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Barometer The Daily

FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 2013 • OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY CORVALLIS, OREGON 97331

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Baseball looks for PAC-12 redemption against USC

VOLUME CXVI, NUMBER 123

OSU-Cascades campus in transition n

OSU campus in Bend will become 4 year university in 2015, will then welcome first freshman class By Alex Crawford The Daily Barometer

The same factors that make Bend one of the premiere tourist destinations in the state will also attract students to Oregon State UniversityCascades campus as it expands to a four-year university, officials from Bend say. “Higher education adds a significant stimulus to local tourism industries and OSU-Cascades will be no exception,” said Doug LaPlaca, president and CEO of Visit Bend, the city’s tourism bureau and sports commission. Becky Johnson, vice president of the Cascades campus, said the goal is for OSU-Cascades to have their first freshman class in the fall of 2015. The Oregon University System has already approved the expansion and OSU-Cascades is currently in the process of hiring faculty and establishing a physical campus. Currently, the university, which is the first and only branch

campus of OSU, only offers junior-, senior- and graduate-level courses. According to Johnson, visitors to the Oregon State University campus in Corvallis spend an average of $39 million a year. Many of the visitors to Corvallis come for sporting events, something that OSU-Cascades doesn’t yet offer. Still, move-in day, move-out day, sibling days, parent days and alumni days all provide occasions for friends and family of OSU-Cascades students to visit Bend. “Any university has a lot of visitors that come in addition to the students,” Johnson said. “In addition to eating at the restaurants, many will stay overnight. Many will ski at Mt. Bachelor. Also, a lot of people who come as tourists come to live in Bend later because they like it so [much].” LaPlaca noted the importance of tourism to the Bend area, saying it is hard to find a segment of the local economy that is not affected by tourism. “Tourism is a major pillar of Bend’s economy,” LaPlaca said. “There are 2.2 million visitors a year [in] Bend, and 80,000 year-round residents, that’s an enormous influx for an area of this size.”

Bend’s proximity to the Cascade Mountain Range and the Deschutes River makes it a mecca for outdoor enthusiasts. Taking advantage of Bend’s location, OSU-Cascades is one of the only schools in the nation to offer a degree in tourism and outdoor leadership. “We get a lot of students from across the country who are interested in that degree,” Johnson said. “There is no question that location is one of our key factors that we market and that will help brand us. You can get OSU-quality education in this unique location, with an incredible quality of life.” OSU President Ed Ray helped to provide the impetus to expand OSU-Cascades to a four-year school during a State of the University address he gave in Bend last spring. His call upon the university and the Bend area to expand OSUCascades was met with a standing ovation by the 1,000-person crowd in attendance. “Bend is the largest population area in the state of Oregon that doesn’t have its own fouryear university,” said Steve Clark, OSU vice president of university relations and marketing. “We support the state’s educational goals and support the Central Oregon population, economy and

community culture by helping to expand OSUCascades to a four-year university.” OSU-Cascade’s expansion is also in line with Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber’s 40-40-20 plan, the goal of which is for 40 percent of Oregonians to have an undergraduate degree or greater, 40 percent to have an associates degree or greater and 20 percent have at least a high school education by 2025. For the 40-40-20 plan to be effective, the state’s universities will have to take on an increase of tens of thousands of students each year. Clark noted that it would be unrealistic for the Corvallis campus of OSU to take on an additional 15,000 students each year, but by expanding OSU-Cascades, managing the growth of OSU and increasing online enrollment, the plan could see fruition. “To compete in today’s society and for Oregon to prosper as a place we need to improve the education achievement of all Oregonians,” Clark said.

Singing group has a ‘wunderbar’ time n

Vocaldente, an a capella group from Germany, brings comedy, melody to Corvallis By Ryan Dawes

The Daily Barometer

Vocaldente, a five-person a cappella group from Hanover, Germany, performed a concert at the Whiteside Theater Thursday. Members from the Corvallis community were treated to about two hours of crisp harmonies, witty jokes and an insight into German culture at the free event. “I think the whole audience, including myself, had a lot of fun,” said Sebastian Heiduschke, assistant professor of German at OSU. “The Whiteside was the perfect venue for this kind of event.” The concert opened with an arrangement whose original song, “Let’s Misbehave,” was a jazz piece written in the 1920s. The group explained after the song that it was the purpose for the night – to have Spaß, the German word for “fun.” The performance provided just that. See VOCALDENTE | page 2

On Twitter @dr_crawf news@dailybarometer.com

Campus Recycling to host Repair Fair n

Repair Fair volunteers to help attendees repair damaged items of all kinds on Monday The Daily Barometer

hannah gustin

| THE DAILY BAROMETER

Tim Ole Jöhnk, countertenor, Jakob Buch, tenor, Johannes “Johnny” Gruber, baritone, Tobias “Tobek” Kiel, tenor and Tobias Pasternack, bass, sing “Let’s Misbehave” at the Whiteside Theater on Thursday.

Oregon Dance offers unique creative outlet n

Alex Crawford, news reporter

Annual Oregon Dance spring concert takes place this weekend at the Majestic By Lara von Linsowe-Wilson The Daily Barometer

Oregon State University performance group Oregon Dance will be presenting its 34th annual spring concert for two days starting April 26, at the Majestic Theater in downtown Corvallis. In addition to the main troupe, the concert will also feature the OSU Vietnamese Dance Club and select students from Linn-Benton Community College and guest performers. “These concerts have given me an opportunity to pass on the wonderful legacy of modern dance,” said OSU professor of dance Carol Soleau, founder and artistic director for Oregon Dance. Soleau is going on her 36th year of teaching at Oregon State. To this day she believes there is no better place for modern dance than where it began, in universities. When Soleau first created Oregon Dance, it was a group of various dance teachers throughout Benton County. Then, as things began to pick up

speed, students were invited to perform in the concerts. Today, the troupe is made up entirely of OSU students. Although Corvallis is home to many talented dancers, OSU does not have an actual dance degree program, giving students few means to pursue their love for the art form. Instead, these stuR.L. Milstein CONTRIBUTED PHOTO dents were drawn to Oregon State for academic and other reasons, forcing them to leave their tap shoes and ballet slippers at home. Oregon Dance looks to give these students an outlet to keep the dance going. “The wonderful thing about Oregon Dance is that it’s for students without the benefit of a dance program,” Soleau said. “They grew up in dance. They love to dance. They are so happy to find a venue to keep up with their

passions.” Two of the dancers to be featured in this weekend’s performances are OSU students Sean Carrigg and Maryam Baghdadi. Carrigg, 21, has been dancing since the age of 10, and has been participating in Oregon Dance for the past two years. “Dance has allowed me to express myself in ways that can’t be done with words,” Carrigg said. “Dancing makes me feel free and allows many of my everyday stresses to dissolve away by providing a creative outlet.” Bagdadi, also 21 and a member of Oregon Dance for the past two years, has been dancing for a total of 16 years. “Dance to me means an escape where I can focus on whatever I want to focus on, instead of being told what to do,” Baghdadi said. One of the more serious pieces to be showcased, “Isle,” was written by Soleau’s brother. The dance explores the relationship between Adam See DANCE | page 2

Oregon State University Campus Recycling will host a Repair Fair on April 29, at the OSU Recycling Warehouse, from 6 to 8 p.m. Occurring twice a term, the event allows students and members of the community to bring in broken or damaged items. Volunteers may assist them in making repairs, as well as teach them how to mend it in the future. The repairs skills offered for this month’s events include: • Appliances (small items only) • Bicycles • Clothing (hand and machine sewing) • Computers (hardware and software) • Electronics (small items only) • Housewares (furniture, ceramics, lamps, etc.) Special demonstrations will also be offered throughout the event, each lasting 30 minutes in length. Running from 6:10 to 6:40 p.m., the first presentation will focus on home water conservation. The second will offer three quick sewing fixes and will be from 6:50 to 7:20 p.m. The final workshop will cover bike maintenance, and will take place from 7:30 to 8 p.m. Campus Recycling is responsible for managing a comprehensive waste management system at Oregon State University that focuses on reducing, reusing and recycling, with disposal as a last resort. More information about the program can be found at recycle.oregonstate.edu. news@dailybarometer.com


2• Friday, April 26, 2013

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WASHINGTON (CNN) — The U.S. Senate approved a measure on Thursday aimed at ending budget-related air traffic controller furloughs that have been blamed for widespread flight delays this week. A bipartisan agreement giving Transportation Department budget planners new flexibility for dealing with forced spending cuts cleared the chamber unanimously. “It will be good news for America’s traveling public if Congress spares them these unnecessary delays,” White House spokesman Jay Carney said. “But ultimately, this is no more than a temporary Band-Aid that fails to address the overarching threat to our economy posed by the sequester’s mindless across the board cuts.” The House was expected to take up the proposal on Friday. The plan also would allow authorities to protect 149 control towers at small and medium-sized airports that are slated for closure for budgetary reasons. Controller furloughs and the planned closure of towers that are privately run but overseen by federal aviation regulators have become political flash points in the partisanfueled debate over spending in Washington. They have been highlighted by many to illustrate a clear nationwide consequence of the $85 billion in government-wide cuts that took effect in March and may otherwise not be apparent to the public. Vocal and politically powerful aviation interests have argued that the budget cuts affecting their industry would hurt business, travelers and cost jobs. More than 600 million people fly U.S. airlines each year, figures show.

VOCALDENTE n Continued from page 1 The group sang a cappella arrangements, without the use of microphones or anything else other than their bodies, of songs from a variety of genres, ranging from a German lullaby to an a cappella version of a song that originally was from the nu-metal genre. “We try to cover all different types of music,” said Tobek Kiel, who sings first tenor in the group. During songs, they also manipulated the sounds of instruments such as horns, violins and drums with their voices. Their precision brought a positive reaction from the audience.

Furloughs affecting some 15,000 Federal Aviation Administration air traffic controllers began this week with the agency saying it had no flexibility to avert them without action by Congress. Under the sweeping austerity triggered by congressional inaction on deficit reduction, the FAA was required to cut $600 million from its budget. The proposal approved by the Senate would allow the Transportation Department to adjust funding to “prevent reduced operations and staffing” for the remainder of the current federal budget year, which expires on September 30. More than 863 flight delays were attributable to furlough-related staffing shortages on Wednesday at air traffic facilities in Chicago, New York, Washington, Cleveland, Jacksonville, Los Angeles, Detroit and Dallas, the FAA said. By comparison, there were more than 2,100 delays due to weather and other factors, the agency said. Controllers are spacing planes farther apart at key centers so they can manage traffic with current staffing, the FAA said. The deal designed to loosen the grip of spending cuts on aviation moved quickly through the Senate. “Something rare has happened in Washington; the Senate came together on a bipartisan basis to put common sense before politics,” said Republican Sen. Jerry Moran of Kansas. Maine Republican Sen. Susan Collins said she worried that continued FAA furloughs could jeopardize jobs throughout the travel and hospitality industry.

Along with their singing, the group also danced and added some small theatrical performances into several of the songs. Between songs, they used humor as transitions, which sent the majority of the audience into a roar of laughter. A song that brought forth a very enthusiastic reaction was an arrangement of “I’m A Country Boy,” where air-fiddling, mock horse-riding and several other western spoofs was included in it. “I’m glad they included that song,” Heiduschke said. “It was my favorite.” Volcadente was founded in 2004, consisting of two tenors, a countertenor, a baritone and a bass. Since then, it has

DANCE n Continued from page 1 and Eve as they first encounter the world. When it comes to choreographing her own dances, however, Soleau likes to make sure the audience leaves with a smile on their face. “One of the things I take very seriously is humor,” Soleau said. Carrigg and Baghdadi will perform as a duet for a comedic piece written by Soleau called “Can We Dance?”. “It’s about two awkward kids who obviously cannot dance, no matter how hard

POLICE BEAT compiled from Corvallis, county and OSU logs

The Daily Barometer

Burning down the house: On April 24, at 7:00 p.m., Oregon State Police was dispatched to an exploded pipe next to a building east of McNary Hall on 11th Street, and determined it to have been a burnt cigarette receptacle. At the same time a Department of Public Services student officer came upon a post that had smoke coming out of it. Apparently students have been stuffing cigarettes in the posts and using them as ashtrays. Liar, liar, pants on fire: On April 22, officers responded to a fire alarm activation at the International Living-Learning Center. A fire alarm had been pulled on the first floor. After everyone was allowed back into the building, Wei-Shiang Lin came forward and admitted that he pulled the alarm by mistake. After reviewing the tape it was apparent that he pulled the alarm intentionally. He was contacted between classes and transported to Benton County, where he was cited and released.

built up a name for itself locally in Germany, and by 2008 it began frequently touring internationally. They have won awards at several international choral competitions. “It’s a great thing to get to see the world doing what you love to do,” said Christoph Grasse, who sings countertenor. “You also get to see places and connect with people from other countries in ways that you probably would never get to as a tourist.” The vocal group performs songs of which they arrange themselves, specifically contemporary and modern music from the past 100 years. They also have written their own pieces. Stylistically, they focus on keeping their performance

they try,” Carrigg said. “They fall asleep and dream they are the best dancers in the world, only to wake up and realize their hopes were a little too high. I’d have to say this one is my favorite.” Soleau seems excited about the performance as well. “My students this year are a wonderful group of really talented young people, and I think the audience will be really surprised about the innovative ideas and how good the dancers make them feel,” Soleau said. “I love to do it, and that’s why I’m still here,” Soleau added. “34 years is quite a

as acoustic as possible, doing their best to stay away from microphones and other technical aid. “By doing a cappella, you have your instrument, which is your voice, with you all the time,” Kiel said. “You don’t need any amplification, and there is also nothing separating you from your audience.” Volcadente intends to perform many more times in the future, and they plan to return to Corvallis. To express their appreciation of the town and their desire to return, they say: “The audience in Corvallis is fantastic,” Kiel said. “We look forward to visiting again.” Ryan Dawes, news reporter news@dailybarometer.com

long time.” The show will start at 7:30 p.m. both days, and ticket prices are $15 general admission, $10 for students and seniors. All members of the OSU community are encouraged to attend, with all money going back to the dance program to help keep the arts alive on campus. “The purpose of the show is to entertain,” Baghdadi concluded. “There is a large variety of pieces, some serious, some funny, and even guest performers in order to incorporate everyone’s tastes.” Lara von Linsowe-Wilson, news reporter news@dailybarometer.com

Calendar Friday, April 26 Meetings OSU Chess Club, 5-7pm, MU Commons. Players of all levels welcome.

Speakers Pride Center, 3-4pm, Pride Center. Educational event focusing on trans* health and its various aspects, difficulties, and resources. Brenda McComb and Beth Wasylow are presenting. Become a more informed individual.

Events OSU College Republicans, Noon4pm, MU Quad. 2nd Amendment Week. Many events including a concealed handgun class, guest speaker Lars Larson and a drawing for a firearm. Pride Center, 4-6pm, Upper Dixon Classroom. Locker Room Health: Mental & Physical. Learn and discuss the many obstacles that those in the queer community and the heterosexual community face when using the locker rooms at Dixon. M.E.Ch.A. de OSU, 10pm, Snell International Forum. Celebrate our 20th Anniversary as an established student organization! Dance the night away! Free pastel (cake)! OSU Music Department, Noon, MU Lounge. Music a la Carte - Platypus Clarinet Orchestra. Audience members are welcome to bring lunch to enjoy during the performance. The Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center, 4-6pm, BCC Snell Hall 427. Birthday Bash 2013. Celebrate the BCC’s 38th historical birthday celebration. Join us for free food, a scavenger hunt and history of struggles and successes the BCC’s gone through.

Saturday, April 27 Events Pride Center, 10am-Noon, Langton 301. Self-defense class. Ronie Carper will give a brief, crash course on self defense for the OSU community.

Monday, April 29 Events Campus Recycling, 6-8pm, OSU Recycling Warehouse. April Repair Fair Bring your broken items and questions; volunteers will help you learn how to repair your things. The Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center, 4-6pm, MU Journey Room. SPEED Friending! Be sure to make new friends and great connections that will last a lifetime. Free food will be provided.

Tuesday, April 30 Meetings ASOSU Senate, 7pm, MU 211. Weekly meeting. Educational Activities Committee, 5:30-7pm, Student Media Conference Room, 120 MU East/Snell Hall. Discuss funding requests and policy changes. Women’s Center, 1-2:30pm, MU Board Room. Women’s Center Advisory Board meeting.

Events Leaders Empowering Asian and Pacific Islanders at OSU, 11am4pm, MU Quad. Asian & Pacific American Heritage Month Kickoff! Join us for games, cake and company!

Wednesday, May 1 Meetings ASOSU House of Representatives, 7-8:30pm, MU 211. Weekly meeting.

Events Asian & Pacific Cultural Center, 4-6pm, APCC 27th & Jackson. Come learn about how the lei is used in the Hawaiian culture! Lei making and information is provided.

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The Daily Barometer 3 •Friday, April 26, 2013

Editorial

Yeas & Nays Y

ea to the sun. Yea to warm weather. Yea to blooming flowers. Yea to shorts and to spring dresses. Nay to all of the above making attending class a task beyond our abilities. Yea to teachers letting us have class outside like in high school. Nay to major allergy flare-ups because of it. Yea to the term being almost half over. Nay to all the midterms coming up next week. Yea to the end of spring term being in sight. Nay to realizing that summer term is just behind it. Yea to growing up and realizing that most adults work year round, but we still don’t have to. Nay to getting shocked by the static electricity in the door handle. For once, we want to touch the doorknob without pain. Yea to ice cream. Nay to classes that devolve into hour-long discussions of the “Harry Potter” novels instead of actually discussing what the class is about. We really wish we could learn what we signed up to learn in the class, instead of just feeling like our hundreds of dollars are getting flushed down the toilet because that one loud-mouthed kid in the front of the class takes over the conversation and keeps raising his hand instead of allowing the professor to do her job and teach us. Yea to technology being so far advanced that we can ignore all of this because we have the ability to watch a live baseball game on our phones. Not paying attention in class has never been easier. Nay to drama once again embroiling ASOSU. Nay to there being a little bit of schadenfreude about it amongst certain officials and people. Yea to those of you who know what schadenfreude is without reaching for a dictionary. Yea to keeping government accountable. Nay to going about it in a regrettable manner. Yea to all the great work done by Extension Services. Nay to many of those important services facing budget cuts throughout the state. Yea to Larry Roper. He is respected by many, and will be missed as vice provost of student affairs. Nay to posting things you shouldn’t on the Internet. Yea to new laws being considered in Salem that would prevent employers from demanding access to employees’ social media accounts. Yea to boat shoes. Yea to being on water. It’s time for a mini vacation. Yea to it being Friday. Go enjoy the sunshine, get outside, climb a mountain, see some trees or enjoy the Saturday market. Or, take a Benedryl after your allergies hit and spend most of the day indoors sleeping. Stay frosty, children. t

Editorials serve as means for Barometer editors to offer

commentary and opinions on issues both global and local, grand in scale or diminutive. The views expressed here are a reflection of the editorial board’s majority.

Letters

Letters to the editor are welcomed and will be printed on a first-received basis. Letters must be 300 words or fewer and include the author’s signature, academic major, class standing or job title, department name and phone number. Authors of e-mailed letters will receive a reply for the purpose of verification. Letters are subject to editing for space and clarity. The Daily Barometer reserves the right to refuse publication of any submissions. The Daily Barometer c/o Letters to the editor Memorial Union East 106 Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331-1617 or e-mail: editor@dailybarometer.com

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forum@dailybarometer.com

‘Ask an ethicist’

values conflict and how to cultivate ethical habits are long standing and Greetings members of the Oregon important avenues of inquiry. Every State University community. My week I intend to offer my perspective name is Thomas McElhinny, and on situations sourced from the OSU with the help of my cohorts in the community, and perhaps punctuate applied ethics master’s program here by answering emails with original at OSU, I would like to help address content I find important, interesting any ethical conundrums, concerns and nutritive. and challenges we might face. Speaking of emails: I need your Discussing ethical concerns, and morality more generally, are often help. Do you have an interesting ethivolatile conversations. Questions cal question or situation in your life? concerning what it might mean to Email me at: AskAnEthicistOSU@ live a “good” life, how to act when gmail.com. It can be anything from

a concern about lifestyle choices, conflicts with neighbors or business practices here in Corvallis. Surely, this is not an exhaustive list and I expect to see some novel questions. My aim in this column is not simply about “solving” ethical puzzles, but about engaging the OSU community in a discourse centered on ethical issues. I hope this column will not only unlock some of the expertise already available in our networks, but expand it. See you next week.

Should we encourage neo-Nazi, arsonist murderers?

D

ear Ask an Ethicist, I’m a huge fan of the amazing band, Mayhem. As I am sure you are aware, the lead singer, Count Grishnackh, is currently in jail for killing another band member because he was becoming more satanic than him. After he broke out of jail and began burning down churches — to keep a low profile, obviously — he was reincarnated and began the band Burzum. Am I a bad person if I purchase his music? -Robin Graves Thanks so much for your question, Robin. I was not acutely aware of this situation but I have seen the documentary, “Metal: A Headbanger’s Journey,” which briefly outlines some of Count Grishnackh’s more nefarious

deeds along with an interesting anthropological exploration of various metal genres. To take this question down to its more moral root, it seems as though the question at hand has more to do with how we use our consumerist “vote” to support various firms or organizations. Another version of your question might be something like, “X business is causing Y harm: Am I in any way responsible for perpetuating Y harm by providing material resources to X business?” In this more abstract case, it seems fairly straightforward that by some sort of transitive property of harm you are participating in said harm, or at least helping to See ETHICIST | page 7

Letters to the Editor Response to Murga’s April 23 column

thoughts and feelings about a person that. I see it as unprofessional Murga’s nonproductive hatred like and like ridiculous high school gosHunter Murga wrote an article sip. Rosoff is very sincere and cares under the guise of representing an about those around him. He cares opinion displaying the importance to make social changes needed of teaching science to our youth with for equality. He motivated me to information containing the outlook run with him for ASOSU because held by the scientific community I believe he has the heart to make rather than from historical religious the changes needed for the equality traditions. Instead, what ensued that we all deserve. I do not think was an anti-religious rant slinging it is your place or duty to write mud at anyone of faith. The image such reports on Rosoff, or on any made of evolution supporters, such individual. I request that you stop as myself, came off appearing angry writing such off-setting and negative and somewhat asinine. comments about Rosoff. Murga painted this angry scientist Joyce Contreras image by generalizing a religious College of Public Health sect and blatantly referring to the and Human Sciences Southern Baptist Convention as “the dumbing down of America.” The next letters are in response Statements of this sort have no to Resto’s April 22 guest column place in the debate about whether The r-word is not acceptable to teach current scientific concepts In response to “‘Retarding’ our or ancient traditions. They only serve to insult Christians and make language, political correctness and the writer, and those he’s trying to the like,” by Armand Resto, politirepresent, appear foolishly stuck-up. cally-correct references do shy away Furthermore, the irrelevant plea from emotions. The r-word kills the about not being a “heartless com- dignity and hope of social accepmie” is a very ignorant one and actu- tance of a person who has struggled ally fuels the argument about being with an intellectual or developmena heartless atheist instead. Murga tal disability their whole life. Words claims he doesn’t “like religion in are powerful and they do promote places it doesn’t belong.” His largest cultural attitude and change. Using flaw is allowing hatred in where it the r-word is disrespectful and offendoesn’t belong and isn’t productive sive to people with or without I/ within a debate. Words of anger, DD [Intellectual/Developmental such as those I read April 23, are the Disabilities] because it is used in a real driving force responsible for derogatory manner. In 2010, Barack hindering societal progress toward Obama signed bill S. 2781 eliminatteaching current science in schools ing the use of the words “mental — no matter from which side of the retardation” and “mentally retarded” and exchanging them with “intelargument they come. As a supporter of evolution and lectual disability.��� The r-word may other current science being taught not be used in federal health, educain public schools, I’m offended and tion and labor policy. It is not just a ashamed of the opinion displayed by politically correct thing, it is a respect Murga’s article. If we are ever to make thing. Using the r-word mocks a real progress at teaching our next group of people. There is a campaign generation to be open-minded, our that asks people to pledge to stop current one is going to have to view using the r-word at www.r-word.org. debates more objectively and stop Their explanation proves my point: “When they were originally introthe useless mudslinging in order to duced, the terms ‘mental retardation’ come to conclusions about productive teaching practices for our youth. or ‘mentally retarded’ were medical Dylan Beorchia terms with a specifically clinical Senior studying plant biology connotation; however, the pejorative forms, ‘retard’ and ‘retarded’ have been used widely in today’s society Barometer coverage of Nick Rosoff degrade and insult people with Coverage biased, unprofessional to intellectual disabilities. Additionally, I am a close friend of Nick Rosoff. when ‘retard’ and “retarded’ are used I have a concern in which you have as synonyms for ‘dumb’ or ‘stupid’ been biased and pinpointing Rosoff by people without disabilities, it with reports about him and ASOSU. only reinforces painful stereotypes It is not fair or even appropriate of people with intellectual disabilito publicly express your personal ties being less valued members of

humanity.” Fellow students, the r-word has become a part of our speech and it is not acceptable. Times are a changin’. Stop yourself from saying the hateful word. Sasha Kramer Human Development & Family Science Senior in public health and human science

Silence the r-word epithet Individuals with Intellectual and/ or Developmental Disabilities (I/ DD) and those who love them have been nationally active campaigning against the r-word since at least 1996. They worked to change the name of the organization that serves them: The Arc. For more evidence of in-crowd outcry, ask any person experiencing life with I/DD about the r-word. In the body language alone, you will see a demonstration of a long history of painful marginalization associated with the r-word. You will be compelled to apologize. However beautifully written, the argument offered to support the use of the r-word boils down to “the end justifies the means.” This is not so. My concern for individuals far exceeds my requirement for immediate visceral reactions to my statements. Powerful discourse with sword-like words can take a back seat to human kindness. We may not change the world quickly by removing a painful epithet from common speech. However, we can take the initial step by removing that thoughtless, discriminatory barb, the most typical use of the r-word. Self-esteem matters to the quality of life for each of us. Let’s shield it with our words. People with disabilities are the largest minority in America, represented in every demographic, and they have families and staff that care deeply about them. If you can’t avoid the r-word for all these people, change your behavior for yourself. Rebelling against “political correctness,” is counterproductive to personal gain. Please join me and The Arc to promote the silencing of the r-word epithet. It adds to the emotional challenges of individuals experiencing life with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. That is a “means” to avoid. Karin Fredrick Executive Director The Arc of Benton County

Don

Iler

@doniler

What I learned in college: College is mostly a waste

I

’m 28. I have nothing wise to say about the world. But, when I thought about how I only had weeks left at Oregon State, I figured I should go out with a walk-off homerun, the sort of thing that wins the game and keeps people talking long after you’ve left the field. So in the coming weeks I am going to be looking at things I would like to change and reflecting on others. I am not going to say college has been an entire waste of time, but it has been underwhelming. Instead of it being the life-defining challenge with a mixture of selfdevelopment and full of fun and partying, college has been an expensive exercise in self-control amidst frustration. It has been frustrating having to take classes where I learned absolutely nothing — like HHS 231, because seriously, I don’t need a 10-week class telling me I need to eat more veggies, drink less and exercise more — or just general eye-rolling and boredom, like my history class earlier this week where members of the class discussed their favorite novels and personal life for 90 minutes. I know a college degree is valuable, and I’m not going to drop out five weeks away from getting my degree. I am also not saying that universities or liberal arts educations are not valuable, or at least valuable to some. But it hasn’t been to me. Perhaps it is because I am a bit of an autodidact, a self-taught person. I love to read books. Even when I wasn’t going to school, I would read novels or non-fiction books, whether they were about history or journalism. But college is mostly a $10,000-a-year experiment where some intelligent people tell you what books to read, and you either write about it or talk about it or both. I like talking about the books I read. Over a beer or coffee I’ve been known to go through whatever ideas are floating through my head. So I don’t see the benefit of paying money so I can listen to others talk about ideas, especially when it seems like most of the students who participate in class discussion are just saying what they think the teacher wants to hear, or just love the sounds of their own voices. I seek out people who are smart, and I ask them what they are reading. In fact, I have several stacks of books sitting around my house waiting to be read that were either purchased by me or given to me. So I am definitely going to continue reading and educating myself long after I leave college, much like I did before I arrived. For many, college is the last time they will pick up a book or they will engage in discourse about anything, and college might be for them. But for those of us who will continue to read and remain knowledgeable, do we truly need college? I’m not sure we do. Universities are good for putting together intelligent people, and providing researchers the resources they need to solve important problems. But as an undergrad, I have felt like I have been marking time, spending many a class staring listlessly out the window or rolling my eyes when that one person in the front of the class starts talking, yet again, derailing the whole lecture. Most times, I leave class frustrated or bored, instead of feeling intellectually challenged or See ILER | page 7


The Daily Barometer 4 • Friday, April 26, 2013

Sports

Inside sports: Men’s soccer hosts U-23 Portland Timbers page 6 sports@dailybarometer.com • On Twitter @barosports

Beaver Tweet of the Day “Timing is everything. If I didnt get home @ that exact moment I wouldn't of seen that huge spider run across my floor. #ipouncedandkilledit”

@Nat_Meiggs16 Natalie Meiggs

Warner

Strausbaugh @WStrausbaugh

All eyes will be on the QBs, as they should be T

welve months ago, a quarterback emerged in a spring game. It happened 45 miles south of Corvallis. Marcus Mariota, still a relatively unknown redshirt freshman at the time, put on a clinic at the University of Oregon football team’s spring game. Mariota was in the midst of a quarterback battle with Bryan Bennett. Bennett came in as the favorite to win the job. He had experience as Darron Thomas’ backup (369 passing yards, six touchdowns and no interceptions). Mariota was on the scout team. But Mariota’s eye-opening performance last April — he completed 18 of 26 passes (69.2 percent) for 209 yards, one touchdown, one interception, 106 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns — was the first step on his way to winning the starting spot. Mariota ended up being the Pac-12 Offensive Freshman of the Year, First Team All-Pac-12 and the constant for the nation’s fourth-best offense. Bennett transferred to Southeastern Louisiana. That’s the end of the Ducks talk, but the point resonates in Corvallis. The spring game can matter, especially when the starting quarterback position is nebulous. It’s funny how much can change in a year. When two quarterbacks were battling for a spot on “Team Nike,” the Beavers had their guy. Sean Mannion was the starter — no questions asked. He was the quarterback of the future for a team that appeared to be rebuilding after a combined 8-16 record in 2010 and 2011. On a team bursting with talented underclassmen at nearly every position, Mannion was the catalyst behind a team built to win in a year or two. Then, to the surprise of most, the Beavers kept winning. After Mannion tore the meniscus in his left knee and required surgery, Cody Vaz picked up right where Mannion and the Beavers left off. See STRAUSBAUGH | page 6

COMING SOON Friday, April 26 Softball vs. No. 22 Arizona 3 p.m., OSU Softball Complex Women’s Track OSU High Performance Meet, 3 p.m. Whyte Track and Field Center No. 5 Baseball vs. USC 4:05 p.m., Goss Stadium

Saturday, April 27 Men’s Soccer vs. Portland Timbers U-23s 11 a.m., Paul Lorenz Field No. 5 Baseball vs. USC 2:05 p.m., Goss Stadium Softball vs. No. 22 Arizona 3 p.m., OSU Softball Complex Women’s Rowing Oregon State Classic TBA, Lowell, Ore.

Courtesy of hank hager

| OSU ATHLETICS

Baseball looks to bounce back n

After losing 2 of 3 against UW last weekend, OSU aims for a series win against Southern California at home By Andrew Kilstrom The Daily Barometer

When asked what his team needs to do to beat USC this weekend after losing a conference series to Washington last weekend, head coach Pat Casey responded with three words: “play better baseball.” Last weekend, the No. 5 Beavers (31-8, 11-4 Pac12) dropped the first two games of a three-game series to Washington, before getting wins in game three and then against Seattle U in a 14-inning thriller. “It’s hard for people to understand the game of baseball,” Casey said. “It’s not as easy or as fixed as people would think. It’s hard to play, it’s hard to win, it’s hard to catch the ball, it’s hard to get the ball to bounce where you want it to bounce and we just

shot ourselves in the foot [against Washington].” Getting a series victory against USC (16-23, 8-10) will be important if OSU wants to remain in first place in the Pac-12 standings. Oregon State already started the process with the win over Seattle U on Monday. While it took the Beavers 14 innings, getting the win was the most important thing. “Seattle U, ever since I’ve been here, has played us really tough,” said junior catcher Jake Rodriguez. “That was a huge win for us.” The hero in Monday’s win was junior reliever Scott Schultz. Schultz threw the last 7 1/3 innings of the game, allowing no runs and only two hits. The right-hander established himself as OSU’s best pitcher out of the bullpen last season, and has continued where he left off. “[Schultz] was awesome,” Rodriguez said. “I don’t think the coaching staff wanted to throw him that long, but he just kept coming in the dugout saying, ‘give me the ball, give me the ball’, and he took it

upon himself to stay in the game.” Pitching has been Oregon State’s strong suit all season, but the Beavers struggled on Saturday against Washington. The staff could get a lift soon with the anticipated return of sophomore Jace Fry. Fry was arguably OSU’s best pitcher last season, before the left-hander injured his elbow in the NCAA Regionals. The injury required Tommy John surgery, but Fry threw a live bullpen at Thursday’s practice, and could be ready in the next couple weeks. “He’s really close and I’m excited for him,” Casey said. “Everybody felt like he was going to be ready to go last weekend and we didn’t want to do that. When he’s ready he’ll be ready, and we just don’t want to push it.” Fry started last season, but because he’s returning from serious surgery and OSU already has three See BASEBALL | page 6

Beavers host last meet of year, 2nd since 1988 OSU looks to improve upon last week’s encouraging performance at Oregon Relays

any place for them to sit. They bring their blankets and they’re cheering for Oregon State because they want to see their team, and we are their team for once.” In 1988, the track and field, and By Alex McCoy cross-country programs were cut due The Daily Barometer After a promising weekend in to budget restraints. After the Wayne Eugene at the Oregon Relays, the Valley Stadium was torn down, alums Oregon State women’s track and field lost hope in seeing a program that they team will host its second home meet dedicated their college careers to. But of the season, and only the second in in 2003, the university needed to add a women’s sport to comply with Title IX. 25 years. “To credit the university, the adminThe Beavers hosted their first home meet on March 23, and have been istration, President Ray and Bob itching for another chance to compete Decaroulous, the AD at the time, they could’ve just added women’s tennis,” at home since then. said assistant coach Travis Floeck. “It felt great,” said senior Lauren “They already have the courts, get Graebner. “It was really fun being out some rackets and a coach and boom, kevin ragsdale | THE DAILY BAROMETER here. There were a lot of people, so it there you go.” Sophomore Kaitlyn Mason gets a running start in the long jump last weekend was exciting to see the support, espeSee TRACK | page 5 at the Oregon Relays. cially when we don’t have bleachers or n


sports@dailybarometer.com • On Twitter @barosports 

Friday, April 26, 2013 • 5

OSU wants to build off last weekend n

Softball attempts to use last week’s upset victory over No. 10 Cal as momentum for a weekend series with No. 23 Arizona By Grady Garrett The Daily Barometer

vinay bikkina

| THE DAILY BAROMETER

Senior Marina Demore delivers a pitch against Stanford on April 2. OSU hopes to improve its postseason chances this weekend.

Football plays spring game Friday n

OSU plays annual spring game Friday, televised on Pac-12 Networks By Sarah Kerrigan The Daily Barometer

Oregon State football takes the field at Reser Stadium Friday night for the spring football game, which will culminate spring camp. It’s a chance for students and fans to get a glimpse of what the 2013 season will look like for the Beavers. It is also a chance for the younger players to get a better feel for what game day preparations feel like. “There’s a little bit of hype with it, fans come out to watch,” said head coach Mike Riley. “It’s good for some guys because it has a different feel than practice.” Spring games in the past have taken the format of a controlled scrimmage between an even distribution of first-and second-string players. It is expected to be a similar format this year, as well. However, this year the game is to be televised on the Pac-12 Networks. Riley said that having the game televised does not change how he is going to approach the game. He does not want to change anything that might add a higher risk of injury to his players before fall camp. That being said, the players are excited for the game and

the chance to play in front of fans again. “Guys are really juiced for the spring game,” said sophomore running back Storm Woods. “The community’s talking about it, people on Twitter are hitting us up, so we’re excited to get out here and show people what we’ve got.” Fans can expect the players to come out with intensity like a real game. That game day mentality is good practice for the younger players to adjust to the more electric setting. “I think it is good for the young guys to get that feel of getting ready for a game and go through a game day scenario,” said junior quarterback Sean Mannion. The spring game is more intense than a normal practice, but the players also try not to let the extra hype affect their game. “I try not to psych myself out about the spring game,” Mannion said. “But I think it’s important to finish on a strong note.” The scrimmage format allows the players to focus on particular aspects of the game, depending on the situation the coaches present. The players are looking to take advantage of the game-like situation to hone their skills one final time before the offseason. Sarah Kerrigan, sports reporter On Twitter @skerrigan123 sports@dailybarometer.com

The Oregon State softball team received just one vote in this week’s USA Today coaches poll, the fewest it’s received this season. But ask the Beavers (27-17, 4-11 Pac-12), who welcome No. 23 Arizona to town this weekend, and they’ll say things are trending up. OSU is coming off a 1-0 win over No. 10 California on Sunday. The win, which snapped a streak of 13 consecutive losses to Cal, came on the Golden Bears’ home field and against the reigning Pac-12 Pitcher of the Year, Jolene Henderson. “It was a really big win,” said senior shortstop Elizabeth Santana. “It’s been awhile since we’ve beat Cal, so that win was definitely good. It was even sweeter because we beat them with their No. 1 pitcher.” OSU’s Tina Andreana pitched a complete

TRACK n Continued from page 4 “But they looked at the history of the sport, track and cross-country. The school’s very first national championship was in cross-country, men’s cross-country, in 1961. The track program was very competitive, it had Olympians, gold medalists; Dick Fosbury created the ‘Fosbury flop’— I mean, it was a very storied program.” With Tracktown USA just down the street, and knowing the school’s history in the sport, the university decided to bring back the women’s cross-country team and women’s distance in track, without a facility, 16 years after the programs were disbanded. Although this came with much excitement, the administration had to be ready to answer tough questions like, “When are

game, two-hitter in the win. “Tina was fantastic throwing a two-hitter against the No. 10 team,” said head coach Laura Berg. “Yet at the same time, it’s frustrating to know that we can do that all the time.” Consistency has been an issue for the Beavers all season, as they’ve beaten quality opponents such as Cal and No. 17 Stanford yet been blown out by unranked teams such as Utah. This weekend, their test comes in the form of the Wildcats, who have struggled with consistency themselves lately. Arizona (28-19, 5-10) has lost six of its last eight and resides in second-to-last in the Pac-12, just ahead of the last-place Beavers. Arizona’s downward spiral began on April 9, with a nonconference loss to New Mexico State, and has included three losses to Oregon and two losses to UCLA since then. The losses to the Bruins, which occurred last weekend, are particularly eye-popping considering the lopsided scores of 13-3 and 9-1. OSU lost two of three against Arizona in Tucson, Ariz., last season. “They’re a scrappy team, they play quick softball, they play lots of bunts, lots of slaps,” Santana said. “They’re a speed team. Mike

Candrea, he’s a smart coach. He’s going to try and cause some havoc.” Candrea is in his 28th year as UA’s head coach, and has won eight national titles and made it to 21 CollegeWorld Series in that time. He also served as head coach of the Untied States national team — which Berg played on — for the 2004 and 2008 Olympic Games. “I played for Coach Candrea with the national team, so I know they rely a lot on being aggressive, causing people to try and hurry up, speed the game up,” Berg said. With No. 6 Oregon and No. 16 UCLA the only two conference series remaining for the Beavers, this weekend may be their best opportunity — on paper, at least — to pick up a second conference series win and strengthen their NCAA Tournament at-large profile. “We’re just trying to take that into Arizona and stick it to Arizona,” Andreana said. “They’re a quality team, they’re ranked, they’re Arizona, they have a name. But very beatable.”

you going to build a track?” and “When are you going to bring back the men’s program?” “They’ve been open to all that,” Floeck said. “And they’ve been working beside our program, which is why this facility is here, which is all fundraised and donor driven. Now this year we’ve been able to add throwers, jumpers and hurdlers. And then being able to put on meets is gigantic too.” The Whyte Track and Field Center is only phase one of a three-phase process. Phase two is adding all the amenities to the track: bleachers, scoreboard and an entryway. Phase three is reinstating the men’s program with an endowment — all of which will be paid for by fundraising. The Beavers were joined by the University of Portland and Willamette University earlier this season in Corvallis

for their first home meet, and although today marks the last home meet for the Beavers, the team is more eager to compete than ever. “I’m a little sad, but I’m excited to compete out here at home again and have all of my friends, who have never seen me jump before, get to watch and to get to compete with everyone,” said senior high jumper Kristin Oenning. Athletes from all over the state will be competing in Corvallis Friday, including athletes from UP, Western Oregon, Concordia, Southern Oregon, some postcollegiate unattached athletes and the University of Oregon. The Ducks had approached the team last fall about hosting a meet this weekend, and the Beavers jumped at the chance. “We’re calling it a high-performance meet, because we have entry standards and we want to see really good competitions and really fast races,” Floeck said. “We envision this meet as being a place where athletes from our program and other programs throughout the state and country can come here, and run fast and get good marks in the field events, and chase qualifying marks for national races, regional races and championship races.” Most track and field athletes will be competing at the Whyte Track and Field Center, aside from junior Taylor Nowlin, who will travel down to Stanford, Calif., on Sunday for the Payton Jordan Invitational in hopes of improving her mark for the Pac-12 regional meet in the 3,000-meter steeple chase. “Obviously, there’s a lot going on that day between the spring game, and baseball and softball,” Floeck said. “But if people are big fans of track and field, this is going to be one of the best meets this year in the state of Oregon.” Events will kick off at 3 p.m. for the BeaversFriday afternoon at the Whyte Track and Field Center, located next to the softball and baseball fields.

kevin ragsdale

OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

MOMS & FAMILY WEEKEND 2013 MAY 3-5

Merchandise on sale beginning April 29 in Memorial Union 103 and at the MUPC Welcome Table May 3rd & 4th in the MU Concourse. For more information about the schedule of events, check out mu.oregonstate.edu/mupc/momsweekend

| THE DAILY BAROMETER

Junior Taylor Nowlin leaps a hurdle in the 3,000-meter steeple chase at the Oregon Relays. Nowlin is the only Beaver competing at Stanford instead of Corvallis.

Contact Don Iler, Editor-in-Chief, editor@dailybarometer.com or stop by 118 MU East/Snell Hall

Grady Garrett, sports reporter On Twitter @gradygarrett sports@dailybarometer.com

Alex McCoy, sports reporter On Twitter @alexmccoy21 sports@dailybarometer.com


On Twitter @barosports • sports@dailybarometer.com

6• Friday, April 26, 2013

Soccer hosts U-23 Men’s golf set for Pac-12 Championships Portland Timbers, alumni game n

OSU travels to Los Angeles to compete against some of the top teams in the Pac-12, nation By Mitch Mahoney The Daily Barometer

n

Oregon State looks to get the most out of its last two spring games, takes on U-23 Portland Timbers, alumni team in Saturday doubleheader at home By Sarah Kerrigan The Daily Barometer

Oregon State men’s soccer welcomes back the Portland Timbers U-23 and OSU alumni for a doubleheader at Lorenz Field this Saturday. The back-to-back games provide the players with a good representation of the level of fitness needed for their fall season. “It is going to be hard, but it will be good practice for the fall, because [be] the second game, you are exhausted,” said sophomore defender Bjorn Sandberg. During Pac-12 play, the team usually plays on Friday and Saturday, which can be a hard turnaround. This doubleheader will give the team a better sense of what conference play is like. “That’s what it’s going to be like in Pac-12 play,” said junior midfielder Josh Smith. “A lot of wear on our bodies, getting used to it will be good.” The two games also provide the team with much-needed minutes against different opponents. In the eight-month gap between the end of conference play and the few games they play in the spring, the team is only able to play against themselves. “It is a good opportunity for the guys to get more minutes against different opposition,” said head coach Steve Simmons. “They play against each other quite a bit, so any time they get a chance to play in matches against others is crucial.” The competition that the U-23 team brings is a good challenge for the Beavers. Many of the Oregon State players are expected to play with the U-23 team in their summer season. It offers the participating players a feel for each other in a more competitive, dynamic situation. “There are going to be a number of guys that are going to be playing for them, so I am sure they are going to want to see how those guys are progressing,” Simmons said. The players are excited for the high level of competition that the Timbers will bring to their spring schedule. “I think everyone wants to step up to the plate and show that we are in business this season,” Sandberg said. The alumni game takes on a different dynamic than a normal match. In one sense, it is more lighthearted and fun, but on the flip side, the Alumni are also looking to show they are still capable at sticking with the college kids. “We usually have a pretty wide gap between generations,” Smith said. “We will have guys that have been around from the beginning of the program, and then ... guys that were just seniors last year.” Despite the alumni game having a more casual atmosphere, the team is looking to improve with every game they play. Last weekend against Concordia, the team was able to create good chances in the attacking half, but was unable to get the finishing touch to score. “Probably the only piece missing last week was capitalizing on chances created,” Simmons said. “When you create a lot of chances, you want to be able to score goals.” The team is looking to capitalize on more than just scoring goals this spring, but is striving to capitalize on the short time given in spring to prepare for fall. “Every game is a game, and since we only play seven or eight spring games, every single one is important to establish our game plan for the fall,” Sandberg said. Sarah Kerrigan, sports reporter On Twitter @skerrigan123 sports@dailybarometer.com

MEDIA POSITION

ANNOUNCEMENT

•Summer Barometer Editor

The Oregon State men’s golf team is headed to California to begin postseason play. On Monday, the Beavers will play in the Pac-12 Championships along with the rest of the conference. The tournament, hosted by UCLA, will welcome a field that includes some of the premier NCAA men’s golf programs. The Pac-12 is a powerhouse when it comes to golf, and the Pac-12 Championships will have that talent on full display. The conference’s top five teams are all ranked in or near the top 10 in the nation, and that includes No. 1 California. The Golden Bears have had three of their players ranked as the No. 1 golfer in the nation at some point during the season,

STRAUSBAUGH n Continued from page 4 OSU was 6-0 and No. 7 in the nation behind the arm of Vaz. And then Seattle happened, and Shangri-La started collapsing. When it looked as if the Beavers had two capable signalcallers, they actually opened the floodgates to an issue that just might have derailed, what could have been, an unforgettable season. In the last seven games of the season, Mannion started four times and Vaz started three. The Beavers went 3-4 in that span. Keep in mind which teams those wins came against: An Arizona State team in the midst of a mid-season collapse, a 3-8 Cal team that had already checked out and Nicholls State — no explanation necessary. Head coach Mike Riley has already made it clear that this battle is going to drag out into fall camp. We likely won’t know who the starter will be until mid-to-late August. So why does it matter now? It’s a chance for one of these quarterbacks to separate from his counterpart. Beaver fans will be watching, people from around the country will be watching on the Pac-12 Networks and, most importantly, the coaches will be watching. It will be the first and only time for everyone to see these two in a live setting, with the first-team offense and defense going at it with full contact. Which one has the better rapport with Brandin Cooks — arguably the most important player on the team with Markus Wheaton gone — will be telling. The same goes for who passes the eye test — who exudes confidence in his throws and in the huddle. The difference between OSU being a Bowl Championship Series team and playing in the Emerald or Las Vegas Bowl hinges on this quarterback

June 17 – August 16

This position is open to any bonafide student at Oregon State University. To be considered, an applicant must: (1) have earned a g.p.a. of at least 2.0 from Oregon State University, (2) be enrolled for at least 6 academic credits Spring 2013 and intend to be enrolled for at least 6 academic credits Fall 2013, (3) not be on disciplinary probation, and (4) be making normal degree progress. To apply, applicant must: (1) complete an application form obtained from the Student Media Office, MU East 118, (2) submit a transcript, (3) submit a letter of application, (4) submit a resume, and (5) submit a letter of recommendation. Deadline to apply is Friday, May 3 at 5 p.m. Position open until filled. Applicants will be interviewed by the University Student Media Committee on May 17 at 3 p.m.

and they have a fourth who played in the Masters just a few weeks ago. California has won nine tournaments this season and will be fighting hard for their 10th. In the field is also the runner-up to the national title last year, UCLA. The Bruins are the No. 5 team in the nation, and have the seventh-ranked golfer. Just behind them is No. 6 Washington. Last year at the Pac-12 Championships, the Huskies played poorly and slipped down to a seventh-place finish. The 2012 Pac-12 Championships were actually played in Corvallis at the Trysting Tree Golf Course. The Beavers, who were familiar with the course, scored well and ended up placing fifth. They hope to replicate that sort of performance this year on a course that is much more foreign to them. Within the Pac-12, No. 7 Stanford and No. 11 USC are also ranked highly. Although the Beavers are not ranked in the top 25, they are capable of competing.

BASEBALL

UPCOMING EVENT: SATURDAY, 4/27

Centennial Tree Celebration and Planting

Drug Take Back Event

Celebrate Arbor Day by recognizing the library quad elm trees planted by the class of 1913, and the planting of a new tree for 2013.

Free public collection of prescription and over-the-counter medications. Before you go, get the details at http://tiny.cc/takeback13.

12-1 pm | Valley Library Quad

Mitch Mahoney, sports reporter On Twitter @MitchIsHere sports@dailybarometer.com

not going to take a guy out [after] one mistake,” Langsdorf Pre-Washington game Post-Washington Game said. The spring game may get Mannion Mannion knocked for its insignificance. Comp. % 63 Comp. % 66.4 Riley always does make it clear Yards/game 340 Yards/game 272 that it’s no more than a scrimTDs 7 TDs 8 mage. But there’s a difference INTs 4 INTs 9 between coming away from Sacks 9 Sacks 3 the spring game saying, “Chris Brown is going to be the next Vaz Vaz Jacquizz Rodgers,” and coming away from it knowing which Comp. % 62 Comp. % 57 quarterback looks like a starter, Yards/game 253 Yards/game 195 and who looks like a backup. TDs 3 TDs 8 After the spotlight has been INTs 0 INTs 3 on each throw from Mannion Sacks 2 Sacks 20 and Vaz by the coaches all spring, it will now be shining on them for all over Reser Stadium because the battle can’t go on to see. competition. And it should be. It’ll be the Maybe it’s melodramatic, but for eternity. “It’s not an easy decision,” best opportunity to see the it’s true. In the last seven games of offensive coordinator Danny most comparable setting to a the season, beginning with Langsdorf said on Monday. real game before the seasonWashington, Mannion and Vaz “I’ve told those guys daily that opener on Aug. 31. We’re still four months from both saw most of their statistics this competition is very importhat day, but as we saw from the tant. It’s evaluating every single decline. Ducks a year ago, the arrival of For the sake of not spending play.” Having the spotlight on every a quarterback who could lead the next 300 words on stats, play is a lot of pressure for guys his team to a BCS bowl is not here are the highlights: out of the question. • Both Mannion and Vaz’s in their early-20s. It’s just a matter of who that Langsdorf also said once a passing yards per game went will be. starter is eventually named, he’s down by about 60 yards. • Mannion’s touchdown-to- going to be the guy. Warner Strausbaugh, managing editor On Twitter @WStrausbaugh “There is probably someinterception ratio went from sports@dailybarometer.com 7:4 to 8:9, and six of those eight thing to making a decision and touchdowns came against Cal sticking with it, because we’re and Nicholls State. • Vaz was only sacked twice focus on being more consisin the BYU and Arizona State tent and getting more guys games combined. He was on base, moving them over n Continued from page 4 sacked 20 times starting with and scoring them like we did the Washington game. established starters in Matt earlier in the year,” Rodriguez Don’t get me wrong; I don’t Boyd, Andrew Moore and Ben said. “We hit too many balls think either quarterback is bad Wetzler, Fry could be seen in in the air. Our focus this week by any means. Mariota and a relief role. is hitting line drives, driving Hundley from UCLA are the “Because of the extent of gaps, and just seeing pitches only two QBs in the conference the injury we don’t want to and getting on base.” you can confidently say are betthrow him for extended periSeeing more pitches is ter than OSU’s two. ods right away, so you’d see also something the Beavers But this isn’t about talent him at the end of the game,” are looking to do this week— it’s about mentality. There Casey said. “If he gets every- end. Quick innings can be are only a small handful of thing back and if he’s as solid, demoralizing for both the quarterbacks who can handle as I think he will be, we could offense and whoever is on such a prolonged battle for the use him either in a setup role the mound. starting spot. or in a closing role.” “For some reason we got The coaching staff isn’t tryWhile Fry won’t be avail- in the tendency of swinging ing to sugarcoat this competiable this weekend, pitching at the first pitch,” Rodriguez tion, either. They need to feel hasn’t been the Beavers’ big- said. “That doesn’t give your confident in their selection, gest concern as of late. The pitcher too much time to offense is where Oregon State relax in between innings.” has been inconsistent. First pitch is scheduled for Rodriguez said their focus 4:05 p.m. at Goss Stadium. this weekend is plate disciAndrew Kilstrom, sports editor pline, and hitting line drives On Twitter @AndrewKilstrom as opposed to fly balls. sports@dailybarometer.com “Offensively, we need to

2012 Quarterback Statistics

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forum@dailybarometer.com 

Friday, April 26, 2013 • 7

Christian Smithrud is a junior in new media communications.

I

n case you are unaware, the Memorial Union Program Council has just announced the band lineup for this year’s Flat Tail Festival. I am less than satisfied with their selections. Students on this campus and in the community have a wide range of musical tastes, and the MUPC missed the mark to satisfy people’s unique preferences. Give Corvallis rock, country, folk, dance, rap, just a little bit of everything. The Northwest, especially Portland, has so much to offer for a variety of great local music, but this year’s festival does little to demonstrate that. The problem was that I assumed too much of MUPC. I was under the impression that every year they have a different genre headlining than the previous year, and that the bands will be very diverse. Obviously this is not the case. I guess MUPC has a lack of musical knowledge. With the artists they have selected to play, they demonstrate that they are not concerned with anyone else’s taste in music. Congratulations MUPC, you have royally ticked me off. The biggest disappointment of this year’s Flat Tail is that the headliner will be

Kurt Hagan

Guest Column Hoodie Allen. Well done, MUPC — two white rappers in a row. The crowd during Macklemore’s set last year was beyond trashed, overly rude and overall just terrible concertgoers. You’d think the MUPC would have learned their lesson. I was hoping for some variety. I love my rock ‘n’ roll music but I also appreciate good hip-hop as well. For instance, Mosley Wotta is the only artist I am looking forward to this year. He is a hip-hop artist who rhymes with positive and poetic lyrics. He is based in Bend and is going to kill it at this year’s festival, because his raps are backed with talented musicians who understand what hip-hop is all about. This is my last term at OSU and I have to leave this beautiful campus with Hoodie Allen as my send off. I’m quite frustrated. The bottom line is that MUPC failed this year and we all have to suffer through another terrible hiphop set by a goofy white bro. Kurt Hagan Station Manager for KBVR-FM 88.7

I already had before college. But what is a liberal arts degree besides a luxury item invented by a bunch of white upper-class males in the 19th century to train their sons and daughters to sound smarter at cocktail parties? The problem is, I don’t attend many cocktail parties. Instead of being a luxury commodity, it is now a necessity to

thinking, “Gee whiz, that’s a novel idea.� This may have to do with the fact that I am a history major, and it is harder to quantify the skills or knowledge gained from a liberal arts degree — and many of those skills I feel

ETHICIST n Continued from page 3 enable or encourage it. Sweatshop labor, slave-like conditions, exploitation of the natural environment and other unjustified harms are clearly difficult to avoid in our globalized consumerist economy, but our purchasing choices do send signals to the current market paradigm. This is an empowering thought. My iPhone is made of rare earth metals, which are difficult and often dirty to gather under ideal conditions. My iPhone is built in morally dubious conditions by businesses like Foxconn. Further, major components of my iPhone are shipped across the Pacific Ocean at a tremendous fossil fuel cost in the age of well-known anthropogenic climate change. The more we investigate the costs of our consumerist lifestyles, the more it seems like anything short of local, conscious exchange opens us up to taking responsibility for a multitude of social, economic and environmental harms. Because of a kind of radical interconnectedness neo-liberal globalization begs us to recognize our choices should undergo serious scrutiny. In your more specific case, that of Count Grishnackh and his new band, Burnzum, it seems as though we must ask ourselves what kind of market signals we are sending. Upon a brief amount of research, I’ve found that Count Grishnackh was released on parole in 2009, has self-identified as a neo-Nazi in the past and openly rejects Judeo-Christianity as heresy against a kind of neopaganism. The more I read, the more I found Count Grishnackh to be an organized racist and likely a supporter of eugenics, the debunked pseudoscience of the turn of the 19th century. The fact that we participate in a globalized society is a heavy consideration. The question of whether we should support neoNazi, arsonist murderers seems more straightforward to me. I want to live in a society with less neo-Nazi, arsonist murderers, so I will not be buying their music. t

Thomas McElhinny is a master’s student of applied ethics. The opinions expressed in his columns

do not necessarily represent those of The Daily Barometer staff. McElhinny’s “Ask an ethicist� column will run weekly, every Friday. He can be reached at, and questions can be submitted at AskAnEthicistOSU@gmail.com.

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look at college and see a traditional university, like OSU, and feel not only incredibly out of place, but also have a sense of how much of this won’t apply in the real world. There should be a better way than a bachelor’s degree to quantify dedication, success, intelligence and skill. But since there isn’t, people are forced to go through college, fulfilling unnecessary baccalaureate core or survey courses, annoyed most of the time, just waiting until the end when we can get that receipt that cost us tens of thousands of dollars. t

Don Iler is a senior in history. The opinions

expressed in his columns do not necessarily represent those of The Daily Barometer staff. Iler can be reached at editor@dailybarometer. com on Twitter @doniler.

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get a college degree, of any kind, to do jobs that most likely do not require one. I’ve also learned some things too, like chemistry, and a better understanding of the Islamic world. But every class that was a challenge or I learned something, there have been an equal number of classes where I have sat and thought, “What’s the point? There are stories I could be writing instead of being told, for the tenth time, how to write a paper.� If anything, college has just been a distraction from my passion of journalism, and from working at the Barometer. But I know I’m not the only non-traditional student, whether they are veterans, like me, or just coming back after a long break, who

are n

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â—Šâ—Š To play: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3X3 box contains the digits 1 to 9. There is no guessing or math involved, just use logic to solve.

        

        

        



 





        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

Yesterday’s Solution

 

MUPC screwed the pooch on Flat Tail

ILER n Continued from page 3


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May 3 – 5: Free access to Dixon Recreation Center and McAlexander Fieldhouse with an OSU student CHURCH

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May 4: Mom’s Weekend Challenge Course 23 26

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This publication will be made available in accessible format by contacting Wendy Little, 541-737-7096.

Corvallis Municipal Airport

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the background checks expansion. The Giffords/Kelly group went up with radio ads this week criticizing Ayotte and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell over their votes opposing the background checks measure and one praising Sen. John McCain for his vote supporting it. Giffords also sent out an email to supporters asking them to pledge “to become a gun violence voter in 2014.” She said: “If you’re still angry about last week’s vote, you are not alone. But it’s up to us to do something about it, because if we don’t act, no one will.” The advocacy organization formed by some of President Obama’s former campaign aides, Organizing for Action, bought new online ads to run on news sites and key newspapers in the home states of 10 senators, nine Republican and one Democrat who voted against the background checks issue last week. The ads are tailored to each state, such as one for New Hampshire saying “Remind Senator (Kelly) Ayotte: you work for New Hampshire, not the gun lobby.” Among the other senators the group is aiming its ads at are: Republicans Saxby Chambliss, Dan Coats, Ted Cruz, Jeff Flake and Rob Portman and Democrat Heidi Heitkamp. Meanwhile, the National Rifle Association will be trying to marshal its members to keep up the pressure against some of the proposals at its annual convention next week in Houston. The group said it is expecting 70,000 attendees, which would be one of its largest conventions in its history. Among those speaking will be Republican Governors Rick Perry (Texas) and Bobby Jindal (Louisiana) as well as former Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin, former Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum and Senator Ted Cruz, R-Texas. 3

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(CNN) — Vice President Joe Biden reassured leading gun control groups Thursday that the administration remains committed to pushing an expansion of background checks for gun purchases through Congress, according to one of the event’s attendees. Biden, who has led the administration’s efforts on gun control in the wake of the shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, told the meeting of about 15 participants that despite last week’s defeat of a bi-partisan measure in the Senate to expand checks at gun shows and online sales, that this was just the beginning. “He was delivering a charge to us” to stay engaged Pia Carusone, executive director of the group formed by former congresswoman Gabby Giffords and her husband Mark Kelly, told CNN summarizing the vice president’s message. “He was determined.” The meeting included that group, Americans for Responsible Solutions, as well as Mayors Against Illegal Guns (formed by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg), the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, Center for American Progress, Moms Demand Action and representatives of law enforcement. The administration has said it is committed to continue to push Congress on the issue. Biden’s office confirmed the meeting but would not provide further detail of his remarks. “We all are in a period of discussion and figuring out what the best strategy is,” Carusone said. “It is just clear there is a strong determination on the part of the administration and all of these various groups that this issue not go away.” In the wake of their loss, groups involved in the fight are trying to figure out ways to harness public support and build pressure on lawmakers citing polls showing about 90 percent of Americans supported 4

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