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SUMMER 2013, Volume XXXVII, Number 2

The Dachshund Club of America Newsletter Lynne Dahlén, Editor 9086 Daniels 70 Siren, WI 54872 Official DCA Website: http://www.dachshund-dca.org/

th 5 1 y l u J Deadline is tter, e l s w e N n m u for the Aut ssue! i s t l u s e R s l a the Nation

“GEE!” THE FIRST MINIATURE LONGHAIR TRIPLE CHAMPION WHY PARTICIPATION IN CANINE HEALTH RESEARCH MATTERS WATCH OUT FOR I.S.A.R. JUDGING THE DACHSHUND LEARNING TO HEAL


Hosted by Golden Gate Dachshund Club Tracking, Field Trials & Earthdog January 20-25, 2014 Vacaville, CA Lagoon Valley & Centennial Park Hotels: Motel Six: 707-447-5550 & Best Western: 1-888-782-9374

Judges: Cyndy Senff and Frank Canestrini Sweeps Judge: Carol Anderson iowa state fairgrounds • Varied industries Building des Moines ia

Plenty of grooming room on concrete, air conditioned building Plenty of RV parking

Between show hosPitality with laRge fund RaiseR Closing date: wednesday, august 21, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 • Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 • mail@onofrio.com

trophy donations gladly accepted send to CidC, P.o. Box 1472, Johnston, ia 50131

January January January January January January

20th: 21th: 22nd: 23rd: 24th: 25th:

DCA Tracking TD & TDX Host Club GGDC Field Trial All Classes DCA OAAD & OAAB DCA FC Dogs & Bitches & Absolute DCA Earthdog Host Club GGDC Earthdog

Rally, Agility, Conformation May 5-10th, 2014 Red Lion Woodlake Conference Center, Sacramento, CA Hotel - Red Lion: 916-922-2020 May 5th: Agility (Location To Be Announced) May 6th: Host GGDC Conformation & Obedience at Red Lion Woodlake Conference Center May 7th: GGDC Conformation & Rally May 8th: DCA Annual Meeting in the Morning DCA Sweeps & Obedience in the Afternoon May 9th: DCA National Classes and one BOV & Rally May 10th: DCA National 2 BOV’s and BOB Awards Banquet More information to follow, check up dates on http://www.goldengatedachshundclub.org/

Contact: Sharon Carr carrdox@gmail.com or (559) 645-1321 © Best Dogs in Motion


Treasuredox Revolution@Sleepytime ML (Ch. Sleepytime’s Remembrance ML & Carawan’s Constant Comment ML)

Bred by Janice Moseley and Darlene Carawan, Taffy is pictured with Judge William Potter finishing her Championship. Taffy is the 7th Champion for her dam! She was great fun to show and I look forward to puppies from her. Thanks again for sharing, Janice!

SUSAN JONES

1528 Mason Road • Durham, NC 27712 • 919-471-2218 • sleepytyme@aol.com Dachshund Club of America

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board of directors

officers

President

2nd Vice President

Recording Secretary

Carl Holder 1130 Redoak Drive Lumberton, TX 77657 (409) 755-6569 candachs@aol.com

Fran Colonna 700 Maple Lane Lansing, KS 66043-6221 (913) 727-2246 Kanawha123@aol.com

Vicki Spencer 2650 Holland Drive Owensboro, KY 42303-2723 (270) 316-0051 lorindol@roadrunner.com

1st Vice President

Treasurer

Corresponding Secretary

Neal Hamilton 59 Cloverhill Road Flemington, NJ 08822-1947 (908) 782-4724 Applehillfarm@juno.com

Ken Levison 8155 E. Galinda Drive Tucson, AZ 85750-2420 (520) 722-9427 dazdox@yahoo.com

Cheryl Shultz 3817 Seven Oaks Drive Corona, CA 92881 (951) 279-8252 cherevee@sbcglobal.net

Class of 2013

Class of 2014

Class of 2015

Jerry Cerasini 14775 Wood Road Alpharetta, GA 3004-3036 (770) 475-3152 ponyguru@aol.com

Anne Carson 3520 Nancy Creek Rd., NW Atlanta, GA 30327-2406 (404) 237-9245 annecarson@mindspring.com

Georjan Bridger P.O. Box 21352 Salem, OR 97307-1352 (503) 364-9695 artsrpassion@live.com

Marci Forrester 17100 Oyster Bay Rd. #A Gulf Shores, AL 36542 (251) 967-3403 marcifor@gmail.com

Brian Owen 500 Crooked Creek Road Silver Creek, MS 39663-4409 (601) 886-9996 shadowdachs@yahoo.com

Liz Heywood 30 Starbarrack Road Red Hook, NY 12571-2249 (845) 758-8088 liz@starbarrack.net

Emma Jean Stephenson 3040 Old Darlington Road Beaver Falls, PA 15010 (724) 846-6745 emmajean52@aol.com

Robert Schwalbe 71 Valley Way Pendergrass, GA 30567 (706) 693-7142 reschwalbe@yahoo.com

Paul Martin 7417 Lost Creek Court Marshall, VA 20115 (540) 364-0069 brando1@erols.com

Deneice Van Hook, DVM 3 Deerwood Trail Fairview Heights, IL 62208 (618) 213-6016 k9coach@aol.com

Lisa Warren P.O. Box 923 Fogelsville, PA 18051 (610) 285-6425 ElysiumDox@aol.com

Robert Wlodkowski 2710 Valley Farm Road Waxhaw, NC 28173 (704) 843-5858 Rslepyholo@aol.com

AKC Delegate Larry Sorenson 112 Two Does Lane Clayton, NC 27550-8492 (919) 550-7631 llsoren@earthlink.net

ON

No DCA publication, or any part therein, may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever, either in magazines, media, or for advertising purposes, etc., without prior written permission from the Dachshund Club of America. Please contact Anne Carson regarding the DCA Newsletter and Phyllis Rosinsky regarding the DCA Illustrated Standard. Thank you for your cooperation and understanding.

THE

COVER

TC Sharpree’s Imagine That! CD MXB MJB OF JE

From Sharon McDonald: Thanks to the many members of clubs, trial chairs, trial secretaries, and judges of all the events in which “Gee!” and I competed. Without you all, there would be no sport! “Gee!” and I are forever grateful to all our friends and fellow competitors for their camaraderie and encouragement. I am especially thankful to all those who, when I said I was pursuing multiple Championships, believed in us and gave us wisdom along our journey. Dachshund Club of America

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Why Participation In Canine Health Research Matters Submitted by Charlotte Borghardt

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In order to make strides in canine health, researchers depend on help from the dog-owning community. Whether it be participating in a research project where weekly blood-draws are necessary, or in a clinical trial where cutting-edge medications are being utilized to treat a health issue, or providing DNA samples to a bank for use in the research to understand a disease at the molecular level, these are just a few of the ways dog owners can help move canine research forward.

New Applicants, New Members . . . . . . .

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Advertisers Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Health & Welfare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Above & Below Ground . . . . . . . . . .

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by Claire Mancha

Judging the Dachshund . . . . . . . . . .

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by Dr. Ken Levison

First Longhair Miniature Triple Champion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Above & Below Ground Beagle & Dachshund Field Trials by Claire Mancha

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by Sharon McDonald

This issue’s column is about polishing up our field trial game’s description on the Dachshund Field Trials, History of the Sport web page on the “Classic AKC” site. After you read it, I’m hoping you will agree that it is a bit outdated and could really use some sprucing up. The legal staff and Doug Lundgren of the AKC have both given us the green light to reprint these articles in our newsletter. As an aid to getting my point across, here is a “compare and contrast” opportunity for you.

AKC Delegates Report . . . . . . . . . . .

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by Larry Sorenson

Weaves & Retrieves. . . . . . . . . . . . .

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by Karen Scheiner

Random Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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by Kathy Lockyer

The Newest Triple Champion Dachshund

Cancer Research Boost . . . . . . . . . .

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Upcoming Specialties. . . . . . . . . . . .

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Field Trial Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

48

Newsletter Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Letters to & from the Editor . . . . .

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Whelping Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Specialty Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2013 Nomination Information . . . . .

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Volunteers Needed!! . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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by Sharon McDonald

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Gee! became a project. Nature gave me the foundation, but “nurture” became the plan. I worked closely with my primary trainer of agility and obedience, Julie Hill of Fido Finishing School in Mandeville, La. I developed a long range training plan for Gee! with intentions of chasing as many Championships in as many sports as we could manage. The plan was to pursue Field Championship first, Conformation a close second, Agility 3rd, and eventually chase an Obedience Championship.

Weaves & Retrieves: Learning to Heal by Karen Scheiner

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There’s a dog that comes along once in your lifetime, that is so special in so many ways, you know there will never be another one quite like her. I knew when she was a puppy, that Bailey was that dog for me. She had qualities unlike any other dachshund that I had owned. Not only was she was a strikingly beautiful chocolate dapple, but even more amazing than her beauty was her temperament, her drive, and her eagerness to work with me. Bailey earned her breed championship with me as her owner/handler, and when I started training her in agility, she surpassed all expectations, making it to the top five dachshunds in the country.

Nationals 2014 Information . . . . . Dachshund Club of America

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IBC


MEMBER ADVERTISERS

NEW MEMBERS

NEW APPLICANTS

Arnold/Jarbsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

Bernadette Wagner W 19172 Hemlock Rd., Eland, WI 54427-9531

Krystal Couch Vinita, OK 74301 (Robbie Loyd and Aubrey Nash)

Carter, Vidrine/Solo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Gail Tutt 5792 Rudy Dr., San Jose, CA 95124

Central Iowa Dachshund Club . . . . . . .IFC

Lisa Maki 35145 Skeena Ave. Abbotsford, BC, Canada V2S 7H5

Welcome!

Linda DeCastro 1623 Cordova Ave., Holly Hill, FL 32117

Colson/DoeRae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Kaye Atkinson 4332 Columbia Pike, Franklin, TN 37064

Cope/Jeric’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Jeanie Mahaffey 1109 E. Flint St., Laramie, WY 82072

Elaine and Wayne Beard Eads, TN 38028 (Maria Wild and Teresa Walker) Kimberly Ristedt Toledo, OH 43606 (Ryan Horvath and Paula Carter) Jody Bukacek Oaklahoma City,OK 73120 (Aubrey Nash and Gloria LaTour) Comments, in writing, may be sent to Neal Hamilton, DCA Membership Chair.

Couch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

Ellis/Apple Creek Farms . . . . . . . . . . . .27

Golden Gate Dachshund Club,

They have crossed the bridge...

DCA 2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IBC

Innis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Michael Reed

Jones/Sleepytime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Art Grundish

Middings/Legibach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Please contact the editor and DCA secretary if you know of one of our members that has recently passed away.

Olich Nie/Glenavan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

SEE THE DCA NEWSLETTER ON THE INTERNET Ray/Raydachs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Schmidt, Skaer/Stardust, Von Skaer . . .41

http://issuu.com/dachshundclubofamerica/docs/spring_2013_dca_newsletter Editor, Advertising Coordinator, Graphic Design, Layout and Production: Lynne M. Dahlén Contact: Chazlyn@sirentel.net or 715-349-2566 Editorial Assistant: Chuck Dahlén

Senff/Dynadaux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

ARTICLE CONTRIBUTORS Barbara Axel, Charlotte Borghardt, Dr. Ken Levison Kathy Lockyer, Claire Mancha, Sharon McDonald, Karen Scheiner, Larry Sorenson

Thompson/Georgia Dachs . . . . . . . . . . .39

PRINTER/MAILING Modern Litho-Print Co., Jefferson City, Missouri

Van Hook/Obsession . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

Warren/Joy-Den . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

The Dachshund Club of America Inc., The Dachshund Club of America Board of Directors, and the Editor of the Dachshund Club of America Quarterly Newsletter (magazine) are not responsible for the content of any advertisement, solicited or unsolicited editorials, letters or articles that may appear in the newsletter. The content of any advertisement, editorial, letter or article that appears in the Dachshund Club of America Newsletter is the sole responsibility of its advertiser or author. Dachshund Club of America

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Ch. Rosefarm's Palomino X Ch. Solo's Dolce and Gabanna SL

Steve and I are “Head over Heels” for Piper and her littermates. Her litter brother DoRae’s Apple of My Eye - “Parker” - has 4 majors and needs a single to finish. Thank You, Solo Dachshunds - Paula Carter and Kim Vidrine - for letting us lease Gabby for this breed down litter and Thanks to Jeff and Karyn Dionne of Wagsmore. Thank you, Frank Canestrini for this 5 point major at her second show. She was Winners Bitch and Bred Bred By all coats at the Dallas Ft. Worth Dachshund Specialty.

Co-Breeder/Co-Owners: Nancy Colson • DoRae • Dorae_nrc@consolidated.net Steven Garza • Corrbelle • corrbelle@gmail.com Nancy Colson DoRae Longhaired Dachshunds & Whippets Conroe, Texas

Dachshund Club of America

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Photo by Nancy Pearson

Photo by Tim Scott

I would like to thank everyone for the outpouring of texts, calls, emails, and facebook messages. It is very touching to know how many people's lives he and I impacted. I made the most unselfish decision I have ever had to face in my life today at 3:30 as I held and said goodbye to my grand ole man and best friend. Primo was my once-in-a-lifetime dog with a heart bigger than himself. He loved me unconditionally and did everything he could to please me. We achieved my wildest dreams and those priceless memories will be with me always. We did it old man... the unthinkable: Best in Shows, two time DCA Best of Breed winner, Top Producer, Field Champion with an Absolute despite my handling skills, Junior Earth Dog, we made the record books... I had more dreams but God was ready for you. I will thank God daily for allowing you to be my dog. You have taught me so much and I will cherish our time together and our awesome adventures and memories and smile as I see glimpses of you in your progeny and legacy left here at Solo. DCA Nationals seems unbearable at this time but I plan to put on a brave face and smile as I show some of your legacy. Rest easy my boy. I will see you at the rainbow bridge. Until then, enjoy endless dog shows, bunny chases and rat hunts. The house seems empty tonight without the king... DC SOLO'S PREMIERE SL JE.

Kim

In honor of Primo – by Nancy Colson, Nancy Pearson, Karen Murray, Steve Garza, Trish Mims, Kim Ristedt, Amber Leonard, Jordin Misfeldt, June Mann, Cyndy Geiser, Lynne DahlÊn, Cathy Deily Dachshund Club of America

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Welcome to the “Health and Welfare” segment of the Newsletter. It is hoped that DCA members will submit ideas for this section of the magazine as well as articles about experiences pertaining to the healthcare of their dogs that will be of interest to other readers.

Please send ideas, suggestions and articles to: Charlotte Borghardt, DCA Health & Welfare Committee, P.O. Box 1126, Sierra Vista, AZ 85636-1126, teckelhofaz@yahoo.com

WHY PARTICIPATION IN CANINE HEALTH RESEARCH MATTERS In science, progress is measured in small steps along the way to major discoveries. By consistently funding the most innovative research, CHF is realizing both small milestones and major breakthroughs in canine health. All our successes show progress towards our goal to prevent, treat and cure canine disease. In order to make strides in canine health, researchers depend on help from the dog-owning community. Whether it be participating in a research project where weekly blood-draws are necessary, or in a clinical trial where cuttingedge medications are being utilized to treat a health issue, or providing DNA samples to a bank for use in the research to understand a disease at the molecular level, these are just a few of the ways dog owners can help move canine research forward.

Louise Gregg of Newville, PA, an owner and breeder of Cavalier King Charles spaniels, has participated in several studies to benefit the health of dogs. She encourages other breeders and pet owners to become involved in clinical trials and to participate in research studies. “Because of research we have newer, better medications and treatments being developed,” said Gregg. “Some people may think that the dogs will become nothing more than ‘lab rats,’ but that could not be further from the truth.” Sometimes a study simply involves providing blood samples and information about your dog. For the studies involving drug trials, “Every precaution was taken with my dogs,” said Gregg. “At no time did I feel that my beloved pets were at risk from the drugs being tested. They were closely monitored, and their safety was always put first.” On the CHF website information can be found on current research studies being conducted throughout the United States. These studies involve a number of different canine health concerns and involve many different breeds. “Participating in the research studies allowed my dogs to be more closely monitored and cared for than I ever would have been able to afford,” said Gregg. “And I was happy to be able to contribute to working towards my dogs, and all dogs, living longer, healthier lives.” Dachshund Club of America

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Canine Health Information Center (CHIC) DNA Repository The CHIC DNA Repository, co-sponsored by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) and the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF), collects and stores canine DNA samples along with corresponding genealogic and phenotypic information to facilitate future research and testing aimed at reducing the incidence of inherited disease in dogs. DNA samples from any purebred dog may be submitted. There are now over 16,000 samples in the DNA bank from 171 breeds. Any canine health researcher may apply for use of these samples, however CHF-funded studies are pre-approved for sample access. Learn more at the CHIC website, www.caninehealthinfo.org

Canine Comparative Oncology and Genomics Consortium (CCOGC) The CCOGC began as an informal collaboration of veterinary and medical oncologists, pathologists, surgeons, geneticists, and molecular and cellular biologists. Together, they sought to leverage opportunities that would result from a better defined understanding of the


genetics and biology of cancers in companion animals, to provide a forum for discussion and sharing of resources and reagents, and to guide the development of novel technologies that would allow the study and use of appropriate canine cancers in the global study of cancer biology and therapy. The CCOGC collects tissues and fluids from dogs with specific cancer types following strict guidelines. These procedures ensure all samples are of high quality and can be used consistently across multiple research projects. The samples are assessable to any research project with scientific merit. Learn more about CCOGC and find a collection site near you at the CCOGC website, www.ccogc.net. By providing samples to CCOGC dog owners are contributing to the bank of cells that researchers can access in their study of comparative oncology – helping not only their fourlegged friend, but their human friends as well.

THE VALUE OF SUPPORTING RESEARCH OUTSIDE OF YOUR BREED One of the most common concerns of breed clubs is that their breed is not specifically being utilized in a particular study. Sometimes this leads to the interpretation that the research being done does not have application to their personal dogs. Many clubs hold out for the definitive research study that will utilize their breed and solve their greatest health concerns. CHF asked five recognized researchers in canine health whether there is value to supporting research outside of a specific breed, for health problems that cross all breeds such as cancer and infectious disease, as well as diseases that

basis for disease? Are there examples where identification of genetic mutations in one breed have facilitated discovery in other breeds? An excellent example of potential collaborative funding power is aortic stenosis, a serious heart defect that leads to sudden cardiac death in many large breed dogs including Golden Retrievers, Newfoundlands and Rottweilers. Each of these breeds has some subtle breedspecific differences in disease phenotype which suggested that the disease is likely a bit different between the breeds. Dr. Kathryn Meurs, a Cardiologist and Associate Dean of Research and Dr. Josh Stern a Cardiologist at North Carolina State University, started their research into aortic stenosis in Newfoundlands and Golden Retrievers. In both of these breeds the results pointed to the same chromosomal location for a defect. Dr. Meurs believes that, “Although we have not yet found the exact defect, this work demonstrated to us that this is probably the same disease in each breed and that identification of the causative mutation in

appear to segregate within specific breeds, such as bloat, heart and ophthalmic diseases. It is evident to most dog owners that broad-based studies that focus on novel diagnostics and treatment strategies could have an impact across breeds, but is there value in collaborative funding when the goal is to identify the genetic

these breeds will allow faster identification in other breeds.” Quite often research is initiated in more common breeds simply for sample size collection, but Dr. Meurs is confident that her research in Goldens, Rottweilers and Newfoundlands will have an impact on other breeds such as the Bouvier des Flandres, Dogue de Bordeaux, Flat-Coated Retriever, German Shorthaired Pointer, Great Dane, Greyhound, and Miniature Bull Terrier. Similarly, Dr. Danika Bannasch, Professor of Genetics at University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, notes that ancestral mutations are more likely to be shared continued on page 14...

Individual Research Projects: Clinical Trials If your dog has recently been diagnosed with a disease, there may be a clinical trial in your area investigating a treatment for that disease. Clinical trials help veterinarians investigate methods to improve detection and treatment of canine health issues, as well as improve the quality of care each patient receives. Participating in a clinical trial brings with it a commitment to follow through on therapies and testing and may help your dog’s prognosis. The benefits can include access to cutting-edge medicine, advancing veterinary science, and helping future generations of dogs. On the CHF website at http://www.akcchf.org/ research/participation-needed/ dog owners can search for projects by research area, breed of dog, and type of participation needed – blood sample, DNA sample, tissue sample, or clinical study. While this list is in no way meant to be exhaustive of the canine health research projects that are ongoing, it is an excellent resource, placing dog owners with scientists who are developing cutting-edge treatments. The requirements to participate in clinical trials vary greatly. Some offer financial compensation and others will require the dog owner to pay for the medical treatment. You and your dog will likely have to travel to the trial site multiple times, so look for trials in your geographic region.

Dachshund Club of America

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Sire: DC Jagie’s Sunkissed Phoenix X Dam: Ch. Joy-Dens Spice Girl SS “Candy” is pictured going Winners Bitch under Frank Canestrini to finish her championship with 3 majors. CHIC: #85778 for eyes and patella. All breeding stock is x-rayed for intervertebral disc calcifications by Dr. S. Johnson. They are then sent off to Dr. Anu Lappalainen in Sipoo, Finland, for reading and a report with results are issued.

Flash!

Second weekend out Candy receives her FIRST BOV under Ann Bolus.

Dachshund Club of America

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Breeder/Owner/Handler:

Joyce Warren JOYDENKNL@verizon.net Http://JOYDENS.COM/

Phone by Tom Weigand ©2013 • THE WINNING IMAGE.COM

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Sire: DC Jagie’s Sunkissed Phoenix X Dam: Ch. Joy-Dens Spice Girl SS

“Midnight” is pictured finishing his Championship under Sherry Snyder with his 4th Major Win. Congratulations to Mr. Anderson Einstenn Quaresma, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, on the purchase of Midnight. OFA for eyes and patella. With Midnight and his sister, Candy, finishing their Championships, this qualifies their dam Spice Girl, for her ROMX Award with 5 Champions. Breeder:

Joyce Warren JOYDENKNL@verizon.net • Http://JOYDENS.COM/ Dachshund Club of America

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GCH. LAST CHANCE TO DANCE W. CH. NONE SUCH LAST HURRAH SW X CH. JERIC’S DON’T MESS WITH TEXAS W.

A picture of a beautiful Wirehaired Dachshund is worth a thousand words. Look for this girl as she matures and is campaigned in the future. She is a delight to own and show. Dachshund Club of America

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Health & Welfare continued from page 9

across related breeds and points to Dalmatian hyperuricosuria (urinary stones) as a prime example. Research for this disease was funded and discovered based on .samples from one breed, but the mutation occurs in many other breeds and the test was rapidly transfer-able to other breeds with urinary stone disease. Dr. Jaime Modiano, Perlman Professor of Oncology and Comparative Medicine at the University of Minnesota Masonic Cancer Center, extends these observations into the realm of cancer and provides two relevant examples from his research. Dr. Modiano says, “In the case of lymphomas, there are probably more than 20 subtypes of this condition, about six of which are commonly seen in dogs. As it turns out, the subtype of lymphoma tells us more about the disease and its behavior than the breed of origin. So, studying one type of lymphoma in a breed removes some of the heterogeneity (and thus the uncertainty) in the experimental system, and makes the results more readily interpretable, and applicable to many breeds.” Evidence of this was found in a recent study performed by his research group in which they characterized molecular subtypes of lymphoma, developing a simple test to classify the tumors, and showing the clinical benefit of reaching that diagnosis. Dr. Modiano points out that, “Even though the work was biased to include more Goldens than other breeds because of sample availability, the results seem to be broadly applicable to almost any breed.” Finally, Dr. Modiano points out that osteosarcoma has similarities related to breed of origin, but these are not the principal drivers of tumor behavior. What Dr. Modiano and his team

learned from tumors of Rottweilers allowed them to develop a system to organize bone tumors into different categories of aggressiveness that may respond to different treatments. Dr. Modiano emphasizes that this will likely apply to dogs from any breed that is diagnosed with osteosarcoma. Data from the laboratory of Dr. Matthew Breen, professor of genomics at North Carolina State University, further supports the concept that genetic studies are highly transferable across breeds. Dr. Breen’s primary focus is on identifying genomic signatures in canine cancers. Importantly, he is using this information to create personalized medicine strategies for dogs with cancer. Dr. Breen states that, “In general, if we begin the discovery process working with a few select breeds that have a remarkably high incidence of a particular cancer, we are more likely to be able to obtain the number of cases needed to power a study in a shorter period of time. That said, once we have identified genomic changes associated with key factors, such as subtype and prognosis, we are then able to quickly assess other breeds for the presence of the characteristic genetic signatures.” Dr. Breen feels that collaborative funding is a very efficient way for them to launch studies that ultimately will have maximum impact on the health of many breeds. Case in point is when Dr. Breen and his team developed a testto predict duration of first remission in canine lymphoma patients; much of the earlier work was performed with samples from select breeds, simply because they could access sufficient sample numbers. With preliminary data from these few breeds, the study then expanded to include all breeds and they were able to produce an assay that is

breed-independent. Finally, Dr. Urs Giger, Charlotte Newton Sheppard Professor at of the University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, points out the power of One Medicine Research and its translation to humans and multiple breeds of dog. Dr. Giger cites research into Storage Disorders, a group of hereditary disorders causing abnormalities in the skeleton, eyes, and central nervous system as an excellent example. Storage disorders have been recognized in people and dogs for many decades. While considered orphan (very rare) disorders in people, some of them occurred more frequently in certain canine breeds, for example mucopolysaccharidosis in Schipperkes and Miniature Pinschers. Originally dogs were studied as disease models for humans. “If it were not for the original breed-specific studies done for the sake of human patients we would have never understood the underlying genetic component of disease in any species. Ultimately the study of storage disease in one breed led to the research of related storage disorders in various breeds. Thanks to those founding studies we now understand genetic-based errors of metabolism in multiple breeds including Miniature Pinschers, Miniature Schnauzers, and Miniature Poodles.” Collaborative research funding clearly becomes a powerful tool to solve our greatest canine health problems. As CHF strives to be responsive to our breed clubs, our goal is to initiate projects and then facilitate translation of results across all relevant breeds. Individually each breed’s footprint in canine health is relatively small, but the impact when we all work together is significant progress toward dogs living longer, healthier lives. !

Alpine Atlas We have to embarrass them once in a while!! Atlas is wearing his lederhosen and white shirt complete with his Alpine hiking hat and is all ready to attend the Hermann, MO wienerdog festival. Costume designed and created by Shawn Nies and worn under great duress by DC von Schatten’s Guardian of the Pillars RN CGC (Atlas) Dachshund Club of America

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(Ch. Boondox Forrest Gump ROMO* x Ch. Jarbsy’s Mama Mia)

Westin is pictured at 17 mos. winning his 4th major under Dr. Robert Smith. He finished a few weeks later under Betty Ann Stenmark. Watch for him in the ring with co-owner Sophie Tremblay (Telkel) from Quebec.

Breeder/Owner: Sandy Arnold sandyarn@aol.com 812-322-1842

Jarbsy Dachshunds

Co-Owner: Sophie Tremblay Telkel Dachshunds

Dachshund Club of America

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The International Society for Animal Rights (I.S.A.R.) is not well known here yet, but this influential organization that writes model laws for federal, state, and local legislators in this country is also busy increasing membership and making its intemperate, shrill voice heard all over the world. Below are some excerpts from its model law regarding breeders: “Section 7. Breeder. For purposes of this statute, the term “breeder” is defined as “any person or legal entity that intentionally, recklessly or negligently causes or allows a female dog to be inseminated by a male canine.” (a) Limitation on number of dogs. No breeder licensee shall possess at anyone one time in any calendar year more than three unneutered male dogs and three unspayed female dogs, except for unweaned litters which may be kept for no more than three months at which time the provisions of this statute will apply to them. b) Violation. Violation of subsection (a) of this Section shall be a felony. Section 7. Veterinary examination and care. (b) Veterinary examination. All dogs in the custody or control of a breeder licensee must be examined by a licensed veterinarian within five days of its receipt by the licensee, and every thirty days thereafter. All dogs sold by a breeder licensee must be free of disease, injuries, or abnormalities. If a dog is determined by a licensed veterinarian to be unfit to be bred, it must immediately be treated or relinquished to a shelter, breed-specific rescue group, or humane animal shelter. (c) Violation. Violation of subsections (a) and (b) of this Section shall be a misdemeanor. Section 8. Standards of care and treatment (a) Standards of care and treatment. The licensing authority shall promulgate and enforce standards of care and treatment for all dogs in possession of control of breeder licensees, which shall include, but need not be limited to, the following: (i) Consistent with the dogs’ breed, size, gender, and age, they shall be provided with adequate nutrition, wholesome food, and fresh potable water which shall be available twentyfour hours each day. All food and water must be free from contamination, and of sufficient quality and nutritive value to meet normal daily requirements. Food and water containers shall be easily accessible, while reducing to a minimum any contamination from excreta, and kept clean to prevent molding, deterioration, food caking, and other unwholesome conditions. (ii) Shelter shall be provided which will protect the dogs from the elements. The degrees of cold and heat shall not be excessive or otherwise dangerous to the dogs’ health and well-being. Floors and walls of interior facilities shall be impervious to moisture.” My experience of 40 years working in legislation is consistent with the knowledge that the ultimate aim of these restrictions I.S.A.R lists is to make home raised, family dogs of hobby breeders a thing of the past. Tethering

laws are becoming more stringent too. Procedures they want to make illegal are removing dew claws, docking, cropping and debarking, while simultaneously they promote, the much more invasive and long term disadvantageous pediatric castrations and hysterectomies for dogs. I.S.A.R. is closely linked to another animal rights organization of some fame: Animal Legal Defense Fund (A.L.D.F.) most recent activities listed below were taken from a report by S.A.O.V.A. (Sportsman’s and Animal Owners Voting Alliance): ANIMAL LEGAL DEFENSE FUND (ALDF) Scott Heiser, Director of ALDF’s Criminal Justice Program blogged on November 21st, 2012: “Regardless of how you voted in the presidential election, if you are someone who cares about the welfare of animals, you’ll have to agree that November 6, 2012 was a bad day at the polls.” Heiser lashed out at the defeat of Measure 5 in North Dakota stating Opponents of Measure 5 seemed to take great pride in the success of their smear campaign characterizing supporters as extremists who were advancing a radical agenda. Heiser continued his post by lamenting passage of constitutional amendments in 4 states that guarantee the right to hunt, fish, and trap; he writes, “the misguided Cartesian view of animals reflected by these results is

ALDF is the creator of the Center for Animal Law Studies (the Center) at Lewis & Clark Law School which now houses the most extensive animal law program in the nation. ALDF continues to collaborate with the Center in the rapidly developing field of animal law through classes, conferences, scholarship and clinical opportunities. With the help of ALDF the Center brought its first visiting professor, activist and attorney Mariann Sullivan, to teach “Animals in Agriculture: Law and Policy”, a course previously taught by ALDF founder Joyce Tischler. ALDF’s winter newsletter discusses the course noting, “These law students will one day change the way animals are protected by our legal system.” Quoting to Sullivan, “Animal ag is going down and lawyers are going to be the ones to take it down.” What is most frightening is that more and more young adult students are being influenced by animal rights organizations and more and more colleges and universities have animal rights law departments as training grounds to promulgate this viewpoint. The graduates of these schools are ready made for employment as lawyers, judges, and legislators whose rulings can have a significant effect on animal agriculture, canine performance events, hobby breeding and owning multiple pets.

by Barbara Axel disheartening for all who work to advance legal protections for animals.” ALDF ended the year by convincing Representatives Gerry Connolly (D-VA11) and Sam Farr (D-CA17) to introduce legislation that would amend the Animal Welfare Act to include regulation and inspection of birds, rats, and mice bred for use in research. ALDF and their followers introduced 14 animal abuser registry bills in 9 states during 2012. Beginning with Colorado in 2002, activists have now introduced a total of 76 registry bills in 25 states – all of which have failed to date. Registry campaigners have wasted no time, beginning the New Year with bills in South Carolina, New York, and Vermont (see http://saova.org/news.html ) The ALDF website lists the formation of 171 U.S. Chapters and 15 International Student Animal Legal Defense Chapters; with State Bar Animal Law Sections and Committees in 24 states, 15 cities and counties, and the American Bar Association. Dachshund Club of America

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It seems as if a top priority for I.S.A.R. for 2013 is the banning of debarking throughout the U.S. They are making significant progress in that regard by utilizing frightening videos and other fear tactics. Veterinarians seem to agree. To combat these viewpoints please go to the Internet and log on to any of Charlotte McGowan’s sites. Ms. McGowan is a decades-long breeder/exhibitor and judge of shelties and has some down to earth, no nonsense advice regarding the minor procedure regarding debarking that is easy to understand. We may need to review and promulgate it in our own communities shortly. There is no longer any time for brushing off my words as “the sky is falling” for our foes have increased in size and have become more powerful every day. One person speaking up will make a difference. We, who have so much at stake, speaking up as individuals or as a group can combat I.S.A.R., A.L.D.F., P.E.T.A., H.S.U.S., A.S.P.C.A, and their local hangers-on. !


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CH J RUS, CH RUS, ROM, BUL CW Mariss Dofin Apelsin X CH J RUS, CH RUS, 2xRKF, “EURASIA” CW EUJW Magik Rainbow Eldorado

Breeders: Victoria Ivanova, Vasiliy Ivanov Saint-Petersburg, Russia Dachshund Club of America

Owners: Julie & Robert Couch Portland, OR 18

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(BISS Ch. Glenavan Acclaim ML ROMO X Ch. Glenavan Bedazzled MS)

* DC New Jersey 2/8/13: Best Opposite to Best in Specialty, Thank You Judge Charlotte Borghardt * DA of Long Island 2/9/13: Best Opposite to Best of Variety, Thank You Judge Edna Cooper (England) * Knickerbocker DC 2/10/13: Best Opposite to Best In Specialty, Thank You Judge Guy Jeavons * Westminster KC 2/11/13: Select Bitch (pictured), Thank You Judge Jaime Hubbard

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Teddy Moritz and John Jeanneney

by Claire Mancha

Hello all you fellow outdoorsy types!

T

his issue’s column is about polishing up our field trial game’s description on the Dachshund Field Trials, History of the Sport web page on the “Classic AKC” site. After you read it, I’m hoping you will agree that it is a bit outdated and could really use some sprucing up. The legal staff and Doug Lundgren of the AKC have both given us the green light to reprint these articles in our newsletter. As an aid to getting my point across, here is a “compare and contrast” opportunity for you. Please read the following AKC Beagle Field Trial History article then read the AKC Dachshund Field Trial History article and see which one you think represents its breed’s sport more fully. Both of these articles were cut and pasted from the AKC website. Beagle Field Trials: History of the Sport Beagle field trials, a sport found only in the United States and Canada, started with this announcement in the Sunday Boston Herald on October 26, 1890: “A group of Beagle Owners would hold a Beagle field trial in Hyannis, Massachusetts, in a fortnight.” This Group called themselves the National Beagle Club of America, and the advertised trial was held on November 4, 1890, with eighteen entries-fifteen dogs and three bitches. Shortly thereafter, this group applied for membership in The American Kennel Club, which was then just six years old. They were denied because a group of show enthusiasts, known initially as the American English Beagle Club, already held membership. The men in the National Beagle Club refused to give up. Finally, in May 1891, the American Beagle Club (formerly the American English Beagle Club) merged with the National Beagle Club. The new group called itself The National Beagle Club and it became the parent club for the breed. At that time, the AKC was completely show oriented, and an interesting sidelight on the club’s admission to AKC membership was the AKC’s strong objections to the parent club’s

involvement in both field trials and shows. H. F. Schellhass, then president and AKC delegate of the National, told the AKC: “This club was formed for improvement in the field and on the bench of the Beagle hound in America, and will enter the AKC with its constitution unchanged, if it enters at all.” The AKC dutifully backed off. Three Formal Packs were entered at the National Beagle Club’s meet in 1896. The traditional Forman Packs that were either privately opened or supported by subscription from local Beagle devotees. The packs were foot handled, with the Huntsman and his (or her) assistants, called Whippers-in, all resplendent in green jackets, white pants, knickerbockers or skirts, and black velvet caps. Packs were identified by the uniquely colored piping on the

In May 1891, the American Beagle Club (formerly the American English Beagle Club) merged with the National Beagle Club. Huntsman’s jacket. As late a 1983 twenty-eight such packs were registered with that club. They were hunted as three-couple (6), four-couple (8), and eight –couple (16) packs. At a Formal Pack field trial, each pack was judged as a unit or team, and its performance was measured against that of other packs entered in the trial. Participation in the sport of Formal Pack Beagling has always been limited to people with means. With the popularity of the Beagle, a new concept emerged in the early 1900s. Americans became interested in the development of an individual hound that could trail the hare or rabbit effectively and efficiently without the assistance of variously endowed pack mates. Beagles, selectively bred with this concept in mind, were referred to by the pack men as “singles.” To this day, it is not unusual to hear this term on the running grounds of the National Beagle Club when reference is made to Beagle run in Braces. In a sense the merits of a Formal Pack were to be discovered by testing, the traditional method of evaluating the abilities of working dogs, sporting dogs, and hounds. But rather Dachshund Club of America

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than putting them to tests, most Americans always preferred to put dogs in competition on a head-to-head basis. In fact, the AKC Beagle Field Trial Rules and Standard Procedures state it this way in the foreword: “The holding of field trials at which pure-bred dogs may be run in competition… Has been found to be the best method by which the progress which has been made in breeding may be shown.” Early beaglers became aware that industrialization and development for business and housing were reducing the availability of hunting and training grounds. The purchase of land by Beagle clubs was encouraged and even mandated by the AKC. In contrast to field trials for breeds in which domestically raised game can be released for the trial, the Beagle field trial is limited to the pursuit of a quarry that must be acclimated to the terrain. Beaglers became ardent conservationists. Natural food and cover programs on the Beagle Club grounds became necessary to maintain a natural supply of rabbits for training and trialing. In many instances, clubs reclaimed marginal land; soil fertility was measured and improved; and the term “rabbit farming” became the byword at any progressive Beagle Club. Today more than 529 Beagle Clubs either own or lease land in excess of 150 acres each. The building boom that followed World War II introduced hazards to Beagles intent on the chase. Too often the rabbit could take them across a new road or superhighway. Most clubs were forced to fence their land for the safety of the hounds. This, of course, also enclosed the rabbits, which then developed running traits quite unlike their “wild” cousins outside the enclosures. In order to get hounds that could effectively trail the “enclosure” rabbit, houndsmen bred for a slower, more precise working dog. Gradually, the old, one-on-one competition was replaced by an appreciation of the “style” in which the fieldtrial Beagle tracked a rabbit. This was significant in light of the fact that nearly 90percent of four hundred clubs holding AKC licensed trials in the ‘80s were running Brace


events. At these trials the hounds whose “style” most impressed the judges were given the ribbons. Through selective breeding, the Beagles used at field trials and run in Braces became slow and meticulous tracking specialists. However, the rabbit hunter, still the most numerous of all who take wild game in the United States, found that the slow “stylish” field-trial Beagle was totally undesirable as a hunting dog. By the early 1970s, the need developed for a real gundog, or hunting Beagle. This movement gathered momentum, and its breeding programs reflected the trend to hark back early days. Meanwhile the situation was somewhat different for those northern clubs that ran their Hounds in Large Packs on hares. They continued to pride themselves justifiably on producing hunting Beagles and believed that their trials showed the Beagle to such an advantage. The promoters of the “gundog” or “hunting Beagle,” however, did not believe that the Large Pack was the most acceptable method to pursue the cottontail rabbit. Instead, they chose to use a running standard that was already in the AKC Rules. This was the Small Pack in which hounds are run on rabbits in packs of from three to seven hounds, with the judges selecting the outstanding performers to be run in a second series and then finally in a Winners Pack. To prove beyond a doubt that they were competing with “hunting Beagles, “ the AKC in the late 1970s permitted the additional testing of their hounds for gun-shyness and searching ability in what became known as the Small Pack Option, the fifth type of competition for Beagles. By the end of 2001, 46% percent of all Beagle clubs were conducting licensed and sanctioned trials in this manner. The beaglers desire to recognize Brace beagles that were actual hunting dogs vs. those beagles that had been breed to participate only in Brace trials led to the creation of another type of beagle field trial, the Gun Dog Brace. These dogs are cast to search and tested for gun dog brace. Currently AKC offers four methods of beagle

field trials: • Brace on Wild Rabbit or Hare (Gun Dog Brace) • Small Pack Option on Wild Rabbit or Hare • Large Pack on Wild Rabbit or Hare. It is interesting to note that the members of the Beagle Advisory Committee have been working to develop a new trial method, that of the Two-coupled Pack. As with many other things, history is repeating itself in the Beagle world. With the sport Beagle field trials so diversified, and with traditions dating back almost one hundred years, how could the AKC cope with its administration of the five distinctive competitive standards for Beagle trials, recognizing that pure-bred Beagles are the objects of competition in all four standards? It took a unique mechanism. In order to understand this administrative evolution, the reader must know that an AKC Member parent club for any breed, such as the venerable National Beagle Club of America, has not only the responsibility to approve the dates of the events held by local clubs for its breed but also to propose the standards by which its breed is judged in conformation and performance. In 1936 the National Beagle Club voted to abrogate part of its responsibilities as a parent club and ceased granting consent for field-trial dates. Instead they recommended that the AKC appoint a ten-member Advisory Committee from among the delegates of the Beagle AKC member clubs whose purpose would be to advise the AKC’s Board of Directors on the matter of granting licenses for Beagle field trials. A member of the AKC’s executive staff was to chair this Advisory Committee. And so for 70 years a Beagle Advisory Committee (BAC) has been responsible for advising the AKC’s Board of Directors on meeting the challenge of the administration of the sport of Beagle field trials. Evolution has played its part, and there have been some significant changes in the BAC’s structure. For instance, the committee consists of thirteen

Photos by Jolanta Jeaneneny Dachshund Club of America

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members, twelve of whom each represent some forty Beagle clubs from across the nation. The thirteenth committee member belongs to the National Beagle Club of America. An AKC executive still chairs the meeting. The system has worked well. First AKC Brace Trials for Beagles November 4, 1890 *National Beagle Club (18 starters) Hyannis, Massachusetts November 1, 1893 Northwestern Beagle Club (10 starters) Whitewater, Wisconsin November 6, 1893 **New England Beagle Club (21 starters) Oxford, Massachusetts November 6, 1896 **Central Beagle Club (15 starters) Waynesburg, Pennsylvania *Current AKC member parent club **Current AKC member club Today the sport of Beagle field trials has something to offer any Beagle owner who can compete with his hound in any one of four different kinds of trials. One of the oldest types of trials is the Brace, in which the hounds compete by sex in pairs, or Braces, in pursuit of the cottontail rabbit. During the spring of 1999 the Beagle Advisory Committee added Gun Dog Brace where beagles are cast to search and tested for gun shyness. Hounds can also compete in Small pack or Small Pack Option. At these trials the Beagle are run in packs of 4 to 7 hounds, in the later the Beagles are tested for gun-shyness. In the northern tier of states, where the varying, or “snowshoe,” hare is found, Beagles may be trialed in Large Packs, where a pack of thirty to sixty hounds or more in a single class is not uncommon.” continued on next page...


Above & Below continued from page 21

And, now: Dachshund Field Trials: History of the Sport (Originally edited and written by A. Hamilton Rowan, Jr.; updated by M. Sue Richey, from material submitted by George C. Wanner.) In the early 1930s, the short-lived U.S. Dachshund Field Trial Club held the first organized field trial for Dachshund. The hounds were put to ground in artificial rabbit burrows and were judged by rules brought over from Germany. In 1935, under the leadership of the renowned and respected Dachshund fancier Laurence A. Horswell, the Dachshund Club of America, the parent club for the breed, held its first trial at Lamington, New Jersey, under revised rules tailored for American competition. It remained the only club holding field trials for Dachshunds until the Dachshund Club of New Jersey held its first trial in 1966. Thus, with only one trial each year to attend, by far the greatest challenge for any Dachshund owner was to keep his field trial prospect alive long enough to earn the twenty-five points for its Field Championship title. Today 28 clubs hold 53 field trials each year across the United States.

the years. The AKC record books also show that 119 Dachshunds have achieved the ennobled designation of Dual Champion, thereby proving to all breeders that function can follow form, or vice versa.” Well? What do you think? I think we need someone who is well versed in field trials, writes well and has the time to stand up and volunteer for this call to duty. I asked my personal choice, John Jeanneney, but he is booked until he can be booked no more according to his agent. John proposed Carrie Hamilton. Carrie, what about it? Personally, I can think of lots of people who would be great at this, and there could even be a committee made if we didn’t care how long the results would take. One of the people who wrote the article for the AKC has no longer been with the AKC for 14 years! As an added treat, I’m also reprinting with

The AKC Rules for Dachshunds specify that the judging be based on the following standard of performance: In all Stakes the principal qualifications to be considered by the Judges are good noses, courage in facing punishing coverts, keenness, perseverance, obedience and willingness to go to earth. Should a rabbit lodge in any earth, or run through any drain large enough for the Dachshund to enter, the dogs should, of course, be expected to enter without hesitation, and failure to do so should automatically render them ineligible for first award, Photos by Connie Fisher even though their performance was in all other respects outstanding. Since Dachshund trials must be held on live permission an article by John about the past and rabbits or hare, they are always held on the possible future options of dachshund field trials. grounds of an existing Beagle club where game Beagle and Dachshund Field Trials: is usually plentiful. Like Beagles, the Looking Backward and Forward Dachshunds compete in Braces (pairs), and the By John Jeanneney dogs both seek and pursue their game with DCA Newsletter March 2007 obvious delight. However, unless the scent is particularly “hot” or the quarry is in sight, most A dachshund is not a beagle! No reader has to Dachshunds run mute. be reminded of this. At first it may seem All varieties and sizes of Dachshundsparadoxical that the dachshunds, so very Longhair, Wirehair, and Smooth-and both different in character and working style from Standard or Miniature compete in the field on an any of the various types of types of beagles, equal eligibility basis. At a trial, a Dachshund is enjoy field trials with the same general structure a Dachshund regardless of coat or size, and all and rules as that of the brace beagle. I was varieties have done their share of winning over there in the 1960s, back in the mists of Dachshund Club of America

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antiquity, when field trials began to take off as a sport sponsored by many dachshund clubs. In 1982 work on a greatly expanded version of the original “Dachshund Field Trial Rules”, which eventually became official in 1985. Gordon Heldebrant, President of the North California Dachshund Club, took the initiative in getting the project moving. He was first the Chairman of an “Ad Hoc Field Trial Committee”, and later he chaired the official Field Trial Committee recognized by the DCA. I worked closely with Gordon from the East where the majority of dachshund field trialers were located at the time. The details of our draft would be tedious to review here, but rest assured it was no great flight of creative imagination; it followed beagle trial procedures quite closely. Still it was a vast improvement over the old dachshund rules that offered little structure or guidance on procedures. Our new model was the Beagle Brace Trial Rules, adjusted so that it was not mandatory that field trial dachshunds give voice on the scent line, and with an affirmation that the dachshund should make every effort to reach the rabbit after he was driven to ground. Gordon, who lived, trialed and judged in jack rabbit (hare) country, believed that there should be an option of a small pack format for dachshund trials, but he graciously gave way on this point when he got little support from the cottontail East. In light of what we know today about the European development of the dachshund for above-ground work, it might seem strange that we came up with these modified beagle brace trial rules as they became official in 1985. For Europeans it does seem strange that Americans would do such a thing. What Gordon Heldebrant and I proposed was more a reflection of circumstances at the time than any particular understanding or concern for the way the dachshund was used for hunting in his place of origin. Is this a confession that we made a mistake? NO! But we were lucky that things worked out so well. We slipped into a basic brace trial format that already existed for beagles and bassets. And this was to produce many years of enjoyment for dachshunds and their owners. Although I hunt with dachshunds, I do find that the pleasure principle is good and sufficient justification for the rules of 1985. Our field trials are great sport for many people. I see no reasons why our dachshund field trials must be justified as realistic tests of a dachshund’s usefulness as a hunting dog. There are other means of doing this. This said, let’s return to 1967. Dachshund field trials had been restricted to a single National Field Trial until George Wanner and Charles Campbell of the Dachsund Club of New Jersey worked hard and gained AKC approval for a second licensed trial, which was given by their club. These early trials were held on the James Brady Estate or on public hunting areas. Cottontails were usually


scarce. Compounding the problem, our vague field trial rules allowed for highly impressionistic judging. There was no clear guide of procedures. We wandered in a wilderness. The guide, our Moses who led us out of this wilderness and into a land of rabbits, milk and honey was Lloyd Bowers of Somerville, New Jersey. Mr. Bowers was an AKC beagler and field trial judge, who had endless patience and good will. He judged many dachshund field trials, and he introduced me, and many other East Coast field trialers to the world of beagling. First he invited the Dachshund Club of New Jersey to have trials at his Central Jersey Beagle Club in Sergeantsville. What a difference! Rabbits were everywhere. A grid of neatly mowed feed strips framed tidy blocks of brush that gentlemen and ladies could stride through as they brandished their beating sticks. There was a club house with a kitchen and heat for cold spring days. This was the heyday of beagling, and many of us were entranced by the system. The long affair of dachshund field trials with beagle running grounds had begun. Other dachshund clubs began to offer field trials across the country, and we were on our way. In this atmosphere and under the tutelage of Lloyd Bowers it was the most natural thing to adopt the format of the beagle brace trial. When Gordon Heldebrant and I took up the dachshund field trial rules project, we never considered anything but this, or possibly a small pack format on jack rabbits. By this time I was swept up in atmosphere of beagling. I went to beagle field trials. For a month I placed my first dachshund, Carla vom Rode, with a beagle trainer. I subscribed to the beagle magazine Hounds and Hunting. And I dreamed that my dachshunds would become more like beagles. My dogs did improve but they never became like a beagle! It would be many years before I learned that the standard dachshund in Germany was never developed or used as a “rabbit dog”. And the dachshund is used in Germany on hare in a very different way from what we know or can do in this country. Even today I am not sure that a better understanding of German origins would have, or should have made much difference. The American dachshunds and their owners were very different from their German counterparts. The American brace trial format met the recreational needs of our majority much better. The only thing certain in history is that things will change. While our sport of dachshund field trialing was expanding from coast to coast, our template, the beagle brace trial was beginning to crack apart. There was rebellion in Beagledom. Under the brace trial format the “ideal” beagle had evolved into an extremely slow, close working dog, who tracked meticulously but took a very long time to get things done. These brace beagles did not need an instinct to range and search for game because the gallery flushed the

rabbit for the hounds that were then led up to the scent line on leash and released. A strong faction of the beagle field trial community revolted against these developments. The contemporary brace beagle, they said, had been developed into a dog that was worthless in hunting. One of the great values of a hunting hound was that it would search for game, and get it up and running so that it could be tracked. Exaggerated precision on the line, the critics maintained was useless if it came at the cost of such slow speed that the scent line, and the hunters themselves, grew cold waiting and waiting. Derisively, the “gundog beaglers” said that watching a traditional beagle brace trial “was about as exciting as watching paint dry.” In 1980s the deepening rift between brace trialers and those who wanted beagles for hunting led to the AKC recognition of a new,

very different trial format for gun dogs known initially as “small pack”. The dominant variant of small pack became known as “small pack option”. Here a pack of about a half dozen hounds were released together to find their own rabbit and get it up and running. The hounds were expected to hark into one another and run efficiently as a unit. They were expected to drive the rabbit hard, but if was perfectly acceptable for hounds at a check to swing 25 feet or more to keep the line going in a speedy fashion. For a beagle to do this at a traditional brace trial would ensure immediate elimination. AKC gundog trials proliferated. Many beagle Dachshund Club of America

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clubs were convulsed by bitter disputes about which type of trials should be supported and what type of hounds should be favored. In my own club, the New Scotland Beagle Club, there was less than the usual acrimony as the club went over to the basic small pack, gun dog format. A very important innovation accompanying the growth of gun dog beagle trials was a significant difference in how the running grounds were managed. Since the hounds were expected to find and start their own rabbits the blocks of cover could be much larger and these were allowed to grown up to a height and density that made it extremely difficult for beaters to press through. Gun dog field trial grounds became unusable sites for brace trials where the rabbit had to be flushed by the beaters. I remember well the long, exhausting trial that ensued when the Albany Capital District Dachshund Club attempted, for the last time, to hold their field trial on the modified New Scotland grounds. The weekend trials ran over into Monday. While the revolution in beagle field trialing was taking place, dachshund field trialing grew merrily on its own following the original template of the brace trial. The beaglers’ problems appeared to have little relevance to us. As a whole the rabbit trailing capabilities of the dachshund participants did improve, although there were very few dachshunds that even approached the meticulous, slow working style of the brace beagle. The affair linking dachshund field trials to beagle brace grounds had become a marriage. Would it be an enduring union for the future? Sadly, no. Today, to a considerable extent, our dachshund brace trials on rabbits are being jeopardized by the split in the beagle world. As was the case with my New Scotland club, some clubs began to sponsor the small pack trials described above. They modified their running grounds to have bigger blocks of thicker cover. Some brace clubs, such as the famous Long island Beagle Club eventually dissolved themselves and sold the real estate. In other clubs aging memberships were not replenished, and especially in the brace clubs there was an insufficient work force to maintain the running grounds. Most beagle clubs, brace or small pack, have sought actively to recruit younger members, but often this generation, acculturated in a world of “virtual reality”, finds that there is not enough action in beagle trials to hold their interest. The outcome of these developments is that the number of brace trial grounds, which now seem essential for dachshund trials on cottontails, has declined. The situation seems worst in the Northeast where many of the surviving brace clubs hold their licensed trials elsewhere, on the grounds of the strongest clubs which have better running grounds. Things are actually worse than continued on page 32...


Reprinted with permission from the February 2013 Edition of ShowSight Magazine.

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OPTIMUM PROPORTIONS: 1 Head Length=•Neck Length •Tail Length •Body Depth

3 Head Lengths=Length of Body (Breast Bone to Hock) continued on next page... Dachshund Club of America

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Let’s start at conception: It was a Saturday, August 30th, 2008. Hurricane Gustav was in the Gulf of Mexico, targeting Louisiana, and metropolitan New Orleans was under mandatory evacuation. I, however, was not ready to evacuate. Instead, I was pacing nervously at the edge of my driveway, staring at the corner intersection where Hermitage Place met Rural Road, desperately willing the FedEx truck to appear. On the day before, semen from Ch. Spectrum’s WC Pucker Up ML, Patrick, was collected and shipped for an overnight delivery. I had an appointment Saturday morning for my bitch, FC PACH Sharpree’s Sierra Roaring Falls, Sierra, for a Trans-Cervical Insemination. For various reasons, this was my last chance. Friday evening arrived, Hurricane Gustav threatened, the Mayor ordered mandatory evacuation, and 90% of businesses shut down, including FedEx but for emergency delivery. I spent Friday night tracking my precious package, pleading for delivery. One FedEx representative asked “What’s in the package?” I replied, “It’s freshchilled semen and I have an appointment first thing Saturday for insemination”. The agent assumed “human semen” and I let him ... ok ... so maybe I misled him a wee bit. Now here I stood, Saturday morning, the eve of a Hurricane, a tear in my eye as I see the classic white truck with purple and orange writing blazing “FedEx” turn the corner my direction. The fellow didn’t even have to get out of the truck. I had my package! Streets practically empty, I sped to the vet. The staff was gone but for one new doctor. No time for TCI. Simple spin ‘em down and insert. Insemination complete, I returned home, picked up dogs, sister and mom, and evacuated to Jackson, Mississippi. And such was the day that Gee! was conceived. A litter of three wonderful red longhair mini dachshunds were born on October 31st, 2008. They were Hallo-weenies. The above is the literal, “The Making of a Dachshund”. The making of a Triple Champion starts on day 3 of the neonates existence. I refer you to an article I wrote for the Spring 2009, Volume XXXIII, Number 1, newsletter entitled “Performance Bound From Birth”. This article describes the painstaking actions in raising this litter with “the intention to create rock-solid, confident, happy, resilient puppies that were well-conditioned to their possible future competition and training environments. I concluded the article: “my pick of the litter is an adorable yet high-spirited female.” I described the then 9-week-old pup as “a high-strung handful. She’s sufficiently biddable, yet with an independent spunk. She’ll be able to take repetition in training and will no doubt give me resistance ... which means she’ll need to have the resiliency needed to take corrections and still continue training without pouting! I surmise that the fruits of my labor will be evident in the years to come.” Dachshund Club of America

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PROJECT GEE! At 9 weeks old, the pup was named G1, short for Girl #1. I wanted a powerful call name that projected her attitude and the aspirations I had for her success in performance. G1 became: Sharpree’s Imagine That! Call name: Gee! Gee! became a project. Nature gave me the foundation, but “nurture” became the plan. I worked closely with my primary trainer of agility and obedience, Julie Hill of Fido Finishing School in Mandeville, La. I developed a long range training plan for Gee! with intentions of chasing as many Championships in as many sports as we could manage. The plan was to pursue Field Championship first, Conformation a close second, Agility 3rd, and eventually chase an Obedience Championship.

IN THE FIELD: Gee! appeared to be a natural prey-driven hunter and obtained her first field points in November of 2009. She was awarded her “first” placement at the Dallas - Fort Worth Dachshund Club field trial at the Farmerville, La grounds under judges Trudi Kawami and Stephen Dumas on February 14, 2010. To my surprise that day, Gee! also went Absolute. Gee! finished her Field Championship in St. Louis under judges Linda Sullivan and Claire Mancha on November 6, 2010.

IN THE BREED RING OR “MEDIC TO RING 2”

by Sharon McDonald Dachshund Club of America

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For me, the road to a breed championship title was going to be long and challenging. I was very intimidated by the entire conformation scene. I naively believed that I could just get a handler to take the lead and work magic. I hung my hopes on Nancy Pearson. I handed off an untrained and mostly ungroomed dog to Nancy at a 4-day show here in New Orleans. Gee! was an utter mess. She was stubborn and would not work for Nancy. Turns out Gee! was a mamma’s girl. “Ya think so?” said Nancy. Nancy handed her back after two days and said “Looks like you’re going to have to do this yourself”. PANIC! Those who know me can testify to my sheer neurotic meltdown each and every time I stood ringside awaiting my class. With no other option, I donned my big girl panties and tackled the project. Nancy stayed on the team giving me grooming lessons or mostly just doing the grooming herself! Sandy Russell gave me judges advice and loads of ringside handling mentoring. The conformation competitors in the region gave me endless support and encouragement. Heck, even my agility friends tolerated the countless after-class sessions of “let’s play conformation”. I traveled with a grooming table and took the opportunity for “down and back” and “table exam” with anyone I could find willing to play. With a new-found respect for those who excel at conformation handling, Gee! and I managed to earn our majors and 15 points all from the BredBy class. Our first 4 pt. major came in September 2011 under judge Rodger Hartinger in Biloxi, MS. In June 2012, we competed in Lake Charles, La where judge Garry Newton selected Gee! as continued on next page...


his Winner’s Bitch for her final 3 pt. major, capping off our quest and creating a new Dual Champion. I cannot even begin to explain how proud I was that day. I haven’t shown Gee! in conformation since then, and, I can’t believe I’m saying this, but I sort of miss it!

THE AGILI-GEE! With FC and CH checked off the list, my attention turned to her Master Agility Championship (MACH). All along the conformation journey, Gee! had been training and competing in agility. She made her agility debut in June 2010. By September 2010, Gee! earned her Open Jumpers and Standard titles. She ripped through her Excellent titles earning her first MACH points in February 2011. In late summer of 2011, Gee! shut down and had no enthusiasm for agility. Worried, I took her to the vet where no smoking-gun physical ailment could be identified. I rested her, dropped her to jump at the 4˝ preferred height, and worked on motivation. Well, turns out in hindsight that Gee!’s issue was hormonal. She was in season in August and experienced a false pregnancy. By November, hormones all processed, Gee!’s agility performance hit a steady stride. She began to earn double Qs with regularity and MACH points at an even faster rate. Thanksgiving weekend, 2012, we returned to Lake Charles, LA for the Calcasieu Kennel Club agility trial. Gee! entered the weekend needing just two double Qs for her MACH. She earned the first of the two on Friday. On Saturday, she qualified in the morning Standard run. It seemed like forever waiting for the afternoon Excellent Jumpers class to begin. While the “big dogs” walked the course, I sat just outside the ring, inserted my earplugs and listened to music. Whether by divine intervention or just coincidence, R. Kelley traveled from my tiny iPod Shuffle, through the Ear Buds, and into my psyche. There are miracles in life I must achieve But first I know it starts inside of me, oh If I can see it, then I can be it If I just believe it, there’s nothing to it I believe I can fly

I believe I can touch the sky I think about it every night and day Spread my wings and fly away I believe I can soar I see me running through that open door I believe I can fly I believe I can fly I believe I can fly The song snuck up on me, slamming me with the reality of the moment. I succumbed to emotions, cradled my head in to my hands, and cried. I was cracking. Was my dream of a Triple Champion about to enter reality? I’m not sure how long I held myself in that surreal space with R. Kelley gushing into my senses. I felt a presence near me and glanced up to see my friend, trainer, and coach, Julie Hill, looking at me. She had her dog and was awaiting her turn in the ring. The class had started. Her expression turned to scold as she saw my tears. She spoke and I removed the ear buds to hear. She said quite firmly: “NO! Stop it! You can’t do that. It’s just another course.” I reinserted the ear plugs and changed the music to a silly upbeat song by the Japanese girl band Girl’s Generation. “Gee Gee Gee Gee, baby baby baby .... something in Japanese .... Gee Gee Gee Gee, baby baby baby “. I smiled. My psyche was mended and I was ready. At the start line, I kissed Gee! on the head, whispered “I believe we can fly”, and off we went. We qualified on that jumpers run, earned our final double Q for our Master Agility Championship, and completed the trifecta of Championships.

JET FUEL PROPULSION: Somewhere along our agility adventure, I discovered Gee!’s source of propulsion. My coach, Julie, suggested wetting her down prior to a run. I gave it a shot. I drenched Gee! in water moments before moving to the ring gate. She tolerated as the water streamed across her coat. When I released my tight grasp of her collar, she spoke to me in a tone of bark that needed no interpretation. She highly objected! Within moments it was our turn on the course

and she smoked it! Gee! has never run a course dry since! The wetting down has become known as “jet fuel”.

OBEDIENCE, EARTHDOG: Gee! has earned her obedience Companion Dog title and is a Junior Earthdog. She’s one leg shy of her Senior Earthdog title and is trained through Utility obedience. Gee! continues to compete in agility. At the time of this writing, she has 12 double Qs and 613 points towards MACH2. For the second year in a row, she qualified for Agility Nationals. Assuming Gee! holds strong in the dachshund rankings, we’ll compete at the National Agility Invitational at the Eukanuba shows in Florida. After that, Gee! will turn full focus to obedience and to hopefully raising a litter of fabulous little Gee! puppies.

MUSIC MOTIVATES MY FUTURE: Gee!’s next quest is for her OTCH. It’s a mountain, a very steep mountain. The Scripts “Hall of Fame” has been added to my iPod Shuffle: Here’s the Chorus: When your, standing in the hall of fame And the world’s gonna know your name Cause you burn with the brightest flame And the world’s gonna know your name And you’ll be on the walls of the hall of fame Be a champion, Be a champion, Be a champion, Be a champion On the walls of the hall of fame Some acknowledgements: Aside from those already mentioned in the text: Thanks to Don Ingamells and Arvilla Mayhall for my early mentoring in breeding dachshunds. ABUNDANT thanks to Kathy Steele for “Patrick” and for shipping the semen against many odds! Thanks to Patty McMillan for bringing “Patrick” to my attention. Thanks to Sierra for giving me such a sweet litter. Thanks to the many members of clubs, trial chairs, trial secretaries, and judges of all the events in which we competed. Without you all, there would be no sport! Gee! and I are forever grateful to all our friends and fellow competitors for their camaraderie and encouragement. I am especially thankful to all those who, when I said I was pursuing multiple Championships, believed in us and gave us wisdom along our journey. A special thanks to Kurt Hamlen for keeping agility flourishing at K9 Klub Agility Field, and to all my training buddies who have imparted wisdom to my handling! Most of all, thanks to Gee! for being who she is and for keeping me so very entertained! I want to conclude by thanking the most important player in Gee!’s story: Nedeedakh’s Maggie Mae V Hildegarde UD RA SE, my sweet and precious Maggie, Gee!’s grand-dam. Maggie had so much potential for great things, but I was an inexperienced trainer. My desire to continue Maggie’s legacy is what led to Gee!. I lost Maggie in December of 2012 at 171⁄2 years of age. Her legacy lives indeed! !

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FOlSatso hBO! B

B

OV and SBt. Louis

DC of

GCh. Legibach Captain Crunch Best in Specialty Show Presented by: Angela L. Lloyd Owner: Sally Sweatt Breeders/Co-Owners: Gina Leone Middings and Pat Leone

Legibach Double Rainbow Best of Opposite to Best in Specialty Show from the BBE class Breeders/Owners: Gina Leone Middings and Pat Leone Our sincere appreciation to Judge Edna Cooper. Both Captain and Lucille are sired by Ch. Raydachs Great Balls of Fire and out of Ch. Legibach Rain Forest Crunch.

Dachshund Club of America

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Above & Below continued from page 23

the field trial statistics make them seem. My old, now defunct, brace club, Mid Hudson Beagle Club still exists on paper, but a Mid Hudson licensed trial is held each year many miles away on other grounds. This happens to be a small pack option trial! The dachshund field trial leadership, especially TAC, will be faced with a dilemma which will require flexibility. The beaglers offer a possible solution, with the emergence of a new AKC recognized trial structure known as “Gun Dog Brace”, which is somewhat different from the old brace system, now referred to as “Traditional Brace”. Most important for us, the Gun Dog Brace Trial can be held on the more densely vegetated grounds that the small pack beagle clubs maintain. In the gun dog brace trial, the brace is cast to search for the rabbit, and beaters are not needed to buck the brush. The preferred running style in a Beagle Gun Dog Brace trial is usually something of a compromise between Traditional Brace and Small Pack Option, If the DCA and AKC were ever to accept the Gun Dog Brace format as an optional alternative to the old style of dachshund trial, certain significant modifications would have to be introduced. Much more emphasis would have to be placed upon the responsiveness of the dachshunds to handler commands. Handlers would be required to interact with their dogs, short of picking them up, until one dog jumped a rabbit and the brace was off on it more or less together. Dachshunds do not normally hark in to another unfamiliar dog; they were not developed as a pack hound. But if they will handle, they can be guided in by the handler to run with their bracemate, who has the rabbit. I have even seen this done in beagle trials. In Europe one of the above-ground tasks of the dachshund has always been to perform as a close-working flushing dog for drives. The dog is expected to find game in the designated cover and then drive it to the hunters who surround the area. A Gun Dog Brace trial for dachshunds would require some of these same abilities. Gun Dog Brace trials for dachshunds would not appeal to everyone. The big-running, go-for-the-horizon dogs would have to be trained to mend their ways if they were to be competitive in this trial format. But it would be most useful exercise for the falconers’ dogs who work in cooperation with their handler and the hawk. The agility performer, who knows how to work closely with his human partner, would have a significant advantage. It should appeal to people who have a close relationship with their dogs. The Gun Dog Brace Trial would emphasize that quality of responsiveness that distinguishes the dachshund from other scent hounds. Judges would be rewarding dogs for certain qualities largely neglected in our trials at present: searching ability to be sure and also biddability. The ability to stay on a scent line and push the quarry, once it is started, would continue to be rewarded as in our present system. Handlers and dogs, who are real working partners, would be the winners if this type of trial were ever adopted. And such a trial would go a long way to solve the problem of dwindling beagle brace trial clubs and grounds. The author has had some experience to support his thoughts.. He has been an active member in beagle clubs of both the Traditional Brace and the Small Pack varieties. He has judged with an experienced senior judge in both Traditional Brace and Gun Dog Brace sanctioned trials. He currently owns a beagle that has placed three times in highly competitive Small Pack Option Licensed Trials. Of course the dachshund has been his first love throughout his long field trial career as a competitor and as a judge.” As a last thought, I would like to ask WHY are there no futurities anymore? There are still breeders, there are still litters and there are still field trials. There are still some very capable secretaries who can handle the paperwork. I would love a return to the optimism that a futurity represents. I challenge any field trial giving club to offer a futurity in 2014. Let’s do it! !

Delegate’s Report for March 12, 2012 Meeting Held in Newark, NJ by Larry Sorenson This is the highlights of the Delegates’ Meeting; a complete set of Delegates’ Meeting Minutes is located at: http://images.akc.org/pdf/delegate_minutes/March_2013.pdf The following Delegates were elected to the AKC Board of Directors Class of 2017: Lee Arnold, Southern Colorado Kennel Club Carl C. Ashby III, United States Kerry Blue Terrier Club Alan Kalter, American Bullmastiff Association Harvey M. Wooding, Westminster Kennel Club The AKC Bylaws were amended to add the advancement of canine health and well-being to the objects of AKC and to make Agility Clubs eligible to apply for AKC membership. Both changes are effective immediately. The following AKC Staff promotions were announced: Gina DiNardo, Vice President, Assistant Executive Secretary; Mark Dunn, Vice President, Registration Development and Customer Services; Daphna Straus, Vice President, Business Development. The Board interpreted Chapter 4, Section 2, of the Rules Applying to Dog Shows as permitting clubs to send electronic copies of the premium list. If sent electronically, clubs do not have to send a paper copy. Mr. Sprung: As the world rapidly changes and social media increases as a dominant ingredient and driver in our daily lives, we have recognized and taken the necessary step to fill this important need. Allow me to introduce to the Delegate Body Chris Walker, Assistant Vice President of Social Media and Communications, who will be managing our PR, Communications and Social Media Department. Needless to say, with that responsibility, you will be hearing from his staff very often. We are in a new age. Let’s hope it helps. LLS Mr. Farnsworth: Thank you and let me begin. Today we are going to cover how the year ended for the AKC, and the results of the first two months of 2013. In the first slide, we’re focused on 2012 and we make comparisons to actual results for 2011. That middle column where the arrow points is 2012. I want to make sure that one is made clear. In the top two rows, you seeing regular operating revenues and operating expenses. The large revenue change in 2012 reflects the net change of several major effects. First, revenues were boosted when we gradually increased prices of dog registrations in 2012. It was announced at the beginning of 2012, but it went into effect somewhat slowly as we honored subscriptions and offers that were already out there during 2011. But offsetting this, there was a continued drop in litter and dog registrations, and a related drop in other revenues that were related to those registrations. How big was that drop? Well, there was a 7.7 percent decrease in litter registrations and a drop of 10.6 percent in dog registrations when comparing 2012 to 2011. Third, the unexpected management turnover in the spring of 2012 in the Marketing area contributed to a fall in new expected revenues there; and unexpected management turnover, such as Jim Stevens’ departure and in a number of other areas also created challenges to achieving target results in revenue. But the Board of the AKC and the management took prompt action as soon as it was apparent that revenues would not keep pace with expectations. They slashed plans for future controllable expenses as much as possible. But some were already spent, accounting for most of the $800,000, represented there by point-eight, an $800,000 increase in expenses. In all other areas, expenses were able to be held in check during the second half of the year just ended. The net effect is one we can be relatively pleased with. While the increase in revenues was continued on page 53...

Dachshund Club of America

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We are very excited about this girl - my first red wire born on 8/31/12 during the “Blue Moon�. Annabel won back to back 5 point majors at the Dallas Fort Worth Dachshund Club (Breeder Judge: Ms. Sherrill C. Snyder) and at the Fort Worth Kennel Club (Judge: Mr. Sidney L. Marx) at just 6 1/2 months. Then the following weekend wins WB/BOW at the Cumberland Valley Dachshund Club under Breeder Judge Darcy Quinlan. Thank you for all these exciting wins on this young girl. She only needs 3 singles to finish at 7 months old. I also want to thank Neal Glaser & Karen Simmons for bringing this fine young girl into the world. Breeder/Owner: Shirley Ray Co-Breeders: Neal Glaser & Karen M. Simmons Presented By: Cheri Koppenhaver

BIS Ch. Gleishorbach Quest For Fire V Raydachs SW x GCh. Erindachs Nora W

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Multi BISS, GCH, DC Dachshire Son of a Sailor, SL, RN, ME, CGC, (NEW VC)

DC Obsession’s FF, T

Dozer is the son of Bubbles and Crush

Skipper was the 2010 Eukanuba BOV Winner

TC (MACH, CH, FC) White Ridge Sparkling Star, CD, RE, MSG, MJG, OF, SE, CGC, VC Bubbles is the FIRST Longhaired Triple Champion

Exclusively owned and handled by Dr. Denny Van Hook, DVM:

“I will always be grateful to these marvelous dogs who always give me their best effort and totally unconditional love.” Dachshund Club of America

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s Ruff ‘N Ready SL, RN, MX, MXJ, T2B, JE, CGC (NEW VC)

DC Obsession’s Dark Star SL, RN, AX, AXJ, AXP, AJP, NF, CGC, (NEW VC) Duskey is the son of Bubbles and Skipper

SwinHs th!e! A FDL uskey 2 0 1 3 DC A Triathlon!!

GCH DC Obsession’s I’ll Take Your Heart SL OAJ SE NA (soon to be VC)

DC Briardach’s Lucky in Love RE, SE, CGC, VC

Reba is the daughter of Bubbles and Crush

Dr. Denny Van Hook, DVM k9coach@aol.com 618-979-4740 Dachshund Club of America

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LEARNING TO HEAL Weaves and Retrieves By Karen Scheiner

Karen and Bailey

T

here’s a dog that comes along once in your lifetime, that is so special in so many ways, you know there will never be another one quite like her. I knew when she was a puppy, that Bailey was that dog for me. She had qualities unlike any other dachshund that I had owned. Not only was she was a strikingly beautiful chocolate dapple, but even more amazing than her beauty was her temperament, her drive, and her eagerness to work with me. Bailey earned her breed championship with me as her owner/handler, and when I started training her in agility, she surpassed all expectations, making it to the top five dachshunds in the country. When we worked in obedience, she won a first place at a specialty and took two other placements in all-breed trials, easily earning her CD. Around the time when I started to train for her CDX, a wellmeaning, more experienced trainer recommended that I should concentrate on agility, and save obedience for later, when she was older. Regrettably I listened. Although we forged ahead in agility, the obedience competition that I had aspired to do with her was never realized. Bailey developed stomach lymphoma at the age of five; after 20 months of chemotherapy, she succumbed to the disease. At the time, I thought, this is the end. The end of having such energy and enthusiasm in the ring. The end of having a spirited and wonderfully trained dachshund to show and to love. Fortunately, I was wrong.

I knew that I needed an outlet to heal from the emotional pain after losing Bailey. She had been my closest companion, my dearest friend; my feelings for her were as close as for any family member. I was reeling inside from the pain that was raw and deep. Nevertheless, I soon realized that I was amazingly lucky in having kept two puppies from different litters that Bailey had whelped before her illness. Although I didn’t know it then, the loss of Bailey was not the end. Rather, it was just the beginning. After losing Bailey five years ago, my deep emotions choked me from writing about her. That is, until now. I think it is important to share the way that I changed my life and how I healed from her untimely loss. Teaching obedience to Bailey’s daughters, Abby and Cherry, changed my life and theirs. Instead of sitting on the sidelines while their mother competed, it suddenly became their turn to shine. Here is the road to starting in obedience training.

THE BEGINNING Focus is definitely the basic ingredient to training in obedience. Without focus, you have no one at your side! To earn a CD (Companion Dog) title, you are required to heel on-lead with your dog, and then, after a stand-for-exam exercise, the rest of the event is off-lead. For all advanced levels of obedience, there is no lead allowed at all! To make things even more challenging, you cannot talk to your dog through the exercises, and no food is allowed! So how do you get your dachshund to heel with you without a lead? Dachshund Club of America

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Start by playing games. There are a number of focus games to play with your dog. My favorite game is “touch” because no food is required. You merely need to extend your hand out, say “touch” and when the dog’s nose hits your hand, get crazy excited – they love it! After a while, the dog will purposely bounce his nose off your hand, just to get your response. You can then use the “touch” game to teach the dog to heal on your left side. Just lower your left hand and when the dog comes around your left side, and hits your palm with his nose, he gets overwhelming praises from you! Try it with a puppy – if a dog could laugh, this game will get close. To teach other skills, use either tiny bits of chicken or a soft treat your dog loves. Make sure your treat is really small, because hopefully, you will be giving out a lot of them! Start with your dog facing you. Let her see the treat. Say her name. Then stay quiet. When she looks into your eyes, she gets a treat. Do this a few more times with success, before moving on. The next part of this exercise is to hold one treat in each hand, with your arms extended to the side. When you say the dog’s name, she should look into your eyes – and not at your hands holding the treats. The goal here is for the focus to be in your eyes, the dog looking at your face. Practice this exercise a few times a week. The dog will get the idea of focusing on YOU and not so much on the treats. Remember to play games randomly and frequently with your doxie – particularly inbetween teaching different exercises. Make it a fun time; no stress translates to no sniffing. Heeling would be the next skill to teach. For continued on page 37...

Teach your dog to “sit” and “hold” the dumbbell.


Multiple Best in Specialty Variety Best In Specialty Show

BISS Grand Ch. Dynadaux Hey Good Girlicious MS Thank you Judge Aubrey Nash and Judge Sherry Snyder for these recent specialty awards.

Breeder/Owner/Handler

Dynadaux (reg.) Cyndy Senff Del Valle, TX • 512-247-2152 • www.dynadaux.com Dachshund Club of America

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Once your dog understands come-ups, you can move onto continued from page 36 stretches of longer heeling exercises. Try doing change of pace (“fast” and “slow”), and occasionally at the end, instead of going into a Heel and Sit “normal” gait, throw a piece of food or a toy, so that the dog gives chase. Do it when she doesn’t expect it, so it’s a surprise, and the dog gets to run around. Dachshunds, in particular, tend to lag in heeling. That’s why you definitely need some “FRONT” position surprises, especially in training the “fast” gait. Instead of thinking, I hope my dog isn’t lagging, your dog should be thinking, “I’m not going to let my owner get away from me.” A few problems that dachshund owners tend to experience are heeling too wide and sniffing. Both of these problems should and this exercise, I would suggest using string can be corrected by using techniques described above. On the issue of heeling too wide, I can’t cheese. Strip the cheese the long way, so that you have about ten long strands to work with. In stress enough, be careful not to step on your dog! If you are clumsy or have big feet, your training, particularly in the beginning, always dachshund will know it. He will never want to use a lead. The preferred size of the lead should be lightweight and no more than three feet long. get too close to you!! If you have stepped on him, then you need to correct this by heeling (I’ve had people come into my classes with a with more treats and not stepping on him again. heavy 6-foot lead, like they are going to pull As for the dog’s sniffing, do not excuse this around a German Shepherd!! I tell them, they behavior. People tell me that their dog is either have to get a larger dog, or a smaller “naturally” hunting for a mouse, or for food. lead!) Also, you don’t want to be rolling up Let’s just say that this is not acceptable in the bunches of the lead in your hands while you are obedience ring. You will lose the dog in the working. A lead that is left too long may cause exercise and not recover. If you allow the dog to the dog to wander away from you. sniff the floor in To start heeling, the dog should be sitting at training, it will only be your side. Her head should at the seam of your pants, and she should be looking up at you. (See worse in competition. It is a feature of stress and photos) With the lead in your left hand, let a not so much that they strand of cheese also dangle from that same are wildly hunting hand. You then should do a series of very short anything except a piece heeling exercises; I call them “come-up sits” or of lint on the floor. “come-ups,” for short. With your dog in heel Therefore, if the dog is position, take three steps (left, right and halt), happy in training, then and end up with her sitting in heel position. he won’t be sniffing. If Extend the cheese strip down your leg with your left hand, and let the dog get it. You can try to do you are getting a lot of sniffing, then you need come-ups all the way around the ring, with the to figure out why this is dog heeling a few steps, then immediately sitting. This exercise may seem repetitive, but in happening, so that you can correct it. the beginning, your dog needs a lot of repetition Fronts can, and so that he can understand what you want him to should be, taught very do. If the dog starts to forge, in a happy voice early on. Puppies can say, “Let’s try that again!” Avoid the word “no” in training; it does not belong in your vocabulary, learn fronts easily. Whether on a recall, or as it could shut down a new dog.

Learning To Heal

Dachshund Club of America

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just learning to sit in front of you, your dog should sit squarely, with his head looking at you. His front legs should be at your toes, and his hind legs straight behind him. Dachshunds have a tendency of sitting on one side or the other, rather than straight. This is a function of either laziness, or never having been taught the correct way to sit. Do not allow your dog to sit on his haunches when he is called to front. Straight sits are also healthier for a long back. Practice doing fronts by turning in a circle, 90 degrees at a time. Tell the dog “front!”, and let her find the straight front herself. Soon you should be able to rotate a full circle, with your dog finding the “front” position. Dumbbell. To make fronts interesting, you might want to present the dumbbell to your dog while he is sitting in front of you. Say “take it” and “release.” Of course the dumbbell retrieve is an Open exercise, but it is never too early to introduce this to your dog. At the end of your training period, you might also let her chase it and retrieve it in play, so she gets used to holding it and having it in her mouth. Always have her bring it back to you in a “front” sit position. Let the dog thinks this is her reward for an hour well done.

STILL, THE BEGINNING. As I said, this is just the beginning. There are so many components to training obedience, particularly for a dachshund. I plan on discussing more skills, exploring ways to make them exciting to your dog, and addressing common problems in future columns. For me, I still have a long road to go with Cherry is now working in Utility; her older sister, Abby, is retired after having earned her CDX. I do know that Bailey would be so proud of her daughters, who have been able to carry the torch and succeed in everything that she had been working with me to accomplish.

 

I would love to hear from you with comments or suggestions of topics to be discussed in this column. Please send your e-mail to DoxyLadyNJ@gmail.com. Let your dog run with the dumbbell in play.


PICTURED ABOVE Standing: Judges Phil Kirby and Phyllis Meseroll Seated from left to right: Fourth: Open Any Age Dog (OAAD) ~ CH Karuns GaDachs Remember SL with owner handler Kathy Pickrell at their first Field Trial (breeders Kathy Pickrell and Pat Sawyer) Third: OAAB ~ CH Georgia Dachs Kenesha finishing her Dual Championship with owner handler Linda Cockburn (breeders Jerry Cerasini, Roger Brown, and Nancy Thompson) First: OAAB ~ CH Georgia Dachs Jasmine W RE MX MXB AXJ THD CGC finishing her Dual Championship with owner handler Norma Williams (breeders Jacqueline Morgan and Nancy Thompson)

• • •

GEORGIA DACHS

Jasmine, AKA Lucy, Therapy Dog, at Abington House with some senior friends for Easter.

Nancy Thompson P. O. Box 770 • Snellville, GA 30078 770-972-0998 • gadachs@bellsouth.net Dachshund Club of America

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I’m Alpha, a red long haired dachshund with a very curly neck, sitting on my mom’s lap. The date is April 20, 2013. What a week. I’m so glad I live here, safe in our home in Tennessee. The people of Boston and Texas are recuperating from tragedy and senseless acts. The family has been watching the news more this week than usual. There have been phrases like, “Oh my God,” and “Babies killing babies.” They haven’t forgotten to tell me I’m good but they have tears in their eyes that I don’t understand. They seem to need all of us dogs more right now. I get squeezed pretty tight. Dad and mom talk about the families that have been changed and young people that will never know their potential or joys of life. Understanding that is difficult because each day I can run and the hunting here is spectacular. We think that makes our family feel good and it does. They hug us even more than usual. That’s great! But why? My day was about playing and loving the sun and the grass on my back as I roll around in our big yard. Of course, most of the time I like playing with the other dachshunds in our home. Well really, Cruiser is my best friend. We often cuddle up whether it’s in the kennel, on the couch or on our folks’ bed. Some of the dogs in our home have longhair like me and others have wirey hair. There aren’t any naked dogs any more. That makes us sad. We are different from each other but in more ways the same. Some of the other friends are “blended groups”. For example, Lucy is a wire and Lola is a longhair. They show us everyday how to play differently but enjoy each other. You just have to see it! Those of us that have longhair are noble. The wires play differently. They bounce and swirl and – oh, it’s hard to describe those clowns! Love and friendship, aren’t they really close to being the same? We accept and celebrate our differences. Mom took four of the four-legged family to the DCA National field trials. She was so excited because it was the first time she could go. She told dad that she was so proud of all four that went. They all came home with a DCA ribbon. She said the “icing on the cake” was meeting new people and seeing the admirable sportsmanship displayed. People were helping and congratulating each other. There were lots of human pats on the back and hugging dogs. In our house we are getting ready to go to the rest of the DCA Nationals. There is grooming, training, and planning. I’m not going but know that I’m important too. We’ve provided lots of fur for the birds to make nests. Mom grooms outside when she can so she can see what hair needs to

go. She calls it sculpting. I think it is being loved. We all get groomed even if we aren’t going to a show. Mom said, “We have to be presentable when we have guests and go to the vet.” She also says it’s her therapy. Not too long ago we took a very long trip. I hear them talk about things to do on the East Coast when it used to be West Coast. All my friends don’t seem to care where we go as long as we are with our folks. We always try to please them. Sometimes that’s hard because each location on the long trip was different. Mom drove the van and dad drove the motorhome. They always had to find places for us to exercise safely. Usually it took about an hour to get all of us walked. Sometimes people would ask questions about us. Even though I don’t

R andom Thoughts from Alpha, theLonghair Dachshund

understand time very well, I know the differences in the smells, the ground and the temperature. There were many walks over land we had never seen or smelled before. Sometimes it was wonderful and at times it was just what needed to happen. At times, as canines, we were very welcome and revered and other times we were sent packing along with our human friends. Most people were friendly. The folks always had baggies with them. They find them in all their pockets no matter what they wore. I’ve heard laughing about finding them in golf pants and even in coats used for dress-up occasions. Their human dog friends laugh and understand the need for baggies being on hand. Those who are not really into dogs don’t really understand so Dachshund Club of America

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the folks just wad them up and put them back in their pocket. We love living in our new home. Mom tells us we live in the South. Thank goodness, we all live on unrestricted land where neighbors don’t complain about each other. They all have hobbies that have friendly noise from ATVs to practice shooting to the “woo-woos” and howling of other colleagues. Sometimes coyotes sing at night. During the days, we have more warmth from the sun than I ever felt before. Dad had a brand, spanking new kennel built for us. It’s really nice and mom spends a lot of her time in it with us. It gives us lots of room to eat, sleep and play. We are lucky! Not too long after we moved to Tennessee, the folks found a lump on my belly. The vet took it out. A few days later they were told it was cancer so I couldn’t have puppies any more. I liked having puppies but as long as I’m loved it’s OK that I spend my time at home. They like hearing the pidder-padder of paws. I’m not sure I liked showing so much but would always do it for them. Secretly, I did it for the food too! So now there is a reason for me not to go to the shows. Mom says we all have something to give and I’m a special “house-dog”. I never cause problems and I am especially good about asking to go outside. I guess that’s really, really important. I do have lots more hair now. It takes more brushing but that’s nice for me. Mom and I get to spend more time together. She also says I have become a fullbodied women since the surgery. Sometimes I hear dinner may be green beans but that hasn’t happened. I guess they were just kidding. It’s only another two weeks before mom and the junior handler, Sarah, will take off for the dachshund club nationals. I miss her when she is gone. She says she misses me and the others that can’t go too. She’ll come back with stories about her old and new friends, about the dogs that won, and about plans for the future. Mom’s been making new friends in the South. I hear her talking about shows and the other events for dogs. They talk about breeding and why some of my dog girlfriends don’t seem to be having puppies. That disappoints my folks, I know, but they seem to still be planning. I guess that’s like people trying to have a family too. Try, try again! Now that we are all settled in our new home, mom and dad have lots of plans. They want puppies of course and will add more fencing so we have more space to run. Dad keeps making more equipment for agility and earthdog. They both love doing things with us that we were meant to do. We get forgiven for digging because continued on page 42...


Dachshund Club of America

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Cancer Research Gets $1.5 Million Boost Canine cancer questions got $1.5 million closer to some answers last week when the AKC Canine Health Foundation and the Golden Retriever Foundation jointly awarded grants totaling that amount to two projects which will collaboratively research how lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma get started and spread in Golden Retrievers. Lymphoma, cancer of the lymphatic system, strikes one in eight Golden Retrievers, and hemangiosarcoma, which attacks the lining of blood vessels to create tumors on the spleen, liver, heart and skin, affects one in 20, making the two diseases major health problems for the third most popular breed in the United States. Most dogs with lymphoma survive about a year after treatment, and with hemangiosarcoma, only four to six months even with aggressive treatment. Although newly funded research will be on Golden Retrievers, researchers believe the information will help diagnose and treat cancer in many breeds. Although this research will be performed on a single breed, the CHF says the resulting information should help in early diagnosis and treatment of other breeds as well. In a CHF newsletter to its supporters, University of Minnesota’s oncology professor Jaime F. Modiano, V.M.D., Ph.D., was quoted as saying, “In the case of lymphomas, there are probably more than 20 subtypes of this condition, about six of which are commonly seen in dogs. As it turns out, the subtype of lymphoma tells us more about the disease and its behavior than the breed of origin. So, studying one type of lymphoma…makes the results more readily interpretable, and applicable, to many breeds.” Others who do genetic research in dogs support this concept. The first three-year grant of just over $1 million brings together – again – Modiano, Matthew Breen, Ph.D., of North Carolina State University, and Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, Ph.D., of the Broad Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The trio’s previous work together has revealed “several ground-breaking discoveries,” according to Shila Nordone, Ph.D., the CHF’s chief scientific officer. First, they identified several regions of the canine genome that contain genetic heritable, meaning they can be inherited, risk factors for both cancers. They also identified inherited changes in tumors that determine how long a dog will survive after treatment. The researchers determined that a “few heritable, genetic risk factors account for as much as 50 percent of the risk” for the two cancers. In the future, it may be possible to test dogs for certain cancers long before they have any clinical signs so that treatment can begin sooner and to adjust breeding based on a dog’s predisposition for the disease. Modiano, Breen and Lindblad-Toh believe their findings offer the potential to develop methods of assessing the cancer risks in individual dogs, as well as managing risk for all dogs. The risk factors and tumor changes point to pathways that define a cell’s ability to do what it does, Nordone explains. “When we look at results from the study of human cancer, we suspect there are problems in regulation of cellular function such as proliferation [the creation of new cells] and cell death.” Identifying which defects exist in the dog can help determine what treatments will be most effective in stopping those actions, which are key in cancer. “Cellular function is not static,” she says. “There’s an ‘on/off’ switch to everything. There’s growth, survival and death. In

Random Thoughts continued from page 40 we were meant to do that too, Dad says. Rembrandt and Lola love agility. Whiskey is being trained even though, mom says, “He has the attention span of a gnat.” Most of us like to go to field trials and hunt for the bunnies. Many of us will go to earthdog trials. Mom says we need to be trained for rally and there many other

cancer, understanding what is defective will allow us to better diagnose, treat and even prevent cancer.” The researchers will use the CHF-GRF funds to identify “precise mutations” for the heritable genetic risk factors and prove that they define the disease. “Their ultimate goal is to develop robust risk prediction tools, and hopefully, an accompanying DNA test,” according to the study description. The team will use a “large independent population of Golden Retrievers from the USA and from Europe” for its studies. Jeffery N. Bryan, D.V.M., M.S., Ph.D., of the University of Missouri, Columbia, Anne Avery, V.D.M., Ph.D., of Colorado State University, and Heather Wilson-Robles, D.V.M., of Texas A&M University, are the recipients of the second CHF-GRF research grant of about $400,000. For the next three years, they will identify novel proteins in the blood, and what happens upstream of a gene being turned on (known as “epigenetics”) to improve the diagnosis, classification and prognostication of B-cell lymphoma. About 70 percent of dogs with aggressive lymphoma have the B-cell subtype. To do this, the researchers will use state-of-the-art technology, allowing them to develop biomarkers for each class of lymphoma and to identify new therapy targets. The changes in front of and after the gene could serve as biomarkers of risk, allowing medicine or diet to prevent lymphoma in Golden Retrievers before it develops. Finally, the trio proposes to fully analyze lymphatic cancer stem cells from genetic changes on the inside to how it affects what a cell expresses on its surface. “If we understand where the dysfunction is at the individual cell level, then we can have an earlier chance of diagnosing the disease,” Nordone says. Such knowledge will allow diagnosticians to further identify which dogs would best benefit from which treatments. By studying cancer from the perspective of protein and epigenetics together, “the discoveries made in each project can be combined, correlated and translated into biomarkers of risk, diagnosis and prognosis to advance the prevention and management of lymphoma in Golden Retrievers,” according to the study description. Nordone says she loves all of these newly funded studies “because they’re collaborative in nature, and that really, really matters now. We’re pooling both physical and intellectual resources. That is huge.” Such collaborative research, she says is “absolutely the wave the future. I think we’re going to start to see collaboration at the forefront. We can’t work in isolation anymore. “If you look at the strength of all these investigators, they come from very different backgrounds. They bring a lot to the table.” They are also from different universities, and “resources really do differ from place to place,” she says. In addition, the CHF and GRF are “asking for deliverables,” Nordone says. “This is not science for science’s sake. This is science for the sake of doing something about the disease, for solving a problem. These are projects that are structured to translate to the patient.” It has taken three years since the creation of the partnership between CHF and GRF to award these research grants. Studies considered for funding had to include at least three component projects and were reviewed by the “foremost experts in the field of veterinary oncology,” according to the CHF. You can help support these projects by donating at www.support.caninehealthfoundation.org/cancer or www.goldenretrieverfoundation.org/Donatetoday.php. Dog clubs and organizations that wish to sponsor this research should contact chfgrants@akcchf.org.

games we can play, like in barns. There is so much to look forward to! Every day new things happen that are exciting and some times concerning. I forgot to mention the folks want to put up a big flag pole with the United States flag, flying high. Sometimes when they are disappointed about things like not winning or not having puppies, they talk about how lucky we all are to live where we live and have the freedom to do the things we love. They talk about their parents, relatives, friends and Dachshund Club of America

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others they don’t know who fought in wars to keep us free. They talk about the people who continue to do jobs for a living and as volunteers to keep us safe and help us in bad times. As their dog family, they keep us healthy and as happy as possible. We think it is our job to keep them happy too. Thanks for listening to my story. Here’s to serious belly rubs! Story by Alpha who owns and loves Tom and Kathy Lockyer. !


Reprinted from the AKC Events website as of 6/4/13 Contact the secretaries of the events with any questions. Access the url below for all upcoming shows. http://www.akc.org/events/search/index.cfm

Dachshund Club of California July 4, 2013 Ventura County Fairgrounds & Seaside Park 10 W Harbor Blvd., Ventura, CA Total Entry Limit: 100

Dachshund Club of California July 4, 2013 Ventura County Fairgrounds & Seaside Park 10 W Harbor Blvd., Ventura, CA Total Entry Limit: 100

Cascade Dachshund Club July 12, 2013 Red Lion Hotel-Olympia 2300 Evergreen Park Dr. SW, Olympia, WA Web Site: http://www.cascadedachs.org/ Total Entry Limit: 100

Cascade Dachshund Club July 12, 2013 Red Lion Hotel-Olympia 2300 Evergreen Park Dr. SW, Olympia, WA Web Site: http://www.cascadedachs.org/ Total Entry Limit: 100

Houston Dachshund Club, Inc. July 18, 2013 Reliant Center Astro Hall 1 Reliant Center Dr Houston, TX

Albany Capital District Dachshund Club July 21, 2013 Columbia County Fairgrounds Route 66, Chatham, NY Total Entry Limit: 100

Closing Date: Wednesday, June 19, 2013 For additional information contact: Rhonda Storm, Event Secretary 9522 Derby Dr. Riverside, CA 92509-3523 (951) 681-2487 flyingzranch@hotmail.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, June 19, 2013 For additional information contact: Rhonda Storm, Event Secretary 9522 Derby Dr. Riverside, CA 92509-3523 (951) 681-2487 flyingzranch@hotmail.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Mr. David M. Powers Mr. David M. Powers Mr. David M. Powers

Closing Date: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 For additional information contact: Susan Ellestad, Event Secretary P.O. Box 4090 C/O Baray Event Services Sequim, Wa 98382-4353 (360) 683-1507, events@barayevents.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Mrs. Jane Sagami Watkins Mrs. Jane Sagami Watkins Mrs. Jane Sagami Watkins

Closing Date: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 For additional information contact: Susan Ellestad, Event Secretary P.O. Box 4090 C/O Baray Event Services Sequim, Wa 98382-4353 (360) 683-1507, events@barayevents.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Dianne R. Graham (p) Dianne R. Graham (p) Dianne R. Graham (p)

Closing Date: Wednesday, July 3, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 mail@onofrio.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, July 3, 2013 For additional information contact: MB-F Inc., Superintendent PO. Box 22107 Greensboro, NC 27420-2107 (336) 379-9352 mbf@infodog.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Mr. Irving Bonios Mr. Irving Bonios Mr. Irving Bonios

Sweepstakes: Mrs. Cheryl Shultz

Junior Show: Dianne R. Graham (p)

Dr. Kenneth H. Levison Dr. Kenneth H. Levison Dr. Kenneth H. Levison

Sweepstakes: Mr. Brian Owen

Ms. Margaret D. Heaney Ms. Margaret D. Heaney Ms. Margaret D. Heaney

Sweepstakes: Terry Terrell

continued on next page... Dachshund Club of America

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... UPCOMING

SPECIALTIES ...continued

from page 43

All dates, times and addresses are as accurate as possible before the newsletter deadline date. Please consult the show secretaries or superintendents for any further information.

Central Carolina Dachshund Club July 25, 2013 TD Convention Center 1 Expositon Ave Greenville, SC

Northern California Dachshund Club August 2, 2013 Dixon May Fairgrounds 655 S 1st Street Dixon, CA Web Site: http://www.ncdachshundclub.org

Bayou Dachshund Club of New Orleans August 3, 2013 Pontchartrain Center 4545 Williams Boulevard, Kenner, LA Web Site: http://bayoudachshundclub.org/ Total Entry Limit: 100

Western Pennsylvania Dachshund Club August 4, 2013 Canfield Fairgrounds Rt. 46, Canfield, OH Web Site: http://www.dachshund-wpdc.org/

Dachshund Club of America, Inc. August 9, 2013 Bartholomew County 4-H Fairgrounds County 200 So & State Rd 11 S Columbus, IN Web Site: http://www.dachshund-dca.org

Hoosier Dachshund Club, Inc. August 10, 2013 Bartholomew County 4-H Fairgrounds County 200 So & State Rd 11 S, Columbus, IN Web Site: http://hoosierdachshundclub.home.comcast.net

Hoosier Dachshund Club, Inc. August 11, 2013 Bartholomew County 4-H Fairgrounds County 200 So & State Rd 11 S, Columbus, IN Web Site: http://hoosierdachshundclub.home.comcast.net

Closing Date: Wednesday, July 10, 2013 For additional information contact: MB-F Inc., Superintendent P.O. Box 22107 Greensboro, NC 27420-2107 (336) 379-9352 mbf@infodog.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, July 17, 2013 For additional information contact: Ms. Bonnie Prato, Event Secretary 5252 Shafter Ave. Oakland, CA 94618 (510) 653-8883 hanashihtzu@yahoo.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, July 17, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 mail@onofrio.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, July 17, 2013 For additional information contact: MB-F Inc., Superintendent P.O. Box 22107 Greensboro, NC27420-2107 (336) 379-9352 mbf@infodog.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, July 24, 2013 For additional information contact: William Geshwiler, Event Secretary 696 Baker Rd. Columbia, TN 38401-5557 (931) 381-7926 wgesh18@aol.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Steven Wolden Steven Wolden Steven Wolden

Closing Date: Wednesday, July 24, 2013 For additional information contact: William Geshwiler, Event Secretary 696 Baker Rd. Columbia, TN 38401-5557 (931) 381-7926 wgesh18@aol.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Ms. Louise E. Dorr Ms. Louise E. Dorr Ms. Louise E. Dorr

Closing Date: Wednesday, July 24, 2013 For additional information contact: William Geshwiler, Event Secretary 696 Baker Rd. Columbia, TN 38401-5557 (931) 381-7926 wgesh18@aol.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

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Mr. Adrian W. Woodfork Mr. Adrian W. Woodfork Mr. Adrian W. Woodfork

Junior Show: Mrs. Valerie Dombrowski Sweepstakes: Mrs. Valerie Dombrowski

Mr. Douglas A. Johnson Mr. Douglas A. Johnson Mr. Douglas A. Johnson

Junior Show: Mr. Douglas A. Johnson Sweepstakes: Mr. Thomas Sikora

Ms. Charlotte I. Borghardt Ms. Charlotte I. Borghardt Ms. Charlotte I. Borghardt

Junior Show: Mrs. Sulie Greendale-Paveza Sweepstakes: Mr. Carl Holder

Mr. Robert J. Opeka Mr. Robert J. Opeka Mr. Robert J. Opeka

Sweepstakes: Judy Stephenson

Junior Show: Miss Karen J. Rockwell Sweepstakes: Miss Karen J. Rockwell

Wayne Neil Douglas Wayne Neil Douglas Wayne Neil Douglas

Junior Show: Melissa Heymann (p) Sweepstakes: To be assigned


. . .

U P C O M I N G

S P E C I A LT I E S

. . .

All dates, times and addresses are as accurate as possible before the newsletter deadline date. Please consult the show secretaries or superintendents for any further information.

Columbine Dachshund Club August 16, 2013 Island Grove Regional Park 501 N. 14th Ave., Greeley, CO Web Site: http://www.columbinedachshundclub.org/

Minnesota Dachshund Club August 22, 2013 Washington County Fairgrounds MN 12300 North 40th St., Hwy. 5 & Cty. Rd. 15 Lake Elmo, MN Web Site: http://mdcdachshund.tripod.com

Minnesota Dachshund Club August 23, 2013 Washington County Fairgrounds MN 12300 North 40th St., Hwy. 5 & Cty. Rd. 15 Lake Elmo, MN Web Site: http://mdcdachshund.tripod.com

Louisville Dachshund Club August 31, 2013 Kentucky Horse Park 4089 Iron Works Pike Lexington, KY Total Entry Limit: 100

AM: Central Iowa Dachshund Club September 6, 2013 Iowa State Fairgrounds E. 30th & Grand Ave. Des Moines, IA Total Entry Limit: 100

PM: Central Iowa Dachshund Club September 6, 2013 Iowa State Fairgrounds E. 30th & Grand Ave. Des Moines, IA Total Entry Limit: 100

Dachshund Club of Southwestern Ohio, Inc. September 7, 2013 Queen City Dog Training Club, Entry Limit: 100 12018 Tramway Drive, Sharonville, OH Web Site: http://www.dachshund-dcswo.org

Closing Date: Wednesday, July 31, 2013 For additional information contact: Ms. Jan D. Curtis, Event Secretary 2837 49th St. Evans, CO 80620-9516 (970) 339-3272 jdc_showsecretary@msn.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 7, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 mail@onofrio.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 7, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 mail@onofrio.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 mail@onofrio.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 21, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 mail@onofrio.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Mr. Frank Canestrini Mr. Frank Canestrini Mr. Frank Canestrini

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 21, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 mail@onofrio.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Cyndy Senff Cyndy Senff Cyndy Senff

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 21, 2013 For additional information contact: William Geshwiler, Event Secretary 696 Baker Rd. Columbia, TN 38401-5557 (931) 381-7926 wgesh18@aol.com

Judges Breed: (L) (L) (L)

Mrs. Lisa Young Mrs. Lisa Young Mrs. Lisa Young

Junior Show: Maj. William J. Given Sweepstakes: Miss Cindy L. Partridge

Mrs. Sue-Ellyn Rempel Mrs. Sue-Ellyn Rempel Mrs. Sue-Ellyn Rempel

Junior Show: Marissa Shepherd (p) Obedience: Ms. Susan Pauline Emerson Sweepstakes: Alexandra Rogers

Ms. Phyllis Rosinsky Ms. Phyllis Rosinsky Ms. Phyllis Rosinsky

Junior Show: Ms. Phyllis Rosinsky (p) Obedience: Mr. Charles W. Kline Sweepstakes: Melissa Heymann

Ms. Georjan Bridger Ms. Georjan Bridger Ms. Georjan Bridger

Junior Show: Ms. Georjan Bridger Sweepstakes: To be assigned

Junior Show: Cyndy Senff (p) Obedience: Mr. Daniel E. Herald Sweepstakes: Carol L. Anderson

Dianne R. Graham (p) Dianne R. Graham (p) Dianne R. Graham (p)

Junior Show: Dianne R Graham (p) Obedience: Mrs. Tamara A. Woodrow Sweepstakes: Nancy Turner continued on next page...

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... UPCOMING

SPECIALTIES ...continued

from page 45

All dates, times and addresses are as accurate as possible before the newsletter deadline date. Please consult the show secretaries or superintendents for any further information.

Dachshund Club of New Jersey September 7, 2013 North Branch Park 355 Milltown Rd. Bridgewater, NJ

Dachshund Club of Southwestern Ohio, Inc. September 8, 2013 Queen City Dog Training Club, Entry Limit: 100 12018 Tramway Drive, Sharonville, OH Web Site: http://www.dachshund-dcswo.org

Mississippi Dachshund Club September 14, 2013 Mississippi State Fairgrounds, Entry Limit: 100 Trade Mart Building Greymont & High Sts. Jackson, MS Web Site: http://www.msdachshund.org/

Mississippi Dachshund Club September 15, 2013 Mississippi State Fairgrounds, Entry Limit: 100 Trade Mart Building Greymont & High Sts. Jackson, MS Web Site: http://www.msdachshund.org/

AM: Connecticut Yankee Dachshund Club September 20, 2013 Knights of Columbus 390 South Union Street Guilford, CT Total Entry Limit: 100

PM: Connecticut Yankee Dachshund Club September 20, 2013 Knights of Columbus 390 South Union Street Guilford, CT Total Entry Limit: 100

Dachshund Club of Greater Buffalo September 28, 2013 Sampson State Park 6096 Route 96A Romulus, NY

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 21, 2013 For additional information contact: MB-F Inc., Superintendent P.O. Box 22107 Greensboro, NC 27420-2107 (336) 379-9352 mbf@infodog.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 21, 2013 For additional information contact: William Geshwiler, Event Secretary 696 Baker Rd. Columbia, TN 38401-5557 (931) 381-7926 wgesh18@aol.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 mail@onofrio.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 mail@onofrio.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, September 4, 2013 For additional information contact: Ms. Lori Carver, Event Secretary 18 Plainfield Rd. Cummington, MA 01026-9632 (413) 634-5684 seabreez13@hotmail.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Nancy L. Dougherty Nancy L. Dougherty Nancy L. Dougherty

Closing Date: Wednesday, September 4, 2013 For additional information contact: Ms. Lori Carver, Event Secretary 18 Plainfield Rd. Cummington, MA 01026-9632 (413) 634-5684 seabreez13@hotmail.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Dr. Robert A. Indeglia Dr. Robert A. Indeglia Dr. Robert A. Indeglia

Closing Date: Wednesday, September 11, 2013 For additional information contact: Jim Rau Dog Shows, Ltd., Superintendent P.O. Box 6898 Reading, PA 19610-0898 (610) 376-1880 info@raudogshows.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

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Ms. Sharon M. Michael Ms. Sharon M. Michael Ms. Sharon M. Michael

Junior Show: Ms. Gail Miller Bisher (p) Sweepstakes: Mr. John Constantine

Obedience:

Guy Jeavons Guy Jeavons Guy Jeavons Mrs. Tamara A Woodrow

Dianne R. Graham (p) Dianne R. Graham (p) Dianne R. Graham (p)

Junior Show: Dianne R. Graham (p)

Jerry Cerasini (p) Jerry Cerasini (p) Jerry Cerasini (p)

Junior Show: Jerry Cerasini (p)

Sweepstakes: Mrs. Mary Norato Indeglia

Ms. Diane L. Malenfant Ms. Diane L. Malenfant Ms. Diane L. Malenfant

Sweepstakes: Wendy S. York Junior Show: Jack L. Gohde Jr.


. . .

U P C O M I N G

S P E C I A LT I E S

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All dates, times and addresses are as accurate as possible before the newsletter deadline date. Please consult the show secretaries or superintendents for any further information.

Dachshund Club of America, Inc. October 6, 2013 Fauquier County Armory 692 Waterloo Rd., Warrenton, VA Web Site: http://www.dachshund-dca.org Total Entry Limit: 100

Metropolitan Washington Dachshund Club October 7, 2013 Fauquier County Armory 692 Waterloo Rd., Warrenton, VA Web Site: http://www.dachshund-dca.org Total Entry Limit: 100

East Bay Dachshund Club, Inc. October 25, 2013 Dixon May Fairgrounds 655 S. 1st Street Dixon, CA

Lincolnland Dachshund Club October 26, 2013 Capitol Canine Training Club 209 E. Walnut Street Chatham, IL

Dachshund Fanciers Association of Berks County November 17, 2013 Berks County 4-H Community Center Reading, PA

Knickerbocker Dachshund Club February 9, 2014 New York Hotel Pennsylvania Pavillion Level (on the mezzanine) 401 Seventh Avenue (at 33rd Street) New York, NY

Closing Date: Wednesday, September 18, 2013 For additional information contact: Karen Jones, Event Secretary 6683 Ridgeway Drive Springfield, VA 22150-4318 (703) 451-0873 k.l.jones@us.pwc.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Ms. Ann Gordon Ms. Ann Gordon Ms. Ann Gordon

Closing Date: Wednesday, September 18, 2013 For additional information contact: Karen Jones, Event Secretary 6683 Ridgeway Drive Springfield, VA 22150-4318 (703) 451-0873 k.l.jones@us.pwc.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Mrs. Carol Spritzer Mrs. Carol Spritzer Mrs. Carol Spritzer

Closing Date: Wednesday , October 09, 2013 For additional information contact: Bonnie Prato, Event Secretary 5252 Shafter Ave. Oakland, CA 94618-1051 (510) 459-3580 bonnie.prato@yahoo.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Ms. Theresa L. Hundt Ms. Theresa L. Hundt Ms. Theresa L. Hundt

Closing Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013 For additional information contact: Mrs. Sharon Ehr, Event Secretary 11812 Seven Pine Drive Holland, MI 49424-8673 (616) 881-6824 smedachs@mc.net

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Mrs. Barbara L. Burns Mrs. Barbara L. Burns Mrs. Barbara L. Burns

Closing Date: Wednesday, October 30, 2013 For additional information contact: Jim Rau Dog Shows, Ltd., Superintendent P.O. Box 6898 Reading, PA 19610-0898 (610) 376-1880 info@raudogshows.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W)

Closing Date: Wednesday, January 22, 2014 For additional information contact: MB-F Inc., Superintendent P.O. Box 22107 Greensboro, NC 27420-2107 (336) 379-9352 mbf@infodog.com

Judges Breed: (L) (S) (W) BOB

Junior Show: Mrs. Carol Spritzer Sweepstakes: To be assigned

Junior Show: Mrs. Barbara L. Burns Sweepstakes: Mr. Jessie Barringer

Mr. Dan J. Harrison Mr. Dan J. Harrison Mr. Dan J. Harrison

Junior Show: Mr. Dan J. Harrison Sweepstakes: Catherine Thistle

Ms. Patricia W Laurans Eric Henningsen Larry Sorenson Ms. Theresa L. Hundt

Junior Show: Ms. Theresa L. Hundt Sweepstakes: Diana McPhearson

The disposition of noble dogs is to be gentle with people they know and the opposite with those they don't know...How, then, can the dog be anything other than a lover of learning since it defines what's its own and what's alien. - Plato Dachshund Club of America

47

Summer, 2013


1st FC Duchwoods EZ Breezy Covergirl MS JE Alice S. Carter 2nd DC TurningPt We Danced RE, CD, JWW, VC, CGC Steve & Starr Henderson 3rd FC Myswins Faux Golden Holly CD Ed & Valerie Higginbotham 4th FC Rellih”s Hopi Kachina Spirit MW, TD, GCG Linda A Snyder NBQ FC Annamieka vom Jagdfeld CGC Susan A. Gardner REMEMBER! Only those results sent in to the Trophy Chair, editor or webmaster via e-mail will be published in the newsletter. They are published as submitted.

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Dachshund Fanciers of Southwestern Washington March 16, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 27 OAAD Starters: 13 Judges: F. Homar and P. Baker 1st Sigmund Mein Freund ME (EE) C. Pile 2nd Goodwood the Gods Must be Crazy Good P. & B. Whithorn 3rd Max von Bispingdorpe ME U. & C. Smith 4th Code Blue Black Chili Pepper SS J. Milosavljevic NBQ Ch Magik Rainbow Lunny Svet J. & R. Couch OAAB Starters: 8 Judges: F. Homar and D. Mata 1st Dobre Butelka Wino Z Goodwood A. Piatek 2nd Goodwood Fifa’s Good Journey C. Mancha & L. Stutts 3rd Ch. Spellbound’s Winning Hand N. Cooper 4th Code Blue Red Chili Pepper SS J. Milosavljevic NBQ Stardust N Windrose Enchanted Duchess of Serenity P. Baker & W. Snyder Field Champion Combined Starters: 6 Judges: F. Homar and D. Mata 1st GCh. DC Dollidachs Forget Me Not N. Cooper 2nd FC Sausage Stables Liesle SS JE J. & R .Couch 3rd GCh. DC Niebur’s Moon Flower, N. Cooper & A. Leonard 4th DC Serenity’s Grace Like Rain RN W. & B. Snyder & P. Baker NBQ Franka von Schlendrian C. Mancha Judges for Best Open/Absolute: F. Homar & D. Mata Best Open and Absolute: Sigmund Mein Freund ME (EE) ________________________________

Dachshund Club of Metropolitan Atlanta March 22, 2013

Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Alice Moyer, Laura Potash, Ashley Dumas, Kathy Lockyer Best Open: Duchwood’s Paisley Patch MS Absolute FC Duchwoods EZ Breezy Covergirl MS JE ________________________________

TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 81 OAAD Starters: 24 Judges: Alice Moyer & Laura Potash 1st Ch. Karuns Ga-Dachs Remember SL Kathy Pickrell & Pat Sawyer 2nd Lorindol One For The Road SS Bill & Vicki Spencer 3rd Ch. Syringa’s Walkin On Sunshine V Stolz SL Carol Stolz-Blancato & Katerine Schisel 4th Obsessions Custom Lowrider SL JE Deneice L. Van Hook, DVM NBQ Crickhollow Leru Envoy To Sunshine CGC Richard E. Davids OAAB Starters: 23 Judges: Randy David & Phil Kirby 1st Duchwood’s Paisley Patch MS Sandra J. Russell 2nd Ch. Ga-Dachs Jasmine W RE, MX, MXB, AXJ Norma K. Williams 3rd Withheld 4th Withheld NBQ Briarpatch Picayune Mardi Gras News MWP Bonnie Ross & Denise Nickerson Field Champion Dogs Starters: 17 Judges: Ashley Dumas & Kathy Lockyer 1st FC Alpine Owl von Dorndorf LTD, JE, NA, OAJ Patricia Nance 2nd DC Pocketpack Simply Red, CDX, RAE, ME Catherine M. Thompson 3rd FC TownFarm Emmett Sweeps the Spotlight JA Cynthia A. Yeager 4th GCh. DC Lorindol Rider of the Quest Vicki & Bill Spencer NBQ FC Audi Oslo Von Dorndorf CA CGC Stan Knoll Field Ch. Bitches - Starters: 17 Judges: Pam Reed & Vicki Spencer

Dachshund Club of Metropolitan Atlanta March 23, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 74 OAAD Starters: 22 Judges: Randy David & Mike Nothstein 1st Ch. Leoralees Chances Are SI JE Heather With & Marietta Singleton 2nd Duchwood’s Pirate Prince MS Sandra J. Russell 3rd Withheld 4th Withheld NBQ Hoppledachs Sho Me The Beat ML Ed & Val Higginbotham & Pamala Hopkins OAAB Starters: 16 Judges: Phil Kirby & Phyllis Meseroll 1st Ch. Ga-DAchs Jasmine W, RE, MX, MXB ,AXJ Norma K. Williams 2nd Little Miss T Von Raab MS Mary Ellen Byrne 3rd Ch. Ga-Dachs Keneska Glenn Cockburn & John Thompson 4th GCh. Ga-Dachs Tanya Karua SL Kathy Pickrell & Pat Sawyer NBQ Jaffa’s Cabbie Caby Marnie Kerley Field Champion Dogs Starters: 15 Judges: Laura Potash & Ashley Dumas 1st FC Audi Oslo Von Dorndorf CGC CA Stan Knoll 2nd FC Alpine Owl von Dorndorf TD, JE, NA, OAJ Patricia Nance 3rd DC Nexus v Dorndorf L, CD, TD, JE, RN, NA, VC Patricia Nance 4th DC Pocketpack Simply Red, CDX, RAE, ME Catherine M. Thompson NBQ FC TownFarm Emmett Sweeps the Spotlight JE, CGC Cynthia A. Yeager

Dachshund Club of America

48

Summer, 2013

Field Ch. Bitch Starters: 21 Judges: Alice Moyer & Kathy Lockyer 1st DC Amazing Grace von Bakum Phyllis Meseroll & Michael Nothstein 2nd DC VSchwalbes Etta James MW Robert & Janet Schwalbe & Glenn & Corby Barkhaus 3rd GCh. DC Twelfth Night Hertiage Race Against Time Brenna Potash & Anne Carson 4th FC Mach Harlequin Jalyse Chinook ML, CD Jamie Sexton & Karen Scheiner NBQ FC Engelong Marked For Glory MW, CA Karen Campbell Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Randy David, Phil Kirby, Alice Moyer, Kathy Lockyer Best Open: Ch. Leoralees Chances Are SL JE Absolute: FC Audi Oslo Von Dorndorf CGC CA ________________________________

Dachshund Club of Metropolitan Atlanta March 24, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 75 OAAD Starters: 18 Judges: Ashley Dumas & Laura Potash 1st Hoppledachs Sho Me The Beat ML Ed & Val Higginbotham & Pamala Hopkins 2nd : GCh. Lockshire’s Rembrandt SL, RN, NA, NF, GCG, VC Thomas & Kathleen Lockyer & Sarah Pearce 3rd Duchwood’s Klark Kent MS Sandra J. Russel 4th Duchwood’s Pirate Prince MS Sandra J. Russell NBQ: Duchwood’s Royal Riddle MS Sandra J. Russell OAAB Starters: 19 Judges: Phyllis Meseroll & Alice Moyer 1st Nuforest Noelle Hope, ME Glenn & Corby Barkhaus 2nd Ch. Jaffa’s Gabbie Caby Marnie Kerley & Cris Natali 3rd Chloe Von Potash CA, CGC Brena & Laura Potash 4th Little Miss T Von Raab MS Mary Ellen Byrne NBQ Obsessions Simply Brillant SL Deneice L. Van Hook, DVM Field Champion Dogs Starters: 16 Judges: Pam Reed & Mike Nothstein 1st DC Nexus v Dorndorf L, TD, JE, RN, CD, NA,VC Patricia Nance 2nd FC My Little Red Waggin’ V Ruger, BN, RN Catherine M. Thompson 3rd FC Alpine Owl von Dorndorf, TD, JE, NA, OAJ Patricia Nance


4th DC Wingover Lancelot du Lac, ML, RN, OA, OAJ, NF, JE, TD Alice S. Moyer NBQ FC Cadium Aurinkosoturi Patricia Nance Field Ch. Bitch Starters: 22 Judges: Phil Kirby & Vicki Spencer 1st DC Turning Point We Danced, RE, CD VC, JWW, CGC Steve & Starr Henderson 2nd FC Anja von Moosbach Zuzelek, SE, RN Sherry L Ruggieri 3rd FC Penni’s Fly Me to Haleakala SL, CGC Ashley Dumas 4th FC Lady Scarlett Sienna Shelia DeLashmutt NBQ FC Engelong Marked For Glory MW, CA Karen Campbell Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Ashley Dumas, Laura Potash, Phil Kirby, Vicki Spencer Best Open and Absolute: Hoppledachs Sho Me The Beat ML ________________________________

The Dachshund Club Of New Jersey March 30, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 69 OAAD Starters: 12 Judges: Teddy Moritz & Laura Potash 1st Skyhunters Hounds Red Machine Brian Bradley 2nd Skyhunters Hounds Geronimo ML Brian Bradley 3rd Lieder Von Lowenherz Pamela Burns 4th Sleepy Hollow’s Buzz Liteyear L JE Kathleen Newman NBQ Amzwerg Hercule My Mighty Hunter Diana S. Damon OAAB Starters: 16 Judges: Diane Sennett & Bob Patterson 1st Skyhunter Hounds Belle Brian Bradley 2nd Skyhunters Hounds Joy Brian Bradley 3rd July Von Moritz MLD Teddy Moritz 4th Hawkin’ Tails’ Lilah MLD Ted Damron NBQ Bishopgate Go For It Jo-Ann Frier-Murza Field Champion Dogs Starters: 19 Judges: Karen Jones & Phyllis Damron 1st FC Stardox I Know You Rider ME CGC Susan Jill Blake & Lorraine Simmons 2nd FC Rosie’s Little Trooper Bonnie E Mercier 3rd Withheld 4th Withheld

NBQ Doxwood’s Perfect Performance MW John Merriman Field Ch. Bitch Starters: 22 Judges: Alice Moyer & Pete Mercier 1st FC Diamant Lily Von Lowenherz ME Laurel Whistance-Smith 2nd FC Danika Vom Nordlicht TD SE Cheri Faust 3rd FC Stanze Von Lowenherz SE Laurel Whistance-Smith 4th FC Melwyn Underwing Darter ML, ME Lorraine & David Simmons NBQ FC Annamieka Vom Jagdfeld CGC Sherry L Ruggieri Judges For Absolute: Alice Moyer & Phil Kirby Absolute: FC Diamant Lily Von Lowenherz ME ________________________________

The Dachshund Club Of New Jersey March 31, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 54 OAAD Starters: 9 Judges: Teddy Moritz & Bob Patterson 1st Rose Gate Basil John Simon 2nd Lieder Von Lowenherz Pamela Burns 3rd Withheld 4th Withheld NBQ Amzwerg Hercules My Mighty Hunter Diana S. Damon OAAB Starters: 8 Judges: Alice Moyer & Laura Potash 1st Skyhunters Hounds Joy Brian Bradley 2nd Skyhunters Hounds Belle Brian Bradley 3rd Skyhunters Hounds Poppy Brian Bradley 4th Sunlight’s Midsummer Delight, Phyllis Meseroll & Michael Nothstein NBQ Sylvan Von Lowenherz Laurel Whistance-Smith Field Champion Dog Starters: 18 Judges: Randy Eltringham & Jolanta Jeanneney 1st FC Sunlight’s Midnight Express Vbakum JE Phyllis Meseroll & Michael Nothstein 2nd FC Stardox Frankly My Dear Susan Jill Blake & Lorraine Simmons 3rd Withheld 4th Withheld NBQ FC Rosie’s Odie On The Run Bonnie E Mercier Field Ch. Bitch Starters: 19 Judges: Diane Sennett & Phil Kirby 1st FC Rellih’s Hopi Kachina Spirit MW, TD CGC

Linda Snyder 2nd FC Tusoksori-Ugraszto Husniya CGC Sherry L Ruggieri 3rd FC Melwyn Underwing Darter Lorraine & David Simmons 4th FC Paikav Moosbach-Zuzelek SW Jolanta & John Jeanneney NBQ FC Skyhunters Hounds Jess ML Brian Bradley Judges For Absolute: Alice Moyer & Phil Kirby Absolute: FC Sunlight’s Midnight Express Vbakum JE Phyllis Meseroll & Michael Nothstein ________________________________

Dachshund Fanciers Association of Berks County April 11, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 68 Field Champion Dog Starters: 32 Judges: Michael Pitisci & Susan Fuller 1st FC Strolch von Lowenherz JE Laurel Whistance-Smith 2nd FC Stardox Frankly My Dear Susan Jill Blake 3rd DC Wingover's Lancelot du Lac ML, RN, OA, OAJ, NF, JE, TD Alice S. Moyer 4th FC Clown vom Talsdeich Susanne Hamilton NBQ DC Rellih's Little Indian-MW, TD, SE, CGC, VC Linda A. Snyder Field Chamion Bitch Starters: 36 Judges: Pat Warble & Susan Fuller 1st DC TownFarm Water Wings Michael J Pitisci 2nd Marguerite vom Jagerhugel Susanne Hamilton 3rd GCh. DC Siddachs Carmen MW CGC John Merriman 4th Skyhunters Hounds Jess ML Brian Bradley NBQ FC Melwyn Underwing Darter MS Lorraine & David Simmons ________________________________

Metropolitan Washington Dachshund Club April 12, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 52 (for Absolute plus 68 from DFABC) OAAD Starters: 20 Judges: John Merriman & Teddy Moritz 1st Skyhunters Hounds Red Machine Brian Bradley 2nd Skyhunters Hounds Geronimo ML Brian Bradley 3rd Withheld

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4th Withheld NBQ Withheld OAAB Starters: 36 Judges: Alice Moyer & Lorraine Simmons 1st Skyhunters Hounds Belle Brian Bradley 2nd Tuesday Von Moosbach-Zuzelek SW Jolanta & John Jeanneney 3rd Ch. Briardach’s Starstruck Monika & Paul Martin 4th Sylvan Von Lowenherz Laurel Whistance-Smith NBQ Lothlorien Sharpshooter JoAnn Frier-Murza Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Teddy Moritz & Lorraine Simmons Best Open John Merriman, Michael Pitisci, Alice Moyer, Susan Fuller - Absolute Best Open: Skyhunters Hounds Belle Absolute: FC Strolch von Lowenherz JE ________________________________

Greater Portland Dachshund Club April 20, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 21 OAAD Starters: 7 Judges: Frank Homar and Marillyn Douglas 1st Goodwood’s Oh My Goodness Spot Claire Mancha and Laura Stutts 2nd Ch. Magik Rainbow Lunny Svet Julie and Robert Couch 3rd I Spy Anderson Cooper Karen Alsip 4th Max Von Bispingdor Uta F. Smith and J.C. Smith NBQ Goodwood The Gods Must Be Crazy Good Penny and Bruce Whithorn OAAB Starters: 6 Judges: Frank Homar and Michael Dilley 1st Goodwood Good Miss Money Penny K. & M. Ford and Claire Mancha 2nd Hathor Farm’s Dances With Daffodils Marilyn Douglas 3rd Goodwood Fifa’s Good Journey Claire Mancha and Laura Stutts 4th Ch. Solo’s Obvious Choice SL Jordin Misfeldt and Kim Vidinne NBQ None Field Champions Combined Starters: 8 Judges: Frank Homar and Kerri Shandro 1st DC Lockshire Rain Shadow JE Marleen and Ronald Yann 2nd FC Electric Snowqueen of Cedarcroft Mike and Terry Dilley and Kathleen Sahlin

continued on page 50...


Field Trial Results continued from page 49... 3rd FC Marta Etta of Hathor Farm JE Marleen and Ronald Yann 4th GCh. DC Devanna’s Homestretch V. Three Steps Jordin Misfeldt and Dorothy Devanna NBQ FC Sundance of Hathor Farm Pat and Gerry Price Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Frank Homar and Kerri Shandro Absolute: Goodwood’s Oh My Goodness ________________________________

Greater Portland Dachshund Club April 21, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 22 OAAD Starters: 7 Judges: Kerri Shandro and Ronald Yann 1st Ch. Magik Rainbow Lunny Svet Julie and Robert Couch 2nd I Spy Anderson Cooper Karen Alsip 3rd Goodwood The Gods Must Be Crazy Good Penny and Bruce Whithorn 4th Kliene Festus Jacque Keller McCormick NBQ None OAAB Starters: 10 Judges: Robert Couch and Gerald Price 1st Goodwood Fifa’s Good Journey Claire Mancha and Laura Stutts 2nd Goodwood Good Miss Money Penny K. & M. Ford and Claire Mancha 3rd Hunderbar Boom Boom Pow SL Jordin Misfeldt and Mary Friebert 4th KFW Opal In The Sky With Diamonds Michelle Kutzer NBQ Teckelwood Winter Sunshine Jen Milosavljevic Field Champions Combined Starters: 5 Judges: Michael Dilley and Marillyn Douglas 1st FC Barnabas of Kotate Hills Patricia and Gerry Price 2nd FC Sundance of Hathor Farm Patricia and Gerry Price 3rd DC Lockshire Rain Shadow JE Marleen and Ronald Yann 4th FC Marta Etta of Hathor Farm JE Marleen and Ronald Yann NBQ GCh. DC Devanna’s Homestretch V. Three Steps JE RN Jordin Misfeldt & Dorothy Devanna Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Michael Dilley and Ronald Yann Absolute: FC Barnabas of Kotate Hills ________________________________

Buckeye Dachshund Club April 27, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 65 OAAD Starters: 10 Judges: Heidi Meyers & Bill Dyer 1st EJ’s On The Road Again MW Daniel Ruedisueli & Kim Wimmer 2nd Sleepy Hollow’s Buzz Lite Year L JE Kathleen Newman 3rd Ch. TurningPt Undercover Cowboy Karen Leonard 4th GCh. Digalot Magical Merlin Jinx Gellin & Judy Stephenson NBQ Red’s Jack Daniels MS Rita Kepner OAAB Starters: 13 Judges: Bob Patterson & Ashley Dumas 1st Ch. Deisters Prairie Cinderella Ann Deister 2nd Windspirit’s Legacy ML Kate & Charles H Snider 3rd Ch. Digalot’s Miss Sadie Thompson Jinx Gellin & Judy Stephenson 4th Sylvan von Lowenherz L. Whistance-Smith NBQ Ch. TownFarm Mind Over Matter Michael J Pitisci Field Champion Dog Starters: 19 Judges: Bill Dyer & Larry Gohlke 1st FC Windspirit’s Hunter von Wingover ML Kate Snider & Phil Bird 2nd DC Deisters Life With Gusto Ann Deister 3rd DC EJ’s He’s A Good Man MW JE Kimberly Wimmer 4th FC TownFarm Emmett Sweeps The Spotlight JE CGC Cynthia A Yeager NBQ DC Caledonia’s Radar O’Reilly v Ruger MW RN JE CGC VC Kathleen Schoder Field Ch. Bitch Starters: 23 Judges: Ashley Dumas & Randy Eltringham 1st FC Rellih’s Hopi Kachina Spirit MW TD CGC Linda A Snyder 2nd FC Lykke von Lowenherz JE L. Whistance-Smith 3rd FC Danika vom Nordlicht TD ME CGC Cheri Faust & Larry Gohlke 4th FC Apple HIll Digging Sown Under MS CGC Heidi Meyers NBQ FC Anja von Moosbach Zuzelek SE RN Sherry L Ruggieri Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Larry Gohlke & Bill Dyer Best Open: Ch. Deister’s Prairie Cinderella

Absolute: FC Rellih’s Hopi Kachina Spirit MW TD CGC ________________________________

Buckeye Dachshund Club April 28, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 46 OAAD Starters: 7 Judges: Ashley Dumas & Bob Patterson 1st Ch. Petalpusher Red Sage MS Rita Kepner 2nd Sleepy Hollow’s Buzz Lite Year L JE Kathleen Newman 3rd Red’s Jack Daniels MS Rita Kepner 4th EJ’s On The Road Again MW Daniel Ruedisuli & Kim Wimmer NBQ TurningPt Spencer’s Legacy Pub Crawler Dr. Randy & Capt. Pete Eltringham OAAB Starters: 9 Judges: Bill Dyer & Heidi Meyers 1st TownFarm Mockingbird Lane Michael J. Pitisci & Jessica LaBelle 2nd Kordachs’ Pepper Ann MS Rita Kepner 3rd Windspirit’s Legacy ML Kate & Charles H. Snider 4th Ch. Digalot’s Miss Sadie Thompson Jinx Gellin & Judy Stephenson NBQ GCh. TurningPt Nothin But Tail Lites RN CGC Dr Randy. & Capt. Pete Eltringham Field Champion Dogs Starters: 13 Judges: Laurel Whistance-Smith & Ashley Dumas 1st FC Audi Oslo Von Dorndorf CA CGC Stan Knoll 2nd DC Pocketpack Simply Red CDX RAE ME Catherine M. Thompson 3rd FC TownFarm Emmett Sweeps The Spotlight JE CGC Cynthia A Yeager 4th FC Vimy Ridge von Lowenherz Scot Davidson NBQ FC Nix vom Nordlicht JE CGC Larry Gohlke & Cheri Faust Field Ch. Bitch Starters: 17 Judges: Stan Knoll & Bill Dyer 1st FC Danika vom Nordlicht TD ME CGC Cheri Faust & Larry Gohlke 2nd FC Apple Hill Digging Down Under MS CGC Heidi Meyers 3rd FC Anja von Moosbach Zuzelek SE RN Sherry L. Ruggieri 4th DC Short Shadows Runaround Sue CD RE TD AX OAJ NAP NJP JE CGC BVCX Shawn M Nies

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NBQ FC Rellih’s Hopi Kachina Spirit MW TD CGC Linda A Snyder Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Bill Dyer & Ashley Dumas Best Open: TownFarm Mockingbird Lane Absolute: FC Audi Oslo Von Dorndorf CA CGC ________________________________

Wolverine Dachshund Club May 4, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 68 OAAD Starters: 15 Judges: Kimberlee Kaus-Wirth & Gail C. Page 1st Ocs Theres One In Every Box MSD Robin Mousseau 2nd GCh. Trakehndachs Wascally Wrabbit Joanne Fagervik 3rd Bry-Wyn’s Lethal Weapon MW, Wendy Nugent 4th Ironwoods You’re A Wizard Lucinda Schultz NBQ Piccolos BlueGrass Banjo MS Ursula Koch OAAB Starters: 25 Judges: Patricia Nance & Kurt M Visniski 1st Blackhawk Red War Eagle ML William J Boler 2nd Blackhawk Rosie Richard Hoof 3rd Sylvan Von Lowenherz L. Whistance-Smith 4th Ch. Von Oldenburg’s Sassy Girl Julie Inglis NBQ Ocs Who You Calling Honey, Honey MS Robin Mousseau Field Champion Dog Starters: 15 Judges: Lucinda Schultz & Kurt M Visniski 1st FC Alpine Owl Von Dorndorf Pat Nance 2nd FC Nix Vom Nordlicht JE CGC Larry Gohlke & Cheri Faust 3rd FC Strolch Von Lowenherz JE L. Whistance-Smith 4th FC Ocs Pristine Silver Snow Storm MSD Robin Mousseau NBQ FC Audi Oslo Von Dorndorf CA CGC Stan Knoll Field Ch. Bitch Starters: 13 Judges: Robert A. Page & Robin Mousseau 1st FC Diamant Lily Von Lowenherz ME L. Whistance-Smith 2nd FC Lykke Von Lowenherz JE, L. Whistance-Smith


3rd FC Danika Vom Nordlight To ME CGC Cheri Faust & Larry Gohlke 4th Von Schlegel’s Lil Poppinga, MW Wendy Nugent NBQ FC R-obsession Liesel, RA Corinne Gindroz Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Vicki Spencer & Cheri Faust Best Open and Absolute: Blackhawk Red War Eagle ML William J Boler ________________________________

Metropolitan Washington Dachshund Club May 4, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 60 OAAD Starters: 12 Judges: Diane Sennett & Heidi Meyers 1st Ch. Briardach’s Starry Knight Monika & Paul Martin 2nd Sleepy Hollow’s Buzz Liteyear L JE Kathleen Newman 3rd GCh. Hildisvin Wurdig Semper Paratus Too Randy & Pete Eltringham 4th TurningPt Spencer’s Legacy Pub Crawler Randy & Pete Eltringham NBQ Rose Gate Basil John Simon OAAB Starters: 13 Judges: Alice Moyer & Ed Wills 1st Sunlight’s Midsummer Delight Phyllis Meseroll & Mike Nothstein 2nd Tuesday von Moosbach-Zuzelek SW Jolanta & John Jeanneney 3rd Rilla Von Moosbach-Zuzelek Stan Kite & Vonnie Kite 4th Withheld NBQ TownFarm A Splash of Water Michael Pitisci Field Champion Dog Starters: 12 Judges: Michael Nothstein & Monica Galley 1st FC Rosie’s Odie on the Run Bonnie Mercier 2nd FC Rosie’s Little Trooper Bonnie Mercier 3rd FC Doswood’s Perfect Performance MS John Merriman 4th DC Turning Pt A Home At Last Cathy Kelly & Paul Kelly NBQ DC Wingover’s Lancelot du Lac ML, RN, OA, OAJ, NF, JE, TD, Alice S. Moyer Field Ch. Bitches Starters: 23 Judges: Carrie Hamilton & Phillip Kirby 1st FC Tusoksori-Ugraszto Husniya CGC

Sherry Ruggieri 2nd FC Rellih’s Hopi Kachina SpiritMW, TD, CGC Linda Snyder 3rd DC Amazing Grace von Bakum, NA, NAJ Phyllis Meseroll & Michael Nothstein 4th DC Jewles Peridot & Pearls MLC Monica Galley NBQ FC Duchwood’s EZ Breezy Covergirls MS JE Alice Carter

Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Alice Moyer & Heidi Meyers Best Open: Sunlight’s Midsummer Delight Absolute: FC Tusoksori-Ugraszto Husniya CGC ________________________________

Field Ch. Bitch Starters: 37 Judges: Edward Wills, Jolanta Jeanneney 1st FC Rellih’s Hopi Kachina Spirit, MW TD CGC Linda Snyder 2nd: GCh. DC Siddachs Carmen MW CGC John Merriman 3rd DC Jewels Peridot & Pearls Monica Galley 4th FC Apple Hill’s Mirasol Pepper Carrie Hamilton NBQ FC Tusoksori-Ugraszto Husniya Sherry Ruggieri Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Karen Jones, Phyllis Meseroll Best Open: Rose Gate Basil Absolute: FC Rellih’s Hopi Kachina Spirit MW TD, CGC ________________________________

Dachshund Fanciers Association of Berks County May 5, 2013

Bay Colony Dachshund Club May 18, 2013

TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 56

TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 46

OAAD Starters: 8 Judges: John Merriman, Monica Galley 1st Rose Gate Basil John Simon 2nd Ch. Briardach’s Starry Knight Monika & Paul Martin 3rd Ch. Shadach’s FourteenKGold Bullion Diane W. Sennett 4th Ch. Turning Pt Undercover Cowboy Randy Eltringham NBQ Dachrolls Lord Wrigley Kevin Herkelman and Katherine Perney

OAAD Starters: 6 Judges: Karen Jones & Alice Moyer 1st Sandy’s Little Sea Breeze ML Constance LaRosa 2nd TownFarm Thrilling Victory Michael J Pitisci 3rd Caldach’s Claddoch Bill and Karen Brown 4th Poker v Moosebach-Zuzelek, Sarah Stokee Burr NBQ Lieder von Lowenherz Pamela E. Burns

OAAB Starters: 8 Judges: Phyllis Meseroll, Cynthia Yeager 1st Rilla von Moosebach Zuzelek Stan Kite 2nd TownFarm Mockingbird Lane Michael Pitisci 3rd Withheld 4th WithHeld NBQ Ch. TownFarm Mind Over Matter Michael Pitisci Field Champion Dogs Starters: 17 Judges: Randy Eltringham, Karen Jones 1st Ch. Rellih’s Little Indian MW TS SE CGC Linda Snyder 2nd FC Rosie’s Odie on the Run Bonnie Mercier 3rd FC Apple Hills Fra Diavolo MS Carrie Hamilton 4th FC Raindox Rusty Roo Meyers Heidi and Kurt Meyers NBQ FC Jewels Raindox Pearl Button Tux ML Monica Galley, Suzanne Digby-Mccord

OAAB Starters: 11 Judges: Cynthia Yeager & Janice Koslow 1st Yorkdachs Champagne Toast Wendy S. York 2nd July von Moritz MLD Teddy Moritz 3rd Sylvan von Lowenherz Laurel Whistance Smith 4t Ch. TownFarm a Splash of Water Michael J. Pitisci NBQ Amtekel’s Over the Moon Lois Barry Field Champions Combined Starters: 29 Judges: Wendy S. York & Carrie Hamilton 1st FC Harmony Hill Donder A. Horskin 2nd FC Marguerite Vom Jagerhugel Susanne Hamilton 3rd FC Rellih’s Hopi Kachina Spirit MW TD Linda A. Snyder 4th FC Rosie’s Odie on the Run Bonnie E. Mercier NBQ DC TownFarm Water Wings Michael J Pitisci Judges for Best Open/Absolute:

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Summer, 2013

Carrie Hamilton & Wendy York Best Open: Sandy’s Little Sea Breeze ML Absolute: FC Harmony Hill Donder ________________________________

Albany Capitol District Dachshund Club May 19, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 45 OAAD Starters: 6 Judges: Pete Mercier, Phil Kirby 1st Ch. Caldach’s Claddoch Bill & Karen Brown, Cheryl Snedakder-Sims 2nd Lieder von Lowenherz Pam Burns 3rd Yorkdachs Man in Black Andrea Casuras 4th Briardach’s Curiosity Unleashed on Marz Karen Jones & Kathy Kelly NBQ Franky Blu Eyes Lorne Campbell & Jessica Bielejewski OAAB Starters: 10 Judges: Alice Moyer & Carrie Hamilton 1st July von Moritz Teddy Moritz 2nd Ch. Townfarm A Splash of Water Michael Pitisci 3rd Fri Edleweiss von Lowenherz Gail Binder 4th Sylvan von Lowenherz Laurel Whistance Smith NBQ Yorkdachs Champagne Toast Wendy York Field Champion Combined Starters: 29 Judges: Karen Jones & Janice Koslow 1st FC Sunlight’s Esprit v Bakum Karin Boyd 2nd FC Tusoksori-Ugraszto Husniya Sherry Ruggieri 3rd DC Yorkdachs Tax Rebate Wendy York 4th FC Rellih Hopi Kachina Spirit Linda Snyder NBQ FC Marguerite vom Jagerhugel Susanne Hamilton Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Alice Moyer & Karen Jones July Von Moritz ________________________________

Cascade Dachshund Club June 1, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 31 OAAD Starters: 9 Judges: Connie Fisher and Marleen Yann

continued on page 54...


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News From AKC continued from page 32... there, largely from that increase in dog registration prices, expenses were held back and the net operating income jumped from nearly a breakeven $800,000 up a healthy $2.5 million, or about four percent on revenues. In the area of investments, investment gains, the results are dramatic. We can see there was a $9,000,000 turnaround from minus a million to plus seven million on returns on investments held by AKC. Not shown here on this slide, but positively affecting the AKC as we’ll see in a minute, there was a similarly strong return on investments held by the pension custodian, New York Life Insurance Company, as directed by the Pension Committee. The markets had improved during 2012, and none too soon, as I’ll mention in second. The other figures just above that, what we say here is dollars to CHF and the Museum of the Dog, are largely the amount AKC donates to the Canine Health Foundation, with the smaller amount to the Museum of the Dog. Today, all other nonprofit affiliates of the AKC have evolved to a point where they fully support themselves and do not take funds from the AKC. The little good news is due to the increase in fees and AKC’s investments are doing very well. Registrations continue to fall, however we don’t know the number? The real underlying issues have not been addressed. LLS The first vote was on the proposed amendment to Article III, Objects of the Club, of The Charter and Bylaws of the American Kennel Club. The proposed amendment was brought forward by the Delegate Bylaws Committee. This amendment would simply add an object which AKC has in effect espoused for decades with support of canine health research. It has been published in two issues of the online AKC Gazette and is on the worksheet previously distributed. The Board recommends the approval. A two-thirds affirmative vote is required for adoption. This was an easy one to pass. LLS The next vote was on the proposed amendment to Article IV, Sections 1 and 3, of

The Charter and Bylaws of the American Kennel Club. This change would expand the eligibility forms for AKC membership, to permit licensed Agility Clubs that meet the criteria to apply to become AKC Member Clubs. The proposal was brought forward by the AKC Board of Directors. This proposed change to include the agility clubs in the delegate body passed by the 2/3 majority required. It will have little impact in the near term; however in the long term I believe it will have positive effect. LLS Article XVIII, Section 1 of The Charter and Bylaws of the American Kennel Club: This proposal will reduce the number of yearly Delegate meetings from four to three, and that two meetings will be expanded from two days to three days, in order to enable increased attendance at the various Delegate committee meetings. This amendment was brought forth by the Delegate Advocacy and Advancement Committee, and is being brought forward without recommendation from the AKC Board. There was a vote on the main motion of the proposed amendment to Article XVIII, Section 1 of The Charter and Bylaws of the American Kennel Club. There were not two-thirds in the affirmative. The amendment was not adopted. The proposed change attempted to reduce the number of annual Delegates’ Meeting from 4 to 3 failed. The delegate body made it clear that they want more input to the governance of AKC. New amendments proposed and to be voted on at the June meeting: This amendment is to Article VII, Section 1 of The Charter and Bylaws of the American Kennel Club. This amendment would preclude any former AKC employee from serving on the Board of Directors. The proposal was submitted by the Lewiston-Auburn Kennel Club. The AKC Board of Directors did not approve or disapprove this proposal, so it is proceeding for a read and vote as required in Article XX, Section 3, of the AKC Bylaws. It will be published in two issues of the online AKC Gazette, and you will be asked to vote on it at the June, 2013 meeting. “If the amendment to Article VII, Section 1 is adopted effective immediately, it will not apply to any current seated AKC Board members, who

This will be an interesting discussion. LLS AKC NEWS Bryan Martin has been hired as an Executive Field Representative. He will join the staff on April 15, 2013 and will be based in the Portland, Oregon area. AKC Final Five: AKC is adding a day to the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship. This day will be an open day for breed specialties. The “Final Five” will be comprised of: Dec. 10-12, 2013: Space Coast Kennel Club of Palm Bay, Brevard Kennel Club, Central Florida Kennel Club and Orlando Dog Training Club shows, which include all-breed conformation, obedience and Junior Showmanship competitions. Dec. 13, 2013: A full day of specialties and special attractions, including Eukanuba World Challenge pre-judging, the Eukanuba Breeder’s Stakes Finals and the AKC Owner-Handler Series end-of-year competition. Clubs interested in hosting specialties should contact Michael Canalizo at mlc@akc.org or 212-696-8213. Dec. 14-15, 2013: The AKC/Eukanuba National Championship, joined by the AKC Agility Invitational and the AKC Obedience Classic (and their respective Juniors competitions). Other activities include Celebrate Dogs!, AKC Meet the Breeds® and My Dog Can Do That!, Best BredBy-Exhibitor competition, and Eukanuba World Challenge Finals. World’s Largest Gathering of Dogs & Cats Comes Early This Year to The Javits Center: September 28 & 29, 2013. The Board interpreted Chapter 4, Section 2, of the Rules Applying to Dog Shows as permitting clubs to send electronic copies of the premium list. If sent electronically, clubs do not have to send a paper copy. Canine Good Citizen (as a title) and Coursing Ability Test (CAT) – Both of these programs have been very successful programs and are making money for AKC. Agility is the second AKC event to exceed 1,000,000 entries in one year. Conformation and agility both surpassed 1,000,000 entries in 2012. !

g n i p l e h W ox B Litter whelped March 24, 2013

Letters to and from the editor

STANDARD LONGHAIRS 3 Males, 1 Female

Hi Members and Subscribers, I recently returned from a wonderful week at the conformation and performance shows at Nationals in St. Louis. All the kudos for the Purina Event center were well deserved - what an absolutely beautiful venue. I wish I would have had more time to talk to all the people I haven’t seen for such a long time - seems there just wasn’t enough hours in the day! Congratulations to all the exceptional winners! And a big Thank You to the DCA Board! The Autumn newsletter issue will be the Nationals results issue. Don’t forget to send in your ads in for all your wins! The deadline is July 15th.

Sire: BIS BISS GCH Hundeleben Queen’s Armada SL Dam: DC Stardust Do U Believe N Magic, JE Breeders: Anne Schmidt, Barb Koch Stardust Dachshunds • AKC Breeder of Merit www.stardustdachshunds.info • stardust3940@aol.com

Lynne Dachshund Club of America

may complete their current term and serve an additional consecutive term if eligible under the third paragraph of this section.”

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REMEMBER! Only those results sent in to the Trophy Chair, editor or webmaster via e-mail will be published in the newsletter. Submit your results to: http://www.emailmeform.com/builder/form/jvc3z0JrU0kdKb •RESULTS ARE PUBLISHED AS SUBMITTED•

Sierra Dachshund Breeders Club January 25, 2013

Field Trial Results continued from page 51... 1st Goodwoods X-tra Good Maximilian Laura Bolin 2nd Magik Rainbow Lunny Svet, Julie L. and Robert L. Couch 3rd Ch. Serenity Play Boy Prince RN, Patrice Baker and Wendy Snyder 4th Code Blue Black Chili Pepper SS Jennifer Milosavljevic NBQ Goodwood’s Oh My Goodness, Claire Mancha and Laura Stutts OAAB Starters: 10 Judges: Patrice Baker & Ronald Yann 1st Teckelwood Winter Sunshine JE Jennifer Milosavljevic 2nd Goodwood Fifa’s Good Journey, Claire Mancha and Laura Stutts 3rd Springwood’s Naya Brigitte Walkey 4th Withheld NBQ Ariel Julia Byrnes Field Champion Combined Starters: 12 Judges: Patrice Baker & Connie Fisher 1st FC Westrose Gun Powder and Lace MWD JE Julie L. & Robert L. Couch 2nd FC Hathor Farm’s Dances With Daffodils SW, TD ME Marillyn Douglas 3rd DC Lockshire Rain Shower JE Marleen and Ron Yann 4th FC Snow Falling On Cedarcroft Michael and Terri Dilley and Martha Deans NBQ Rose Bud Julie and Rob Couch Absolute: FC Westrose Gun Powder and Lace MWD JE ________________________________

Sweepstakes Judge: Johnny Shoemaker Sweeps Entry Numbers for each coat: Longs (1-2) 3, Smooths (1-5) 6 Wires (4-7) 11

Cascade Dachshund Club June 2, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 28 OAAD Starters: 8 Judges: Marleen Yann & Ron Yann 1st Serenity’s Blast From The Past Wendy Snyder, Patrice Baker, Constance Fisher 2nd Springwoods Billy Cesar David and Roxine Berg 3rd Goodwood’s Oh My Goodness Claire Mancha and Laura Stutts 4th Goodwood’s Xtra Good Maximilian Laura Bolin NBQ Ch. Serenity Play Boy Prince RN Patrice Baker and Wendy Snyder OAAB Starters: 13 Judges: Patrice Baker and Connie Fisher 1st Dobre Butelka Wino Z Goodwood Angelyn L. Piatek 2nd Hathor Farm’s Rosebud SW ME Jean M. Dieden 3rd Ozbree Penelope Spring Wire JE Brigitte Walkey 4th Hathor Farm’s Blue Bearded Iris JE Jean M. Dieden NBQ Springwood’s Naya Brigitte Walkey Field Champion Combined Starters: 7 Judges: Connie Fisher and Wendy Snyder 1st GCh. DC Hathor Farm’s Wild Poppy SW, CD, RN TD NA NAJ NF NJP EE Jean M. Dieden

Sweeps Best of Variety - Longhair: Marginn’s Summer Vision V Willowcraft K. Meyers & B. Meyers Sweeps Best of Opposite - Longhair: Gold Canyon’s Red Hot Chili Pepper RN C. Baldwin Sweeps Best of Variety - Smooth: Kinderteckel’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s P. Auld/L. Pino/K. CihosWilliams/E. Williams Sweeps Best of Opposite - Smooth: Benway’s Mr Shamrock P. Benway Sweeps Best of Variety - Wirehair: Brodny Schoolhouse He’s So Fine J. Anderson/E. Williams Sweeps Best of Opposite - Wirehair: Trevolis Frequent Flyer MW P. Benway/S. Ehr Best in Sweepstakes: Marginn’s Summer Vision V Willowcroft K. Meyers/B. Meyers

2nd FC I Spy Anderson Cooper W Karen L. Alsip 3rd FC Elektric Snowqueen of Cedarcroft Mike Dilley, Terri Dilley and Kathleen Sahlin 4th DC Lockshire Rain Shadow JE Marleen and Ronald Yann NBQ TC M’I Spy of Hathor Farm SW Jean M. Dieden Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Marleen Yann and Ronald Yann Best Open: Dobre Butelka Wino Z Goodwood, Absolute: GCh. DC Hathor Farm’s Wild Poppy SW, CD RN TD NA NAJ NF NJP EE _________________________________

Western PA Dachshund Club June 2, 2013 TOTAL NUMBER OF STARTERS: 55 OAAD Starters: 13 Judges: Randy Eltringham andJohn Merriman 1st Ch. Briardach’s Starry Knight Monika and Paul Martin 2nd Ch. Petalpusher Red Sage Rita and Rick Kepner 3rd Smitledach’s Braveheart Jinx and Dan Gellin 4th Red’s Jack Daniels Rita Kepner NBQ Ch. Shadach’s Fourteen K Gold Bullion Diane Sennet

Dachshund Club of America

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Best of Opposite in Sweepstakes: Brodney Schoolhouse He’s So Fine J. Anderson/E. Williams Breed Judge: Mr. K. H. Delaney Total Entry Per Coat: 26 entries LONGHAIR Dash’N Doxies Spot You Anywhere MLD D. James WB Marginns Summervision V Willowcraft SL K. Meyers/B. Meyers BOV GCh. CH Walmar-Solo’s IOU SL S. Snyder BOS Ch. Cobblestone Philigree ML T. Bienefeld SEL D GCh. CH Sleepy Hollow Carolina Special M. Taylor/B. Wlodkowski SEL B Ch. Willowcraft Maria of Tecklewood J. Docherty/D. Docherty WD BOW

OAAB Starters: 12 Judges: Robert Patterson & Shawn Nies 1st July von Moritz Teddy Moritz 2nd GCh. Turning Pt. Nothin But Tail Lites Dr. Randy and Pete Eltringham 3rd Ch. Darshan All the Rave Vicki Spencer 4th Ch. Briardach’s Thank My Lucky Stars Monika and Paul Martin NBQ Ch. Digalot Miss Sadie Thompson Jinx Gellin and Judy Stephenson Field Champion Combined Starters: 30 Judges: Vicki Spencer and Diane Sennett 1st FC T-Dachs Myrtle The Turtle JE Jamie Bonser 2nd FC Augden von Moosbach Zuzelek ME RE Sherry Ruggieri 3rd FC Diamant Lily von Lowenherz ME Laurel Whistance-Smith 4th FC Rellhi’s Hopi Kachina Spirit TD CGC Linda Snyder NBQ DC Jewels Peridot Pearls Monica Galley Judges for Best Open/Absolute: Cynthia Yeager and Diane Sennett Best Open: July von Moritz Absolute: FC T-Dachs Myrtle The Turtle JE _________________________________


SMOOTH Sunrise-XO Boot Cut Jeans MS P. Guthrie/V. Colon WB Kurzebeine Ms Depend California Dream B. Gold/T. Carr-Hall/V. Colon BOV GCh. Grandgables Sumbuddy Walden MS D. Walden BOS GCh. Toskydox Witchy Woman SS S. Lutosky SEL D Ch. Lucene’s Austin Healey M. Stall/J. Sudinski SEL B GCh. Tudorglen’s Burlesque V Benbon MS B. Gold/T. Carr-Hall/B. Polk

WD BOW

WIREHAIR Brodny Schoolhouse He’s So Fine J. Anderson/E. Williams WB Trevolis Frequent Flyer MW P. Benway/S. Ehr BOV GCh. Verdon’s Devil In Disquise MW S. Snyder/S. Henderson) BOS Ch. Greta Garbo My Way MW L. Garret/M.L. Hurd SEL D Ch. Laurjosh’s Game Day Decision Maker for Sunrise MW V. Herandez Colon

WD BOW

BOB BOS

GCh. Grandgables Sumbuddy Walden GCh. Toskydox Witchy Woman SS

Best Junior: Sage Williams _________________________________

Florida East Coast Dachshund Club March 8, 2013 Sweepstakes Judge: Mrs. Janet Narushka Sweeps Entry Numbers for each coat: 12 Dachshunds 5 Long - Puppy 4 Smooth - Puppy 1 Wire - Puppy 1 - Long - Veterans 1 - Wire - Veterans Sweeps Best of Variety Longhair: McRobs Little Mermaid Mary C. Boyle Sweeps Best of Opposite Longhair: Midnight Love Token ML James V. Hall

Best in Sweepstakes: Leoralees’s Barstool Boogie MS Best of Opposite in Sweepstakes: Turningpt Midnight Steak Kaboom Kabang Breed Judge: Mrs. Diane Young McCormack Total Entry Per Coat: 32 Longs, 14 Smooth, 6 Wire LONGHAIR Sweetgrass They Call It Puppy Love Richard & Dalia Sak WB Sweetgrass To Know Her Is To BOW Love Her At McRobs Richard & Dalia Sak BOV Ch. Syringa’s Walkin’ On Sunshine V Stolz SL Carol Stolz-Blancato BOS Ch. Sweetgrass My Southern Belle Nelle Richard & Salia Sak SEL D GCh. Cream Ridge Sundermans’ Once Upon A Dream Jennifer Sunderman SEL-B GCh. PDD Madison Von Dachshire SL Raymond H.Chaplin & G. Michael Scarbrough

Sweeps Best of Variety Wirehair: Shorlynes Crystal Blue Persuasion MW Vicki Youngquist & Beverly Wright-Osment

Breed Judge: Marlies Noll Total Entry Per Coat: Longhair 46, Wirehair 24, Smooth 19

WD

SMOOTH Turningpt Midnight Streak Kaboom Kabang Susan A. & Peter P. Botsakis WB Leoralee’s Barstool Boogie MS BOW Robbie Addison BOV GCh. Passport Boy You’re One of My Kind SS Arvind & Joyce De Braganca BOS GCh. Brownwood Topaz SS Walter Cunningham & Jerry Cerasini & Rober Brown SEL-D Ch. Keenose Midnight In Casablance Susan A. & Perter P. Botsakis SEL-B Ch. My Little Athena Von Raab MS Mary Ellen Byrne & Katie Hendrix WD

WD WB BOW BOV BOS

BOB BOS

Sweeps Best of Variety Smooth: Leoralee’s Barstool Boogie MS Robbie Addison Sweeps Best of Opposite Smooth: Turningpt Midnight Streak Kaboom Kabang Susan A. & Peter P. Botsakis

Best In Sweeps Junior: Longhair Stardust Jumping Jack Flash BOS in Sweepstakes Junior: Longhair Northwoods Followed by a Moonshadow at Chazlyn SL Best in Sweeps Senior: Wirehair Ragtyme Gossip Girl SW BOS in Sweeptakes Senior: Longhair Cedarhurst CBWags4u Shade O’Gold ML

BOB BOS

Jagermeister Von Skaer SL B. Skaer/A. Schmidt Essehunds Stir It Up ML A. Essebaggers Johnson/ J. Barringer

LONGHAIR WD/BOW Jagermeister Von Skaer SL BOV B. Skaer/A. Schmidt BOS Essehunds Stir It Up ML A. Essebaggers Johnson/ J. Barringer RWD Speechless The Sky Is The Limit ML J. Barringer RWB Stony Banks Vive La Reine SL J. Janz/A. Janz SEL-D Ch. Jarbsy’s Wyndcrest Wild Card At Stony Banks L J. Janz/A. Janz/S. White SEL-B Ch. Stony Banks Amethyst Sky At Chazlyn L. Dahlen/C. Dahlen

WIREHAIR Rellih’s Mister Gunther MW Mary A. Hurst Full Circle Harbor Cadence W Jan Maxwell

SMOOTH WB/BOW Kinder’s Speechless In BOV Avalon MS J. Dubois BOS Victory’s Dark Side Of WD The Moon MS S. White/J. Dubois RWD Kinder’s Show Me The Ribbons MS J. Dubois RWB Dilu Bam’s Lovin Candy Bar Wish MS P. Dilg SEL-B GCh. Speechless Kinder’s In It To Win It MS R. Jarrett

Ch. Dastropen Bugkaroo MW Azalia A. & Leticia Alvarez

BOV

GCh. Passport Boy You’re One Of My Kind SS Ch. Sweetgrass My Southern Belle Nelle

Best Junior Handler Hanna Sunderman _________________________________

Badger Dachshund Club March 9, 2013 Sweepstakes Judge: Ellen Hardin Sweeps Entry Numbers for each coat: 22 Longhair, 6 Wirehair, 4 Smooth

WIREHAIR Ch. Ragtyme Worth The Wait SW H Jones/L Blackbourn/K Roth BOS GCh. Novami Bauz V Schenkenburg SW BN M. Fowler/N. Glaser/K. Simmons SEL-D GCh. Incahoots Howlin’ Tornado A. Cotteleer/R. Cotteleer/ C.Heitzmann WD Rosethorn Guessing Game BOW D. Stoll/S. Parish RWD Ragtyme Because I Said So SW L. Blackbourn/H. Jones WB Roundabout Gleneagle We’ve Only Just Begun T. Wright/L. Kennell RWB Intruders Whatever Lola Wants MW L. Cleveland _________________________________

Dachshund Club of America

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Badger Dachshund Club March 10, 2013 Breed Judge: Mrs. Connie Fisher BOB GCh. J Kistner Sweet Cider BOS GCh. Insight’s Illusionist SL Best Junior Handler Bayly Ann Jones LONGHAIR (39 Entries: 21 dogs, 18 bitches) BOV GCh. Insight’s Illusionist SL C. Taylor/C. Geiser BOS Ch. Clipper Puritan D. Nickel/M. Nickel SEL D GCh. Jarbsy’s Born To Hand Jive S. Arnold/S. Arnold SEL B GCh. DC Stardust’s Simply Irresistible RE NJP A. Schmidt WB Stardust’s Sunshine On My BOW Shoulders K. Renzelmann/A. Schmidt WD Chazlyn’s Opus Of Oberon SL L. Dahlen/C. Dahlen RWD Stardust Blockbuster Von Skaer SL B. Skaer/A. Schmidt RWB Stony Banks Vive La Reine SL J. Janz/A. Janz SMOOTH (20 Entries: 6 dogs, 14 bitches) BOV GCh. J Kistner Sweet Cider J. Kistner/J. Kistner BOS Kinder’s Show Me The WD Ribbons MS J. Dubois SEL-D Ch. Sagerun Baron Von Richthofen MS RA NJP THD C. Lewis SEL-B GCH CH Speechless Kinder’s In It To Win It MS R. Jarrett WB Kinders Velvet Ribbons MS BOW M. McLean RWD Victory’s Dark Side Of The Moon MW S. White/J. Dubois RWB Melridge Party Rock Anthem SS D. Melgreen/S. Melgreen WIREHAIR (19 Entries: 5 dogs, 14 bitches) BOV GCh. Incahoots Howlin’ Tornado A. Cotteleer/R. Cotteleer/ C Heitzmann BOS GCh. Full Circle Ruffles And Flourishes W D. Martin/E. Martin/L. Goodman SEL D Ch. Ragtyme Worth The Wait SW H. Jones/L. Blackbourn/K. Roth SEL B GCh.Novami Bauz V Schenkenburg SW BN M. Fowler/N. Glaser/K. Simmons WD Rosethorn Guessing Game BOW D. Stoll/S. Parish RWD Tomar Full Circle Corsair W M. Doerner/E. Martin WB Ragtyme Gossip Girl SW C. Haas/H. Jones RWB Tievolis Dances With Dragons MW S. White/S. Ehr _________________________________

continued on next page...


2013 NOMINATING COMMITTEE

Volunteers needed!

The members of the committee are as follows:

AKC Meet the Breeds at the Jacob Javits Center in NYC will be September 28-29, 2013. If DCA is to have a booth again this year we need volunteers to set it up and man it for the two days.

Chair: Larry Sorenson Members: Diane Graham, Jan Oswald, Ken Hagmueller, Cheryl Snedaker-Sims

If you are interested in this project please e-mail Fran Colonna at kanawha123@gmail.com immediately.

DCA members may submit names for Board of Directors nomination consideration to any committee member.

Specialty Results continued from page 55...

Dallas Fort Worth Dachshund Club March 22, 2013 Morning show Breed Judge: Frank Canestrini Total Entry Per Coat: Junior - 1 Long 8-12-7-4, Smooth 4-7-4-5, Wire 8-4-4-1 LONGHAIR Kaycees Galewinns Squirrelnutzipper V Wagsmore ML Steve & Sherry Ceplius, Karyn & Jeff Dionne WB Dorae’s Head Over Heels V Corrbelle Nancy Colson & Steven Garza BOV Ch. Solo’s Twelve Bells SL Kimberly Vidrine & Paula Carter BOS GCh. Doxdane’s Aviance Encore SL Nancy Pearson SEL D Ch. JT’s Kaycees Infineon at Doxhaus MLD Susan M Gillings SED-B Ch. Pramada’s Talley Ho at Tama Cathy & Tiffany Marzluf

BOS

Twinkle’s Corbin at Carowynd Carolyn O’Neil SEL D Ch. Twinkle’s Orrin at Carowynd Carolyn E. O’Neil BOB BOS

Best Junior: Brielle Hall with Weatherly’s Fancy Don’t Let Me Down ________________________________

Dallas Fort Worth Dachshund Club March 22, 2013

WD BOW

SMOOTH JMK’s Cowboy Wyatt MS Kristal Couch Hall WB Joy-Dens Candy Kisses SS Joyce Warren BOV GCh. Bessdach Electric Martini Renee M. Lara & Betty Jeffery BOS GCh. Joy-Dens Cha-Ching-ChaChing SS Joyce F Warren SEL D GCh. Dynadaux Redneck Fancy Boy MS C. Senff, P. Spencer, B. Claxton, B. Sandoval, S. Summers SEL B Marginns Fredricka V Rufknabe Sharon Lutosky

Afternoon show Sweepstakes Judge: Rudy Ayala Sweeps Entry Numbers for each coat: 14 - Varieties Combined Best in Sweepstakes: Hathor Farm’s Ramblin Gamblin Man SW Karen Mann, Jean Dieden Best of Opposite in Sweepstakes: Elfin Aubray’s Unchained Melody Brielle Y. Hall Breed Judge: Sherrill Snyder Total Entry Per Coat: Long 9-14-8-6, Smooth 7-10-4-6, Wire 8-5-4-2

WD BOW

WD

WB BOW BOV

WIREHAIR Westwind’s Street Fighting Man MW Gary & Judy Cline Rivendell’s Livewire Diana Rockwell GCh. Raydachs Ruby Tuesday SW Shirley Ray

Ch. Solo’s Twelve Bells SL GCh. Doxdane’s Aviance Encore SL

LONGHAIR Swancreek Noah ML Sherry Rogers WB Solo’s Shake Your Money BOW Maker SL Kim Vidrine, Paula Carter BOV Ch. Solo’s Playboy SL Steven Garza, Kimberly Vidrine, Paula Carter BOS Ch. Solo’s Twelve Bells SL Kimberly Vidrine, Paula Carter SEL D GCh. Doxdane’s Aviance Encore SL Nancy Person SEL B GCh. J-Lyn’s All About The Bling MLD Jennifer L. Van Niman, Tammy Van Niman

WD

SMOOTH Joy-Dens Midnight Express to Phoenix Joyce Warren WB Bessdachs Jaguar Jubille BOW Marina Renee Lara, DVM BOV Ch. Dynadaux Hey Good Girlicious MS Cyndy Senff BOS GCh. Dynadaux Redneck Fancy Boy MS C. Sneff, P. Spencer, B. Claxton, B. Sandoval, S. Summers SEL D GCh. Joy-Dens Cha-Ching-ChaChing SS Joyce Warren SEL B Ch. Seacrest Guns N’ Roses For Sunrise-OX SS R. Hernandez, S. Britter-Ilouno, P. Guthrie, V. Colon WD

WIREHAIR Raydach’s Blue Moon Fireball V Novami SW Shirley Ray WB Raydach’s Once In A Blue Moon BOW V Novami SW Shirley Ray BOV GCh Roushland’s Alexandra SW F. T. & J. B. Rouch BOS Ch. Corbin At Carowynd Carolyn O’Neil SEL D Ch. Twinkle’s Orrin At Carowynd Carolyn O’Neil SEL B Rivendell’s Livewire Diana Rockwell

WD

BOB BOS

GCh. Solo’s Playboy SL GCh. CH Dynadaux Hey Good Girlicious MS

Best Junior: Brielle Hall with Weatherly’s Fancy Don’t Let Me Down _________________________________

Metropolitan Baltimore Dachshund Club April 19, 2013 Sweepstakes Judge: Dr. Joan Eversole Sweeps Entry Numbers for each coat: Longhair 2, Smooth 5, Wirehair 5 Sweeps Best of Variety Longhair: Sunlight’s Midsummer Dream Sweeps Best of Variety Smooth: TurningPt Hot As Blue Blazes

Dachshund Club of America

56

Summer, 2013

Sweeps Best of Opposite Smooth: Oakcrest Mister Mister MS Sweeps Best of Variety Wirehair: Rosemont & Pocodox Fame & Fortune MW Sweeps Best of Opposite Wirehair: Meadowood I’ll Have Another SW Best in Sweepstakes: TurningPt Hot as Blue Blazes Best of Opposite in Sweepstakes: Rosemont & Pocodox Fame & Fortune MW Judge for Regular Classes: Mrs. Joan P. Scott Total Entry Per Coat: Longhairs 17 (6 dogs, 11 bitches) Smooth 19 (6 dogs, 13 bitches) Wirehairs 23 (11 dogs, 12 bitches) LONGHAIR BOV/BOW WD Dikerdachs Blake WB Averdachs Hello Dolly ML BOS GCh. Old Hanover’s Shadow’s Lady ML SEL D GCh. JT’s Kaycees Phoenix Of Tam-Boer SEL B GCh. Baybreeze Can’t Go Wrong with Rum SMOOTH WD/BOW Tarlyn’s Rhinestone Cowboy MS WB TurningPt Hot as Blue Blazes BOS GCh. Kochana’s Duke of Black Reign BOS GCh. Hildisvin Wurdig Lightning Bug SS SEL B Ch. TurningPt Sonoma Coast Corks & Forks WIREHAIR Rosemont & Pocodox Fame & Fortune MW WB Brazos Ski Sugarberry At Rivendell BOV GCh. Raydachs Ride My Ducati SW BOS GCh. Rivendell’s Hotwire SEL D GCh. Legibach Captain Crunch SW SEL B Ch. Rosemont’s Life of the Party MW WD BOW

BOB BOS:

Dikerdachs Blake GCh. Old Hanover’s Shadow’s Lady ML _________________________________


Hosted by Golden Gate Dachshund Club Tracking, Field Trials & Earthdog January 20-25, 2014 Vacaville, CA Lagoon Valley & Centennial Park Hotels: Motel Six: 707-447-5550 & Best Western: 1-888-782-9374

Judges: Cyndy Senff and Frank Canestrini Sweeps Judge: Carol Anderson iowa state fairgrounds • Varied industries Building des Moines ia

Plenty of grooming room on concrete, air conditioned building Plenty of RV parking

Between show hosPitality with laRge fund RaiseR Closing date: wednesday, august 21, 2013 For additional information contact: Onofrio Dog Shows, L.L.C., Superintendent P.O. Box 25764 • Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0764 (405) 427-8181 • mail@onofrio.com

trophy donations gladly accepted send to CidC, P.o. Box 1472, Johnston, ia 50131

January January January January January January

20th: 21th: 22nd: 23rd: 24th: 25th:

DCA Tracking TD & TDX Host Club GGDC Field Trial All Classes DCA OAAD & OAAB DCA FC Dogs & Bitches & Absolute DCA Earthdog Host Club GGDC Earthdog

Rally, Agility, Conformation May 5-10th, 2014 Red Lion Woodlake Conference Center, Sacramento, CA Hotel - Red Lion: 916-922-2020 May 5th: Agility (Location To Be Announced) May 6th: Host GGDC Conformation & Obedience at Red Lion Woodlake Conference Center May 7th: GGDC Conformation & Rally May 8th: DCA Annual Meeting in the Morning DCA Sweeps & Obedience in the Afternoon May 9th: DCA National Classes and one BOV & Rally May 10th: DCA National 2 BOV’s and BOB Awards Banquet More information to follow, check up dates on http://www.goldengatedachshundclub.org/

Contact: Sharon Carr carrdox@gmail.com or (559) 645-1321 © Best Dogs in Motion


SUMMER 2013, Volume XXXVII, Number 2

The Dachshund Club of America Newsletter Lynne Dahlén, Editor 9086 Daniels 70 Siren, WI 54872 Official DCA Website: http://www.dachshund-dca.org/

th 5 1 y l u J Deadline is tter, e l s w e N n m u for the Aut ssue! i s t l u s e R s l a the Nation

“GEE!” THE FIRST MINIATURE LONGHAIR TRIPLE CHAMPION WHY PARTICIPATION IN CANINE HEALTH RESEARCH MATTERS WATCH OUT FOR I.S.A.R. JUDGING THE DACHSHUND LEARNING TO HEAL

Summer 2013 DCA  

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