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1

the raw [thesis] 4 - 11

2 3 GALVANIZE 12 - 17

PU L L 18 - 25


CONTACT

4 5 MONOLITHIC dec a y 26 - 31

C R O SS 32 - 39

DACE R U S S E L L E-mail:dacerussell80@gmail.com OnlinePortfolio:www.behance.com/dace Blog:www.daceformations.blogspot.com


1

the

raw

Authentically Expressing an Aging Materiality

A

rchitecture of the 20 & 21st century predominately serves to sterilize our lives and homogonize experience. the raw is a call to contaminate our cities, architecture, and experiences with a comprehension of the changing processes inherent in the materials architects deploy to define their spaces. I believe that an authentic expression of the colour, smell, and haptic tactility of the processes inherent in our materials can manifest a more tangible link with the denizens of our environments? Might this type of stimulation infuse our buildings with a more accessible dialogue between architecture and our human physiology?


+ GETTY TOMB GRACELAND CEMETERY +

U R B A N MAUSOLEUM invi g ora ting ur ban liv in g th ro u g h a n a w a re n e s s o f human i mpermanence + THESIS

+

SIMMONS ISLAND

GOOSE ISLAND

+ OAK PARK

RY +

E

+ CHICAGO +

+

BERWYN

NORTHERLY ISLAND

+ CICERO EXPERIENCE

F O R M G E N E R AT I O N

PRESCOTTS ISLAND

+

WOODED ISLAND

+ OAK WOODS CEMETERY


CLIENTS

+ FREQUENTER

park, vegetation

grade

++ ENDURER

sectional requirements

plan requirements

sky

Endurer

described

link realms flicker between introversion and extroversion

grade

earth

+ MOURNER

sectional requirements

Mourner

reaction

compress spaces to reduce central void singular connection with sky, but privatized

plan requirements


SUBTERRANEAN MAUSOLEUM A-A

B-B

B-B

A-A north


A-A

PARK TOPOGRAPHIC


chamber CEREMONIAL


B-B west


2

G A L VAN I Z E

A R e c y c l i n g P a rad ig m fo r D es i g n

G

ALVANIZE rethinks the process of using recycled materials to achieve sustainable design. Normally, recycled materials are melted down then fabricated into new components. GALVANIZE takes salvaged steel in its existing form and normally unusable short stock lumber in its current state, and introduces a system of reversible connection to create a versatile double-sided system.

S

alvaged, reclaimed, and worn materials are everywhere. Reclaimed materials hide in the decaying and abandoned buildings of our urban centers, rest in the junkyards of suburban cities, and having lived out their usefulness to society, lay forgotten. These materials in their current states are an overlooked source of inspiration and opportunity for design.


MATERIAL

TOOL Component

STEEL

WOOD

RE-USE

Connector


ASSEMBLE Angle

STACK

(degrees)

Offset

Length

(inches)

(inches)

12

15

2.5

24-

15

2.5

16

14.25

4.25

48+

14.25

4.25

18

13.5

5

72-

13.5

5

12

15

2.5

S T E E L E N C L O S U R E

RIB

W O O D

I N T E R I O R


office cubicles

THE

reception desk

building rainscreen

G A L V A N sIyZ E stem


3

PU L L

Gra vit at i o n a l D eforma ti on o f F orm

P

ull attempts to define how and why people gather in the places they do. The project consists of three buildings that sit within a science block of the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Campus.

H

olding true to the existing conditions of the block that are organized for science and engineering students, it seemed appropriate that the project would follow a similar vein of inspiration in cosmology.

P

ull processes platonic circles that are then deformed based on the perceived affect the contextual buildings would have on the specific sites themselves. These deformations are then stacked to create the floors of each structure. Within each of the structures are the combination of needed campus program and gathering spaces for students of science and engineering specifically and the campus wide community in general.


P A R

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


K alien

satellite

gravity

bridge

crater bury

3RD

5TH

FOCUSING EXPERIENCE


Manifest Place

Embrace the Stars

TYPES

OF

G AT H E R I N G

Type_ Transformative

Members move into and out of interpersonal engagements _Dynamic Evolving Group

Plastic

_Fluctuating but retains quantity Defined Quantifiable

Clustered

_Group appears plastic but is made up of smaller sub groups

Singular

_Onlooking Private person wanting privacy within an active environment

Spatia

HOW_ Suggests a spa providing the o movement into

WHY_ Also suggests this kind of gat

HOW_ Suggests a spa space. Predom aries than the t

WHY_ Allows individua few core memb

HOW_ Suggests a sp couples but allo

WHY_ Provides a pred entirely closed

HOW_ Suggests a sp private actions ing

WHY_ User is given a c an active space


+ I N S P I R AT I O N ach of the structures within Pull relates to the E heavens in a specific way. Alien: houses a planetarium for observation of the cosmos. The students study space is set between the planetarium above and lecture halls below. Gravity: would employ a large sun scoop at the top of the building which would funnel light down through the central opening and also serve as an illuminated icon to inspire intrigue and promote student gathering. Crater: to the east of the site would be predominately buried within the earth and house a library, computer space, an active central core, and a sky deck for observing the heavens and surrounding park.

ASTROLOGICAL


SUBSTR UC TU R E

TECTONICS CRATER WALL SECTIONS


E

REALITY

ach of the detail drawings here illustrate the tectonics of how the conceptual ideas of PULL are resolved. The overall wall section on the far left shows the material differences between substructure and superstructure conditions. The foundation wall (1.0) illustrated left, shows a typical condition of the light well, which would scoop natural daylight into the two floors below grade.

A

t right is a detail of the superstructure wall condition. Here, the goal was to bring the notion of gravitational deformation to the fore. This is predominately done by using an architectural mesh rainscreen which wraps the custom extruded aluminum framing elements. These are then tied back to the spandrel at each occupiable floor level. The mesh would spill over the parapet of the superstructure and onto the skydeck where students sit and study or relax under the night sky.

S UP E R S T R U C T U R E

conceptual


4

MONOLITHIC DEC A Y Material Investigation

T

he material investigation of a concrete-like material ‘rockite’ was implemented to draw real-world connection between the design studio and actual building materials; used in contemporary building practices.

T

his research started with a personal curiosity about concretes ability to feel massive and heavy while disparately portraying characteristics of the delicate or fragile. This series of iterations explores that specific relationship in an attempt to find a balance of these qualities.

A

spectrum analysis reveals the desired characteristics, which are studied, understood and controlled to bring that quality to full realization for the final installation. Monolithic Decay was realized as a series of 12 - 6” x 18”in. stones aggregated to form a single panel. These pieces are then laid inside an extruded aluminum frame measuring 6’ x 2’.


VA R

ROCKITE

v is c os ity


FLAME intensity

T Rdensity A C E PA P E R

R I A B L E S


D1.0

Dm1.1

M1.0


DEC A Y

ONOLITHI

V A L U E S A

fter finding an emergent quality in the Rockite and bringing it to a satisfactory level of expression, the product was then used to generate a 6 x 2 panel. This panel would need its own frame and have to fit into the curtain wall system at The School of Architecture and Urban Design(SARUP) in Milwaukee without damaging the existing system. The goal was to use the exact effect but push the panel to remain more monolithic towards the edges, while breaking down or decaying at its center.


6

C R O SS

Intersecting Emotional and Rational Pedagogy ROSS brings students of Art and Engineering together C around a singular piece of program fundamental to academic buildings; the auditorium.

R AT I O N A L

first, is a rational grid born from the existing condition of the untouched site. A sixty four foot module astonishingly resonates with all of the existing buildings the form the boundary of the site. The alignments were simply uncanny. This 64’ grid aligned itself with north and south facades of buildings, main circulation arteries for campus, and even described the location of doors and large volumetric changes of its neighbors. The relationships were so staggering that this grid had to become a part of the proposal. he second key analysis that fueled the proposal was a T more whimsical matrix. Here, I examined the conditions of the site if the Kunkle building (a structure set for demol-

ishion) was removed from the site. How would students use the site if it were free from all obstacles? Where would they walk? Where would they stand? While some of these observations were mere hunches, because we simply cannot prescribe use, they were none-the-less telling in their own way. An angular matrix was created that suggested ways in which pedestrians would desire to travel. This matrix was then simplified into six key arteries that would become valuable for decision making in the design process.

y equating the program of the Engineering students with B the rational 64’ grid and aligning the pedestrian matrix with the emotional or whimsical pedagogy of Art students, CROSS was born.

EMOTIONAL

n analysis of the site revealed many aspects that could A be implemented in designing a building such as this, but I chose to organize it around two key elements. The


MATRIX pedestrian

GRID contextual


RESOLUTION

FORMAL MASSING RESPONSE

COURTYARD auditoria unfolded

1. align with existing conditions

2. extrude perimeter

3. mi t i gat e scal es

4. provi de pedest ri an condi ut


VESSEL A - A NORTH STUDENT UNION

AUDITORIA

Level 2


B-B

GUARDIAN A-A

B-B

A-A

Level 3

B - B EAST AUDITORIUM

Level 4


SS

I N T E R S E C T I N G

C R O S S E F F I C I E N T LY C I R C U L AT E S S T U D E N T S A C R O S S T H E C A M P U S B A S E D O N K N O W N PAT H S O F T R AV E L

STUDENT CONNECTION

SHARED KNOWLEDGE

T

hroughout CROSS there are three small auditoria that connect the internal courtyard to the can-

tilever at the center of the project. The image above

shows this secondary means of circulation through

CROSS, which evokes students to implement the smaller auditoria in a self-directed approach to individual enlightenment.


SS

intersecting disparate EXPERIENCES


Dace Architectural Portfolio