knowledge or seek out your opinion. Screen your calls if you want to follow your schedule. Tonight: Do what you must. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) HHH You are able to move past a problem quickly, as long as you use your imagination as a resource. You are easily able to draw out others, especially one person who could be unusually tense. You might want to continue this conversation later. Tonight: Add some spice to your life. BORN TODAY Actor Jack Klugman (1922), cartoonist Walter Lantz (1899)

Pearls Before Swine

by Stephan Pastis


THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

6 | SPORTS

women’s soccer

Friday August 24, 2012

volleyball

Young Mountaineers host tournament to start season by austin seidel sports writer

matt sunday/the daily athenaeum

Sophomore forward Kate Schwindel scored the game-winning goal in West Virginia’s win over Western Carolina.

WVU travels to face Central Michigan, No. 1 Stanford by shea ulisney sports writer

The No. 18 West Virginia women’s soccer team will travel to Penn State this week to take part in the Penn State Invitational. The tournament showcases three 2011 NSCAA Top 25 teams, including No. 1 Stanford, No. 8 Penn State and the Mountaineers. “We are really the underdogs,” said sophomore forward Kate Schwindel. The Mountaineers will face Central Michigan today at 5 p.m. In 2011, the Mountaineers beat CMU 2-1 in an exhibition, and outshot them 13-8. According to Schwindel, the Mountaineers are working on taking more shots on goal and making opportunities in the midfield. Sophomore goalkeeper Sara Keane had an outstanding performance in last season’s scrimmage against CMU, making crucial saves in the first half. Following an off day Saturday, West Virginia will face the defending national champion Stanford Cardinal at noon Sunday. Stanford is coming off a two-game winning streak, with a 2-0 exhibition win over

Fresno State and a 6-1 blowout over Santa Clara. Stanford returns this season with seven starters, including College Cup Defensive MVP Emily Oliver. Due to injuries to many key players, WVU head coach Nikki Izzo-Brown was forced to play many inexperienced players in the last two games with a WVU team that was already young. As a result, true freshman Kailey Utley scored her first goal in Sunday’s game against Western Carolina. “We’re a young team,” said senior midfielder Bri Rodriguez. “But we’re only going to get better as we go.” During the past two games, coach IzzoBrown noted there weren’t many opportunities inside the penalty box but is confident after practice this week the team can get behind the back four to get more opportunities. “I think we can do a better job getting behind (the back four) with more passes and some blind-sided runs,” Izzo-Brown said. As the underdogs, the Mountaineers are confident and excited to show everyone what they can accomplish this weekend. dasports@mail.wvu.edu

Have You Paid Your Fall Tuition Bill? Payment was due by the first day of the term. Failure to submit payment by August 27th, 2012 will result in your fall courses being removed. Please review your STAR account to verify the status of your account. Should you have questions please contact the Office of Student Accounts ASAP at 304-293-4006 or stop in Stewart Hall Room B33

Best of luck this semester! Office of Student Accounts

The West Virginia volleyball team opens its 2012 season at home this weekend with the Mountaineer Invitational Aug. 24-25. The Mountaineers will take on Saint Francis, Central Connecticut and Loyola-Maryland. The tournament will serve as a litmus test for many of the players as the Mountaineers’ head coach Jill Kramer is set to start several freshmen, including middle blocker Caleah Wells, who comes to the Mountaineers as a 20112012 Texas Girls Coaches Association 4A all-state team member. “Caleah is probably the most explosive and dynamic player on the roster,” Kramer said. “I expect her to go up and give some of the best middle blockers in the (Big 12 Conference) a run for their money.” The team will also rely heavily on junior co-captain Liz Gulick, who serves as the team’s defensive specialist and finished the 2011 season with 52 digs, two service aces and five assists. Gulick also managed two stellar performances against DePaul and Louisville, recording a season-high eight digs in each match. The team starts the tournament against Saint Francis, a team that may hold an initial challenge for the young West Virginia team. The game will feature a matchup between two talented middle blockers, as Wells will go up against Elizabeth Williams, who returns for her senior year after leading the Red Flash in kills a season ago. Williams finished her junior season with 282 kills, 68 digs and 65 blocks. The Mountaineers and Kramer will have an early test against Williams and her fellow Red Flash teammates in the invitational’s opening game. Central Connecticut enters the tournament after a

mel moraes/the daily athenaeum

Freshmen middle blockers Caleah Wells, left, and Nikki Attea will be playing in their first collegiate matches this weekend when the West Virginia volleyball team hosts St. Francis (Pa.), Central Connecticut State and Loyola-Maryland in the Mountaineer Invitational. fairly successful 2011 season. The Blue Devils held a 20-11 record and were 11-5 in conference games. Central Connecticut will look to take advantage of the Mountaineers’ freshmen outside hitters as the Blue Devils sport two excellent outside hitters themselves. Seniors Emily Cochran and Blaike King combined for an astounding 744 kills last season with Cochran leading the team with 446. West Virginia freshmen Nikki Attea and Hannah Sackett are scheduled as the outside hitters slated with the task of countering Central Connecticut’s onslaught. The pair is just two of three freshmen at the outside hitter position for the Mountaineers, who come into the season with only three returning players from last year’s team. The final matchup for the Mountaineer volleyball team is against Loyola-Maryland. Loyola looks to rebound and prove its worth in the MAAC as it managed just eight wins total from the

2011 season. The Greyhounds are led by senior Janet Pressler, who had 363 digs last season and anchored the team at the libero position. Anna Panagiotakopoulos will hope to outshine Pressler as the Mountaineers’ libero. Panagiotakopoulos enters the season as a freshman with quite the record sheet. The young libero served under Kramer on the US Volleyball National Youth Training team in 2010 and was selected as an AVCA all-American nominee in 2011. “(Anna is) a sparkplug,” Kramer said. “She’s always upbeat and positive. Nothing can upset her.” With that, the Mountaineers can be sure that Panagiotakopoulos will be able to keep her fellow freshmen in the game. And, with the senior leadership of captain Karly Rasmussen, the team can expect a solid performance in each game of the opening invitational. dasports@mail.wvu.edu

Experts question Spanier’s defense HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The story being told by Penn State president Graham Spanier as he defends himself against accusations that he covered up a sex abuse allegation runs contrary into his own reputation as a detail-oriented manager. But experts in university governance also suggest that if Spanier truly didn’t know what was going on, he showed a willful ignorance and a disturbing lack of curiosity about a scandal that stood to ruin Penn State’s reputation. In a series of interviews this week and at a Philadelphia news conference, Spanier and his lawyers have repeatedly portrayed him as somewhat on the sidelines, completely unaware that complaints about former assistant football coach Jerry San-

dusky were serious enough to warrant much more than passing attention. The governance experts acknowledge the job of president requires dealing with a continual stream of problems, but they are raising doubts that Spanier took a less than active role in investigating the scandal that engulfed two of his top lieutenants and longtime football coach Joe Paterno. “You can say I didn’t know. You can say I was distracted. You can say they didn’t tell me – up to a point,” said Stephen Trachtenberg, who spent three decades as president at the University of Hartford and George Washington University. “But from what we have heard about what transpired, his vice president, his director of athletics,

his coaches allegedly were concealing this bad news from him for such an extensive period of time that I find the story implausible,” he said. Spanier said he had no recollection of email traffic involving a 1998 police investigation of Sandusky, triggered by a woman’s complaints that he had showered with her son. He also told The New Yorker he had little memory of a 2001 complaint about Sandusky in a team shower with a boy, and that a follow-up meeting on the topic was wedged into his schedule during a busy time. Sandusky was convicted of various criminal counts in June for both of those encounters, as well as child sexual abuse of eight other boys. He awaits sentencing.


THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

Friday August 24, 2012

SPORTS | 7

Garrison, Thompson bonded as high school opponents

matt sunday/the daily athenaeum

Sophomore running back Dustin Garrison, left, and freshman inside receiver Jordan Thompson played against each other in the 2010 Texas state tournament in high school.

by greg madia multimedia editor

Overlooked, undersized and undervalued are all words describing West Virginia’s sophomore running back Dustin Garrison and freshman inside receiver Jordan Thompson before they stepped on campus in Morgantown. Garrison was an allstate standout at Pearland High School, Texas, and the Houston Area Offensive as Player of the Year, in addition to being named the 2010 Houston Touchdown Club Offensive Player of the Year. He was offered by only

four other schools. With two of the four being FCS programs, Garrison was left behind by any big-time programs. “He was undersized; not many colleges looked at him even though he had a great season. He was the Player of the Year in Texas his senior year. I played against him,” Thompson said. “I knew he was good, but he didn’t have offers.” Thompson, who was tabbed a top-100 area recruit by the Houston Chronicle didn’t have a single offer, either. Despite being named District 5A Special Teams Player of the Year,

Thompson’s size was still a problem. Two similar stories ended up crossing paths in the 2010 Texas 5A Division 2 state quarterfinals when Garrison’s Pearland Oilers met Thompson’s Katy Tigers. With the glory that comes with being just two victories away from playing in a Texas High School state championship at Dallas Cowboys Stadium, the two teams battled. Thompson caught two passes for 41 yards. On the other hand, Garrison led the Oilers to a 38-35 victory – he ran for 104 yards and caught two

football posiiton previews: linebackers

Young linebackers ready to make an impact on new-look defense BY Nick Arthur

Associate Sports editor

One of the most inexperienced positions for the West Virginia football team entering the 2012 season is the linebacker position. Ten of the 15 players listed at linebacker on the roster are underclassmen, and codefensive coordinator Erik Patterson is in his first year coaching the group. Despite the youth and lack of experience, this is a group that really meshed during fall camp. “I don’t feel like anyone has really separated themselves at linebacker, but I’ve seen tremendous improvement from several guys,” Patterson said. “I feel comfortable with the fact that we have also created some depth.” The depth generated during camp can be very useful against up-tempo Big 12 Conference offenses. Patterson admits in some situations they will stick to a three or four-man rotation. “Realistically, throughout the course of the game, I don’t think you’re going to be four or five deep,” he said. “Some days we might only play three or four. It just depends on the situation. I like where we are.” The Mountaineers released their depth chart earlier this week with seniors

carvelli

Continued from page 8 to spend. Once they get to the point that it is earning a full share of the Big 12 revenue in 2016, there’s a good chance that WVU will be making more than three times as much money per year as it did when the Mountaineers were members of the Big East Conference. “It’s a competitive world, and I think it’s important that we’re able to compensate them,” Luck said. “At

Terence Garvin and Tyler Anderson, as well as juniors Doug Rigg and Jared Barber listed as the four starters in the new 3-4 alignment. Anderson in particular feels he’s comfortable in the new defense. “Right now I feel like I know every responsibility I can know,” he said. “I try not to mess up a lot and just keep doing what I’m doing. “You have to take advantage of every opportunity you get, and that’s what I did (in camp).” Anderson’s position will allow him to roam more freely than the other linebackers. He will line up on the line and rush the quarterback in some situations and back into coverage in others. “Defensively, we’ve came a long way from the spring,” he said. “Everybody is more comfortable, we’re playing as a unit and we’re attacking the ball a lot better.” “I can’t wait for this season. I can’t really show you how excited I am. I guess I’ll just show you on the field.” Patterson is also pleased with the progress made by his defense during fall camp. “There is still a lot of work to be done. We’ve had 19 practices in the 17 days of camp,” he said. “They understand there is a lot of progress we have to make before the first game.” the end of the day, the Big 12 will pay us $23 or $24 million in TV money, and the Big East was only paying us $8 or $9. “Looking in the long term, this is a great financial position for our University to be in because we’re going to be able to receive additional dollars.” It has to be encouraging for Holgorsen, men’s and women’s basketball coaches Bob Huggins and Mike Carey and the rest of the coaches at WVU to know that Luck and the University are commit-

matt sunday/the daily athenaeum

Junior Terence Garvin will move to linebacker after spending the last two seasons as a safety. Fall camp is a time when coaches get the opportunity to evaluate each player and implement their system. Patterson was able to install essentially his entire defense over the course of three weeks. “I think we have the majority of our base package in right now,” he said. “We’ll change tracks on certain zone blitzes and things like that. But we’ve got most of the defense in (this fall camp).” nicholas.arthur@mail.wvu.edu

ted to putting more money into keeping the coaches in Morgantown. With some of the talented coaches leading teams here at West Virginia, if the University isn’t committed to paying them the money that a coach at a big-time school should get, there will be other schools who will. Holgorsen’s contract is the first sign that West Virginia’s committed to being one of those schools that will do what it has to do to keep its coaches around. james.carvelli@mail.wvu.edu

passes for 17 yards, scoring two touchdowns. Garrison and Pearland ended up winning the state title a couple weeks later. Inside the WVU locker room, Garrison and Thompson laugh about that game. “I mess with him all the time. I let him hold my ring a little bit – my state championship ring, I let him wear my state championship shirt, I joke with him and he laughs at me,” Garrison said. Since that semifinal matchup almost two years ago, Garrison established himself as the Mountaineers’ top running back, in-

cluding a record-breaking game in 2011 against Bowling Green when he rushed for 291 yards in his first career start. More importantly, West Virginia head coach Dana Holgorsen assigned Garrison to be Thompson’s host on a recruiting trip. “Me and Dustin came from Texas; we have very similar stories,” Thompson said. “Me and him were talking one on one. Then I realized he started as a freshman, he’s undersized, (and) we’re both small.” Garrison made a huge impact on Thompson. Garrison explained the differences to Thompson while

patrick gorrell/the daily athenaeum

he was in Morgantown on his visit. “I let him know that it’s different from Houston, but at the same time you’ll like it here. The fan support is just like it is back home, and you’re just going to like it here,” Garrison said. Now, after a huge spring, Thompson will join Garrison as a starter. At WVU in Holgorsen’s offense, both undersized guys can succeed. “We’re proving the schools that didn’t give us the chance wrong,” Thompson said. dasports@mail.wvu.edu


8

SPORTS

Friday August 24, 2012

CONTACT US

304-293-5092 ext. 2 | DAsports@mail.wvu.edu

THE WAIT IS OVER

Men’s soccer kicks off 2012 season against Hartford by doug walp sports writer

Seniors Uwem Etuk, left, and Shadow Sebele celebrate after a goal last season.

matt sunday/the daily athenaeum

The West Virginia men’s soccer team kicks off its 2012 season Saturday in the WVU Nike Classic against Hartford at 7 p.m. at Dick Dlesk Soccer Stadium. S a t u rd a y ’s season opener will also mark the first game for the Mountaineers in their inaugural season in the Mid-American Conference. “We’re hoping to get a good turnout,” said senior midfielder Travis Pittman. “But most importantly, we’re looking to get a result. Practice has been great this week.” West Virginia received two preseason top 25 rankings leading up to its first game Saturday. TopDrawerSoccer.com has the Mountaineers ranked No. 18 in the nation, while the Soccer America preseason poll ranks West Virginia at No. 23. Some individual players for the Mountaineers have begun to accumulate their own preseason accolades as well. Senior center back Eric Shoenle was announced as a first-team preseason all-American for the College Sports Madness website and was also named to the 2012 Hermann Trophy preseason watch list – the highest individual honor in collegiate soccer. Sophomore forward Andy Bevin, the Mountaineers’ leading goal scorer in 2011, was named to the “Ten Sophomore Players to Watch” list at TopDrawerSoccer.com “It excites us, but we can’t settle,” Pittman said of the collective preseason expectations. “We’ve just got to work hard every day. If we’re not No. 1, it’s nothing. That’s our main goal – to be No. 1, and at the end of December, to win a national championship.” Th e Mou nt a i n e e r s played George Mason to a

0-0 tie at Manassas, Va., in their only exhibition of the fall, while Hartford scored a 2-0 win against Northeastern and tied Holy Cross 0-0 in their two fall non-team scrimmages. Pittman noted that the team’s attacking play has been a focus in practice leading up to their season opener, after failing to score in both the Blue-Gold game and the George Mason exhibition. But Pittman was also assertive that everyone will be ready to go Saturday. “I’m pretty confident,” Pittman said. “Our coaching staff is unbelievable with the way they break down game film. They do a great job telling us how to defend and explaining the opponent’s weaknesses. Hopefully we can get a couple goals this weekend.” The Mountaineers were 11-8-1 last season and were eliminated in the second round of the NCAA tournament by Maryland. Hartford finished 8-9-4 overall and fell to Stony Brook in the 2011 America East tournament championship game. West Virginia head coach Marlon LeBlanc said the team’s emphasis leading up to the season opener with Hartford would be more on preparing to play their own up-tempo style than trying to focus too intently on the characteristics of any single opponent. “I know very little about Hartford,” LeBlanc said. “But I think that’s mostly what happens early on in the year. We’ll look at very, very short clips of Hartford. We try to focus more on ourselves than on the opponent. “I’ll do most of the focusing on my opponent myself, and then implement what we need to do in training in order to see it come out in the game without bogging them down with too much information.” dasports@mail.wvu.edu

Holgorsen’s new contract a sign of things to come at WVU michael carvelli sports editor

Earlier this month, West Virginia Athletic Director Oliver Luck took a big step toward continuing to move WVU in the right direction when head football coach Dana Holgorsen signed a contract through 2017. It means that – at least in theory – the Mountaineers will be led by one of the brightest offensive minds in college football for the next six seasons. But Luck understands that just because he’s signed on the dotted line, it doesn’t mean he’s “locked in” for the duration of that contract by any means. “I don’t think you can ever really lock a coach up for a long-term contract because it’s such a classic free-market deal now,” Luck said. “He has a contract and he has a buyout if he leaves. If somebody really wants to hire him, somebody can hire him if he really wants to go. You could triple the buyout, and it wouldn’t change that fact. “It’s a great commitment to Dana from the University, as well as to the University from Dana. I can’t imagine that we could have anybody better in here leading our program, and I hope that will be the case for a long time.” It’s a major commitment for the school, indeed. The deal, which could be worth as much as $20.5 million by the time it’s up,

is the largest contract for any coach in WVU history. From Luck’s perspective, it had to happen. “He’ll be in high demand,” Luck said. “When I was talking to him about coming here, there were a lot of schools that had him on speed dial and were trying to get him to try to come and do the same thing he’s brought here. “He saw the value of what we have here, and it’s great that he did, but I do think he’ll be in high demand, especially if he can keep winning.” But it also had to happen when you look at the other contracts for coaches around the Big 12 Conference. Even with the new contract, Holgorsen ranks as just the sixth highest-paid coach in the league, ahead of Kansas head coach Charlie Weis, Kansas State’s Bill Snyder, Texas Tech’s Tommy Tuberville and Iowa State coach Paul Rhoads. It’s the first of many steps that WVU is going to have to take in order to keep up with their new conference. “It’s no secret that we’re playing in a new sandbox now,” Luck said. “Ultimately, we don’t want any of our coaches to be No. 10 out of 10 in terms of salary. That said, we know we aren’t going to be one of the top two or three either.” While it’s easy to figure out that they’re going to be spending a lot more money, realize that there will also be a lot more money available

see carvelli on PAGE 7


A&E

9

Friday August 24, 2012

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304-293-5092 ext. 3 | DAA&E@mail.wvu.edu

WVU back-to-school fashion Njeri Taylor

Deanna Elardo

Freshman | Fashion Merchandising “I am wearing jean shorts, crop top and knee highs. I think my style is a little bit of everything – I wear what fits me best.”

Freshman | Pre-Pharmacy Deanna Elardo sporting fashion from Free People and PacSun. “I like to keep things casual.”

caitlin graziani A&E writer

Whether you are a new or returning West Virginia University student, going back to school means looking your best and making a good impression. Planning that coveted first day of school outfit has been something that many students have prob-

ably done since kindergarten. The passion for fashion doesn’t have to end with the first few days of classes. While the weather is warm now, fall is peeking around the corner, which will mean cool mornings and evenings. The best way to make it through this transitional fashion period is by layering. Layering is both a functional and fashionable way to dress yourself. For girls, adding a tai-

lored blazer over a trendy top and denim shorts can keep you looking polished while staying warm. Accessorizing with a lightweight scarf can also help with those colder mornings and can easily be stashed in your purse, complementing your bag later on in the day. Other easy switches for transitional weather include switching out sandals for flats or tall leather boots. Gentlemen, you have

things a bit simpler with what you can choose to do to refrain from wearing gym shorts to class. Adding a button-up shirt over a graphic Tshirt is a more fashionable alternative to pulling on a hoodie. You too can switch out those sandals for a lightweight sneaker or even waterproof leather loafers. Still running out of fun and functional outfits to wear to class? Try finding someone

else in your dorm or class who wears the same size you do. Switching out trendy pieces allows you to extend your wardrobe without diminishing your bank account. This also helps the other person out, giving them more clothing options, as well. Are you still bored with your wardrobe? Is it in need of a face lift, but you are still strapped for cash? The Endless Closet, located at the end of Walnut

Street (closest to University Avenue) is a new consignment-style shopping experience. You can shop other pre-owned brand name clothes or trade in some of your own for credit to shop at the store. No matter your budget, there are simple fixes to stay looking fresh throughout the beginning of the new school year and into the cooler weather. caitlin.graziani@mail.wvu.edu

Backyard Wings, Brews and BBQ Cook-off at Mylan Park by emily meadows a&E writer

Pig out at Mylan Park Saturday with the best brews, barbecue and much more, all while contributing to a good cause. The Ronald McDonald House Charities of Morgantown is sponsoring its

first Backyard Wings, Brews and BBQ Cook-off Saturday from 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. For just $5 per car, attendees can sample barbecue dishes and other delicious menu items from area restaurants including Buffalo Wild Wings, Texas Roadhouse, Coaches, Sports Page, Roma’s and Big Frank’s

Barbecue. “We want to create an event where everyone feels welcome, whether it’s families, couples or students,” said (Morgantown House Charities Executive Director and CEO) Steven De Jesus. All proceeds for the event will go to the RMHC in Morgantown.

More specifically, earnings will go toward the development of the Ronald McDonald Family Room at the WVU Children’s Hospital. The project is scheduled to be complete by February 2013. Just make sure to fill out a ballot as you chow down. A contest will be held where each participating restaurant will have the opportunity to win judges’ and people’s choice in wings and barbecue dishes. The winners will receive a Mountaineer statue carved out of coal. For those with a lighter appetite, the event has much to offer in entertainment, whether you’re 60, 16

or six. “To create that feeling we are not only having wings, beer and barbecue, we are including an antique car show, a kid’s activity center with a bouncy house and face painting, a craft show and snow cone truck,” De Jesus said. There will also be an exciting opportunity for sports fans. Just in time for the start of the Big 12 season, an autograph session with former NFL Quarterback and Super Bowl winner Jeff Hostetler and Hall of Fame coach Don Nehlen will be held during the day. For lovers of live music, an eclectic mix of perfor-

mances from modern rock to bluegrass will be provided by local bands Junior Fez, Shane Meade and the Sound, Higher Ground and 3 Nuts and a Woody. Other numerous and popular home-based businesses and crafters, such as Mary Kay, Scentsy, Lia Sophia and many more, will be on site for you to explore as well. If your Saturday is free and you are looking for the perfect opportunity to eat some delicious food, listen to some of the area’s finest music and give back to a worthy cause, Mylan Park is the place to be. daa&e@mail.wvu.edu

2nd man charged in ‘Cathouse’ slaying OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma prosecutors on Thursday charged a second man with killing a prostitute featured on HBO’S “Cathouse series” and three other people. Denny Edward Phillips faces six counts of first-degree murder for the 2009 shooting deaths of Brooke Phillips, 22, who had worked as a prostitute at the legal brothel Moonlite Bunny Ranch near Carson City, Nev., Milagrous Barrera, 22, Jennifer Ermey, 25, and Casey Mark Barrientos, 32. The two additional murder charges are because

Brooke Phillips and Barrera were pregnant. The victims were found inside a burning home in southwest Oklahoma City. Phillips, who was not related to Brooke Phillips, faces an additional charge of conspiracy to commit murder. Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater said he plans to seek the death penalty. “We believe he ordered the hit on Casey Barrientos,” Prater told The Associated Press. The others were killed to eliminate witnesses to Barrientos’ slaying, the prosecu-

tor said. Officials with the public defender’s office in Oklahoma County, which was appointed to represent Phillips, did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment. Phillips, 34, is currently in federal prison in Terre Haute, Ind., after pleading guilty to charges related to an April 2010 shootout in Tulsa in which he was shot three times after allegedly pointing a weapon at officers. A motive for the Oklahoma slayings was not clear, but drugs appear to have been involved, Prater said.


THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

10 | ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday August 24, 2012

123 Pleasant Street delivers weekend trifecta Friday: Sleepwalker, Pat Pat, Rozwell Kid and Old Indian by alec berry web editor

Tonight, local music takes center stage at 123 Pleasant Street as bands Sleepwalker, Pat Pat and Rozwell Kid host a “Back to College Party,” and the Frederick, Md., act Old Indian will make its Morgantown debut alongside them. Billed as the first big local show of the semester, the event offers a chance to see another side of Morgantown’s night life, simultaneously showcasing a good selection of what the music Morgantown has to offer. “If you want to go out and have fun without the usual club atmosphere, this show is a good alternative,” said local resident Max Ogle. “Plus, you know, it’s a bunch of good bands.” These bands all supply their own twist on rock music, from haunting guitars to blues. Still, Sleepwalker vocalist Tyler Grady insists it makes sense for these groups to contribute to the same

show. “The bands on this bill are all different, but the combination of the four of us makes sense,” Grady said. “I would almost guarantee that someone who likes rock ‘n’ roll will be able to hear something they like.” For those unfamilliar with the three groups playing with Sleepwalker, Grady provided a relevant summary. “Rozwell Kid is very reminiscent of mid-to late ’90s power rock – Weezer or Jimmy Eat World – but with very on-point lyrics that are hilarious at times,” Grady said. “Pat Pat is a band I would describe as driving and also very precise. They are a threepiece that sounds much bigger. “And Old Indian ... they are kind of a rhythm and bluesrooted rock band with a solid backbone. Cory Springirth’s voice will remind you of Jack White for sure, but these guys are grounded and writing really good songs.”

As for Sleepwalker, Grady’s own band, their presentation is all about mood and tone. It’s a band with a slightly post-hardcore edge, yet it also seems wrong to jam them under one generic genre label. If anything, the band depends on a layered sound. Guitar noise bounces in all directions, and the final result resembles something a little saturated. Joining Sleepwalker will be Ancient Shores guitarist Brett Carpenter, who is filling in the absence of former guitarist David F. Bello, now in Brooklyn, N.Y. This will add to the band’s trademark guitar orchestration. Sleepwalker is currently working on a new full-length album and will likely play on of these songs. “We are also rehearsing a cover that is a secret, so that should be a crowd pleaser,” Grady said. The members of Old Indian list various influences, from Neil Young to “Prince’s

Local post-hardcore group Sleepwalker takes the 123 Pleasant Street Stage Friday. guitar solo on ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’ in a VH1 George Harrison special,” and while not local, they do acknowledge an already present connection to the music scene here. “We played a show with Sleepwalker at the Blue Moon in Shepherdstown,W.Va., and since then we have kept in touch,” the band said. “Tyler (Grady) mentioned that 123 is an awesome venue to play in Morgantown, and he was able to get us a show there.” Old Indian has played for roughly two years in venues

throughout Frederick, West Virginia and Baltimore, and they can say they’re equally excited to add Morgantown to their list, saying they “expect to party.” To Pat Pat singer Brian Spragg, though, this show can do a little more than provide a party. For him, it’s a showcase of local music. “For the people who are new in town itching to hear some local music, this is a fine representation of Morgantown’s music scene,” Spragg said. “I think with students just starting classes this

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week, I would be surprised if 123 doesn’t get a great turnout. Hopefully, if people come and enjoy it, they’ll come to more 123 shows and bring friends.” Spragg isn’t alone. Grady also sees the event as a great way to open eyes. “I would encourage someone who has never been here before and who likes live music to not miss this show,” Grady said. “The other bands on this bill are very good, and I’m sure mostly anyone could find something to enjoy

Saturday: D-WHY returns to Morgantown Sunday: Byzantine headlines metal show

Rapper D-WHY is set to make his triumphant return to 123 Pleasant Street Saturday.

by hunter homistek Associate a&e editor

Local rapper D-WHY has been gone too long, and he is eager to return. A 2009 graduate from West Virginia University, the rapping sensation is set to perform at 123 Pleasant Street Saturday at 9 p.m. “This will mark the first time I’ve performed in Morgantown since I graduated in 2009,” D-WHY said. “This is the homecoming, the welcome back, the back-to school celebration – I’m super excited.” Coming along to support D-WHY in his return to the historical Morgantown venue is rapper/ disc jockey duo Dinosaur Burps and Charleston, W. Va., rapper B-rude, and these acts have D-WHY’s full endorsement. “B-rude has been a friend for a long time, and he is one of the artists who has inspired me from day one,” D-WHY said. “He is always a great performer; he’s been doing it for years.” Further aiding D-WHY in his 123 takeover is his right-hand man and DJ, DJ Etrayn. For DJ Etrayn, the performance Saturday

marks his first appearance in Morgantown. “This will be his first time spinning at WVU,” D-WHY said. “I can only imagine what it’s going to be like.” Where material is concerned, D-WHY is unleashing a platter of new material from his latest release, “Don’t Flatter Yourself,” for his fans to sample. While the music is undeniably rooted in hiphop and dance grooves, D-WHY looked to push the boundaries of conventional rap music with the release. “The sound on the album is an amalgamation of genres,” D-WHY said. “I want to blur the lines and bend the rules a little bit and just let the music speak.” Letting the music speak has always been an issue for D-WHY. As a 17-yearold freshman on campus, D-WHY was eager to perform at 123 Pleasant Street – but there was a catch. “I remember being snuck in through the backdoor at 123 so that I could perform, because I wasn’t old enough to get in,” DWHY said. This first taste of the “big show” has left a sweet taste in D-WHY’s mouth,

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and the rapper still has a soft spot in his heart for the Morgantown that, in a sense, gave him his beginning. “The feeling of being back in there is going to be surreal,” D-WHY said. “123 Pleasant Street is very special to me.” With such history and a deep-seated passion for the venue, Saturday night’s performance promises to be an intimate and electric experience for all to enjoy. Compounding this, DWHY noted that the venue is well on its way to a sellout crowd. When 123 Pleasant Street is packed and bumping, it absolutely cannot be beaten for those craving a hard-hitting live musical experience. Tickets for the show are $15 online at www.showclix.com/event/3708237. Any remaining tickets will be sold at the door on a first-come-first-served basis for $20. Per 123’s usual restrictions, concergoers must be 18 years of age to attend. Further information on D-WHY and his upcoming performances and releases can be found at www.D-WHY.com or on Twitter @DWHY. daa&e@mail.wvu.edu

Byzantine fronts a stacked lineup of metal bands Sunday at 123.

by josh ewers a&e writer

Local metal band Byzantine, is returning to Morgantown, and they are bringing friends. The “Byz” is set to play 123 Pleasant Street Sunday at 7 p.m. along with metal acts Solar Burn and Reanimator. Fresh off their Kickstarterfunded recording and mixing process, Byzantine will undoubtedly be looking to pay back its loyal fan base. Known for their absolutely crushing live experience, the band is sure to shake the walls at 123 and ensnare the audience in its tornado of brutality. These West Virginia natives are suppliers of a particularly groovy and head-bobbing brand of technical death metal. Complex rhythms, vocalist Chris Ojeda’s powerful vocal style and avant-garde guitar work of Tony Rohrbough are

what characterize the band as “progressive.” With lyrics touching on familiar West Virginia-related subjects as the Hatfields and McCoys, these guys are Mountaineers through and through. Along for the ride, but certainly not just hanging on Sunday night, are two other metal acts, Solar Burn and Reanimator. Solar Burn delivers a crusty, groove-laden variety of spectacularly mosh-worthy music straight out of the Steel City. This is a band that will make even the most timid of showgoers move with its big and burly, no frills presentation. If you are upset by the absence of a vocalist, it won’t matter – you’ll be too busy slamming into the person next to you to care. Completing the lineup with another band from the Mountain State is

metalsucks.net

Reanimator. Reanimator is from Weston, W. Va., and the group brings to the table a dose of modern death metal by way of bands like The Black Dahlia Murder. Guttural vocals, blast beats, dark guitar riffing and breakdowns are all hallmarks of the band’s barbarically heavy sound. In conclusion, these two unsigned acts will serve as incredibly heavy appetizers for Byzantine’s main course. They are so heavy, in fact, that if you are not careful you will have to ask for to-go boxes before Byzantine even takes the stage. Tickets are $12 if ordered online from 123pleasantstreet.com and $15 at the door. There will be free billiards available and a special $4 Bloody Mary offer in effect. The show is open to all ages. daa&e@mail.wvu.edu

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Jones Place 4 BR, 2.5 BA W/Covered Parking $625/person

Townhome Living Downtown 304-296-7400 scottpropertiesllc.com

S M I T H R E N TA L S , L L C 1 and 2 Bedroom Apartments For Rent Houses For Rent AVAILABLE MAY - Aug. 2012 Check out: www.smithrentalsllc.com

(304)322-1112 UPSCALE DOWNTOWN CONDO overlooking the waterfront and Rail-trail. Large, private bedroom and full bathroom, large closet and balcony. You will have run of the house. Large kitchen/dining room, living room, and utility room (W/D). enjoy the courtyard, exercise room, party room. Secure building with closed circuit cameras. Must have references. $1000/month includes all utilities. Available September 1. Call Larry at 703-786-8422.

“The Largest & Finest Selection of Properties”

DOWNTOWN PROPERTIES Phone: 304-413-0900

341 MULBERRY STREET close to Suncrest Park. Two Bdrm/one bath, single car garage. $950 per. Mo./yr. lease. 304-685-3457

PLUS UTILITIES

3/BR, 2/BA RANCH ON 1 ACRE W/ GARAGE. CAC. 10 minutes from both hospitals. $1000/mo + Utilities. NO PETS. Call 304-282-8769.

Glenlock Skyline

EVANSDALE PROPERTIES Phone 304-413-0900 24 Hour Emergency Maintenance & Enforcement Officer Off Street Parking

PLUS UTILITIES Ashley Oaks Valley View Copperfield

Phone: 304-413-0900

UNFURNISHED HOUSES

3BR/1.5BA HOUSE. Student housing at 511 Melrose Street. All appliances and parking included. $400/bedroom, $1200 total. Carmac LLC, 304-203-5953. AVAIL. 8/10 Nice 3BR/2BA. In Quiet Neighborhood. Close to most conveniences. Some upgrade/remodeling currently in progress. Grad Student Preferred. $1,080 + util. Call 304-288-5133, 304-598-2387, 304-296-8111 NICE 3BR/1BA. DECK. LARGE YARD. Near University Farm. On West Run Road. $735/month. plus Utilities. Deposit. 304-288-2740 or 304-291-6533. PINNACLE HEIGHTS TOWNHOME, 5 Hannah Lane, $1200/month+utilities, 2BR/1.5BA/1 car garage. Unfurnished, AC, W/D, dishwasher, deck, no smoking. 304-290-7727.

www.metropropertymgmt.net

ROOMMATES

INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES

MON. RIVER CONDOS. NEW 4/BR, 4/BA. WD/Pool. University-Commons. $1200/month, plus utilities. Available now. Call Paul Ragland at 304-291-1112

Metro Towers

NOW RENTING TOP OF FALLING RUN ROAD Morgan Point 1+2/BR $590-$790+ utilities. Semester lease. WD. DW. Parking. NO PETS. Call: 304-290-4834.

FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: for quiet, clean, 3 BR Apartment on Price Street. Close to downtown campus. Includes utilities, washer/dryer. AC, parking, 1.5 Bath. No Pets. $400+ deposit. 304-379-9851 or 304-680-6808

PRETE RENTAL APARTMENTS

Med. Center & PRT

2,3, AND 4 BR

Minutes to PRT 304-296-3919

NEW SUNNYSIDE TOWNHOMES

24 Hour Emergency Maintenance & Enforcement Officer Off Street parking

Within walking distance of UNFURNISHED FURNISHED

* 1BR * Remodeled, Attractive, Private * Heat included * Off-Street Parking * No Pets * Lease and Deposit

UNFURNISHED APARTMENTS

www.chateauroyale apartments.com

2BR APARTMENT South Park. New Central AC, W/D, New Kitchen, 2 car garage. $1100/mth. NO PETS. 304-288-2052 or 304-288-9978

PINEVIEW APARTMENTS

South Park!

Office Hours

PREGNANT? Loving West Virginia family seeks infant adoption. Let’s help each other! 304-216-5839 or weparent@comcast.net.

FURNISHED APARTMENTS

BARRINGTON NORTH. 2BR, 1BTH. Prices starting at $605. 304-599-6376. www.morgantownapartments.com

Monday-Thursday 8am-7pm Friday 8am - 5pm Satruday 10am - 4pm Sunday 12pm - 4pm

SPECIAL SERVICES “AFRAID YOU ARE PREGNANT?” Let’s make sure. Come to BIRTHRIGHT for free pregnancy test. Open Monday-Friday 10:00am-2:00pm. 364 High Street / RM 216 Call 296-0277 or 1-800-550-4900 anytime.

UNFURNISHED APARTMENTS

www.metropropertymgmt.net SUNNYSIDE 1 MINUTE WALK to campus. 1-2-3 BRS. Lease and deposit. NO PETS. Call 291-1000 for appointment.

UNFURNISHED APARTMENTS 1 & 2BR Downtown Location, Available May 15th. Parking. 304-685-6565 or 304-685-5210. 2 BR APT AVAILABLE MAY 15. Located on Grant Ave. $700 + utilities. Parking available. Monday-Friday 8am-4pm. 304-365-2787 or 304-777-0750. 2 BR on High Street - washer/dryer, balcony, dishwasher. 409 High Street. 304-322-0046. 2-3BR APARTMENT. Large rooms. University Avenue, Star City. NO PETS/SMOKING. Utilities included, lease/deposit. 304-692-1821 3BR APARTMENT (1 side of duplex), Large, W/D, Walk to Town&Campus, off street parking, $395/person, AVAILABLE NOW, call/text 304-290-3347.

EFF: 1BR: 2BR: Now Leasing For 2012

UNFURNISHED/FURNISHED OFF-STREET PARKING EVANSDALE / STAR CITY LOCATION LOCALLY OWNED ON-SITE MAINTENANCE MOST UNITS INCLUDE: HEAT, WATER, and GARBAGE SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED

Mountain Line Bus Service Every 10 Minutes and Minutes From PRT

304-599-4407

ABSOLUTELY NO PETS WWW.PRETERENTAL.COM SPACIOUS 1/BR APRT. Available now! $550 mo. 513 Clark St. Parking, NO PETS. Call Dave at 304-376-7282 or 304-292-7272.

STAR CITY 2BR 1BTH. Large carpeted D/W, W/D, gas, AC. No pets/smoking. Off street parking. $575 plus util. 304-692-1821

JUST LISTED! MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE for brand-new apt. Close to downtown. Next to Arnold Hall. WD, DW, AC, Parking. NO PETS. $420/mo includes utils. Lease/Deposit 304-296-8491 or 304-288-1572 MALE ROOMMATE WANTED for 3BR apartment on Price Street. 5 min walk to downtown campus. Includes utilities, w/d, dishwasher, air conditioner, parking, 1 1/2 bath. $390/mth plus/deposit. No Pets 304-698-3454 or 304-379-9851 MALE ROOMMATE WANTED. Grad-student. Private bedroom. Close to Evansdale campus. $210/mo+ ½utilities. kidwellmcclellan@yahoo.com & 304-292-3807. MUST SEE MALE / FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED close to Arnold Hall, excellent condition. WD and parking. Individual lease. $395-450 all utils included. 304.288.1572 or 304.296.8491 ROOMMATE WANTED 2½-BR 1/BA HOUSE. WESTOVER. 5/min from downtown. $425/mo including all utilities, W/D, free parking. 304-322-1230. ROOMMATE WANTED for 3 bedroom house. $400/month, includes utilities. 304-677-6634

HOUSES FOR SALE HOUSE FOR SALE In Westover. Call for Appointment. 304-292-1834

MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE 14 x 70 3BR, 2BTH. Central air, W/D, DW, Covered front porch, rear steps off Van Voorhis. 304-830-0782 14X70 FLEETWOOD (VOGUE). 2BR. with two private baths. 1 bath is a garden tub. Located at Blue Grass. Painted and clean, some quality furniture. 304-329-4535 or 304-568-2907

AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE CASH PAID!! WE BUY CARS and trucks. Any make! Any model! Any condition! 282-2560

MOTORCYCLES FOR SALE 2005 YAMAHA SCOOTER EXCELLENT condition. Great MPG. Great for around campus. $1,000. 304-276-0401

HELP WANTED BARTENDERS & cooks wanted. Bucket Head’s Pub. 10-mins from downtown, Morgantown. Small local bar, All Shifts Avail. 304-365-4565. BARTENDING UP TO $300 A DAY potential. No experience necessary. Age 18 plus. Training available. 800-965-6520 Ext. 285 BLACK BEAR HIRING cooks and dishwashers for Suncrest location. AM and PM shifts. Part-time and Full-time, including kitchen managers. Pay based on experience. Apply at 3119 University ave, next to the party store. BLACK BEAR HIRING FOR EVANSDALE location-line cooks, dishwashers, and kitchen managers. Cooks average $8-10/hour. Both am and pm shifts. Apply at 3119 University Avenue, next to party store. CAC NUDE FIGURE DRAWING models needed. $20/hour. Contact Katherine at 304-293-2552. CUSTOMER SERVICE Representative needed to work on behalf of our company. 18-yrs or above needed and you must have computer skills. Accounting experience not needed. Any job experience needed. You will earn up to $5,000 monthly. Contact us at: foxrun58@yahoo.com. HELP WANTED: Everyday’s a Party, Morgantown. Part Time. Flexible Schedules. Friendly Work Environment. Apply Within. 304-598-5556 INDESIGN, PHOTOSHOP, ILLUSTRATOR (Mac): min. 2 years experience; project work on as-needed basis. 304-599-3830, M-Th, 10-4 (no messages pls). JERSEY’S SUBS HIRING line cooks, drivers, and cashiers. Day or evening available. Apply in person 1756 Mileground. Mr. C’s WISEGUY CAFE looking for part-time cook and delivery driver. Phone 304.599.3636 or 304.288.2200 NOW HIRING Tudor’s Biscuit World. Suncrest and downtown locations. All Positions. Apply at 3071 University Ave. 304-241-1702 NOW HIRING WAITRESS’S apply in person after 8pm at 3395 University Ave. PT NATIONAL SALE POSITION with local “Green” Internet Company. 10-15hrs/week. $7/hr + comm. Send contact letter/resume to info@thegreenconnoisseur.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS MANDATORY MEETINGS for all interested in joining WVU’s Wrestling. Meetings will be held Tuesday, August 28th & Wednesday, August 29th at 4pm in the Jerry West Lounge. Must attend both meetings.


12 | PAGETITLE

THE DAILY ATHENAEUM

FRIDAY AUGUST 24, 2012

Fall add/drop dates The Office of the University Registrar registrar@mail.wvu.edu 304-293-5355 registrar.wvu.edu


The DA 08-24-2012