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DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE &BUILT ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE & BUILT ENVIRONMENT

UON UON

ISBN-13 9780853583066 Department of Architecture and Built Environment The University of Nottingham University Park Nottingham NG7 2RD UNITED KINGDOM t: +44 (0)115 951 4882 e: eng-student-support@nottingham.ac.uk w: www.nottingham.ac.uk/abe

Designed by: Victor Lam Alex Chapman Andy Edwards

2014

2014


Editors: Katharina Borsi, Alexander Chapman, Victor Lam, Robin Wilson Design: Alexander Chapman, Victor Lam Design Support: Andy Edwards Published by the Department of Architecture and Built Environment, The University of Nottingham. Printed in the UK by Ratcliff and Roper Print Group. Copyright symbol 2014 Department of Architecture and Built Environment, the University of Nottingham/individual authors, unless otherwise stated. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher. The views expressed as part of individual projects are those of their authors and may not reflect the view of the publisher. ISBN XXXXXXXXXXX Department of Architecture and Built Environment The University of Nottingham University Park Nottingham NG7 2RD UNITED KINGDOM t: +44 (0)115 951 4882 e: eng-student-support@nottingham.ac.uk w: www.nottingham.ac.uk/abe


department of architecture and built environment


Contents Foreword Prizewinners

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PART 1 Introduction to Part 1 David Short Introduction to Year One Ethos of First Year, Liz Bromley Introduction to Year Two/Three David Short Unit 1A Alisdair Russell post industrial transformations

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Introduction to Part 2 Katharina Borsi

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Year Five, Semester 1

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John Morgan SUB: sustainable urban building Studio

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Dr Philip Oldfield David Nicolson Cole TALL Buildings: (MArch) tianjin tall building issues

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Dr Laura Hanks Dr Wang Qi Exhibiting the Past Feathered dinosaurs in wollaton hall and portal of south kensington

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Professor Tim Heath Dr Amy Tang Mike Taylor Urban design reconfiguring the city

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Professor Brian Ford Benson Lau Environmental design school design and the learning environment

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Dr Chantelle Niblock Tom Bennett Digital architecture bennerley viaduct project

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Unit 1B Jim Hutchenson The janus condition continuity and connectivity

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Unit 2A Alison Davies (SA)3

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Unit 2B Dik Jarman Winter is coming

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Unit 3A Nicola Gerber transient tectonics infrascape

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Unit 3B Warren McFadden hybrids + highstreets

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Unit 4 David Short, Amanda Harmer, Matt Strong spatial narratives

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PART 2

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Unit 5A Toby Blackman in the country of last things

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Unit 5B Farida Makki brink territories

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BEYOND THE STUDIO

Year Five, Semester 2 Unit 1 John Morgan civic hub Unit 2 Dr Johnathan Hale Dance space

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David Nicolson Cole TALL BUILDINGS: advanced tall buildings Dr Lucelia Rodrigues ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN: sustainability and resilience through design: the regeneration of the bakewell road Dr Wang Qi Dr Laura Hanks building projectthe revitalization of bashan reservoir Dr Yan Zhu urban design project infusing the city

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studio 1 Dr Katharina Borsi Tim Collett Nick Haynes urban mediations. city fringe: persistence and transformation studio 2 Professor Michael Stacey Frances Stacey Laura Gaskell Sheldon Brown John Morgan mars [making architecture research studio]

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Architecture Matters Lecture series

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Beginnings, Middle & Ends Lecture series

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T&G student society

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Facade Workshop

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Field Trips: Amsterdam Berlin Copenhagen Madrid France Canada

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UON / Tianjin University Tall Building joint studio & exhibition

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Universitas 21 | The International Student exchange

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Nott: just a city Exhibition

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The Completion of the Creative Energy Homes

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Year Six

Specialist masters John Chilton Paolo Beccarelli Digital architecture: SPACE ENCLOSURE studio

Introduction to Year Six Katharina Borsi

End of Year Show 2014

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Architectural Humanities Research Group 206

The Built Environment. University of Nottingham Main Campus. Architecture Studios Centre for 3D Design

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Dr Robin Wilson Head of Department What happens if you bring together 700 talented students, about a quarter of whom are new to Nottingham (if not the UK) set them loose on challenging design briefs and support their endeavours with enthusiastic staff? A yearbook can only offer a snapshot of what happens next, but we hope this one offers you a clear picture of the diversity in approach taken across our programmes and the depth of creativity and rigour achieved by our students. If you are one of the students or staff involved in this year’s activities please accept my thanks for your contribution to what was an exciting and stimulating year. If you are a parent, I hope it provides a flavour of what your daughter or son was getting up to in Nottingham during 2013/14. For those considering joining one of our programmes, I hope it strengthens your interest in studying with us and for any potential employers, I am sure the Yearbook will confirm the strong reputation our graduates carry with them into practice.

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“BArch Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part I) [K100] & MArch Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part II) [K10I]Prizewinners. To all our sponsers, Thank You.


PRIZEWINNERS


Sponsored Awards Benoy Prize for Excellence in Drawing and Presentation in Architecture Winner | Matthew Cobb 2nd Place | Gaurav Goel & Farid Hernandez 3rd Place | Alexander Chapman & Rebecca Floyd North East Timber Trade Association Prize for the Best Use of Timber Winner | Dominic Ward 2nd Place | Emma Fraser 3rd Place | Chloe Thirkell

[18] Marsh Grochowski Design for Sustainability Prize Winner | Ben Mitchell [19] Price & Myers Prize for the Best M/Arch Environmental Design Student Winner | Heba Nazer [20] Bashan Award for the Best Bashan Project Winners | Wenyan Zhou, Siyi Wang

[3] Canary Wharf Best Tall Building Prize Winners | Harsh Varshneya, Khushboo Bansal

[21] Prize for Best Masters in Architecture Portfolio Winners | Shuo Qiu, Lucia Pramanti

[4] CPMG Urban Design Award Winner | Philip Noone

[22] Mr. Huang Guolei - M/Arch Bird Award Winner | Khushboo Bansal

[5] Gensler Prize for Design Awareness and Communication Winners | Joshua Hovey, Rob Neal

[23] Urban Design Group Prize for the Best Urban Design Project at a Masters Level Winner | Malathe Hamid

[6] NDSA Best 6th Year Design Portfolio Award Winner | Vasiliki Chatzikonstantinou [7] NDSA Part III RIBA Prize Winner | Madeline Pope [8] Foster & Partners Architecture Prize Winner | Chloe Thirkell Runner Up | Alexander Bramhill

[10] CAB Tectonics Prize Winner | Peter Blundy Runner Up | Josie Dorling [11] Lafarge Tarmac Award for Best Use of Concrete Winner | Yusi Wang 2nd Place | Haoran Deng 3rd Place | Alex Bramhill [12] Make Architects Award for Best Use of Physical Models in Architecture Winner | Shamiso Sithole 2nd Place | Matthew Humphreys [13] Purcell Architects Adaptive Reuse and Contextual Design in Architecture Award Winner | Matthew Humphries Runners up | Oliver Beddard, Rob Neal [14] Rushcliffe Solar Best Use of Photovoltaics Prize Winner | Chetan Ravi Tippa Runners up | Santosh Raja, Onyekachi Igbokwe

[24] RIBA Bronze Medal Nominations Winners | Lawrence Flint, Shamiso Sithole [25] RIBA Silver Medal Nominations Winners | Mike Ramwell, Rob Neal [26] 1st Year B/Arch Best Portfolio Winner | Josh Mallins [27] 3rd Year B/Arch Best Portfolio Winner | Laurence Flint [28] 4th Year M/Eng Best Portfolio Winner | James Innes-Wilkin

PRIZEWINNERS

[9] Blueprint Award for Excellence in Sustainable Processes and Winner | Edward Higgins Runner Up | Joel Day

Department Awards

[29] 5th Year B/Arch Best Portfolio Winner | Jamie Brown [30] Architectural Studies Prize Winner | Jamie Brown [31] 5th Year B/Arch Best Portfolio Winner | Samuel Bold [32] The Mark Shaw Award Winner | Philip Gilder [33] 5th Year B/Arch Best Portfolio Winner | Jamie Brown

[15] Wavin Architectural Engineering Dissertation Award Winner | Jiayi Qiu [16] Arup Architectural Engineering Design Award Winners | Tingting Qin, Yankun Wang, Yechen Yu & Yihan Zhao [17] Michael Stacey Architects Prize 2nd Year Best Design Portfolio Winner | Sandra da Fonseca, Martynas Vielavicius

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PRIZEWINNERS [2]

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[1] Benoy Prize for Excellence in Drawing and Presentation Architecture Winner | Matthew Cobb 2nd Place | Gaurav Goel & Farid Hernandez 3rd Place | Alexander Chapman & Rebecca Floyd [2] Canary Wharf Best Tall Building Prize Winners | Harsh Varshneya, Khushboo Bansal [3] CPMG Urban Design Award Winner | Philip Noone

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PRIZEWINNERS [5]

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[2] North East Timber Trade Association Prize for the Best Use of Timber Winner | Dominic Ward 2nd Place | Emma Fraser 3rd Place | Chloe Thirkell [5] Gensler Prize for Design Awareness and Communication Winner (Y5) | Joshua Hovey Winner (Y6) | Rob Neal [6] NDSA Best 6th Year Design Portfolio Award Winner | Vasiliki Chatzikonstantinou [7] NDSA Part III RIBA Prize Winner | Madeline Pope 013


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PRIZEWINNERS [10]

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[8] Foster & Partners Architecture Prize Winner | Chloe Thirkell Runner Up | Alexander Bramhill

[10] CAB Tectonics Prize Winner | Peter Blundy Runner Up | Josie Dorling

[9] Blueprint Award for Excellence in Sustainable Processes Winner | Edward Higgins Runner Up | Joel Day

[11] Lafarge Tarmac Award for Best Use of Concrete Winner | Yusi Wang 2nd Place | Haoran Deng 3rd Place | Alex Bramhill


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PRIZEWINNERS [14]

[12] Make Architects Award for Best Use of Physical Models in Architecture Winner | Shamiso Sithole 2nd Place | Matthew Humphreys

[14] Rushcliffe Solar Best Use of Photovoltaics Prize Winner | Chetan Ravi Tippa Runners up | Santosh Raja, Onyekachi Igbokwe

[13] Purcell Architects Adaptive Reuse and Contextual Design in Architecture Award Winner | Matthew Humphries Runners up | Oliver Beddard, Rob Neal

[15] Wavin Architectural Engineering Dissertation Award Winner | Jiayi Qiu

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PRIZEWINNERS [18]

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[16] Arup Architectural Engineering Design Award Winners | Tingting Qin, Yankun Wang, Yechen Yu & Yihan Zhao

[18] Marsh Grochowski Design for Sustainability Prize Winner | Ben Mitchell

[17] Michael Stacey Architects Prize 2nd Year Best Design Portfolio Winner | Sandra da Fonseca, Martynas Vielavicius

[19] Price & Myers Prize for the Best M/Arch Environmental Design Winner | Heba Nazer


Bashan Reservoir Administration, Shandong [20]

China Architecture Design & Research Group [21]

PRIZEWINNERS [22]

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[20] Bashan Award for the Best Bashan Project Winners | Wenyan Zhou, Siyi Wang

[22] Mr. Huang Guolei - MArch Bird Award Winner | Khushboo Bansal

[21] Prize for Best Masters in Architecture Portfolio Winners | Shuo Qiu, Lucia Pramanti

[23] Urban Design Group Prize for the Best Urban Design Project Winner | Malathe Hamid

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PART I “BArch Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part I) [K100], Architecture & Environmental Design MEng. (ARB/RIBA Part I)”


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Introduction to Part One Bachelor of Architecture Y2/3, Architecture and Environmental Design Y2/3/4. David Short The Bachelor of Architecture and the MEng in Architecture & Environmental Design undergraduate courses at Nottingham are structured around a holistic approach to architectural education based on the two fundamental qualities of creativity and technique; a ‘creative rigour’. Following a skill building year 1, two distinctive methods of studio teaching unfold. Year 2 and 3 students are allowed to choose, at the start of the academic year, one of ten studio units to work within. Our students will therefore, not only develop core skills, at the heart of architectural design, but are offered the opportunity to choose an architectural interest to study to a more advanced level of attainment. The second distinctive feature of year 2 and 3 studio is that it has a vertical structure. This means that small groups of year 2 students work alongside year 3 students in the same studio unit. Each year group will be working on different projects but year 3 students are encouraged to mentor year 2 students and year 2 students can see the quality of year 3 work and can quickly learn ways of doing things. This last year it is pleasing to note that our graduating students have achieved perhaps the highest level of attainment that we have seen in recent years with 78% being awarded either a 2:1 or 1st class degree. As a consequence of this approach, our students are well thought of within the profession and leave us as thoughtful, creative and imaginative individuals, who are able to contribute to society through the proficient practice of architecture or by working in another industry. This year our graduates have been working with top UK practices including Rogers Stirk Harbour, Foster & Partners, Wilkinson Eyre, Hopkins Architects and Cullinan Studio. There is a strong student community within the school, enriched by a mix of students entering from a diverse range of backgrounds and nationalities. We have an equal balance of female to male students entering the course. We have a strong student body that organises extramural lectures and social events. The taught lecture programme is divided into four streams, ‘Humanities - history and theory’, ‘Technical - environmental design, structures and construction’, ‘Integrated Design Approaches in Architecture’ and ‘Practice & Management’. Although the first two streams will be found in most schools, a stream dedicated to integrated design approaches in architecture reflects the belief in teaching and learning through multifaceted and practical real life experiences at differing scales. These integrated design modules sit between the lecture theatre and studio and seek to develop and encourage research, experiment and exploration. In this way, studio work can be supported by specific and contemporaneous delivery of additional information and the lecture room material is made more real. Practical experiences and opportunities to learn by doing are promoted. This year in particular the Department took a decision to engage in its region by working with real clients. Opportunities arose to work with a community group in Beeston, Waleda in Ilkeston and the NHS at the City Hospital in Nottingham. All will involve students designing discrete projects for real clients in the real world. The Department also undertakes a series of live building projects run as charitable enterprises in developing countries. Two nursery schools have already been completed in South Africa. Field study trips to enable students to experience buildings at first hand are considered important components of the course. The year 1 week long field study went to Paris in November and again this was paid for by the Department. Year 3 students also went off later in the year to a number of European destinations for three day study trips, again paid for by the Department.

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liz bromley

barch/meng year one

year one. The first year is a foundation and qualifying year at the University of Nottingham for both Architecture (B.Arch.) students and Architecture and Environmental Design (M.Eng.) students. It is a studio based module within which the fundamental principles of architectural design are taught, tested and developed through a series of design projects. The studio module is year-long and runs for 25 weeks, with two full days of tutoring per week. The year is divided into five units, each unit having a full-time Unit Leader (listed below), assisted by visiting practitioners, Ph.D. students and Year 6 Diploma students. The students entering Year 1 each have very different sets of skills and levels of understanding related to the study of architecture. The foundation year is designed to be a gradual process of learning and development, with each project building on the project before, and being designed to test the students’ skills in each of the key areas of architectural education. The academic year starts with the ‘Tour de Pasenville’, a project created by our former Visiting Professor, Ted Cullinan, of Edward Cullinan Architects. The ‘Pasenville’ is a fast paced, action packed design project in which students from Years 1, 5 and 6 work together to produce the design for a building in two days. It is an exciting project and a great introduction to the world of architecture for Year 1 students. The studio programme comprises five stages. Stage 1 - ‘Foundation One’ - is an initial five weeks of observation, drawing, sketching, model making and skills development, based on short practical exercises, and culminating in a six day field study trip to either Amsterdam or Paris

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Stage 2 - ‘Design Integration One’ - applies and tests the skills acquired in ‘Foundation One’ in a five week exercise to design a studio and optimal living working space for an artist or sculptor. Stage 3 -‘Foundation Two’ - is a further two weeks of skills building. Stage 4 - ‘Design Integration Two’ - is the final project of the year. It is an eleven week design project that integrates all the knowledge and experience of all the previous stages in the design of a building in the City of Nottingham. Students choose from one of five projects whose themes are all based on ‘community’ to bring likeminded people together to share an interest and ‘fostering enterprise’ to help people starting out in their careers. Stage 5 - ‘The Portfolio Review’ - assesses how well the students have progressed throughout the year and whether they have acquired the skills needed to pass to the second year of their course. In addition to learning the fundamental architectural principles of creating a building that responds to the needs of a specific client and a given site, the studio module also places great emphasis on teaching students to communicate their ideas and design intentions clearly and effectively through drawings, models and verbal presentations. The integration of taught modules within studio plays an important role in Year One, with Environmental Design, Architectural Humanities, Construction, Structures, and Integrated Design in Architecture contributing to and being tested within the studio projects at various points throughout the year.


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The projects shown on the following pages display student’s work (from previous years) for Stage 4 – the Comprehensive Design Project – undertaken in the Spring semester. This is an Urban Retreat - a place of beauty and of quiet, in which people can get away from the noise and fast pace of the city, to rest, reflect and recuperate. The Urban Retreat also provides rooms for private conversation for visitors and therapists starting out in their career. The perspectives above show the atmospheric community kitchen leading out into the beautiful and contemplative multi-sensory garden with rooms for private conversation. Students choose from one of five projects whose themes are all based on ‘community’ to bring likeminded people together to share an interest and ‘fostering enterprise’ to help people starting out in their careers. Assisted by their Unit tutors, students start by analysing their chosen site and creating a client narrative. Their design then evolves in response to the analysis of the client / site and is developed through extensive model making. For the final review students produce a full set of presentation drawings, images and models to fully represent how their design responds to the project brief.

UNIT LEADERS Unit 1. Valeria Carnevale Unit 2. Rachel Grigor Unit 3. Liz Bromley Unit 4. Derek Trowell Unit 5. Jeffrey Keays VISITING PRACTIONERS [Y6 Students & PHD] Unit 1. Annie Duquemin, Jonathan Fisher. [Rob Neal, Philip Gilder, John Comer.] Unit 2. Michael Ellis, John Newbery. [Nikki Linsell, Vasiliki Chatzikonstantinou, Edward Higgins.] Unit 3. Balveer Mankia, Dhiran Vagdia. [Michael Ramwell, Matthew Fielding, Philipa Griffiths.] Unit 4. Paul Grey, Mani Lall. [Peter Blundy, Alisdair Gray, Joseph Yates]. Unit 5. Philip Etherington, Annie Duquemin. [Matthew Humphreys, Vikash Patel, Rebekka Ranjan.]

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[1-6] Comprehensive Design Project - Cookery School | Alicia Hollis The Comprehensive Design Project involved designing a cookery school that had the capacity to grow fruit and vegetables and encourage the users to cook and grow foods at home. The site given is in-between the Pitcher and Piano (a restaurant/bar) and The Nottingham Contemporary Art Gallery. I designed the school on three levels with a private and public circulation – entrance for the public is on street level where they can move through the gardens on the top floors and then down into the ‘mixing pot’ where they can sample food that is cooked in the school by the pupils who enter on the lower level. There are 6 arches set into a red brick wall which I have kept and in cooperated into my building a conservatory space suspends over this arches, so they also act as 024

a space divider. This is an attempt to combine the traditional of the church on the site with the modern contemporary on the other side of the building. You can see in my designs that I have kept the liner format of the Nottingham Contemporary combined with green colour scheme.


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[7-14] Comprehensive Design Project - Music Studio | Peter Wheatcroft The key objective for my 1st Year architectural design project was to help promote music and entertainment in Nottingham. I was given a client brief to develop a space at Canning Circus by designing a building that would allow people to practice, write and watch musical performances. As a part of the development process, I used the words ‘division and interaction’ as a design formula for the different areas of the building. For example the practice rooms incorporate a large glass wall at one end that opens up to the public what would otherwise have been a private contained room, to allow them to observe the musical performances inside. I sought to create areas that appear dynamic yet peaceful, pleasant areas where people can sit down. The open planned nature of the building maximises the light received into the 026

spaces and I added to this by designing a series of ribbed windows and sun filters to manipulate shadows to further stylise the internal spaces. Finally the coiled nature of the music studio allows for an outdoor performance space to be installed, where lunch time and evening performances can be conducted. Alternatively it could serve the other functions demanded by public spaces in the City of Nottingham. Helping to promote music and entertainment in Nottingham was the key objective for my 1st Year architectural design project. In order to envision this idea, I was given the client brief of designing a space in Canning Circus to develop a building which allows people to practice, write and watch musical performances.


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year one


Unit 1A Alisdair Russell post industrial transformations Unit 1B Jim Hutchenson The janus condition continuity and connectivity Unit 2A Alison Davies (SA)3 Unit 2B Dik Jarman Winter is coming Unit 3A Nicola Gerber transient tectonics infrascape Unit 3B Warren McFadden hybrids + highstreets Unit 4 David Short, Amanda Harmer, Matt Strong spatial narratives Unit 5A Toby Blackman in the country of last things Unit 5B Farida Makki brink territories

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Part One Year Two/Three David Short This has been our third year of running a vertical studio structure where year 2 students have the opportunity to work alongside year 3 students. Ninety-nine percent of our year 3 students when asked confirmed that they felt that they has benefitted positively through this method of teaching. At the beginning of the academic year all students are allowed to choose which studio unit they would like to join for that year. Each has its own character and approach. This year, unit choices on offer to both years remained impressively wide ranging. As well as teaching the core design skills, advanced streams of teaching offered by the different studio units focused on computer rendering/animation, urban design, theoretical work, responses to sensitive landscapes, speculative drawing, the making of architecture and sustainable communities. Year 2 students have also been able to engage this year with hands on experience of making. Workshops were offered in bricklaying, insitu concrete forming and straw bale construction. In addition as part of the Integrated Design Module year 2 students were also taken onto a construction site. We promote a strong studio culture and although years 1 and 2 predominantly ‘hot desk’ year 3 students are encouraged to set up their own studio space where they can work without disturbance. This last year it is pleasing to note that our graduating students have achieved perhaps the highest level of attainment that we have seen in recent years with 78% of them being awarded a 2:1 or 1st class degree. Congratulations are due to all involved. Congratulations are also due to Max Bolton (MEng student) who was successful in having his final year design project hung in this summer’s Royal Academy Summer Exhibition architecture room.

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alisdair russell

stuart bUckenham

barch/meng uNIT 1a

post industrial transformations. Sheffield. As a unit we continued to investigate the theme of post - industrial reinvention and adaptive re-use in the urban context of Sheffield, forming the key focus of the academic year. Known as `Steel City` Sheffield formed the industrial heartland of the UK for steel production, its history of innovation and mass scale manufacturing during the industrial era was paralleled by its visionary legacy of Modernist architecture and urban design in the post-war period. As a unit we studied the urban (physical, socio-economic, cultural) context of the city, both learning through its history of making and its architecture. The familiar sounds of the legacy of abandoned industrial ruins that remain as the characteristic trace of the power and scale of industry that formed the Industrial North for 150 years until the 1970s. Following this Britain (as with the USA and many other westernised countries who had moved away from industry towards services) entered a post-industrial period of economic decline, with little inclination to rekindle our ailing industrial economy or how to re-inhabit the vast swathes of buildings and land, long since abandoned. We politely gentrify our industrial `heritage` with museums glibly referencing our past times and allow our post-industrial landscapes and edgeland conditions to be reprogrammed as parks or re-inhabited by faceless and temporary distribution centres and retail outlets; but what of our industry? It still exists in the shadows but it is not an industry of scale, or of calculated supply and demand but it has reinvented itself as a provider and producer of crafted and bespoke goods. Kelham Island in Sheffield is such a place, existing fragmented pockets between the rusting industrial hulks of dead industry and the last bastions

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of lottery-funded Café and Museum culture, industry continues almost hidden and apologetic sandwiched between slices of gentrification. Yet it is its location that would have brought industry here in the first place and that made it an island – the millrace powered the water wheel of the first cornmill. Kelham Island now offers an eclectic context, of threshold conditions, of historicism, banal gentrification and low rent industry, creative industries there for the `vibe` of the area, oppositional to those that are holding on in their desperation. Project i The year commenced with a site visit to Oxford to study notable examples of Modernist Architecture. We studied James Stirling’s celebrated Florey Building. Considered a flawed modernist masterpiece and the subject of a current design competition; our students considered considered dynamic ways of how to inject new life into this fantastic building by means of a new façade which may control: light and shadow, movement/ adaption, sound, weight, permeability etc. Students were required to undertake a rapid prototyping exercise to create and refine iterations of the device/components. Physical installations were supplemented high quality working drawings of the detail/assembly. Project ii A collaborative exercise across years 2 & 3. Whilst students were involved in the creation of individual designs, collaboration, discussion and peer learning/review formed a key role in the project. Year 3 students designed a small public forum for a Craftsmens Guild, forming a spatial, structural and material study. Students were expected to reconcile spatial design with programme, however the resolution of qualities of materiality/ façade attuned to the particular site condition were of equal importance.


uNIT 1a barch/meng

Year 2 students were involved with the design of Live/Work Housing for Little Mesters, upholding the local tradition of Master Craftsmen/artisans trained in bespoke metal fabrication which would complement and serve the Guild. Project iii Year 2: Project 3 was concerned with a place of `making` as appropriate to the working rationale/programme of the live/work units for project 2. The final project for the academic year was concerned with a small forum for showcasing the wares of the Little Mester community, either forming an amalgam with project 3 or a standalone building working within close proximity to the previous projects. Where the remit of the previous works has been largely private, the Guild Hall operates within the Public Realm and forms a place of learning where the skills of the Little Mesters may be showcased. Year 3: For the final degree project students had the opportunity to develop individual briefs in accordance with programmatic and research interests developed through the course of the year.

YEAR 3 Katie Ball, Pak Choi, Heather Clifton, Wangsu Ding, Yi Dong, Tianqi Guo, Stephanie Ioannidis, Yaling Li, Yi Lu, Natasha Marks, Joshua Sharp, Kathryn Thomas, Janko Todorovic, Estibalitz Urquidi Ferreira, David Whitehead, Yu Jiachen, Yuan Di. James Innes-Wilkins [mEng], Khelsea Robinson [mEng]. YEAR 2 Alec Crisp, Alexander Lau, Oluwakayode Oguntayo, Charlotte Anthony, Sophie Barks, Jacqueline Beracha, Filippos Glibbery, Hoi Kwan, Milton Arun, Electra Pangalou, Benjamin Retchless, Sam Robinson, Shogo Suzuki, Ana Tuica, Rhys Waring, Samantha Wilson, Jiecheng Zhou. REGULAR CRITICS Andrew Cross Gordon Reavley Neal Tanna [PCKO Architetcs/ Slamshed] Chris McCurtin [Corstophine Wright Architects/ Slamshed] VISITING CRITICS Andrew Rowson [Haworth Tompkins Architects] Richard Mullins [Alexander Sedgley Architects] Jeoncho Son [JHP Design] Timothy Moorhouse Adam Lampon Matthew Stratford

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INTRO

[1-5] Bicycle Factory | Natasha Marks

[6] Material Recycling Centre | Katie Ball

A Sheffield bicycle factory using a combination of 3D printing and physical steel modelling to create bespoke bicycles. Based in Kelham Island, the project is inspired by Sheffield’s history of steel and a community of self-employed steel craftsmen, the Little Mesters.

On first inspection of the site, I sought to make connections between the three key typologies which over the years had become disconnected. This meant drawing lines between derelict buildings, residential housing, and the museum on site to create a new grid system specific to Kelham Island. This was conveyed through my concept image which illustrated the reconnection of the islands residents through a mechanised system. Bringing through the theme of adaptive facades into this project resulted in the up cycling centres façade being both a tool for the occupants and a signpost to passers-by. As the mechanical façade could manipulate itself to bring larger materials inside, and resonate as smaller objects were brought in on a conveyor belt.

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[12] Cinémathèquetonics | Joshua Sharp

[14] Material Recycling Centre | Katie Ball

Sited in the heart of Kelham Island, this project looks to utilise both existing infrastructure and new architecture in order to transform a derelict set of warehouses into a lively and social educational environment. Currently a large expansive patch of brownfield site, the area is set to be developed into a vast swathe of student houses. Through careful landscaping I have redesigned the site to benefit not only my primary clients, students, but also the visiting public.

On first inspection of the site, I sought to make connections between the three key typologies which over the years had become disconnected. This meant drawing lines between derelict buildings, residential housing, and the museum on site to create a new grid system specific to Kelham Island.

[13] Conformists Assembly | Katie Ball In the early 1900’s Kelham Island, Sheffield; received a significant amount of inward investment from the National Lottery and Local Government to fund the construction of the Kelham Island Museum.

This was conveyed through my concept image which illustrated the reconnection of the islands residents through a mechanised system. Bringing through the theme of adaptive facades into this project resulted in the up cycling centres façade being both a tool for the occupants and a signpost to passers-by. As the mechanical façade could manipulate itself to bring larger materials inside, and resonate as smaller objects were brought in on a conveyor belt. [6] 033


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[10] PopUp Community | James Innes-Wilkins

[12,14] The Ark of Brutalism | David Whitehead

The Project is an investigation into Genotype crisis housing solutions for the re-use of abandoned warehouse structures which exist throughout our post- industrial cities. Utilising lightweight adaptable, deployable structures, which can be quickly and easily erected, the old factories form the host environments from which the new communities are forged.

In recent history, the ‘public’ backlash against Brutalism has led to the demolition of many famous and beloved exemplar buildings. Those with the power to condemn a building are often non-architectural, concerned only with money, and bowing to fad popular opinion. Robin hood gardens was recently on the chopping block, when Lord Rogers and Zaha Hadid came to its defence, yet still the entire building was sentenced to destruction.

[11-13] Public Forum | Tianqi Guo The project is a public forum for craftsmen in Kelham Island, Sheffield. The project is developed base on an abandon factory located at the southwest edge of Kalham Island. In this specific project, the designer attempt to explore and use the beauty of the existing building. 034

My brief aims to create an ark, onto which actual physical ‘slices’ of condemned structures are taken to be saved. An ark also keeps alive what it saves, as will this building, by adaptive re-use of the exhibits in the architecture.


[16]

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[15]

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[15-18] Mutagenic Epicentre for Dark Tourism | Krystyna Massey Liverpool used to epitomise the Industrial Revolution with its illustrious dockland system which facilitated the success of its cotton trade before it was outsourced. It was this dissolution of Liverpool’s main source of industry that brought the city to its knees creating the derelict borderland environment that is Stanley dock, eventually resulting in Liverpool’s acquisition of the title of the poorest city in the UK 2012.

The extraction of this water bound chemical could fuel the process of mutagenesis helping to demystify the currently secretive governmental transgenic food process, highlighting how irradiation could be used for benefit as the 1970’s ‘Atomic Gardening Society’ had conceived. as well as providing an outlet for dark tourism within the city as a heterotopia to rival the ‘Disneyland’ of Albert Dock.

The creation of a site specific industry that could take advantage of the existing infrastructure of the docklands as an export system linked to the UK canal network would be perfect in revitalising the city. For this, the process of mutagenesis is suggested which would help to cleanse the dockland water from CS-137 leaching from the Sellafield’s site. 035


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[18-20] Site Regeneration Territory | Yi Lu The project was based on a former industrial land in Sheffield. The area remains the most intact area of industrial heritage in the city, but it is also suffering the rapid decay at the moment. By establishing an extended virtual and physical network across the abandoned site, a center-motivated ‘site regeneration territory’ will be built to provoke the self-built and user-generated reconstruction process. A series of interventions are installed in the selected satellite buildings to form a material recycling circle. Depending on the extended network (including both physical railway tracks and virtual connections) spread out the site, recycling materials are able to reach each repairing site and join the assembly work. The movement of recycling materials also represents the information flow of physical changes on the site. 038

On the other hand, cutting-edge information technology ‘SmartWrapTM’ is introduced as catalyst to initiate a new architectural typology. ‘SmartWrapTM’ is a new building material fabricated from recycled PET bottles and meets the eco-friendly requirements. More than that, due to the additional functionality of OLED panel applied on top of PET substrate, the panels are even able to displaying the realtime information remotely, forming a reciprocal virtual network across the site.


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[21,23,25] Kelham Island Craft Centre | Janko Todorovic

[22,24,26] The Exchange | Estibalitz Urquidi Ferreira

This project adapts an old mill building site on Sheffield’s Kelham Island into a craft centre that brings craftspeople together into a single place and help in the promotion and sale of their produce, as it would both make it easier to attract people to come and see their work with a view to purchase, and create a unique and marketable brand value for their goods. Another critical asset of a craft centre is the enhanced connection between visitors and craftspeople. If craftspeople want, they can show visitors how products are made and demonstrate the craft first hand; this kind of interaction promotes crafts and provides a greater likelihood of someone wanting to stay on as an apprentice. This project address each of the contemporary needs of the craft industry in Sheffield and the wider geographical region, while respecting the historical underpinning of these requirements.

The Exchange consists of a market, auction and stock exchange, as all three are functions of a market and as means of trade, link to each other. It will aim to bring together Sheffield’s historical trades with its contemporary trades, while exploring the cultural identity and reintegrating the small business, into Sheffield’s cultural and economic fabric through the reuse and rehabilitation of Castle Market, and allowing the excavation of the Castle and spirit of the place to carry on.

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uNIT 1a

[21]

The reuse and redevelopment of Castle Market, will redevelop and return something which is loved and missed by many as well as helping smaller producers combat large corporations.

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Jim hutcheson

ross lambie

barch/meng uNIT 1B

The janus condition Continuity and Connectivity. chiltern street, marylebone. Janus is the Roman god of beginnings and transitions. He is most commonly represented as looking in two directions simultaneously – both to the past, and to the future. As such, he embodies the notion of change – representing a present which enables the transition from the past to the future, and which reciprocally might be interpreted as representing a way of understanding the progression from past to future through the mechanism of present interventions. Janus can represent a portal between the past and the future, a means of transformation from one state to another, one set of conditions to a different reality. In this sense he can represent altered ways of seeing – an altered vision of the world we inhabit; sometimes a progression from an immature, to a more mature state of being. Similarly, as a totem, Janus could represent a condition on the edge, between two states; a way of reconciling opposing conditions. In more prosaic terms, Janus might represent a position between the naive and the cultured, between urban and non-urban; between history and the future. Our unit will consider the role of architecture in these changing times, looking into the past with one face and into the future with the other, with a particular focus on an understanding of present context. This year we’ve allied this with the concept of ‘Ortus’, a Latin word referring to the arc of the sun, and carrying the meaning of new beginnings, or a new dawn. This concept is also loaded with an aspiration for the advancement of society and humanity; the idea of creating a better world. One of the critical challenges for architects practicing today is to address the notion of ‘continuities’ in a whole series of ways. Architecture and society exist in an on-going cultural continuum, and it is incumbent on

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those who are responsible for shaping the environment in which we live to ensure that the architecture which we produce supports and enriches the community which it serves. We must concern ourselves with a concern for continuity between the social context of development and architecture itself. It is the duty of the architect to bring clarity to the complex organisational, technological and contextual parameters inherent in each scheme. This approach guarantees a specific, unique response to every project. This work of this unit will be concerned with introducing contemporary interventions, at whatever scale might be appropriate (from the scale of a single exhibit to an entire building, for example), harmoniously into their immediate physical, as well as larger historical, contexts. To achieve this, we will research the historical, physical, cultural, and social circumstances of each project, integrating this information with a considered response to the brief, to the environmental and other technical parameters which apply, and our own ambitions, which ‘stand in’ for those of the clients whose aspirations we hope to translate into physical reality. Project i The objective of this first project is to ‘set the scene’ for Projects 2 and 3, principally through the identification, analysis and assessment of a specific site with a view to using this information as the basis for the design exercises which will constitute Project 2 (Pars Pro Toto), and subsequently the mixed use propositions which will comprise Project 3. (A Posse Ad Esse). We will be assessing the cultural, philosophical and geographical location and context, looking specifically at the potential for continuities inher-


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ent in the existing condition. These may be apparent in the physical fabric of the site; latent (in a sense ‘absent’) but which can be inferred through the contextual conditions; or which can be related to the historical development of the site, it’s physical evolution in response to evolving physical, social, environmental or other circumstances, and so on. Project ii Project 2 requires you to develop a conceptual finding from project 1 into a small but large-scale design project, which will serve as a conceptual PARS PRO TOTO for the main design project 3. Given the scale of the site, you are required to firstly develop an outline ‘masterplan’ proposal for the overall site, in sufficient detail to communicate the scale, volumetric composition, functional disposition, basic spatial disposition and the urbanistic principles which underpin your thoughts. This should clearly be based on your response to the site evidenced in the material produced at the end of project 1. The building types you choose to assemble your masterplan are at your own discretion, but clearly there should be a synergy between the proposed functions and the site (at some level). Project iii The Unit theme is that of continuities, explored at a number of levels. We have been interested principally in the urban context, and have explored physical continuities within the urban fabric; how to maintain, enhance, restore, or re-invent these as necessary within specific contexts. We have been interested in continuities between the urban context and the buildings which inhabit it – how we integrate our work with the physical fabric and spatial configuration of our cities.

YEAR 3 Ahjeev Ananthasivam, Alexander Bell, Jack Broad, Jack Cambridge, Pak Chung, Josephie Dorling, Joanne Hart, Chen He, Shan Lee, Tingting Li, Jason Passmore, Dilminder Rai, Denice Toyinbo, Thien Tran, Timothy Tsung, Nicola Wernham, Hang Zhou, Benjamin Guess [mEng], Nicolas Yiasemis [mEng] YEAR 2 Samuel Ocock, Hong Chung, Sandra da Fonseca, Faaizah Hosein, Hanrui Jiang, Kelvin Lam, Francesca Levey, James Lowsley-Williams, Nicolle Skett, Maria Tsvetkova, Joshua Ward-Penny, Robert Waters, Mikaela Wigstrom, Kefei Yang, Sophie Collier [mEng], Johnathan Fairbairn [mEng], Hugh Potter [mEng]. REGULAR CRITICS Douglas McCorkell [Rick Mather Architects] Debby Kuypers [RFK Architects] Bruce Newlands [MacLab/ Kraft Architecture] Ben Smart [Marsh Grochowski] Andy Roberts [Church Lukas] Matt Greenhalgh CONSULTANTS Iain Williamson [Axis Consulting]

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[2]

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[1-4] Baker Street Brewery | Joesphine Dorling The proposal for project three is a brewery, used primarily to produce local beers whilst providing guided tours, with an accompanying brewpub, fine dining experience and market place for the promotion and enjoyment of products made on site. The vision for the site as the venue for learning new skill sets and creating new products for trade was inspired by the occupancy of land adjacent to the site by Marylebone Workhouses and by the recent revival of London’s brewing industry. The scheme also follows the concept of a sustainable brewery, whereby by-products of the brewing process, such as spent grain and hops, are sent to compost for use in the urban allotments on site, 042

which then grow produce that can be harvested and consumed in the dining spaces provided as part of the programme. In this way, the site is able to become a centre for the celebration of local food and drink. In order to maintain intrigue and encourage the public to enter into the building to discover more about the brewing industry, only selected elements of the brewing process are visible externally to the public, with hints to the industrial function within made possible through the copper façade.


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[2] Project Title | Student Name

[4] Project Title | Student Name

The project aims to push the boundaries of biomimetics, and how these ideas can be applied to form a low-carbon, ecology-based industrial template. The focus will be on how the ecosystems can be assimilated into the industrial the architectural ecosystem. The historic

The project aims to push the boundaries of biomimetics, and how these ideas can be applied to form a low-carbon, ecology-based industrial template. The focus will be on how the ecosystems can be assimilated into the industrial the architectural ecosystem. The historic The project aims to push the boundaries of biomimetics, and how these ideas can be applied to form a low-carbon, ecology-based industrial template. The focus will be on how the ecosystems can be assimilated into the industrial the architectural ecosystem.

[3] Project Title | Student Name The project aims to push the boundaries of biomimetics, and how these ideas can be applied to form a low-carbon, ecology-based industrial template. The focus will be on how the ecosystems can be assimilated into the industrial the architectural ecosystem. The historic trial template. The focus will be on how the ecosystems can be assimilated into the industrial the architectural ecosystem. The historic

The historicThe project aims to push the boundaries of biomimetics, and how these ideas can be applied to form a low-carbon, ecologybased industrial template. The focus will be on how the ecosystems can be assimilated into the industrial the architectural ecosystem. [5] 043


[6]

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[7]

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[5-6,10] Symbiotic Fishery | Alexander Bell My ‘Symbiotic Fishery’ design intent is of both a sustainable and continuity orientated ideology related to a forward thinking relationship between the growing demands of a consumerist society which emphasizes the need for renewable solutions and sustainable agendas. The current issue with fish imports into Billingsgate fish market London is that over 90% of stock is delivered by road from major ports around the UK, a new ‘hub’ along the river would mean that both wider and local fishing boats can deliver their catches with ease and in a less polluting way by river; returning to the origins of London’s fish trade in a renewed light. Additionally there exists no formal collaboration between experienced fishermen, competition organisers and local enthusiasts for fishing and I feel that my proposition can unite each in spaces that promote teaching and learning about both the river 044

and provide a ‘hands on’ approach to fishing for those who wish to experience it, whether amateur or veteran through a controlled ‘lake’ or tidal Thames respective. For those who do not wish to participate, particularly the affluent in Chelsea, will be attracted by a sushi bar and restaurant which will be fuelled directly from these catches via a culinary school with kitchens. The raising of public awareness towards sustainable agendas will be integrated through a variety of exhibition spaces alongside prized catches. The building takes advantage of material properties, with the large semi-exposed central fish market being situated under a large swooping glulam roof, known for its durability and sustainable benefits.


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[10]

[11]

[7-9] School of Theology | Nicolas Yiasemis

[11] A Precedent for London Food Production | Jason Passmore

The decision to develop a brief for a school of theology was due to the influence of religion in the local communities that was evident from the large number of religious institutions in the area as well as the religious significance of Paddington Street Garden next to the site as a former graveyard.

Regional food branding helps make consumers more aware and interested in the origin of food, strengthening their links with the rural economy. The farmers market is synonymous with self sufficiency and quality, becoming the greatest example of the success of regional branding.

The brief attempted to interact with this social context, by offering public and semi-public spaces that provide education on the various aspects of religion, enable debate and discussion of religious matters, and facilitate contemplation and prayer.

My scheme aims to incorporate and celebrate the skill that is required in each stage of the food production process from initial production and sale to responsible waste disposal and research. By locating these together, each user group can benefit from the others and the public can be educated.

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[12]


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[13]

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[12] New Mediatheuqe | Jack Broad London is one of the most connected cities in the world; physically and virtually. It may be known for its historic river or financial power, but the media industry is one of the city’s biggest sectors. From within this idea of connectivity, along with the site’s fortunate positioning within central London, came the idea to utilise this sector and create a programme tailored to the site. [13,16] The Garden Square Hub | Benjamin Gess The Garden Square Hub will be a multi-functional typology whose programme will accommodate the aim of preserving and invigorating London’s garden squares though a number of ways. The scheme will accommodate permanent and temporary exhibition space which

[16]

will enable public exploration. A plant research laboratory will explore plants common to London’s garden squares and plants which have the potential to thrive in London’s gardens squares. [14,15] Health and Wellbeing Centre | Shan Lee The site is situated on the junction of Chiltern Street and Paddington Street in City of Westminster, London. The proposal is to create a Health & Wellbeing Centre with the aims of tackling some of the targets set out in the ‘City of Westminster’s Health & Wellbeing Strategy 2012-2015’. Social engagement of the community will be enhanced through landscaping of North Paddington Street Gardens located next to the site and a range of fitness programmes and learning courses will be widely available to promote the idea of healthy living within the local area. 047


Alison davies

john ramsay

barch/meng

(sa)3.

uNIT 2a

khomotso crech, south africa. snienton, nottingham. The unit promotes an architecture of Engagement. The process we will follow will involve a mix of rigorous thinking, real constraints, ingenuity, opportunity, creativity and serendipity. The resulting projects may be spatially modest or more ambitious. An entirely abstracted architecture is a false premise; when we learn how to connect with context, materiality, society and the actual fabric of a place architecture becomes meaningful. The unit is part of the studio ‘making’ stream. Our investigations will focus on the opportunity making offers to develop and test ideas. Through physical acts of making we will explore space, place, ergonomics, structure, materiality and detail. The year’s work will culminate in a live ‘make’: the construction of new nursery school accommodation in South Africa. The unit’s interpretation of this theme extends to making a case: the construction and communication of a well-conceived architectural proposition. Students will be encouraged to work individually and collectively to develop their powers of critical review. The unit will draw on Kenneth Frampton’s triad of Topos, Typos and Tectonics, where topos refers to the physical context, climate, topography and available respources; typos refers to the cultural context, its people, pedagogy and societal framework; and the tectonic is the built response to these circumstances, laced we hope with delight and serendipity. We will be working in the context of this current time of austerity. Students will be expected to use creative ingenuity and lateral thinking to stretch limited resources to a constructive and delightful end. This process will manifest at various scales, from small maquettes in studio, through large scale construction prototyping and built insallations, to the ‘live’ build in South Africa.

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Project i Our first context in semester one will be rural South Africa, where we will explore culture, climate, place, precedents, typologies, available resources and construction techniques to inform the design of additional nursery school accommodation at Khomotso Creche. We will develop design proposals to a high level of resolution, sufficient for us to use to construct the accommodation in Easter 2014. This project consolidates the work carried out by two successive cohorts of Nottingham University students on this site, in 2012 and 2013. The previous phases of work on this site - and the experience of the students and staff involved - should be considered a resource available to the unit. Project ii Our second context in semester two will be in Nottingham, where we will follow similar explorations to inform proposals for a semi-derelict site on the edge of the city. This site is now a theoretical project and marks a shift in studio work from the actual to the possible. This represents a chance to stretch our creative thinking towards a more ambitious and potentially larger scale intervention. However, it should also be noted that the future of this site is currently under review by Nottingham City Council – plans for it’s regeneration are in discussion. Therefore students should certainly consider the potential for advocacy in their proposals. Project 2: The study focus for this project is based in the Humanities subject area, hence the approach will focus on design rigour, implementing your knowledge of critical theory and historical typology to achieve an architecture that expresses the identity of its ‘place’. We will explore precedents, highlighting three contemporary examples. The programme will be for a ‘democratic’ forum to include space for public communication


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(debate etc) and additional supporting spaces (eg a club or institute). Spaces may be internal and/or external. The size of the resultant building will be approximately 1000m2. Project iii The site for this project will be the area around Sneinton Market, Notiingham. The study focus for this project is based in the Environmental Design subject area, hence the approach will focus on a physical site analysis supported by IDA teaching ‘Ecotect’ simultaneously. The programme will be for a small educational building (offering nursery or primary education) relating to, and exploiting, the outer physical situation to create stimulating interior spaces. The size of the resultant building will be approximately 1000m2.

YEAR 2 ‘Afifah Abdullah Soefri, Balraj Bains, Olivia Birnbaum, Dominic Blake, Alexander Bradley, Toby Cope, Hang Du, Stephanie Ete, Damilola Gbadamosi, Mikhil Haria, Danielle Hart, Jack Hollis, Rebecca Lane, Hiu Leung, Dominic Li, Rebecca Lipscombe, Pak Ma, Starvrini Mouktari, Georgios Partalidis, Silvi Popova, Aala Sharfi, Thomas Sheldon, Lydia Stott, Ben Tipson, Holly Trehearn, Oliver Weldon, Pui Wong, Jiejia Yan, Wen Zhu. YEAR 2 [mEng] Kaitlin Allen, Jessica Chapman, Bryn Davies, Alexander Douglas, Bianca Latini, Eve Mason, Catherine O’Leary. REGULAR CRITICS Richard Woods Joe Kemish Steve Wickham VISITING CRITICS Guillermo Guzman John Edmonds Mike Siebert

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[1-5] Mathematical Community Forum | Hang Du | Y2

[6-8] Democratic Forum | Rebecca Lane

The design is a mathematical community, which is a democratic forum and ideas exchange for mathematical thinkers located in the central infill in Sneinton Market.

The main feature of my project for a democratic forum was the translucent concrete faรงade which is demonstrated in the sectional model using plaster and optical fibres. At night shadows visible through this faรงade will hint at activities happening inside and during the day people passing outside will create shadows inside. This breaks down the barrier between public and private spaces, another theme of the design.

This building aims to re-use the existing wall structures to form a new design upon the old structures. There is a double-height space to give clients an open view, which is necessary for mathematical thinking and discussing. An external informal discussion area is here as well. This building is a design about composition using mathematical ideas, such as golden section and jigsaw puzzle. The exhibition area offers academic communication to display excellent work and models in mathematical area 050


CA FE

[7]

[7] [8]

[9]

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uNIT 2a

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[9-10] Snienton Market Redevelopment | Thomas Sheldon We were tasked with designing a Democratic Forum and Free School both of which had a creative theme. A key drive behind both of my designs was to retain the existing Art Deco market buildings as I thought they gave real character to the area. For the Forum I chose to take this further and try to keep additions to a minimum so that the existing Market Square was retained. To achieve the spaces I needed I created a basement floor and was able to make a series of different rooms for different uses.

I intended for the school to resemble a Victorian garden with a series of small spaces and a big emphasis on light. The stand out elements included a semi permanent gallery space to be shared by the school, forum and community and a “green wall� which acted as a barrier and advertisement to Sneinton as a whole.

With the school I still retained the existing Art Deco building but the other building was demolished to make way for the series of individual units that made up my creative school. The main drive of this design was to create a sheltered oasis with a defensive wall to the busy city. 051


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[2] Unit 2A: (SA)

The theme of the unit this year was the ‘creative fix’: using limited resources, creative thinking and ingenuity to complete this important and interesting design challenge. The project is for new teaching, learning and play space at the Khomotso Creche in Calais Village, Limpopo region. In Nottingham, students worked together to explore the environmental, climatic, social and political context in which the project is based; to understand relevant pre-school pedagogies, typologies and precedents; and to consider available materials and construction techniques. This research informed their subsequent design proposals for the new facility, developed in studio during the Autumn semester. 052

At Easter, the team of 37 architecture students and 9 staff travelled to South Africa to construct the ‘winning design’ for the creche, using money they had raised themselves. The project provides vital early years numeracy, language and play skills for a marginalised community. This year’s construction was the final phase of a project that has been ongoing on this site with students from the University for the past 3 years. These projects are delivered in partnership with the NGO ‘Education Africa’ and teacher-training agency Thusanang Trust.


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[11]

[11]

Unit head Alison Davies said: “The project is a fantastic opportunity for students to see their designs realised at a very early stage in their career. The students get hands-on experience of a number of construction techniques including building with timber frame, straw bales and sand bags. They get to design for a ‘real’ client, and to understand the constraints and opportunities of programme, budget and climate. It is also wonderful life experience: working hard together to build something meaningful in a beautiful but under-resourced part of the world.

[11]

[1] [2, 4] [3] [5] [6]

The Finished Building nd 2 year students working on site in South Africa Local children and creche staff make their mark on the building Team C explain the principles of a reciprocal frame The successful design by team F

This year’s project has been a fantastic success, the students’ commitment and the standard of work has been excellent and we are very proud of what we have all achieved.” 053


dik jarman

Mani lall

barch/meng uNIT 2B

winter is coming. the north. The NORTH is a region in the United Kingdom that has its own identity separate to the rest of Britain. Distance from London, cold weather and proximity to possible invaders have traditionally given it the aura of a hostile and uninviting place.

be exploring. This will mean lots of models, concentrating on different manufacturing techniques, finishes and designing methods (digital and hand-drawn). We will then look at photographing them appropriately for portfolio and for digital video.

We will be examining this region to try to define its mood (and its boundaries) and see if it is changing in this era of globalisation. The unit will assess whether the accusation of the region being “grim” are true and debilitating, or in fact whether this view masks some greater goods of the human condition that have come about through hardship.

Project i After hearing all the different points of view and methods of looking at defining The NORTH in the first part of the project, students will then spend the next week preparing their own individual NORTH versus SOUTH Mood Board giving their own vision of what they think the mood of the NORTH is and how it differs from the SOUTH.

We will be concentrating our studies in Yorkshire which as a region has been inhabited since before 7000BC and has had since that time been controlled by a large number of people from different regions. The capital of Yorkshire, the city of York, was founded in AD71 by the Romans whose streets and defensive walls have catalysed much of what we see today. Over the Roman ruins lie the works of the Anglo Saxons, Vikings and Normans, creating the palimpsest of competing geometries and pathways made of castles roads and minsters that we see today. We will be unpicking this tapestry of built form and history and make a map over time illustrating the growth and changes in the city. We shall do this through the process of making. The third years will make models, both physical and digital, of things that define this region through time, and assemble them into a short stop-motion/CG animation that captures both the spirit and change over time of the city of York. We are in the “making stream” and so an emphasis will be made on making objects to develop our understanding of the topics that we will 054

Project ii For Project 2 the Year 3’s will be exploring the history of York and finding ways of expressing it with models and movement. The end result for the student will be a series of drawings by hand and by computer, and models made by computer, by hand and by machine. The end result for the entire Year 3 group will be a short film showing the history of York using the models (both real and CG) and is inspired by the title sequence from the HBO series Game of Thrones. The models are to be representative of the events that happened throughout the history of York. The models are NOT to be exact replicas of buildings or things but rather interpretations that express a bigger picture than just the object itself. This will be a direct extension from your examinations of the mood of the NORTH project, in that this will be about designing objects that capture the spirit of place rather than its look.


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Project iii The Unit theme is that of MAKING, explored at a number of levels. We have already looked at the Mood of The NORTH in the Project 1 mood board, and then the History of specific aspects of York in Project 2 model making, now it is time to think of its future. What do you think is an appropriate future vision of York from now on? This site is big enough and significantly located enough to make an iconic statement that can make a statement about York that can help inspire a city. Through Projects 1 and 2 you should have gained a certain knowledge about the history and character of York which will be the foundation for your vision and ambition for the main project. You are required to communicate your strategic vision for your main project, supported possibly with a narrative/poetic text, and perhaps a re-presentation of earlier work with a revised emphasis to communicate your present concerns. This should include reference to historic and contemporary precedents, etc. Your vision for your project should be communicated partly in a graphic format. Basically what is your vision for York from now on? Should it be preserved as a historic city with its scale limitations and character or should it allow itself to develop into a city that embraces the best the future can bring in whatever from that takes? Should it endlessly live in the past or should it show itself to be a relevant contemporary player? Can a mix of the two be successful? Where do you draw the line?

YEAR 3 Oluseyi Ajewole, Chang Chen, Arun Chopra, Hongzhi Cui, Ross Eilliston, Jacob Maddocks, Oliver Mortimer, Oluwaseyi Obagun, Zhefa Pan, Simrit Panaich, Mark Roberts, Yufan Wang, Herong Zhou, Daniel Buban Ngu [mEng], Vivien Cheung [mEng], Rachel Clubb [mEng], Katherine Whitehead [mEng], Jennifer Yu [mEng] YEAR 2 Gorkem Diges, Bethan Hall, Jake Lenahan,Maria Bitsou, Lucie de la Mothe, Andrew Jowitt, Crystal King, Philip Krentos, Zhizhou Liu, Anur Mbaya, Toan Nguyen, Salim Popoola, Kekai Ren, Haoxiang Wei, Yida Xu, Zihao Xu REGUULAR CRITICS Joseph Kemish Mani Lall John Edmonds VISITING CRITICS Steve Wickham [Price and Myers]

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[1-2] Art & Culture Complex | Herong Zhou My vision for this project, the Yorkshire culture and art complex is to create a place where people can gather around comfortable and immerse themselves into the culture and art’s embrace. It can be mainly specified into 4 parts. 1. Interactions and communications between peoples and environments are strongly encouraged through all aspects of design. A space that can accommodate advanced interactive technologies and activities to let people have a better understanding the world around them as well as themselves. 2. Art and culture as the main theme of the scheme to arrange the activities and circulation of the design. The programme is set in the aim 056

of providing people with the information of art and culture in the form of that can benefit their understanding most. 3. A place where people can gather around and appreciate the beauty of wisdom and art, a square is needed for York. The quality of the square need to be friendly and graceful just likes the character of the York city, providing a place for a comfortable resting and gathering ground. 4. To build connections with the rest of site in the aspects of materiality, size and form. It is a new building but a new YORK building, special identity. It should present a feeling of it is being grown out of this pieces of land. The proposed scheme is a culture themed complex.


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[1]

[1] [2]

The concept for this complex is to explore the sense of curiosity towards the unknown, the future. Since this scheme is a structure for people to connect and touch the future, rather than stuffing the space with the high tech machines, it would be much helpful for people to explore the things they are looking for by creating a space that can raise people’s primal interest and desire to explore. The complex is intended to provide people a journey of exploration towards the future, the past of the world, and themselves.

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Cocoon

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[3-4] Chrysalis | Jennifer Yu York is an ageing city. In the first decade of the 2000s there was an increase of 24% in the over 80s population in York. Society needs to support this ageing population. Almost half of the over 75 population live in single households. There needs to be a place for community integration not only to accommodate the ageing population but also the social diversification. There is a long held assumption that in old age there is a retraction from life but old age is more so an opening of boundaries. The provision of time and a different outlook of life.To support this community, a cultural centre is proposed. York needs a cultural centre for the aged to encourage social interaction and mental stimulation. The centre is a mixture of spaces. It has spaces to have classes for the 058

performance and visual arts and to perform. This will allow people to meet at classes provided by the University of the third age. It will also create spaces for people to engage in social activities. The building is set out along central corridors to allow simple movement between spaces. The concept behind the centre is the idea of a cocoon, a metamorphosis formed from an enclosure. In a sense the centre will instil youthfulness into the occupants by providing a social network and mental stimulation. This has derived from cocoon the movie. The inhabitants of a residential home gain youth from cocoon pods.


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[5-11] From Dark to Light | Herong Zhou In the mood board project, I produced a pair of long rectangular frames to show the South’s and North’s people’s views of the north. To show the difference between them, though with the same general composition, they are made with almost complete opposite structure and color pallet. The whole south mood board is sunken inwards into the frame. The top layer is the glazing protective panel to provide it with a certain shine. The Second layer is the floor of the expensive gallery space giving out the sense of expensive of the south. The layer at the bottom of the frame is the goddess of hell, Hel. The composition of this whole frame is suggesting people of the south are usually looking down on the north. Coupled with the South mood board, the North mood board

is showing how the north people see themselves. The whole frame bulged up in the center. Contents burst out of the frame showing energy of the north. The main theme for this frame is to show the brave and raw of the north, being honest and hospitality, all the merits of North. The goddess Skadi is placed at the top, with several tree trunks supporting below, showing its solid foundation. The whole frame is intended to convey a sense of simplicity and honesty of the North.

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[6] The Shambles | Vivien Cheung

[7-9, 13] Twin Castles | Zhefan Pan

The Shambles was a second project in Year 4 and as being in the making stream of Unit 2B, the design brief was to explore and capture a key moment in York’s history and to portray that in a built physical model. The model consisted of hand-made timberwork, laser cut and 3D printed elements.

This project is an in-depth site study of York castle area, producing a unique understanding in terms of its history background and landscape. The result of the project is a combination of a model and animation presenting the domination of two castles stands at opposite of River Foss by its long tendril arms. This model is designed for picturing animation that reflecting images of York’s history events. The first part of the storyboard is telling the story that King William’s conquest over local people using giant castles with arms representing his power and authority reaching over York’s sky. The part 2 story is telling about local citizen fighting back for their freedom.

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[10-11] York Entertainment District | Zhefan Pan

[12] Military Rehabilitation: Integrated Transitions | Rachel Clubb

The initial idea of this project is providing York an entertainment space not only for the local citizens but also for tourists coming to York. This place will become another interesting point apart from other historical spot. The project will cause a transformation to York, bring diversity to the city’s planning and keep it alive from daytime till night. The key design idea is giving space back to the public, creating a space that attracts people and let the visitors stay.

The military rehabilitation centre proposes to unite injured veterans together with the community of York in aid of their transition back to civilian life. Unlike the norm, veteran recovery will occur directly in the heart of the city, preventing mental health stigma and producing genuine integration with the civilian world. Through veteran rehabilitation, the celebration of York’s military history will now look towards the future and therefore assist the evolution of a historic city into the modern world.

The general programme of the project is a public square including coffee shops, clubs, bars, restaurant, retail space and other facilities. This is because the transferring of visitors’ interests on York from historical spots to eating and shopping.

Within the military rehabilitation centre, the concept of transition is fulfilled. True transition of soldiers back into society however involves a broad spectrum of issues including physical, mental and social rehabilitation. 061


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nicola gerber

tiran driver

andy thomas

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transient tectonics infrascape. shoreditch to dalston junction, london. The unit researches the transient aspects of architecture and the environment. The studio focuses on 4 transient aspects: 1. The dynamics of the environment. The students are encouraged to observe, understand, integrate and respond to weather conditions and cycles, seasons, tides, winds as well as extreme weather events and the implications of climate change. In addition to the physical environment, we also investigate the changes in global relationships, fast developing technologies and their cultural consequences for the way we live together. 2. Temporal relationship. A non-linear reading of past events connects these directly to the inherent nature of a place, its local customs and characteristics, and help create a specific architecture. 3. Programming as a creative architectural tool. The unit observes, questions and re-evaluates the way we live together today. Our interpretation of programming is open and flexible. The unit develops adaptable functions, integrates poetic qualities and encourages crossprogramming to create unexpected encounters. 4. Form in transition. The unit pursues a methodic and conceptual process to develop a unique, original and authentic formal response with poetic qualities. The unit explores the relationship between built structure and LAND... landscape, surface, topography, ground, movement, cycles, rhythms, the physical and the poetic. The unit’s interpretation of TECTONICS includes the skilled and well-crafted execution of an architectural argument. Landscape Urbanism has emerged as a new discipline in the last decade; we are using these themes, ideas and processes to re-imagine

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the hinterlands of the “city beautiful”, the somewhat disorganised and informal zone, that we often perceive in motion, that holds such potential for experiments and chance encounters. Moving at different speeds, the cinematic view, non-places associated with transient use, but also pockets where little dreams come true, where people play, where new activities pop-up... these will be moments in our zone of experimentation, imagining a city that is more than liveable – that is enjoyable. Project i This project will explore the translation of a moving experience in time into a still presentation of the same. This translation will require and therefore define and create a visual and analytical vocabulary, which we will work with throughout the year to express the dialectic character of static buildings in relation to the movement along urban infrastructure. You will then change from a moving observer to a static one and discover the complex detail of a short event experienced in situ. Project ii In “Infrastructure as Architecture” Stan Allen describes landscape as a continuous surface, a field, which needs to be “irrigated with potential” (Rem Koolhass) in contrast to architecture, which has a static vertical dimension read as partitioned space. One can imagine this as active large and open space versus a still small enclosed space – architecture is the space where the city comes to rest. This project explores the relationship between one mode of movement and a single space, their spatial relationship, their transitional space, their presence within each other an artistic installation, rather than a practical building, creating a space of “ar-rest” and exploring the essential qualities of movement and rest


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spatially and architecturally. If the whole city would be a park, then this space would be its pavilion, an architecture of pleasure or a place to take advantage of a view (gazebo). This projects explores the nature of a quiet intimate space in the city and develops a spatial and thematic language to express its relationship to the wider cityscape; it is therefore a pars pro toto, developing a relevant architectural vocabulary to explore the theory of landscape urbanism. Project iii Beginning with the book titled ZOOMSCAPE, this project will explore the relationship of a static architecture in a world that is moving fast, where viewpoints are constantly changing, where we are altering the zoom of our eye to bring different images into focus and focusing on different distances simultaneously. Considering the topic of landscape urbanism one may question, if and what aspect or technique of landscape design/drawing/perception can mediate between these two spatial concepts. But beyond the question of movement, distance and time in relationship to space, which found their agency through various types of infrastructure such as the canal system in England, the motorways in America, the electricity networks or train lines - our world today is dematerialising and new types of infrastructure are emerging as the defining systems of our times, such as 24/7/365 television or the internet. Super speed cable networks, higher bandwidth and measurements in milliseconds, total accessibility and omnipresence are pushing architecture into the backdrop of a film set, questioning the genius loci. Is there a landscape of infrastructure, how does architecture relate to it, is this the emergence of new typologies ?

YEAR 3 William Brouwer, Emily Buckland, Matthew Butler, Neeraj Chandi, Lingdi Chen, Konstantinos Fetsis, Laurence Flint, Rebecca Floyd, Emma Fraser, Carmen Hwangbo, Xinzhi Jiang, Chen Man, Grace Mitchell, Krishan Pilch, Tedora Stefanova, Yusi Wang, Ching Wong, Emilia-Ioana Zipis, Nicolas Salthouse [mEng] YEAR 2 Calvin Lee, Barnaby Miles, William Atkins, Loic Delnatte, Tyler Gordon, Ionna Grigoriou, Man Lam, Monique Leybourne, Long Lo, Xinming Ma, Sara Martinez, Eleni Mitzali, Jason Sayer, Jialing Shi, Haya Zabaneh. REGULAR CRITICS Mike Wood [ARUP] Ed Cooper [UoN] VISITING CRITICS Astrid Bornheim Alison Gwynne David Baggerly Emily Thurlow Nicole Luck Marcus Todd William Gowland

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Back Passage Sub-Shop Obelisk

Rectory Gardens Reflecting Pool

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Staff Entrance Reading rooms and Art movers passage Itchy Park

Exit and Special Entrance

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Fashion Street Square

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[1-4] The Gilbert and George Institute | Emma Fraser Screen

In an interview dating from 2008 the artists Gilbert & George expressed an interest in curating. As they have spent a great deal of their time collecting, collating and collaging aspects of their lives. This project speculates on creating a space for the artists to arrange this life’s work. The project deals with both the artifacts and the specific locus of their activity in Fournier Street. As an addition to the artistic and cultural infrastructure already present in the area, the project will be an institution exhibiting the collections the artists have collated over their fifty-year experiment as living art. As the oeuvre of work Gilbert and George have produced during their artistic partnership is well displayed in galleries and museums around the world, the project will focus on their personal collections and curational style. The structured processional aspect of the scheme will allow the visitor to view a

life’s collection through the collector’s eye. The project on an urban scale proposes to activate the Commercial Road street frontage by re-designing the pre-existing church gardens, creating a new public square facing onto Fashion Street and link the new gallery to G and G’s studios and dwelling. The idea formed early on that the institute should become in some way a ‘twin’ of the adjacent Christ Church Spitalfields. The symmetry that characterises Gilbert & George in their work, and their inseparable pairing, gave rise to the notion that the Institute could stand side by side with Christ Church with a similar volume.

Heavy Goods entrance

Administration

Ground floor plan +0 with surrounding urban design and connections to Gilbert and George’s Residence.

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[5-7] Critical Infrascapes | Laurence Flint As a society we have already shifted towards a culture that communicates on a constant basis. Phone calls, text messages, tweets, blog posts and chat rooms are an intrinsic part of our society - “We are in the age of the simultaneous, of juxtaposition, the near and far, the side by side and the scattered.” As communication possibilities become a global carpet of coverage ‘Critical Infrascapes’ proposes a new ideology for maintaining the last parts of privacy we have left, negating an ‘Orwellian’ surveillance state. The building provides an uneasy interface between the people and governmental surveillance, offering the ability for citizens to view personal files. Inspired by Edward Snowden and the NSA scandal the project creates a new sanctuary from the digital world; off-grid spaces,

spaces in which we can communicate freely without surveillance, spaces of complete privacy. Fundamental to the project is the concept of common ground, a space driven by your rights to do something, in this case the right to private conversation as well as political sanctuary and refuge for whistleblowers. Whilst offering a new privacy the building also proposes a new voice for the people, a platform for protest and space for broadcast. Ultimately the project asks questions about democratic communication and what architecture’s relationship with this might be area and the once prosperous

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[8-9] Pick 63 | Rebecca Floyd Having been established in the 18th century as the heart of London’s textile industry, Shoreditch is instead renowned today as the city’s digital epicentre. The proposed intervention unites the tactile values of the longstanding artistic communities with the intangible technologies of the ‘silicon roundabout’. Threads and wires entwine, using the power of projection to create a digital gallery which constantly evolves with the flow of visitors. [10-12] Urban Physic Garden | Lingdi Chen The Urban Physical Garden will be a part of urban landscape, which gives people a place to cure, relax and get close to the nature in the modern city. It also has practical value that people can get treatment by medical plants 070

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[13] Fabrica an Art Cooperativa | Kostantinos Fetsis The era we live in is characterized by unethical political approaches in the social structure and in the planning process of the urban environment. The lack of free gathering spaces, in modern world’s technocratic countries, apocalypses the lack of political consciousness. An organically developing community is being introduced, which can provide a shelter for nomad artists, who can design their own domestic environment and contribute to the organization with their knowledge and creativity. A self-managed organization which provides different functions such as cultivating spaces and workshops for the locals, in which people can contribute, cooperate and activate their own space.


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[14,16] The Haggerston Rail Pavilion | Krischan Pilch

[15,17] Light + | Chig Yiu Wong

Project 2 of Semester 1 consisted of designing a pavilion, constructed along the length of the Kingsland Viaduct, the North London Line of the London Overground. The Haggerston Pavilion, situated opposite Haggerston Ovrground Station, centres on collecting and collating information from passing trains; displaying tweets and statuses from passengers northbound and southbound and from the local area and analysing this information to find key terms and trends. This transient information is displayed within the pavilion by split flap displays, which have recently been removed from all railway stations in the UK. The use of this redundant, analogue technology displaying digital information creates an intriguing audial quality as each train passes and data floods the pavilion, flaps fluttering and clicking with the arrival of this flurry of new information.

The Light +, a light installation, was a continuous study from the project 2 in expanding the size of the lighting infrastructure into a light scape in a larger scale. The project was bouncing in between the fantasy and the reality that what is going to happening with a clean and self-sustainable lighting infrastructure and the existing situation in Shoreditch. A huge scale lighting device was designed to allow both the penetration of natural light and artificial light and modify both the indoor and outdoor lighting environment in the same time. The building was designed as a huge light installation or as a Lightscape to allow the circulation and movement in between shadow and light.


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[18-19] Breaking Pointe | Rebecca Floyd

[20-21] Allotment Communities | Chen Man

Since French silk weavers settled in Spitalfields in the late 18th century, the area has been renowned for its creative community. However, its rich artisanal heritage is at odds with the digital industries which now pervade the area.

London is a city of canals though this does not seem evident as say compared to the historical cities of Venice or Amsterdam. It is becoming increasingly evident that people are beginning to reinvent the uses of the London canal system with the number of households living in houseboats at a record high; it is becoming an increasingly common demographic. In a city where there is an 80 year wait for allotments it is likely that the canal-side infrastructure will quickly be considered, especially in those pockets of land near intersections neglected by the local authority. The design wishes to re-purpose those spaces, highlight the canal infrastructure, so often hidden behind high walls as well as be flexible for reconfiguration along the stretch of the pathway repopulating those neglected spaces

The scheme will re-engage the public with the world of the artisan, playing on the artistic and theatrical legacies of the Freed guild of Hackney pointe shoe makers. Their relationship to both dancers and the public is repositioned, whilst maintaining the intriguing mystery of their craft. Countering a landscape of increasingly ‘flattened’ perception, the factory presents itself as haptic theatre, where the tactile choreography of production is accompanied by the flow of dance.

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[22-23, 26] The Music Factory | Matthew Butler

[24,25] Dereliction: an Artist’s Perspective | Nicholas Salthouse

The building forms a central hub of activity for the underground music scene in Hackney. The conditions of the site - Kingsland Road to the east and Kingsland basin to the west (rear) - have called for the waterway along the canal (once a key means of distribution) to be revived, with the buildings location along the main road making music in the area more easily accessible.

Through this introductory project, I sought to unearth underlying cultural wealth rife within an otherwise dishevelled site littered with derelict buildings. Christiaan Nagel has been mapping derelict buildings in urban areas around the world with vibrant mushroom sculptures but has mainly focused his attention in East London because of this cultural richness. I was interested in the contrast between such dead spaces and the livelihood of the culture therein.

It aims to improve the social sustainability of the area through teaching, manufacture, music media and social events by bringing together young people from the area and local musicians. The Factory manufactures guitars for students at local schools, as well as high grade guitars to be sold to musicians. It builds on (“manufactures”) talent through the tuition of music, radio and guitar craftsmanship skills. 074

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[27] Urbam Farming | Man Lam | Y2

[28-29] Housing Project | Loic Delnatte | Y2

Urban farming is the theme of this project. This aim to introduce a collective communal green space and raise people’s attention towards food crisis through integrating an urban farm into the project. Programme is a driver for the design. It focuses on the transition between different space (farming, eating, rest). The design aims to blur the distinction between these “contrasting nature” spaces by provider various buffer zones.

The client for the housing project was to be refugees, more specifically flood victims. This is translated through my design through the material choice and certain features. The main idea behind my design was to make it “un-floodable” in a sense that in the future, whether a flood were to take place, or in the case that the sea level rises, my building would remain, and most importantly be occupied. [30] Affordable Housing | Calvin Lee | Y2

The vertical farms located at the south elevation provides act as a environmental barrier to the street. A drainage system was integrated into the vertical farm such to use the excess water from the roof farm to irrigate the crops. The dwellings have direct access to their crops such to facilitate the process of urban farming.

Modular housing as a means to solve the issues of affordability and mass population housing of 21st century working life in London. The cold steel frame structure allows flexibility of configuration, and adaption ready for future expansion. 075


warren mcfadden

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hybrids + high streets. sheffield. Working under the title/theme of Hybrids + High Streets, the unit our work was situated within the on-going debate surrounding the future of the Sheffield’s city centre’s retail quarter. Sheffield’s high streets have suffered from the combined recessionary malaise and online retail growth that prompted the government’s Portas Review, which also laid blame on the continuing attraction the out of town American mall experience. The latter in the case of Sheffield is Meadowhall creating a particularly acute regional retail condition that attracts those who live and work in city, even though the centre is more accessible.

We recognized that beyond the flat above the shop, high streets in their most successful iteration are programmatically diverse in their uses, which in turn encouraged us to delve into the world of hybrid buildings. We where interested in what constitutes hybrids and what values they can bring to encourage a vital sustaining high street. Taking a cue from Steven Holl we prioritized the dynamic section over the plan, acknowledging the quality of daylight as crucial to the success of cross-programmed architecture. This allowed us to further explore a recurring theme in the unit – the environmental and poetic qualities of light in architecture.

Picking up on this, Laura Mark writing in the Architect’s Journal in July 2013 describes Sheffield as being ‘locked in a drawn-out retail battle’, that’s “hampering” the necessary regeneration the centre craves to compete with the; “major retail offerings of the other two Northern big-hitters”, Manchester and Leeds. Mark’s article garnered the opinions from Sheffield’s great and good on what shape a sustainable urban strategy may take for the city’s retail core.

Unit 3b’s field trip was to Tenerife to study Herzog and de Mueron’s cross-programmed TEA as well as experiencing the light sculpted essays in concrete by Fernando Menis. Setting aside numerous visits to Sheffield other excursions throughout the year included the ‘art on the high street’, Walsall Art Gallery, Niall McLaughlin’s Bishop King Edward Chapel, the Soane Museum, Lincoln’s Collection Museum and Cathedral as well as Jonathan Hendry’s Great Coates Village Hall.

One view, that of the architect Simon Alford stood out as offering an alternate future not wholly dependent on retail. Alford advocated an urban centre full of the liveliness, the sort that sustains any city, suggesting programmes such as education, residential, leisure and even making are considered with alongside the more commonly found uses. Ultimately investigating how these programmes could translate successfully to highstreets was the key question that concerned the unit, and particularly Year 03 in their final project proposals.

Project 01 saw both year’s support each other in undertaking audio/video analysis of the city in a single day when the first of several visits to Sheffield began with an exclusive lecture on Park Hill from Urban Splash’s Mark Latham. This was followed by a city walk culminating in the Arts Tower, and specifically panoramas offered from the vantage point of the eighteenth floor where the Sheffield School of Architecture kindly shared their physical city model capturing the city in 1900. Year 02’s second, third and final projects combined over the course of

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the year towards developing a hybrid on a single site on Pinstone Street containing Happi housing, nursery, retail, village hall, market hall, public convenience and urban realm. Boutique and other Retail spaces - The Architecture of Seduction, [edited by David Vernet and Leontine de Wit], provided Year 03 with the staring point in Project 02 when they where asked to engage with Sheffield’s shoping streets by reimagining the 19c Laycock House with a cross-programmed boutique. In preparation for their final project brief writing and site selection Year 03 participated in Sheffield’s 2013 Urban Design Week’s, Castlegate Quarter Design Charrette; an intensive planning session where designers, developers and members of the public can come together in conjunction with University of Sheffield, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield Civic Trust and Sheffield Society of Architects. As mentioned above Year 03’s final project specifically responded to Alford’s view presenting students with the opportunity to major on either hybrids or high-streets, or both.

YEAR 3 Constantina Avraamides, Oliver Beddard, Stephanie Bott, Alexander Bramhill, Rebecca Chim, Matthew Cobb, Hannah Deacon, Christopher DeWeever, Samuel Garson, Stephan Humphrey-Gaskin, Daniel Maguire, Luke Moran, Callum Murphy, Daniela Salgado Silva, Christina Stavrou, Magdelena Steflova, Benjamin Tynegate, Orthodoxia Varnava YEAR 2 Oliver Cammell [mEg], Sally Lofthouse [mEng], Rafaela Sampaio Agapito Fern [mEng], Seyi Adeleku Matthew Austin, Matthew Chamberlain, Emily Danou, Stavros Georgiou, Anna Hadjimitsi, Charles Harris, Sofia Jassim, Michaela Li, Fathima Mohammed Hairu, Georgia Roberts, Olivia Thomas, Charles Waddington, Robert Marshall [mEng]. REGULAR CRITICS Russell D Light Rosamund Diamond Ellie Connolly Jonny Ballard VISITING CRITICS Mary Ann Steane Seth Rutt Laura Wardak Nic Crawley Adrian Fiend Aida Hoggard Ellen Page Carolyn Butterworth

Sam Diston Jessica Rowden Emily Temperton Eleanor Croxford Matthew Goodfellow

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[1-4] Matthew Cobb | The Sheffield Banking Company George Street, Sheffield, is home to former headquarters of the Sheffield Banking Company - Located down one of the many redundant city side streets, lies the beautiful, vacant, four story Georgian town house. The Bank was established in 1836, by the wealthy and industrious merchants, manufactures and traders of the time, for the purpose of keeping the wealth of this industry within the city centre. Since its liquidation in 1906, the building has been left to ruin & has never quite found its place within the city again. The project broadly attempted to address the role of the modern private bank, and its relationship with the highstreet - commenting on how Banks no longer give back to local communities, funnelling money away to distant, (and sometimes immoral) investments. By 078

reconnecting with the past narratives of the site, my intervention here aimed to re-establish the building as a place of social transaction, connecting the building back to the pedestrian & the highstreet. The private bank has been reinstated, and combined with a startup business accelerator - allowing the bank & its clients opportunity to invest in the local startup companies, that are showcased as assets to the side Bank.


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[5] Upcycling Furniture Boutique | Luke Moran

[6-10] The Moor Theatrical Production House | Benjamin Tynegate

In today’s society, stewardship of the environment is more prevalent that it has ever been before. Having said this, there is still a long way to go until sustainability is fully embraced let alone self-sufficiency achieved. A major issue as a result of the mass production boom in the early 1920’s in close collaboration with the development of capitalism is that today products can be made so cheaply that it is often cheaper to buy a new item then to source replacement parts and to repair. This results in an extortionate amount of waste; waste that maybe easily replaceable however is having catastrophic consequences on our natural resources and our environment.

The project is interested in making an architecture that celebrates all aspects of theatre production within a high street context; an everchanging shop window that both reveals and conceals all the intrinsic factors that communicate meaning and emotion as well as reflecting the mood, themes, location, style and atmosphere of any play. The Moor Theatrical Production House is a centralisation of the production factors associated with theatrical performance. The project will facilitate three rehearsal spaces, a public gallery celebrating Sheffield’s rich theatrical history, prop manufacturing workshops, costume workshops and set construction.


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[11] Conditions For Trade | Oliver Beddard Exploring the effects of closing a market trading institution, this project sought to create an architecture of display - celebrating the unique and exclusive goods Sheffield has to offer within a new market destination in the city centre. The ambition was to define the building as a new trade hub, active of an evening and ever changing throughout the year, guest accommodation provided in a small hotel business run by the traders themselves.

secluded courtyard within the city, the George Street site had a true quality of exclusivity and desirability. In order to extend this to the busy city centre, I introduced an arcade that bridged the gap between seclusion and footfall, creating a new High Street façade. Small stalls appear throughout the building allowing an exploration of Sheffield’s produce displayed in the walls and hung from the decorative moulded ceilings.

Contrasting the weight and visual density of the stone and brick of the existing listed architecture, I opted for timber to develop a very open structural system of Glu-lam columns and beams interspersed by CLT shelving that both facilitated the display of the market’s goods and also provided cross bracing for the primary structure. Set back in a rather 081


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[12-14] In Praise of Shadows | Alexander Bramhill 4% of women and 9% of men show signs of alcohol dependency in England. Named after an essay by Japanese author Jun’ichirō Tanizaki, In Praise of Shadows explores the subtlety of crafting light as discussed in the essay. The project explores the depth of Britain’s drinking problem in the form of an alcoholics recovery centre. The project sets to create a disconnection from the city, drawing heavily from monastic architecture throughout both design and ethos. Patients are first completely disconnected from the city, and as they recover, are slowly re-introduced to Sheffield though carefully considered views and windows. 082

In Praise of Shadows, however, is not merely a retreat for alcoholics. The project aims to redefine the highstreet, creating a social pillar to the community through the inclusion of both the retreat garden (which allow the public to escape from everyday life - if only for a few hours) and social help shops/charities. As out-of-town shopping centres draw out traditional trade, the project seizes an opportunity. It is not just a building, It is an ethic that should be considered for the required reimaging of the highstreet. A project that draws the community closer, breaking down social divides, and creating acceptance for those outcast from society.


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[15-16] Sustaining the Unsustainable | Luke Moran My ambition with this project is to integrate into society those vulnerable members of the community who do not have somewhere they can call ‘home’. Sustaining the Unsustainable requires an appreciation for the short term necessities of being homeless as well as the ultimate long term ambition of safety and peace of mind. This encompasses providing immediate relief in the form of shelter, nourishment, sanitation and healthcare. Addressing the long term needs involves access to counselling, education and development of skills for employment primarily through an urban allotment system in conjunction with the John Lewis cafe, all aimed towards achieving the most important goal; integration with society. Subsequent employment opportunities

are provided through my project 2 work, an upcycling furniture store opposite this site. Integration with society is critical so following on from project 1, I am attempting to further engage Sheffield with its beautiful context that is the Peak District by providing the city with an urban compromise. Rounding the project off is a commitment to a sustainable environment, a paradox upon the current view that the homeless are often seen as ‘parasites’ upon society; conversely it is societies responsibility. Allotments provide employment and reduce the miles of food consumed in the shelter and the John Lewis café. A heavy influence of urban greenery has excellent environmental benefits including biodiversity and natural solar shading.

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[17-18] Pinstone Street Upcycling Boutique | Stephanie Bott Project 2 took a theme of regenerating and reconnecting Sheffield’s city centre with its inhabitants which had suffered greatly since the development of the large out of town shopping centre, Meadowhall. This project therefore aimed to redefine the high-street creating a new purpose for the users of the city, in this case through an Upcycling Boutique located on Pinstone Street. Crafted beneath the Laycock House, the project looked carefully at old and new ideas of Boutiques, to create a more traditional arcade system. Here the project focused on the crafting of new from old as well as creating a rich and everchanging experience for the users, considering shop window displays carefully.

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This second project created a spark for the third project as I moved from the small scale of high-street windows to aiming to regenerate whole communities.


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[19-20, 22-26] Oniomaniac Boutique | Daniela Salgado-Silva

[21] Moor Fashion | Cristina Stavrou

With the principles of a 19th century Boutique, my intention was to create a shopping experience with the secret act of rehab. It is not to rehabilitate the addict of this issue, but force a mental intervention; allow the addict to question their problem. Qualities such as event, progression of the Victorian Boutique influence the process of the shopper’s journey. The retail design challenges the psyche through its play with attainability. A series of escapes provide continuations or exits for the addicts. These ‘escapes’ can filter the undiscovered infatuate from the average shopper. The higher they are in the design, the worse their addiction.

The ambition of Project 03 is to create a new High-Street Hybrid comprising a new home for the Sheffield Hallam University’s Fashion Design Course (BA), together a new home for the Crucible’s costume production facilities. Also the new high street hybrid will contain a small fashion museum and cafe that connects the high street to the private elements (Sheffield Hallam University + Crucible) of the programme.

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Sheffield Hallam University is under pressure because of the too many faculties in the Sheaf Building. So the Fashion Design Course (BA) will be moved to a more appropriate location which is The Moor street, one of the largest shopping area in Sheffield.

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spatial narratives. bristol. Working through critical observation, students in the unit are encouraged to design through drawing and making. Through the slower pace ‘of the hand’, there is always space to think, question and adapt. The unit works by interrogating present and particular conditions of the location. Readings on the city, Georges Perec and Louis Aragon in particular, are brought into the mix. We use Perec because of his forensic and microscopic observations and his disciplined way of writing and his ability to make the extraordinary, or as Perec calls it the ‘infraordinary’, out of the ordinary. Aragon lends us the tools of a voluptuous imagination. Perec, in particular, tells us that if we are not seeing anything interesting then we are not looking hard enough. Students are encouraged to find their own lines of interest and enquiries in order to develop architectural ideas through the year. These interests often start from social, cultural or political concerns. This year in particular we will focus on the readings informing the process; the process involved in observing, imagining, recording and studying by making and drawing. Working with real problems, Unit 4 tends to work in cities or towns in the UK, looking particularly at decay, left over spaces or the nondescript new developments common across the UK. We observe and comment in order to prod and provoke a discussion that might have a relevant outcome within those communities. To avoid the charge of imposition and being conscious of the brevity of the study, the propositions require both a seriousness in their intent and a slight ‘wink’ at something else. Project i Georges Perec classic novel, Life: A User’s Manual, describes a fictitious apartment block in Paris. We learn of the spaces within the different apart-

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ments through the description of the tenants and their histories. You are to thoroughly read the texts given and then reconstruct a new abstract ‘apartment’ based on the dimensional grid and exact position within the block given to you from the book. This is not an interior design project, instead you are to prioritise requirements and conditions and design a response. You are to conjure what you think your character is about by artefacts found or made. In addition you are concern yourself with key relationships only both within and without and key threshold opportunities. You are to work in groups of two or three in order to discuss ideas and help with ideas. The three individual boxes should be made in common materials and be consistent in their overall general appearance. However each of you should ultimately be responsible for one box (apartment) and its outcome and meanings. Each will therefore take a different apartment or space in the building to work with. Project ii Working through made-pieces, maquettes, models and sketches you will create a series of touch-stone pieces that explore various elements of your design. These will form the basis of a series of architectural drawings, starting with the section, that develop your design both spatially and speculatively – allowing you to experiment, test and develop an architectural vocabulary derived from your character, place and context. Project 2 sees the work becoming more grounded and architectural. At the end of the project you will „own‟ drawn and made pieces which will act as touchstones, to translate ideas into potentials which will remain to be realised in the writing of a Hybrid Brief and then by the design project in Semester 2.


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We will work with you to develop your proposals through a series of acts. Each „Act‟ must be taken forward with you to the next stage of the project and be clearly legible at each stage. These „Acts‟ will become a schemata. You are encouraged to establish additional individual schema that could be important to you. Project iii Your brief should be hybrid in nature. It should propose a function which can be read as real, achievable and practical and dovetail this with another purpose or function that may be less realistic, peculiar or fictitious in some way. The relationship may be obscure, meaningful, mysterious or downright funny, and may therefore provoke equally an unusual and enigmatic response. Guidance through tutorials will be given on this. The aim is to allow the particular enquiries already established to develop with the real potential to produce original and particular buildings that will be personal to you. There is more likelihood of achieving a final project of outstanding quality is this is rooted and developed from a year’s work of research and development.

YEAR 3 Steve Back, Roshni Bhudia, Leah Bingham, Laura Brain, Fletcher Cooper, Daniel Flemming, Christopher Halfacree, Francesca Harding, Safora Karimzada, Myungbum Kim, Kunal Koshal, Sou Leung, Ying Li, Andrei-Cristian Negrea, Pui Ng, Nelson Nip, Ivan Popov, Karim Rouabah, Barbara-Cristina Sandulescu, Katherine Scott, Eleanor Sillett, David Simmons, Phillip Sims, Shamiso Sithole, Hugh Stant, Chloe Thirkell, Amy Turner, Yui Wong, Eleanor Shelly [mEng], Rachel Wakelin [mEng] YEAR 2 Carlos De Felipe Pena [mEng], Madeleine Moore [mEng], Matheus Stolarski Mayer [mEng], Noora Al-Mulla, Cristina Carbajo, Wing Chan, Saskia Collins, Alice Dammery-Quigley, Stamatina Dimaraki, Timothy Fentem, Michael Field, Malika-Zaynah Grant, Olivia Hastings, Shijinh Hou, Katie Hutchinson, Karolina Kaminskaite, Min Kang, Belma Kapetanovic, Sheryl Lam, Pui Lin, Yue Man, Thomas Mclean, Stefan Mocanu, Alice Moxon, Josephine Reining, Shona Sivamohan, Natalie Smith, Toma Sova, Lucy Stone, Chiara Torregrossa, Martynas Vielavicius, Talia Yilmaz, Ruijing Zhang, Chen Wang REGULAR/GUEST CRITICS Mike Russum [Partner Birds Portchmout Russum Architects] Sam Critchlow Emma Brown Steve Parnell Chris Goodwin Hugh Avison [CPMG] Tony David [Hawkins Brown Architects] Margret Mulcahy 087


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[1,6] The Folly Structure | Andrei Negrea ‘I am walking down the Shingle Bank...It is exhausting, frustrating and monotonous. The pebbles under my feet make an unbearable sound. I am constantly looking for a landmark that would break the monotony... but it just goes on and on...Is this everything that is?’ Formulated as a personal response to the existing site conditions, the project begins to reveal layers of authenticity, through its elected function, present behind the monotonous mask of the site. The structure hosts a venue for poetry reading and folk singing. The main feature of the building is the long, solid wall, covered in a layer of wax, where everyone can leave messages, thoughts, poems and songs. Even if they are carved in the wax or just pinned up on pieces of 088

paper, the wall will become a mean of communicating the essence of the place, through the people that live there. Due to its subjective nature, the design becomes a silly attempt of expressing the authenticity of the place. There is no clear outcome, nor a certainty that the structure will generate a change in the way the site is perceived; thus the nature of the folly becomes apparent.


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[2-3] A Folly on the Shingle Bank | Roshni Bhudia

[4,5] The Folly of Remembrance | Hugh Stant

The priorities explored in project 1 informed the idea behind project 2; looking into layers and process as a starting point as well as the changing narrative of Cley I explored the layering and changing nature of the landscape as a way to inform the function for the folly. This change resulted in the formation of marshes which now allow for the growth of Samphire. Exposing an ancient tradition where this vegetables ashes were used in glass making, my folly came to accommodate the process of burning the Samphire, whilst the byproduct of smoke would be used in smoking fish.

The Folly of Remembrance is dedicated to those drowned in the 1953 Salthouse flood. Situated by the sea, on the shingle bank; it is a place for the people of Salthouse to come and contemplate on how their lives have changed since the flood, and to remember those who didn’t survive the event. The Folly is composed of a bronze envelope coated in a corrosive patina, and supported reinforced concrete. As the memories of the flood wither away, so too will the bronze of The Folly, leaving only the concrete skeleton as a meaningless landmark on the shingle bank.

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[7-11] Urban Vineyard: Ecologies of Value | Shamiso Sithole The formal parallels between the postmodern literature of Georges Perec and Architecture have in projects one and two informed a methodology of converting text to structural space by creating specific frame¬works. In project one, ‘Constructing the Architext’, a method was developed to analyse writ¬ten and spatial narratives and the structures which govern and activate both. Departing from literary analysis, this project looks at other systems of narrative calibration, taking information processed by a specific algorithm to determine universal architectural relationships. The Urban Vineyard is a celebration of the common cultures of wine and art which date back to the drinking parties of ancient the Greek symposia; a culture which prevailed through to the private gentlemen’s 092

clubs of the 18th and 19th centuries and the ubiquitous ‘café/bar’ of contemporary art institutions today. The scheme is also rooted in Bristol’s wine trading, industrial past, particularly in Redcliffe, the area in which the building is sited. It provides fresh opportunities for collaborative work to regenerate and re-brand a unique image for the Bristol Art scene, embracing consumerism in a climate where funding to the Arts is scarce.


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[11, 16-17] Halway Home | Katherine Scott

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For the servicepersons injured in action, life is never the same. Not only do they face the reality of coming back home after war, they must contend with adapting to a new way of using their bodies and prosthesis.

to ordered spaces, the building seeks to contain a heterotopic view of the urban condition of today, while the very deliberate public/private relationships enable a halfway point between a traditional home and a barracks.

This scheme deals with this as a starting point: providing a retraining through narrowboat building. Narrowboats offer a mobile lifestyle, a heterotopic home. Through the craft of building boats, with a public interface by means of the GongoozlersĂ­ Rest Pub (To Gongoozle: the act of watching narrowboats, akin to train spotting), there is an opportunity for the transition home to be eased for these people. The scheme is residential in the short term, but provides an opportunity to construct a life as part of the boating community. Through chaotic

Through the theme of prosthetics, the scheme has been developed to act as a solution for a site that could be described as ill. StelarcĂ­s prosthetics and Rebecca HornĂ­s sculptures acted as a starting point for this idea.


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[12-15] Just a Pinch of Salt | Eleanor Sillett

[16-17] Insomiacs of a Lunar City | Francesca Harding

‘Just a Pinch of Salt’ is sited in Cley Next the Sea, Norfolk. It is the design of a folly whose single purpose is to produce small amounts of salt for the user of the folly to put on his dinner. The condiment is mechanically produced through the medieval process of extracting salt from halophytic plants located in the surrounding marshlands and is controlled by local climatic conditions.

Each organism stands as a permeable structure, responsive and reliant upon the rhythms of the cosmos. This relationship is inescapable. I aim, through architecture, to draw attention to this perpetual bondaccentuating the inescapabilty of our own governing circadian rhythms, the importance of which has become neglected in our 24 hour, fast-paced, modern day world. When circadian rhythms are ignored and neglected, our sleeping patterns quickly reflect this. Therefore, by drawing attention to one’s biological and physical behaviour I aim to tackle sleep disorders through my ‘Insomniacs Retreat’. In order to emphasise the inevitability of one’s own rhythms, I shall draw parallels between circadian and tidal oscillations. This would reconnect the city of Bristol, not only with a healthy sleep culture, but

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[18] Synopsis of the Soap Factory | Hugh Stant with the similarly evaded and depreciated tidal rhythms of the Avon. In a sense I shall be recalibrating the city dweller’s own internal body clock by accentuating and utilising the rhythms of the Atlantic Ocean. I propose to relocate the sleep studies department of the late Redcliffe Hospital onto Bathurst Basin lock, spreading along the tidal Avon’s banks. This would form a retreat and research facility for inner city Bristolians suffering from sleep disorders. Based upon the threshold between the work place and working class housing to the south, the retreat locality faces the same inconveniences posed in the patient’s every-day inner city home.

Situated in the Temple Meads Business district, The Soap Sanctuary is a retreat where the working people of Bristol can escape the incessant demand of productivity and purpose of the modern age in which work has become the crux of life. Staying for 5 days (a working week), visitors are detached from External Rationalised Life; from man’s struggle to find purpose and be unflinchingly productive, and they are immersed in Internal Absurdity. Ritualistic processes with no intrinsic meaning are undertaken in the unending cycle of making and using soap, which ties to Bristol’s manufacturing history and ideas of cleansing.

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[19,22] G.R.I.T. Co-op | Nelson Nip

[20-21] Winnowing the Cocoa Alley | Kunal Koshal

Gain, Restart, Integrate, Therapy Homelessness is a dilemma that affects millions of people world-wide with a depressing rise. Nations have to face their own homelessness issue and have their own reaction towards it. I chose to work with homelessness youth in Bristol in response to the number of youth recorded without a home in the city of Bristol. Instead of living out on the street, living rough, visiting night shelters, these homelessness youth are in hostels or temporary accommodation or “sofa surfing”. The primary causes of homelessness among youth are family conflict or severe economic hardship. Some homeless young people have run away from homes where they were the victims of physical, sexual or emotional abuse.

The networks of alleyways in Bristol’s fabric need reviving in order to prevent them being uninhabited and forgotten. A parallel and forgotten pulse in Bristol’s history is the craft of making chocolate. This craft was lost over time and recently one of the last chocolate making factories in Bristol was shut down. [25] The Progressive Journey to Ascent | Leah Bingham The Progressive Journey to Ascent aims to reconnect the people of Bristol with recycling, natural resources and green schemes taking place within the city that are a part of Bristol’s Green City status. The hot air balloon is a mechanism for addressing these ideas within Bristol due to their heritage in the city.


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In the country of last things. nottingham. “Once a thing is gone, that is the end of it.” In the Country of Last Things, Paul Auster IN THE COUNTRY OF LAST THINGS In Auster’s book In the Country of Last Things, the author deeply studies the disappearance of manufactured objects and technology from the story’s post-apocalyptic context, and the characters deal with both the fading of memories of them and the words used to describe them. In Unit 5A we will study the idea of building that develops from a critical reading of material and meaning, architecture and participation, consider the fit within the urban fabric, the spaces in between, and the language and resolution of materiality in Project 3. We will teach technique and enable your creativity. Taking each text in turn and beginning with the first book of The New York trilogy, City of Glass, we will study, map and hypothesise our collective, and our individual readings of the city and its people, its life and meaning for people. Specifically, we will study the perception and the life of architecture; how do we as architects enable social cohesion, define territories, and integrate people and the built environment? How do we appropriate structure and material, and how do we generate meaningful definitions for such adaptive work? In City of Glass, Daniel Quinn challenges us to invent a programme for these found, or reclaimed structures and materials, “Because it can no longer perform its function, the umbrella has ceased to be an umbrella. . . . The word, however, has remained the same. Therefore, it can no longer express the thing. It is imprecise; it is false; it hides the thing that it is supposed to reveal.”

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The overarching themes of the studio for the year’s work will be of participation and contribution in the public realm, and you will be challenged to read the urban environment, make archival representations of urban experience and perception, test sustainable principles at community level, and to propose designs enabling community cohesion. During the Spring Semester you will develop a deep, rigorous, critically considered design project. Individual projects will be based on preceding investigative work, and apply techniques learnt from emergent industries, practises of appropriating structures and technology to form part of a cohesive hypothesis for the city. Project i In the City of Glass, Paul Auster’s detective, Quinn poses the architect a question when says “A pencil is for writing, a shoe is for wearing, a car is for driving. Now, my question is this. What happens when a thing no longer performs its function? Is it still the thing, or has it become something else?” This first project requires you to curate an exhibition, The City of Collective Memory, as a collaborative studio unit representing the urban experience and perception of Nottingham, to collect, design and produce a small representational exhibition. As a group you must write this story, and in so doing you will formulate a position in regard to the City of Nottingham, a position or more explicitly a representation of its history, culture, social aspects and the materiality of the place which will inform later design work. It will come to represent an archive of your action in mapping the city itself, and tell stories of discovery, compassion, frustration, hope and vision.


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Project ii The City of Glass: To define a small, district-scale masterplan, and test culturally and socially sustainable principles (eg Cradle 2 Cradle manufacturing), enabling urban cohesion. In groups you will research and develop a cohesive balance and mix of function in an outline plan for a quarter of the City of Nottingham.

YEAR 3 Joshua Bull, Shaun Davey, David Edward, Dominic Eley, Samuel Homer, Nicholas Keen, Punit Modha, Luke Nichols, Benjamin Oakley, Emily Philips, Amye Stead, Rosie Colver [mEng], Michael Gibbs [mEng], Daniel Hawkins [mEng], Portia Heley [mEng], Yasmin Nally [mEng], Rory Wood [mEng].

Project iii In Project 3 you will connect the theory of design to its practice; we will engage in the author of Demystifying the Visual, Kathryn Moore’s “rigorous debate about the artistic, conceptual, and cultural significance of the way things look” as you translate the Idea of Building into a Comprehensive Design Project and a detailed architectural proposal.

YEAR 2 Samuel Chai [mEng], Sirage Saudi Ibreek [mEng], Pui Chan, Zhenzi Chen, Tao Dong, Chin Ee, Kerry Fox, Themba Fraser, Yitao Ge, Fiona Grieve, James Price, Coling Smith, Matthew St Leger, Xianming Yang, Alice Jones [mEng], Peter Macnaughton.

The proposition for your work has been stated in your Individual Brief. The Semester’s interim reviews, will be thematically linked to specific requirements of the Comprehensive Design Project to support the development of your work and final submission.

REGULAR CRITICS Lydia Boylan Louise Mansfield [Allies and Morrison] Stephan Workman [Scott Brownrigg] VISITING CRITICS Collyn Ahart Mark Baker [Paul Brookes Architects] Henry Luker [Foreman Roberts]

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[1-2] Portia Heley | Sneinton Microalgae Biorefinery Just North of Nottingham’s railway station is a thirty four acre site known locally as ‘the Island’, presumably this name stems from the site having once been squeezed between two arms of the Nottingham Canal System. Over the years the Island has been witness to legions of urban uses, and sadly the social cost of abuse and misuse of the built environment has left the Island in a state of abandonment and waste. This project required students to produce a series of drawings illustrating character and urban experience, and a sectional model demonstating the theoretical possibility of the section to communicate massing and materiality. The Pars Pro Toto project focuses on a single building within the masterplan. This focal project is a proposal for a microalgae research and monitoring facility in Sneinton, its primary 102

function is to research the field of algaculture in order to satisfy the need for renewable fuels, but also intends to become an integral part of the identity of the site. It will live symbiotically within the environment, driving the image of sustainable living, and educating visitors in architecture, science, and art.


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[3-7] Canal Farm | Nicholas Keen The master plan questioned whether Nottingham could sustain itself and start to own up to its own responsibility in terms of waste and whats happens to it. The solution came about from dissecting the proportions of Nottingham’s waste, splitting these into separate streams and processing them accordingly. This was done while also integrating the public into the process. Placing residential areas, workshops, and shops within the master plan hoped to bring the public back to this city quarter with the help of integrated bridges seamlessly continuing the master plan into the surrounding urban fabric. In this project I have zoomed in to how Nottingham can be responsible for it own waste and focused on a particular stream - this being organic waste, as it made up one of the biggest proportions of waste. 104

Canal Farm takes organic waste and, using a process including worm composting and aquaponics, turns it into food produce. The building sits within Nottingham by echoing Victorian warehouses. It also uses its subterranean levels to reflect Nottingham’s large population of caves, taking the public on a journey parallel to the waste.


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[6-10] Portia Heley | Sneinton Microalgae Biorefinery This proposal provides Nottingham with a microalgae research and monitoring facility. Its primary function is to research the field of algaculture in order to satisfy the need for renewable fuels, however it also seeks to retain the industrial heritage of the site as a symbol of urban culture and history. For the people it provides an iconic landmark for the area, an alternative fuel to fossil fuels, and alerts the public to the importance of respecting their environment. For the environment, the building consumes tonnes of carbon dioxide and expels tonnes of oxygen into the Nottingham area.

energy. Phase two, which could be implemented at a later stage will provide more than one hundred percent of the required energy. The building aims to mean as much to the environment as it does to the humans that admire and make use of it. It hopes to highlight the importance of a sustainable and well managed environment for future generations.

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ETFE set wthin metal frame, this runs down the spine of the buildings providing adequate light throughout.

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Wire rope forms the basis of the tesile sysem which supports the roof structure.

Purlins run the length of the roof to provide a surface for the tensile material to follow.

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Steel Upright arms take the immediate load which is then transfered through the structural system.

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Steel pegs slots between the arms. The wire rope passes through thispeg via a whole in the center which then allows the rope to change direction.

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The large Glulam beams sail over the pool hall effortlessly due to the external support structure.

Steel column 210mm x 530mm at 7m intervals provides structural system for the wall.

Steel connector Plate (Glulam to concrete) this also provides the hinge mechanism for the steel arms.

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Steel column at 7m intervals provides structural system for the wall.

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9 Lateral steel supports have been slotted between the large concrete elements to ensure they remain upright.

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1mx1mx1m Gabions are able to be slotted into place.

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Reinforced concrete columns carry the total load ofthe roof.

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[11-12,15] The Island Botanical Research Institute | Rory Wood

[13-14] Nottingham’s Riverside Olympic Pool | Joshua Bull

The research institute builds upon the Pars Pro Toto work established in project two and aims to further research into the symbiotic relationship between a bee orchid native to the site and a mycorrhizal fungi which helps it to produce glucose without light. The scheme looks to develop the concept of artificial photosynthesis through biomimicry of this plant and also how we may some day produce a transportable fuel without light. Tests are carried out on site on two test rigs, the “mechanical palm” and the “porous sphere”.

The project first established its roots within a masterplan proposal for the British Waterways site which lies to the east of Nottingham’s City Center. A site dominated by old and services industries appeared to have so much potential being adjacent to the River Trent therefore we proposed establishing a community here whilst also helping to reinvigorate Nottingham’s Riverside. A key area of interest for me was promoting healthier communities and how in turn these benefit the city as a whole whether it be via wellbeing or reduced loads on the transport network due to people cycling/ walking more.

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Steel Base plate to attach the columns to the ground.

My research deduced that one of the most popular physical activities in the UK was swimming and that the City of Nottingham was already considering proposals for an Olympic Pool elsewhere.

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Main and Training Pool

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Diving Pool


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[16-17] Culinary School | David Edward

[19-20] Analogue Photography Centre | Shaun Davey

Sneinton Culinary School is set in Nottingham’s Creative Quarter. The dilapidated James Alexander Building and attached warehouses will be converted into an allotment, reconnecting urban people with food production.

Analogue Photography is currently at a very volatile stage of its popularity and as such the building has the potential to contract and expand with it. The building has a hierarchy of three spaces and components. Firstly, there is the short lifespan, replaceable spaces which are specific to the cradle to cradle process I have proposed: therefore spaces to process the wheat and water, the facade and the plant room are some of these elements.

[18] Incinerator Road Exhibition | Emily Phillips The Incinerator Road site is a disturbing illustration of the reality as to what truly happens to our ‘waste’, and the lack of discernment in what is disposed of and how. The initial ethos of our group masterplan was centred on the intent to transform the area into a sustainable site that will promote the concept of efficient and responsible waste disposal. 108


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farida makki

daniel marmot

mike reade

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brink territories. lincolnshire. This year we are interested in BRINK territories specifically those located along the Lincolnshire Coast. We are drawn to 2 fragile qualities: The first describes the ‘the bread basket of England’ signifying the best of efficiency, commerciality and pure practical technicality, the now lost ‘romantic’ world of ‘jobs for all’ in agricultural communities. The second is the ever changing sea edge unpredictable, seasonal, always diminishing. Here every society is served seasonally from the rush of a touristic summer, harvest time to the dearth of winter. It’s a feast or starve existance with no long term plans. These 2 qualities couldn’t be more different yet both are seemingly not embracing the future, they are quite literally on the brink. AND yet this coastal place is a favourite spot for some to earn a quick buck, taste their first sea air, or embed for a 3rd age. The Lincolnshire Coast Region is part of a historic county in the east of England. We will be studying the coastal region and communities ranging from shores facing Spurn Bight to Gibraltar Point and bounded to the west by Louth. This unit will analyse coastal and agricultural people, place and landscape, discover lost meanings and find hidden gems in order to re-visualise a promising highly individual completely contextual future scene and will be the site of projects 1-3 under the following studio methodology; I Sampling + Storage: Each student will develop a personal sampling method which allows the documentation and recording of the BRINK conditions. This will include documenting geological, historical, climatic, mystical data to understand what has made these lands at this point in time. The sample information will be stored categorised and visible. II _Tissue Tests: Students will select and study in detail specific tissues

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[typological + behavioural] that are unique to THAT place and from OTHER places. What has made that specific ‘type’ what it is? What are the effects of its inherited use pattern and locality? What has externally influenced its current form? III_ Fertilizer: The sample and tissue study will allow the students to test new programmatic typologies enabling predictions for a future history, geology, physical and climatic fingerprint. IV _Application: The fertilizer tests will indicate potential successful applications. The unit will develop structures with intimate socioeconomic and cultural relationships, robust contextual form, and detailed programme + future specifics for a selected BRINK territory. V_ Collate: Each student will precisely document all pertinent enquiry, reflection, development + proposals in a working journal @A3. The journal is an ever-present illustrative reflective journey. Project i Multivision: Students will develop a rapid multiview illustrative methodology to enable expression of their observations [personal, time, distance, topography, geological, light, elements, history] and extend them into a future ‘WHAT IF?’ strategic Multivision proposal for those areas that bind and reside within the Lincolnshire Coast. Project ii The student will now work to develop a micro detailed study for a _resolution_ an entity with a specific problem solving purpose on a personally


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selected site with reference to either; Agriculture or Maritime with particular focus to their seasonal requirements. Continuing [from Project 1], the student will select a site and study its temporal dynamics, its seasonal role in society and its needs for support structures. The HUSK structure can be adaptable, must be seasonal and can be either lightweight or robust in nature. The HUSK taps into KEY moments.. The structure can be dispersible and must be responsive. This is a 3 dimensional structure for human use in key conditions. Project iii The student will now work to develop a macro detailed programmatic study to address a specific personally selected issue within the brink territories. The programme will seek to create new enduring typologies embracing seasonal and|or demographic change. The building will be regionally and contextually appropriate, relating to the specific place and people and become part of a future proof solution. By thinking of the building as a germinator students are encouraged to think in detail about the programme intention, the final design and its ambition, a germinator provides the correct conditions for something to survive and succeed. A building is not only a shell but a detailed experience of space light and events, suitably scaled, highly detailed with an intimate understanding of the sense of place.

YEAR 3 Lewis Baker, Laura Brett, Sally Downey, Lydia Gibbs, Sophie Jordan, Carolyn Kirschner, Ben Mitchell, Annabel Prentice, Tahima Rahma, Oliver Reynolds, Jacob Stapleton, Henry Svendsen, Mai Ta, Esha Thaper, Emma Warbrick, Hiu-Yue [Matthew] Yip, Alexander Chapman [mEng], Alla Elmahadi [mEng], Askshey Shah [mEng]. YEAR 2 Kate Hosking [mEng], Grace Thompson [mEng], Jasmitha Arvind, Rhiarna Dhaliwal, Andrew Edwards, Siyao Huang, Chun Lam, Yichong Li, Philip Mosscrop, Christiana Torto, Zhe Xu, Vaishnavi Greevarajah, Hana Barnes [mEng], Maximilian Lewis [mEng]. REGULAR CRITICS Fiona Herror Lois Plaistow Jo Fairfax VISITING CRITICS Tom Partridge Luke Royffe Matthew Powell Alexander Turner

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[1-5] Plastic Design Guild | Matthew Yip

[6-11] Brookenby Gardens | Henry Svendsen

Increasing beach litter is threatening the health and safety of beaches for humans and wildlife. The greatest amount of rubbish found are plastics, almost all of which are recyclable, but only 24% are currently being recycled.

Far from the institutionalised environment of a hospital care home, dementia sufferers can live within a hyper-real environment, under the premise that this is an idyllic Lincolnshire Village. However, due to the one-to-one carer to patient ratio, there is a constant support system within the enclosure, creating a protective environment that inhibits the symptoms of the illness. Various holistic therapies such as Scototherapy, Reminiscence therapy and Haptic Architecture are in built within the architecture.

With advancing technologies, waste materials such as plastic bottles, discarded fishing nets and plastic particles can be transformed back into useful materials such as polyester and nylon to be used in the fashion, textiles and manufacturing industry. The programme features a regeneration process that will see the cycle of plastic bottles being transformed into a garment through the depolymerisation and repolymerisation process into useful threads subsequently used within the design studios. 112

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[12] Grimsby Crown Mill | Alexander Chapman The proposal will be key to engineering two reciprocal cycles, to form a closed loop, where the pollution from the water will be able to feed the blue mussels. And because blue mussel farming is too expensive solely for the filtration of water, will be then fed to chicken stock as a protein rich diet. The poultry will then lay protein rich eggs which would be used in the production of a albumen paper, once one of the largest industries in Grimsby. This methodology follows on from the use of a medium to filter out the agricultural waste in Project 2 (Dispersal Husk), whilst also building on that a new program that encompasses activity to create a new agroaqua ecology, a greater understanding between the agriculture and its consequences. Similar to the ‘Cardboard to Caviar’ precedent in which 114

at every stage, perceived waste, in this case, agricultural pollution, was being exploited as a opportunity which would feed another cycle, adding value at every stage. The process effectively combats the agricultural and human waste in the water which is currently leading to a state of ecological deadzoning in the north sea through the increased algae blooms. An agro-aqua ecology is formed between the landscape and sea, linking Lincolnshire, a predominantly agricultural based county with the ports of Grimsby whilst also dealing with the consequences the pollutants.


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[13] - The Cities of the Hansa league -

[14] - The Reconditioned Cultural Dock -

“The League’s creation reflected the weakness of medieval governments and the divergent interests of city dwellers and the feudal overlords with whom they were often in conflict.”

The cultural dock which once flourished in the golden age, will be re-mapped to introduce life back to the dockland, the residents, the tourists and the heritage.

Boston earnt its plaque for the strong front in the wool trade, which was largely due to their woad dye within the wool. Woad was highly sort after, showing wealth, heritage, and quality represented within the deep blue.

Infusing colour through the river which runs the entirety of Boston, will allow for a redevelopment of public space, cultural life, and hope.

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[13-14, 19-21] The Woad Guild | Mai Ta

[2] Fertility Retreat | Carolyn Kirschner

The germinator project, “The Woad Guild” is centred around the preservation and revitalisation of the an- cient ink production within the disappearing dockland culture in the face of rising sea levels. The site focus for the project is Boston, a town under constant threat from flooding, while battling with constant coastal problems being situated in the Brink territories. “Coastal communities are among one of the least well understood of Britain’s locality’s.”

Project 3 is a fertility retreat by the seaside in Skegness, for infertile couples facing the daunting process of in-vitro fertilization. The IVF procedure is emotionally draining with a relatively low success rate, which can be greatly increased by providing stress relief and a fertility diet. As fertility clinics only address the medical procedure, the Skegness fertility retreat makes use of the Lincolnshire landscape to address these factors and thereby enhance fertility to such an extent that IVF is either no longer necessary or carries a much greater success rate.

The intent of the project is to create an Architecture, which encases and protects the heritage of Boston’s traditional ink production while embracing the trading route of the river; spreading colour back into Boston’s culture. 116

Skegness was once a popular destination in Victorian times, as the construction of the railway allowed for easier travels, and a general interest in health tourism persisted.


- The Woad Guild The preservation and revitalisation of ancient ink production, within the disappearing dockland culture, in the face of rising sea levels

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- Dying yarn -

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[22-25] Dispersal Husk | Tahima Rahman A pocket in the depths of a quarry opens a door to a site of special scientific interest; ecological Narnia. The neglected specific site is home to rare species with need for encouragement and celebration. The building role will be to provide access to the quarry from the top to the base; exploration on foot only. Functions of the building will be for studying and viewing.

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[26-29] Grey Seal Rescue Centre | Ben Mitchell

[30,37] The Hospital[ity] Project | Emma Warbrick

The project acts as a response to the recently large numbers of seal pup fatalities along the Lincolnshire coast, and to the rapidly growing grey seal colony at Donna Nook. The rescue centre is a place where seals can be treated and rehabilitated before release. It also acts as an educational facility for visitors to learn about Lincolnshire wildlife and the seal rehabilitation process.

The objective of this intervention is to address the growing disparity between designing healthcare architecture for machines and for the patient: celebrating the Lincolnshire coasts’ history of convalescence homes and the ‘healing’ properties of being at the seaside. The scheme aspires to create a unique building typology that engages with an aging population, youth migration and unpaid care peculiar to Skegness whilst domesticating the medical experience for patients and families, focussing on end-of-life care and organ transplantation. The centre will adhere to the rigours of functionality with a prevailing focus upon experiential and phenomenological design that improves the resident’s wellbeing.

The building is set within the dunes of the site, opening out towards the Saltmarsh where the seal colony hauls out. A series of lightwell towers have been designed to create a comfortable environment in the underground spaces. A rubber skin has been pulled around the externally exposed elements of the building reflecting the thick waterproof skin of seals. 118

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The spaces within the centre vary dramatically; catering for the critically


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[31-33] The Street Performers Guildhall | Oliver Reynolds ill, grieving families and the supporting medical staff. The scheme revolutionises the current UK transplant system with an ‘inclusive’ ethic that unites the donors and recipients consistent with the desires expressed by previous patients and rekindles Skegness’s health tourism, bringing an influx of prosperity to the area. Materiality and structure are to be inspired by the vernacular housing of east Lincolnshire: mud and stud, modernised to be relevant to 21st century medicine but still retaining the domestic language of previous generations. The building will mediate between the raw nature of the coastline and the tamed residential land

My Final project focuses on street performance as a regenerative activity for Skegness, to echo the art-based flag ship projects commonly used to kick-start regenerative schemes across the UK, and utilizing Skegness’ existing reputation for public performance festivals and events. By creating a space for street performers, where they can live for short periods, learn to perform, and also perform for the public, my scheme aims to make Skegness a permanent home for street performance, encouraging a larger tourist influx during the less popular months. The space not only provides a performance hub on the coast of Skegness, but provides infrastructure which acts to extend the number of skills which may be practiced by street performers. 119


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[34-36] The Flaxworks | Sally Downey The Flaxworks is a proposed programme based in Saltfleet village, East Lincolnshire for an entrepreneurial and ecological business to introduce new opportunities into a both rural and coastal setting utilising factors that naturally occur within the region – agriculture, water and nature reserves. There is an increasing amount of knowledge held on creating skinon-frame kayaks and canoes from renewable materials such as flax utilising its fibre and natural oils to create cloth and bio resin. The farming of flax on an unused plot of land and the placement of the business on a waterway that is no longer utilised by bigger vessels and trade due to excessive silt build-up offers a new and exciting profitable income. 120

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[38-41] Submarina Campus | Andrew Edwards | Y2 Submarina Campus outlines a proposal for a new educational typology nested within the Grimsby Royal Docks: a center for the teaching of submarine manufacture to young apprentices. The scheme addresses themes of gentrification, regeneration and education. Grimsby is a town in decline. The diminishing primary and secondary sectors have generated a fragmented landscape of disuse, into which the encroach of harsh environmental forces has moulded the territory. The site sits between commercial docks and an inlet to the North Sea. A disused lock is the only signal of the sites rich history as a graving dock for military boats and submarines.

The project incorporates public and institutionalised learning strategies: A museum wing is open to visitors and overlooks a workshop accessible to apprentices. This wing explores narratives of submersion through its tectonic composition. The duality of water types is utilised to enforce this narrative, and allows submarines to pass through the scheme when needed (for maintenance or display). Nearby Sea Forts complete the narrative loop, serving as submarine tour destinations for visitors. Access to the scheme is restricted by stringent dock access policy. A disused railway has been regenerated as a tourist shuttle between Grimsby Train Station and the scheme, for both visitors and students.

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PART II

“MArch Architecture (ARB/RIBAPartII)[K10I], DesignMArch,Environmental DesignMArch,Sustainable TallBuildingsMArch,Digital ArchitectureandTectonics MArch,TheoryandDesign MArch,SustainableUrban Design MArch.”


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Introduction to MArch Architecture (ARB/ RIBA Part 2) Dr Katharina Borsi The two-year MArch Architecture (ARB/ RIBA Part 2) programme focuses on design research at an advanced level. It combines the delivery of technical, intellectual and design skills with architectural experimentation and creativity. In the first year of the programme, Year 5, students have a choice of design studios, which are supported by modules in the humanities, technology and professional practice. In the first semester, design studios are shared with specialist masters programmes. The second semester focuses on the resolution of a complex building that integrates technology and professional studies. In the second year of the programme, Year 6, students pursue their individual research agendas through a yearlong thesis in the framework of a design research studio. These provide an intellectual framework for architectural experimentation and critical reflection. The themes of the individual studios offer an initial impetus to the student’s individual design thesis. Students refine their research skills and develop proposals into comprehensive design portfolios reflecting the year’s endeavors. In so doing, students begin to define their individual architectural ethos and declare the individual academic agendas that will carry them into their future professional careers. Introduction to MArch Postgraduate Courses Dr Wang Qi In Nottingham the MArch courses reflects a real spectrum of the scope of contemporary architectural design. Being defined as six different specialist approaches - Design, Theory and Design, Sustainable Tall Building, Sustainable Urban Design, Environmental Design, and Digital Architecture and Tectonics - students work either individually or in small group to challenge combinations of various design skills, built environmental analysis methods, philosophy and theories, and advanced digital tools. The MArch courses are one-year taught postgraduate programmes and the degree is widely recognized as academic Master degree in most of the countries and regions.

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Year Five, Semester 1

Year Five, Semester 2

John Morgan SUB: sustainable urban building Studio

Unit 1 John Morgan civic hub

Dr Philip Oldfield David Nicolson Cole TALL Buildings: (MArch) tianjin tall building issues

Unit 2 Dr Jonathan Hale Dance space

Dr Laura Hanks Dr Wang Qi Exhibiting the Past Feathered dinosaurs in wollaton hall and portal of south Kensington

John Chilton Paolo Beccarelli Digital architecture: SPACE ENCLOSURE studio

Professor Tim Heath Dr Amy Tang Mike Taylor Urban design reconfiguring the city Professor Brian Ford Benson Lau Environmental design school design and the learning environment Dr Chantelle Niblock Tom Bennett Digital architecture bennerley viaduct project

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Specialist masters

David Nicolson Cole TALL BUILDINGS: advanced tall buildings Dr Lucelia Rodrigues ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN: sustainability and resilience through design: the regeneration of the bakewell road Dr Wang Qi Dr Laura Hanks building projectthe revitalization of bashan reservoir Dr Yan Zhu urban design project infusing the city


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SUB STUDIO Y5-S1 MARCH

MArch (ARB/RIBA PT II) Nasser Al Amri, James Bishop, Foteini Chachali, Toby Gilding, Christina Grigoropoulou, Daniel Hodson, Maria Mitsinga, Nicola Wildman, Jamie Brown, Jose Andre MArch (Design) Zhiqi Ding, Xu Li, Yuan Wu, Wanzhuo Zhang REGULAR CRITICS Adrew Cross Gordon Reavley Chris McCurtin Neal Tanna VISITING CRITICS Guvenc Topcuoglu [ucl] Matther Stratford [Ward Cole] Andrew Rowson [Haworth Tompkins] Jeongho Son [JHP Design] Philip Hayes [Philip Hayes Architects]

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[1,2] Hackney Road Estate | Jamie Brown Hackney Lane Estate reaches out to the wider site with two axial routes slicing through the stepped and varied programme of the scheme. Appropriate street edge conditions were created to the south, east and west opening up northern side for public parkland and canal side promenade. The main driver was the creation of a layered garden estate responding to the public, communal and private needs of the residents. Along with the public park for the city, each block benefits from their own raised communal garden creating a real sense of local identity. Residents could also retreat to their own private garden terraces cutting into, and stepping the southern facade creating brighter and more delightful individual units.

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[3,4,7] Urban Density | Toby Gilding This project was an exploration into the issues faced by the increasing demand for low rent housing in dense urban areas. I investigated Alexandra Road housing estate in London; a 1970’s brutalist housing estate which still remains a controversial project showcasing relatively low rise development with a high density, whilst trying to provide a comfortable space in which to live. Through analysis and testing of the projects key ‘rules’ and components, namely scale, mass, circulation, thresholds and public space, I extracted the key parts of the project which I felt could be improved upon in a modern proposal. The resultant project provides a higher overall site density whilst maintaining privacy, daylighting and private entrances as well as reducing the inhuman scale and providing pleasant public space which becomes part of the daily life rather than a separate space. 131


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[9] Smart Density | Maria Mitsinga Continuous investigation, analysis, mapping, critique, testing, manipulation and finally application; a series of sketches, diagrams and models; questions on density and new architecture that responds to the scales of the City – Block – Dwelling. From Celosia; the permeable block, to the Lego; a series of different pieces coming together. A series of different pieces that expand on the site towards the boundaries, based on their own system of growth. They become reassembled and rearranged to allow for sunlight penetration, circulation, terraces, open spaces and courtyards; creating a miniature city itself within the urban form of the city.

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[9-12] XXX | James Bishop The design of the accommodation sought to address the many concentrates found in developer lead housing. Critical was improving each residents quality of life, by looking in detail at the design of an existing deck access housing scheme found on the site. The main focusing strategy was to improve the individual and group involvement within the community on the site as well as it’s borders within the wider city.

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Dr. Philip Oldfield

David Nicholson-Cole

Dr Yan Zhu

Y5-S1 MArch TALL buildings

Tall Buildings – Climate, Culture, Context. Rotterdam, Singapore and Tianjin. The 21st Century has seen an unprecedented growth in the construction of tall buildings, with more, and taller, skyscrapers being built than at any other time in history. At the same time population growth and urbanisation are creating nearly 200,000 new city dwellers every day with the world’s urban population set to almost double to 6 billion by 2050. The question is where will these people live, work, play? Can the tall building play a role in accommodating this dramatic growth in compact sustainable cities, or is the typology destined to be typified by the air-conditioned, mono-cultural glass boxes that litter many of our urban centres? This studio, based on three international sites in Rotterdam, Singapore and Tianjin examines these issues above and explores opportunities for the alternative design of high-rise architecture. Emphasis is placed on the students researching and digesting the regional qualities and characteristics (the ‘climate, culture and context’) of their site and developing an appropriate high-rise concept as a design response. Inspiration is taken not only from environment, but also from cultural, social and vernacular traditions in the location. Mixed-use programs are encouraged to foster social sustainability, often including residential content appropriate to the locality, but also accommodating new and innovative functions that could become valuable in the vertically urbanised hyperdense city of the future. This year such ideas have included vertical farming, the integration of common industrial technologies with the high-rise stack effect to clean smog-ridden air, a high-rise school, vertical cottage industries concerned with e-waste recycling, and a tall building design inspired by Hutong courtyard living in Tianjin.

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The studio began with a field visit to London to explore contemporary high-rise including a guided tour of KPF’s Heron Tower, followed by two weeks of site analysis and thematic studies. Students then work as individuals, or in small groups, to develop their ideas into a comprehensive tall building design. Whilst initial intentions are driven by concept, the unique technical challenges related to high-rise architecture – structure, vertical transportation, facade design, servicing, ground floor interface, environmental systems, etc – are also developed in parallel, with support from external experts in the field, in-depth precedent studies and a dedicated lecture/seminar course.


TALL buildings y5-S1 MArch

MArch (ARB/RIBA PT II) Alexander Balching, Christopher Beardsmore, Guilia de Mauro, James Fitzgerald, Philip Noone, Haniyyah Rashid, Alfie Roden, Laura Sheridan MArch (STB) Khushboo Bansal, Hemant Bagul, Sanjiv Saini, Harsh Varshneya, Chujie Wang MArch (Design) Chao Yin, Lucia Pramanti, Shuo Qiu, Siyi Wang, Zhaochen Yin GUEST TUTORS Stephen Fernandez (Arup) Edward Ng (Chinese University of Hong Kong) Yuri Hadi (DeMontfort University) Akshay Sethi (Gensler) Paul Simovic (KPF) Noura Ghabra (University of Nottingham) Matthew Humphreys (University of Nottingham) Michael Photiou (University of Nottingham)

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[1-5] Clean Air Tower | Alexander Balchin The PM2.5 particles in China’s air killed 1500 people in Tianjin alone in 2011. Air inside peoples homes and offices is no different from the toxic outside air. The Clean Air Tower filters the air as it enters the building, using industry standard machines and self-generated power. Air is accelerated through the south facing solar chimney reaching an simulated 8-10ms-1. The air current drives wind turbines at the peak of the tower generating electricity. The electricity powers electro-static precipitators to ionise soot and PM2.5 particles and collect them at oppositely charged plates inside the chimney, providing clean air for the city. A separate system of venturi scrubbers is powered also, providing clean air for the building’s workers and residents. 138

All of these processes are celebrated and on show encasing the atrium, visible from every floor, the underneath of the atrium and a viewing deck at the peak of the tower. The tower is modular allowing it to be constructed in toxic regions of China, then de-constructed and relocated as the air quality is improved. Punctuating the modules are sky gardens providing green space for the public and building occupants to enjoy with healthy, filtered air.


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[6-9] Tianjin Courtyard Skyscraper | Alfie Roden Located in the Binhai area of Tianjin this living skyscraper is intended to relink the area with its cultural past through the reinterpretation of the traditional Chinese Hutong into a modern, vertical context. This is achieved through the use of a progression of public to communal to private spaces intended to create communities where, the ‘international style’ skyscraper, creates divisions. This ‘community’ style of living is reinforced through the contoured architectural form which gradually rises from the block at ground level, thus reconnecting the individual to a human scale they are familiar with.

to the ground with a series of food court. To the West and North of this are the two main residential towers. These contour down to the ground through a series of pixelated allotment units which are owned by the different ‘village units’ of the towers above. Thus connecting the site horizontally and vertically and giving a greater economic potential to the developer.

The design is essentially formed of a ground floor plane of commercial units with informal market places which taper and rise into three separate towers. On the South side is a short office tower, connected 141


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[10,12] “SPORTS IN THE SKY” TOWERS | Khushboo Bansal, Harsh Varshneya, Sanjiv Saini “Sports in the Sky” towers revolve around the idea of four towers linked by sky-bridges at height and a central full size football field at the ground level. The ground plane interface is completely porous by lifting the towers on its cores from the base and making the plane completely permeable for the general public. Separate service cores mark the lateral entries for the general public who want to use the sports courts at height and the residents who live there. The central football field acts as a magnet for the nearby communities to meet and socially interact. The central field will be the place to be at which will be buzzing with all activities. Due importance has been given to the privacy of the residents who have a completely separate access 142

and service core dedicated for them in each tower. There are two “loops” of sports between the 8th - 12th level and the 16th-20th level connected by covered skybridges. Inspired by the Downtown Athletic Club building in the United States of America which was the first building to incorporate sports at height, “Sports in the sky” towers take a step ahead by successfully incorporating high density housing and sports facilities coupled with extensive retail facilities which facilitates a successful housing scheme.


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[11,13] “Landbouw Tower� Tower | Shuo Qiu, Lucia Indah Pramanti, Siyi Wang This design is located near many well-known landmarks of Rotterdam - Old Harbour, White House, Cube Houses and Blaak Station, and is above the city underground line. To match Rotterdam city skyline, the tower is split into three towers, that is to say, office, hotel and residential towers and provide three functions:

3. Stepping-up skyline: Three towers are designed into different heights to balance the existing city skyline

1. Vertical farm: Vertical farms are introduced into the southern parts of the towers to supply food for on-site and near-site markets. 2. Urban window: To respect the importance of Old Harbour, the lower part is permeable to connect central plaza with good views and to extend the recreational zone into central plaza. 143


Dr. Laura Hanks

Dr. Wang Qi

Y5-S1 MArch Exhibiting the past

Exhibiting the Past Feathered Dinosaurs in Wollaton Hall and portal of south Kensington. wollaton park, nottingham. South kensignton, london.w The ‘Exhibiting the Past’ unit is concerned with the potential of design in the nexus between two major areas of enquiry: built heritage and the museum. This interstitial ground is of considerable relevance today. A large proportion of architectural projects in contemporary practice are focussed on adaptive reuse, and the existing historic building stock in the UK is now regarded as a vast, unique, and irreplaceable asset. As well as offering invaluable physical material and embedded energy, this built heritage crucially is invested with stories. These explicit and implicit narratives offer a direct connection to the typology of the museum. Over recent decades, many museums, galleries and historic sites around the world have enjoyed large-scale investment in their capital infrastructure; in building refurbishments, new gallery displays, and the creation of a series of new purpose-built museums and galleries. What is common about these developments - from small scale exhibition re-designs to large capital projects - is the importance of narrative as a design tool, and this is true across multiple scales. The museum in essence is a collection of objects, each of which is invested with multiple stories (of their users, makers, and wider society), and which together, in a spatial relation to each other, constitute another set of multiple collective narratives. This complexity is further increased in that popular nineteenth-century development - the cultural quarter - in which each museum within the urban locale has its own complex internal logic or institutional narratives, but also stands as an object or artefact in space – in crucial dialogue with its neighbouring museal monuments.

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With the intensions of promoting the community engagement with scientific research, establishing closer link between the public and scientific society and encouraging children’s interests on scientific career, a brand new Dinosaur Show is proposed in the summer of 2015 by bring some most unique and spectacular paleontological discoveries made recently in China to the Nottingham local communities. The Department of Architecture and Built Environment and the Natural History Museum of Nottingham in Wollaton Hall will co-organize this special Dinosaur Exhibition. The Palaeonzoological Museum of China (PMC), which is directly associated with the high profile Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), China Academy of Science, meanwhile is the leading base of popularization of paleontological knowledge in China, will provide the major part of artefacts. Temporarily named as “Feathers”, this exhibition intends to focus on one of the most advanced discovery in palaeontology – the evolutional track from dinosaurs to birds. Based on this idea, DABE intends to create a series of innovative exhibition-narrative design schemes in the high-profiled historical Wollaton Hall in line with the nature of interdisciplinary cooperation. This is a live project and this studio is fitted in as a stage of feasibility study. In the summer time of 2014, all completed schemes have been exhibited in the Wollaton Hall for public enquiry and comments.


Exhibiting the past Y5-S1 MArch

MArch (ARB/RIBA PT II) Hannah Pedel, Viktoriya Stoyanova, Ellen Vafeades MArch (Design) Ahmed Al-Jahdhami, Malathe Hamid, Biying Lin, Dhiyana Moodley-Chetty, Dan Wu, Yuan Yang, Maoting Zeng MArch (T+D) Nama’a Qudah, Sogol Zafari, Richen Zan REGULAR CRITICS Dr. Wang Qi Dr. Laura Hanks VISITING CRITICS Prof. Claire O’Malley [School of Psychology] Mr. Ron Inglis [Nottingham City Council] Dr. Adam Smith [Wollaton Hall] Dr. Didem Ekici Prof. John Chilton

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[1,4,13] The Albertopolis Memoreum | Ellen Vafeades

[2,12] Exhibiting Dinosaurs | Maoting Zeng

Cabinets of curiosity otherwise known as Kunstkammer, Wunderkammer, Cabinets of Wonder, or wonder-rooms, were collections of strange and unique items. This was an attempt to categorise these items to tell a story about the wonders and oddities of the natural world. In the same way, the Albertopolis Memoreum is a cabinet of curiosities; a collection of items which tell stories about the world we live in. These stories are both collective (about the site itself) and individual (personal) but through the memoreum they become part of each other.

This is a dinosaurs exhibition project in Wollaton Park, it is mainly including five parts, like See the hope, Pandora Box, and The Burst. But the more meaningful one is the Pandora Box, it is in the Great Hall in Wollaton Hall, what this design try to express is the curve, and on the top of the curve, there is a feathered dinosaurs looking outward to a window, he is the symbol of the survived dinosaurs, it also mean the hope of life. It also try to show the love from parents to children, it is this kind of love that keep the hope of life continue.

The Albertopolis Memoreum encapsulates memories in the same manner that objects are saved in a museum; to awe, to recollect and savour. 146

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[3] Museum Frozen In Time | Viktoriya Stoyanova

[5-7] Flying with the Feathered Dinosaurs | Al Jahdhami

The building is separated through the façade or the remaining Palaeontology building in two parts. One is designed to be quite flexible and adaptable in order to host various temporary exhibitions. The “Frozen” part of the museum consists of containers holding cut out parts from the buildings on Exhibition Road in order to preserve them forever in their present state. The design driver has been the tension created by the constant battle of the passage of time and the conservator-restorers who are trying to keep the exhibits forever the same.

The Forms of this building are inspired from the form of wollaton Hall with some changes. The cladding material is ETFE (Ethylene Tetraflouro Ethylene). The ETFE is a transparent material which has high corrosion resistance and strengthe over a wide temperature range. It is an environment friendly polymer that offers immense possibilities in terms of lighting and treatment. This building design aims to create the same environment of those dinosaurs had in the past (Jehol Biota). The building is a combination of wood as trees, concrete as the building core, metal as stairs and water as the pool.

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[8,9,11] Shadow Museum | Richen Zan This site is located in South Kingston. The aim of the design is tried to attract more people to using the exiting building and make more optional exits for the natural history museum. The concept is coming from the light and shadow. Using the different materials, people could make some different shadow to relate the social phenomenon. At the same time, our site is located in the educational centre. In those museums, it also have some collections would not to exhibit to public, which could be an opportunity to attract more people to think themselves and deeply consider some social phenomenon. Thus, I tried to open the roof and elevation to let the natural light can penetrate through the building structure and make the different atmospheres for the people to see the shadow and enjoy the shadow. 148

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Exhibiting the past

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[10] Dream of a Dead Man | Malathe Hamid The great Wollaton Hall is originally the house of the Naturalist Francis’s Willoughby and houses the Nottingham Natural history museum. In 2015 the museum is hosting the Chinese Dinosaurs Show. The main aims of this design are to refresh Wollaton Hall through recreating an intimate museum where fact meets fiction by linking the existing galleries with the new ones via Francis’s Willoughby story. The design suggests a new cubic extension next to the hall built from modern building materials, therefore; reflecting the contrast between the old and the new. It will exhibit Francis’s journeys through imaginative stories. 149


professor Tim Heath

dr Amy Tang

Mike Taylor

y5-S1 March URBAN DESIGN

Reconfiguring the CityInclusive Urban Design: Nottingham Waterside Regeneration. Stanley Dock, Liverpool. Nottingham’s determined to capitalise development opportunities around the River Trent, which is one of the City’s greatest assets. This year, the urban design studio was working closely with Nottingham Regeneration Ltd and taking on the challenge of developing the Nottingham waterside areas. The study area of the site was over 100 hectares, stretching from the Eastside and along the north bank of the River Trent, which included 6 key areas. The project aimed to enhance a better link the Nottingham city centre to riverside with mixed-use development. It is looking for sustainable inclusive urbanism, age-friendly communities and new inspiring architectural design that catering for new patterns of work, life and leisure. Stage One (Group Work) – Site Analysis, Strategic plan and Masterplan (50%): The students were asked to work as a group (3-4 members) for site studying, contributing to development strategy and an overall initial masterplan. Students were asked to identify the current issues of the site and propose solutions through their masterplan. Stage Two (Individual Work) – Focused on site architectural and urban design (50%): The student was asked to work individually to further development an identified area into detailed architectural and urban design project which chosen site’s plans, sections and perspectives were requested. The proposed design was presented as a design portfolio that included the consideration of mixed-use development in cooperating with age-friendly living, affordable urban living, accessible and open public realm, public transportation and water front activities.

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URBAN DESIGN y5-S1 March

MArch (UD) Adriyan Kusuma, Chang Liu, Nicole Rogers, Feifan Yin, Zhihao Li MArch (Design) Theodoros Pyrillos, Wenyan Zhou MArch (ARB/RIBA PT II) Yiyi Liu, Romina Souri VISITING CRITICS Guvenc Topcuoglu [ucl] Matther Stratford [Ward Cole] Andrew Rowson [Haworth Tompkins] Jeongho Son [JHP Design] Philip Hayes [Philip Hayes Architects]

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[1-7] Waterfront Regeneration | YiYi Liu The water Regeneration Zone is hugged by the River Trent from the south. It is managed by Nottingham Regeneration Limited. The area offers an unique opportunity to respond to the changing pattern of development and offers a truly unique environment for investment. However, during the last few decades, this area was used for industry and manufacture. The discarded old buildings, restricted traffic no longer can serve the development of the city. Nottingham’s determined to capitalize development opportunities around the River Trent which is one the city’s greatest assets.

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The masterplan will provide a continous retail growth from the rail station to the hot spot developed market serves the office during weekday and saturday. People enjoy food on the sun-in plaza in the green land, watching games by screen on stadium. Visual links between stadium on both bank. Bigger scale sports than the sunk-in plaza. A connection of the sports link place to rest, public realm Link betwen inland and the water, hot spot, place to meet, stop, entertain walking accessable along the water. Low density residential area surrounds the public green, extending the approaches to different direction


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Brian Ford

Benson Lau

Y5-S1 MArch Environmental design

School Design and the Learning Environment. Gaziantep in Turkey (Lat 37oN, Alt. 706m) Mansfield, Nottinghamshire (Lat 53N, Alt. 180m).

It has been found that the quality of our working environment has a significant impact on our performance & productivity. In schools, the internal environment impacts on our ability to concentrate and learn, and has been found to influence cognition and the performance of students. Most importantly, the internal environment can impact on our health and well- being. In schools, the internal environment can, and should, provide a stimulus to creative thinking. This is difficult if students are distracted by glare, inadequate light, cold draughts, stuffiness or noise. These aspects of environmental design need to be addressed strategically within the design process. In the context of climate change and global warming, we also need to promote energy efficiency in our use of buildings. The good news is, that by focusing on providing a high quality internal environment, we may also simultaneously provide an energy efficient environment. This ‘virtuous synergy’ is of benefit to the building occupants and wider society. The main objective of this design project is to develop understanding and skill in the manipulation of environmental design variables to achieve high quality internal environments. This will be achieved by using the design of a primary school to explore what makes a good learning environment and to investigate the relationship between architectural design, internal environment and occupant well-being. Through meaningful testing, students were encouraged to critically evaluate their architectural proposals and then make improvements in the design schemes. The key design challenge is to embrace environmental design thinking during the design process with an aim to strike the right balance between architectural poetics and pragmatics.

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PGT Masters students were asked to design a primary school in the city of Gaziantep in Turkey (Lat 37oN, Alt. 706m) as part of the 10th International ISOVER student competition, while 5th Year students (seeking RIBA Part 2 accreditation) were asked to design a primary school at Rosebrook Primary and Nursery School, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire (Lat 53+N, Alt. 180m). The design schemes developed by MArch Environmental Design students Heba Nazer, Nadia Vashti Lasrinday and Liwei Yu won three UK national prizes and Heba Nazer won a special award in the 10th International ISOVER student competition.


environmental design Y5-S1 MArch

MArch (Environmental Design) Mauricio Lecaro, Cristina Montoya, Heba Nazer MArch (Design) Kaiqi Chen, Haoran Deng, Venkatesh Kumaravel, Dawa Masih, Onyekachi Igbokwe, Jing Li, Cong Wang, Liwei Yu, Tianfu Zhou MArch (Tech) Santhosh Raja, Swirnath Swaminathan MArch (ARB/RIBA PT II) Nicholas Lo, Zein Madanat, Dianna Wai Yee Tang Guest Critics and lecturer Robin Nicholson Robert Evans Lucelia Taranto Rodrigues Giles Bruce

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[1]

Y5-S1 MArch Environmental design [2] [4]

[1,6,7,15] Gaziantep School of Tomorrow | Heba Nazer

[2] Yesil Primary School | Liwei Yu

The relation between the classrooms as a basic design unit with courtyards and hallways followed a parametric shape grammar which generates the plans of traditional Turkish houses. The grammar is based on a corpus of architectural buildings that have been built in Anatolia for the past five centuries. The shape rule schemata are used for characterizing formal compositional aspects of this historic style.

A school that combines classical school elements with modern learning facilities taking in to account the existing realities for the new ECO Project developed by the Municipality of Gaziantep, Turkey. The school dedicated to children between the ages of 6 to 10 will accommodate a number of 400 to 600 students.

Through modern interpretation of the mashrabeya as one of the adopted vernacular architectural elements, all classrooms get satisfaction in uniform daylight and evaporative cooling through a developed E-cooler system. Supported by active methods, rain water harvesting, and solar collecting, this project will be constructed to reach ‘A’ rated Energy Performance Certificate. 158

The terrace field is a piece of sloped plane that has been cut into a series of successively receding flat surfaces or platforms, which resemble steps, for the purposes of more effective farming. Based on the inspiration of terrace field, this project is developed to be a part of the nature other than a construction, which also shows responsibility to the environment with not only architectural design methods but efficient environmental strategies.


[4]

Y5-S1 MArch

environmental design

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[3] The Rosebrook Primary School | Dianna Wai Yee Tang

[4] School of Tomorrow in Gaziantep | Cong Wang

The five main factors are sustainability, shelter, society, self-confidence and safety. Sustainability is to take the advantages of the atrium so that natural ventilation can be achieved. Shelter is to create not only a school but a home where the students feel safe.

This project aims to provide a comfort environment both for teachers and students to work and learn. A compact building shape could not only be beneficial from north coming wind, but also avoid strong solar exposure. Diverse natural heating and cooling strategies were introduced in this project so as to improve the comfort level, for example, misting tower and cooling pond in front of south facade are good at reducing cooling load, and winter garden offers remarkable reduction for energy usage in atrium. Furthermore, by means of harnessing renewable energy, sustainable building strategies such as photovoltaic system and ground source heat pump system successfully help to further cut down the use of convectional energy.

Society is to make good use of the building both in school times and weekends. Self-confidence is to build up the knowledge of the students, active learning is very important and special access to the library encourages students to read in the library. Safety is the most important factor, not by using fences but natural landscape to protect the students in a safe studying environment.

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Y5-S1 MArch Environmental design [8]

[5] Primary School in Gaziantep | Haoran Deng

[8] Rosebrook Primary School | Nicholas Lo

This project is a primary school located in Gaziantep, Turkey. Many sustainable environmental strategies were integrated into this project. For instance, all classrooms have a steady and acceptable daylight factor, natural ventilation is considered and calculated in each classroom, PV panels are mounted the pitch roof, a vary of shading devices are installed to avoid overheating.

The Rosebrook Primary School, located in the heart of Mansfield. The project has been designed environmentally through maximise the use of natural daylight and natural ventilation. The design concept is to create a playscape area by creating lots different level changes with ramps and stairs. It begins to create lots of different bridges and voids for children to investigate during the journey through the building. Taking the opportunity of using elderly students as part of the teaching resources to the younger students. A central atrium creates a gathering space where these two types of students interact together.

The concept of this project comes from the memory of my childhood: kids are always being curious about mysterious things. What I did was creating a ‘ruin’ which was inspired by the local ancient ruins. Ancient ruin is the thing that full of stories and mysteries. This school will be not only a place for indoor teaching, but also a place for outdoor adventure. 160


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environmental design

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[9-14] Gaziantep Primary School | Cristina Montoya The Project is located in Gaziantep, Turkey (37°04’N 37°23E) and is located in a new urban development, for that the strategy implemented was to do an urban analysis of the context and propose what was actually needed for the place, in terms of connections, green areas and community spaces, so this project could be more than a school, could actually be a place of encounter to the community. The shape of the proposal is determined by the connections NorthSouth proposed to link the green areas and make the project a transition area for the community. On the right side, are located the private functions of the School, such as: classroom, services, dinning room, offices; for them to have a safe and controlled environment. 161


Dr Chantelle Niblock

Tom Bennett

Y5-S1 MArch digital architecture

Bennerley Viaduct Project. erewash valley, derbyshire. Students within the Digital Architecture studio are encouraged to approach design empirically, using digital modelling and digital fabrication techniques. A parallel seminar module focuses on developing prototyping skills, design research, and decision-making within the digital architectural framework. Together, the Studio and Seminar modules create an educational venue to optimise advancement in technology and innovative ways of designing. Within the studio, students engage with design projects and investigate propositions from a perspective of advanced technology used in architecture design and construction. Emphasis is placed on research and experimentation to inform inventive, purposeful, and elegant architecture, enabling a research focused exploration of the making of architecture. The new Centre for 3D Design, which houses 3D printers, laser cutters and a 5-axis router. The department’s design studios, computing laboratories, printing facilities, and technical workshops provide the tools for the investigative analysis of current structural, construction, social and environmental issues informing the making of architecture studio brief In collaboration with Sustrans, the Digital Architecture studio identifi ed the site at the Bennerley Viaduct. Sustrans help local authorities and transport bodies to develop strategy and vision for the delivery of ambitious but achievable cycling, walking and sustainable transport travel change. The challenge of this project was to re-conceptualise the infrastructural networks at Bennerley Viaduct situated in the Erewash Valley, at local scale, and to develop an architectural design proposal for a centre

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for cyclists and pedestrians, with a focus on architectural tectonics. The valley provides vital breathing space for people across a region crisscrossed by a number of major transport corridors including the M1, A610 and mainline railway. Three individual Masters (ARB/RIBA PT II) level students and four groups of three international Masters level students were asked to create a Mecca for cyclists and visitors entering the site, offering a new resting place for pedestrians and cyclists to meet and shelter. They were asked to consider how architecture and infrastructure are intertwined; how new connections and additional public spaces contribute to existing landscape and transport infrastructure. This booklet outlines the students response to the brief, highlighting their individual and group proposals. The ambition of the studio was to integrate digital tools into the design exploration with the intention to enhance creativity. A range of digital tools will be integrated into the students’ design processes, including: ‘Rhinoceros 3D’ (freeform modelling software) and ‘Grasshopper’ (parametric modelling software). The use of iterative digital and physical modelling was effective in the exploration of structural form, materiality, architectural tectonics and experiential/spatial qualities.


digital architecture Y5-S1 MArch

MArch (ARB/RIBA PT II) Mohammad Fahad, Joshua Hovey, Benjamin Youd MArch (Tech) Diana Benjumea, Gaurav Goel, Hitesh Gujar, Farid-Alfredo Hernandez Eljure, Nawshin Pritha, Sonal Parakh, Jiawei Yan, Jiejian Yang, Ning Wang, Fan Xia, Yue Wang MArch (Tech/Renewable Energy) Chu-Chun Chuang lecturers Toby Blackman Guillermo Guzman Sean Lu elliot wood Peter Smith Adam Greenfield Jonathan Martin Sustrans Tony Russell James Lowe Jeff Wynch (volunteer)

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[1]

Y5-S1 MArch digital architecture [3]

[1,5,7] Transport Exchange Ilkeston Train Station | Farid Hernandez, Gaurav Goel, Diana Benjumea Bennerley Viaduct is a bridge of northern railways located in Derbyshire, which is now disused. Presently Ilkeston is only one of the few cities in UK without a train station. Therefore our brief for this studio directs a proposal of a train station on Bennerley viaduct. This train station would bring economic prosperity, attract tourism and solve problems of accessibility for the area. At the same time network for cyclists will be reinforced due to activation of Bennerley viaduct. The design proposal will play a vital role in restoring connection between two towns and it will reuse Bennerly viaduct, as train stations would be accessed from the bridge. Consequently this design proposal will bring back life to whole urban area including viaduct and this place would get a new meaning. 164

[2] [4]

[2,9] Bennerley Viaduct Cyclocross Centre | Joshua Hovey The Bennerley Viaduct, situated near Nottingham, is a ghost of the town’s rich industrial history. Previously the pulse of the valley, it is now a flat-lining heartbeat, the proposal provides a chance to give the surrounding towns a pulse again, allowing life to burst from the decaying structure and creating infrastructure that regenerates a dangerous site. The proposal centres on a national outdoor training centre dedicated to the sport of cyclocross which creates a safe and welcoming gateway into the sport and provides a public facility for exercise. The proposal will also extend the existing Sustrans cycle network.


[4]

Y5-S1 MArch

digital architecture

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[3,8] Dreams Old and Nascent | Benjamin Youd Many biological remediation processes will cleanse an array of organic and non-organic contaminants. Plants and microorganisms will be nurtured on community allotments to naturally restore the landscape through a site wide strategy, all overseen by the Scientist. The viaduct, housing functional spaces, becomes a living machine. Cyclists at deck level see water filtering through the railway ballast beneath their feet, but are oblivious to its further cleansing below - one must enter the heart of the living machine to experience this. The living wall and the bioventing system further treat the contaminants through a grid of steel wire supports, tubes carrying polluted water, aerating piles, wind catchers and planting bags, a vast hydroponic system of components that are standardised in their logic but bespoke in their application to a specific part of the system.

[4] Energy Cyclotel | Jiejian Yang, Hitesh Gujar, Chung Chu (Jenny) Chuang The project therefore focuses on study and design of various innovative means to incorporate this sustainable form of energy critically in the green fabric around the Bennerley Viaduct by satisfying the local people as well as generating renewable energy through the creation a journey over the ancient viaduct providing splendid views, which are ideal for the cyclists to pause, rejuvenate, come together, enjoy, learn and move ahead with their journey. This proposal proves the feasibility of using the wind for renewable energy generation.

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[6]

Y5-S1 MArch digital architecture [7]

[8]

[6] Ecological Centre | Nawshin Abdullah Pritha, Sonal Parakh, Ning Wang The Bennerley Viaduct stands robust as a symbol of architectural and structural excellence in one of the most scenic settings amidst the Erewash Valley. It speaks of a forgone grandeur and lost galore. The challenge of the studio project is to re- conceptualize the infrastructural networks at Bennerley Viaduct at an urban scale, to develop a suitable project brief in response to the conditions at the site, and to develop an architectural proposal for the same with a focus on architectural tectonic. Bennerley viaduct has been chosen as the site for this project in collaboration with Sustrans, the sustainable transport charity behind the 12,600 mile national cycle network. The focus of the design is 166

to revive the ‘Bennerley Viaduct’ as a mosaic of its glorious history, myriad culture and natural splendor and to evolve it in such a way that it becomes very lively interactive space and a cyclists/pedestrians most cherished route. Moreover, as a response to this brief and inspired by the natural abundance and biodiversity at the site, we propose to design an ecological centre with an aim to create awareness and interest about the natural heritage of the area, and facilitate education and research activities.


Y5-S1 MArch

digital architecture

[9]

[10] [7]

[8,10] Erewash Museum | Fan Xia, Jiawei Yan, Yue Wang Bennerley Viaduct is a disused railway viaduct spanning the Erewash Valley between Awsworth in Nottinghamshire and Ilkeston in Derbyshire. Erewash Canal, Nottingham Canal and Erewash River are in this site. There is a railway under the viaduct. An area used for old factories is near the viaduct. Bennerley is in fact one of only two wrought iron trestle viaducts left standing in the UK.

feel the changes happened in this place, what people in the past experienced, what they saw and how they lived. This journey is just like experiencing an old movie.

Our design is a museum under the viaduct, around one pier. The propose to build a museum is that this site has a long history and Bennerley Viaduct is a heritage with rare structure, it is meaningful to make people know about it. A story is used to organize every room. Bennerley Viaduct used to have railway on it,so the story is about a passenger’s journey as time passed. From his angle, people can 167


john morgan

Y5-S2 MArch civic hub 168

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Y5-S2 MArch civic hub [2]

[2,3,5] Bankside Open Space Trust - Room To Grow | Jamie Brown From time to time everybody needs a little space. In the built-up streets, near London Bridge and Waterloo, the Bankside Open Space Trust work with local people to develop urban green space so they can relax, kick a ball, grow plants or just hang out. The existing charity work with communities, encouraging community involvement and a local pride to improve and maintain important green open space. The Room to grow project, situated on Blackfriars road, aims to create a new headquarters from which the charity can operate from increasing both the scale and the scope of work. At the same time, creating an inspirational learning and research facility, specifically looking at intensification of green potential space within urban areas making this wealth of knowledge and skill available to all. 170

Meticulously weaving into the existing fabric, the proposal uses the complexity of the programme (ranging from residential to research) to create a porous urban addition emphasising a hidden wildness of growing living autonomously with the tactile architecture. From East to West there is a transition from the ‘reflective’ to the ‘active’. Within the reflective the public can use the learning facility to research growing techniques and attend workshops and lectures. This is also where the urban plant research is carried out. Within the active is an inspirational botanic garden where practical learning and research takes place in a number of test beds and greenhouses. As the new BOST hub, the room to grow scheme will encourage visitors and wider communities alike, whilst being sensitive to the local residents on the square.


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[6,7] Hestia | Elen-Maria Vafeadou

[8,9] Southwark Makers Enterprise Centre | Stuart Bacon

In Ancient Greek mythology Hestia (“hearth” or “fireside”) is a virgin goddess of the hearth, ancient Greek architecture, and the right ordering of domesticity, the family, and the state. Her name means “home and hearth”, the oikos, the household, house, or family.

Southwark Makers Enterprise Centre aims to build upon the historical association of this area with craft industries to provide rentable facilities for creative start up businesses who would otherwise be unable to work within the centre of London. At the centre of the facility is a craft market, which not only allows for creatives within the centre to sell and exhibit wares but also those from around London, establishing the scheme as a centre of creative craft industry within London.

The Hestia seeks to redefine the hearth in the modern home, giving it purpose and the power of togetherness and social status. Furthermore, it aims to create a different notion of living within its “micro-city” boundaries. Using Mat Architecture as a tool, the Hestia seeks to emphasize the meaning of hearth by placing it in the focus of each of the design modules. The project consists of an interplay of repetition and the interweaving of specialised modules around this hearth, which sits back within the site, to draw people inside. 174

The scheme’s eventual massing manifestation is formed of three distinct parts: the service basement, the commercial podium and the residential towers. The Ground and First floors of the scheme form a commercial podium in which the makers enterprise centre programme operates.


Y5-S2 MArch

civic hub

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[10-11] B-Hive | Alexander Balchin Blackfriars road is undergoing change, Southwark council wants to bring life to the streets. However, currently the road is entirely impermeable and offers little to pedestrians. On the corner of St. Georges Circus, B-Hive provides a hub for the Blackfriars design community to showcase their work to the public and inspire each other with their work, process and offices all on show.

The community spaces include infrastructure for design offices such as printing services, rapid prototyping, photography studios and an exhibition space. Designer/resident spaces are lush with green spaces and room for apartment anterooms to extend out to the deck. All residential units also have private balconies and either one or three bedrooms.

The architecture is conducive to creating a design community hub, with a under-croft of offices showcasing their work to the public below, and a series of valleys connecting the offices with residential units for designers and their families. The building also responds to context stimuli to reinforce the access points to the central public spaces.

Public space is reinforced with retail units and cafÊ’s extending onto the street. Overall the building truly provides interest and reprieve from the impermeable Blackfriars environment.

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[12]

Y5-S2 MArch civic hub [13]

[12,13] Makers Centres Mission | James Bishop This project seeks to interrogate a mixture of usages on an underused part of South London. Facilities including public workshops, private affordable housing and a public library designed under constraints of Passivhaus. The design is extremely flexible to allow small industries to grow and technologies to advance. By using this method of construction it has provided affordable family housing and workspaces in the city, as it is far more affordable to run in the long term.

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civic hub [4]

Y5-S2 MArch

[2]

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[14] Growing Streets | Eleanor Jolliffe The design comprises of a two story grid of vaults, in-filled with a teaching kitchen, foodbank, fresh food shops, and hot food stalls. Tenancies of the latter will rotate giving a showcase to street food vendors and start-up businesses, as well as motivation for visitors to constantly return- and taste something new. Materials and layout were chosen to engage visitor’s curiosity, with glimpses through, between, and around shops and stalls: following sights, and smells through the market to discover new foods, and how to cook them. Each dwelling is planned around healthy living and food, designed to PASSIVHAUS standards, and with large inviting kitchens, to ensure a comfortable and sustainable living environment. 177


Jonathan Hale

Mani Lall

Y5-S2 MArch dance space

dance space. blackfriars, london. The working title for the project is ‘DanceSpace’ which captures the pragmatic intent of the brief - the creation of a public building whose programme contains an auditorium for public performance alongside rehearsal and teaching spaces. There will also be a mix of supporting public functions such as restaurant/cafe and exhibition, along with residential spaces for visiting artists and a library/resource room for individual study. The ‘conceptual title’ for the project is ‘Chora: the place of becoming’, which refers to the origins of the word choreography in the Greek term for a dance-floor or platform. The word also relates to the space used for the chorus in ancient Greek theatres, (equivalent to the choir in a modern day opera), providing musical and vocal backing for the action taking place on the stage. In a philosophical context the word is used in Plato’s creation story, the Timaeus, to refer to the process by which ideas take form in reality. Chora is the ‘receptacle of becoming’ where this magical transformation takes place. For the purpose of our project we might also think of the city itself as a place of becoming, a kind of melting pot or market place where ideas and goods are brought and exchanged. A key part of what cities do is to make communities visible to themselves, therefore the metaphor of the theatre can usefully be applied in relation to the urban spectacle of both production and consumption. With the advent of contemporary society more of these processes have disappeared from view, partly due to the increasing number of transactions (both social and economic) that now take place in the virtual realm. An important part of the current project therefore is to question the changing role of urban architecture - to ask what responsibility we have as architects to express and visibly support

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these cultural and social transactions. The DanceSpace will be both a public performance space for the presentation of contemporary dance and performance art in a ‘formal’ theatre setting, as well as a base/HQ for a contemporary dance company. It will provide studios/rehearsal spaces plus a public café/restaurant and associated exhibition space that could also be used for informal performance. If space allows on site, there should also be an outdoor public space, usable by both café visitors and performers.


dance space Y5-S2 MArch

YEAR 5 Nasser Al Amri, Jose Andre, Christopher Beardsmore, Kristian Bjerre, Tom Bradley, Mohammad Fahad, Laura Fernandes, Toby Gilding, Christina Rallou Grigoropoulou, Daniel Hodson, Joshua Hovey, Joshua Jones, Nicholas Lo, Yiyi Liu, Maria Mitsinga, Philip Noone, Alfie Roden, Romina Souri, Dianna Wai Tang, Nicola Wildman VISITING CRITICS Roger Watts, (Haworth Tompkins Architects) Jonny Pugh, (AOC Architects) Dr Katharina Borsi Tony Barber

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Y5-S2 MArch dance space [1]

[1,10] Dance Space | Joshua Hovey This project, located in Southwark, London, aims to create architecture which promotes dance as a beneficial activity for the health and wellbeing of people living in the surrounding area as well as providing a permanent base for an extroverted dance company. Functioning primarily as a theatre venue, the building also hosts training lessons and school classes. The use of reclaimed materials and recycled lightweight structure gives the building a ‘rough and ready’ feel so that it has the appearance of a playground or workshop, rather than a pristine environment not to be touched, allowing people to adapt the environment to suit their own needs. 180

A central Cor-Ten pod is propped up by seemingly temporary trusses and structural supports, like a ship in a dry dock, whilst the facade of the building fragments around its entrance, creating the opening through which the golden theatre pod has been inserted. In this fragmented void public performance can take place and glazing from dance studios faces you on all sides, immersing visitors in the dance experience.


dance space Y5-S2 MArch [2]

[2-4] Dance Space | Philip Noone An atrium acts as a mediator between the railway viaduct and auditorium whilst providing daylight, ventilation and vertical circulation to the stacked functional programme. Thick walls reflecting that of the railway viaduct structure provide recessed observation seats and exhibition spaces up the atrium stair with views out to the river Thames and Tate Modern as well as passing trains adding drama to the space.

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[5,6] Erlang House Arts and Dance Centre | Toby Gilding This project aims to help in the regeneration of a stretch of road in Blackfriars, Southwark in order to draw the prosperity of the north of the city down below the river. The charitable Artist’s Studio Company are seeking an extension to this tower block to expand their services to include a contemporary dance stage and rehearsal spaces. We need to start looking at the opportunities afforded to us by renovation rather than resorting to demolition as an immediate response. By extending out onto the circus in order to generate a street life and draw people in from the circus and utilising the existing structure, the project minimises its cost and environmental impact but also provides a design generator which helps to mediate between the differing scales around the site to enhance the character of the area. 183


[7] [6]

Y5-S2 MArch dance space [8]

[7,8] The Depot | Tom Bradley The project is for the design and establishment of a contemporary dance theatre in Southwark, encouraging participation from residents of the nearby housing estates and subsequently visualising the community. The project is sited at the base of the spine of Blackfriars Road in an attempt to assert emphasis toward the south end away from the high rise commercial developments adjacent to the river. The building aims to facilitate the fluid movement of the dancers’ body by rejecting the corridor and offering ramped and stepped walkways that connect the solid elements of the scheme together. These spaces then open out onto a public park that bridges across the train lines of the Depot, creating a rare green space in an area of stone and concrete.

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dance space Y5-S2 MArch [9]

[9] Dancespace | Nicholas Lo ‘DanceSpace’, located in Blackfriars Road, London consists an auditorium for a contemporary dance performance. It is situated in a mixed used of offices and residential buildings. The site contains an existing building of Southwark tube station that can easily provide access to the central of London through Jubilee line. The design concept is to apply the dynamic of movement of contemporary dance. Using the opportunity of different speeds of movement around the site, to produce an illusion of moveable façade. Each type of speed will contain its own scale in order to maximise the moveable effects. Larger scale of vertical fins will be used respond to the high speed train. On the other hand, people with lower speed require a smaller scale of fins to notice the movement. 185


[10]

Y5-S2 MArch dance space [11]

[11] Dance School/Artist’s Collective | Alfie Roden The intended intervention utilises the current condition of the site and renovates two existing significant buildings. These are given over to an artist’s collective as studios and exhibition area. To counteract these traditional forms a number of performer studio ‘boxes’ are placed within the site and the space between these and the original buildings given over to the public as informal exhibition space for the artists to convert into their own exhibits and works. Thick walls reflecting that of the railway viaduct structure provide recessed observation seats and exhibition spaces up the atrium stair with views out to the river Thames and Tate Modern as well as passing trains adding drama to the space.

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dance space Y5-S2 MArch

[12]

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[12,13] The Dance Space | Dianna Tang The proposed new Dance School is located adjacent to Blackfairs Road, which is situated, on top of the Southwark Underground Station. The location and plan form of the proposed new Dance School was driven by the desire to maximize natural lighting and ventilation to the Dance School as well as minimize the disturbance to the operation of the Southwark Underground Station during construction. Sound is everywhere and is unpredicatable which is very similar to contemporary dance. Contemporary dance has unpredictable changes in rhythm, speed and direction. In this site, there are four different kinds of sound happening together with different rhythm and volumn. The contrast between very noisey on the east of the site and very silent on the west of the site, make this site very special.

Stainless steel architectural mesh is used in order to add dynamics and aesthetic perspectives to the building. Arhictectural mesh facades can enhance both the visual and funtional value of the building. The wire mesh panels can be woven into different densisties. This facade acts as a good solar shading device. The light inside the building reflects on the fascade and it is seen as a shimmering delight, and facades made of Stainless Steel architectural mesh can also be described as architecture of light. The wire mesh panels will be designed into different pattern according to the sound analysis in order to act as a acoustic systesm as well as a solar shading device.

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John Chilton

Paolo Beccarelli

Y5-S2 MArch Space ENCLOSURE

Space Enclosure Studio. milan, italy. Within the Space Enclosure studio students are encouraged to explore the holistic, research-informed design of a medium to large volume architectural space. In order to create innovative design solutions, they are asked to investigate the potential for the application of novel materials, lightweight, complex and 3-dimensional structures and associated technologies at both building and individual component scale. The emphasis is on the integration of architectural and tectonic aspects of space enclosure, with alternative structural and façade forms explored in concept through physical and digital design modelling. Environmental performance, spatial quality, human comfort and the environmental impact / sustainability of the design solution are also taken into account. Brief: UK Pavilion for Milan Expo 2015 The 2013-2014 Space Enclosure studio brief was based closely on Malcolm Reading Consultants’ design competition for the UK Pavilion for Milan Expo 2015, run on behalf of the British Government - http:// competitions.malcolmreading.co.uk/milan2015/ . Using the site allocated for the pavilion and the design constraints (plot size and density, building setbacks, height restrictions, etc) imposed by the Expo organisers, students were challenged to develop an innovative design reflecting the Expo theme “Feeding the Planet: Energy for Life”. Since the first Great Exhibition in Hyde Park, London, in 1851 there have been regular world expositions. These events present participants with the opportunity to exchange ideas and share knowledge. They also allow participants to display the latest innovative architectural tectonic forms and materials to realise their pavilions. This has often resulted in iconic structures and landmark buildings – e.g. Crystal Palace, London, 1851; Eiffel Tower, Paris, 1889; Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion, 1929;

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Frei Otto / Rolf Guttbrod’s German Pavilion and Richard Buckminster Fuller’s US Pavilion for Expo’ 67 in Montreal; Shigeru Ban’s Japan Pavilion, Hanover, 2000 and Heatherwick Studio’s UK ‘Seed Cathedral’ Pavilion, Shanghai, 2010. However, for the Milan Expo 2015 the organisers have suggested an alternative design approach with an emphasis on the pavilion contents and visitor experience, proposing that pavilions should be “light horizontal constructions that play on the contrast between alternating full and empty spaces”.


Space ENCLOSURE Y5-S2 MArch

MArch Tech Diana Benjumea Mejia, Chu Chun (Jenny) Chuang, Gaurav Goel, Farid Hernandez Eljure, Chao (Rock) Yin, Tianfu (Frank) Zhou REGULAR CRITICS John Harding (Ramboll) Chantelle Niblock Sean Lu VISITING CRITICS Tom Bennett (Wolfgang Buttress Studio) Xiaokai Liu (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)

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Space ENCLOSURE Y5-S2 MArch

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[1-11] Milan Expo 2015 Pavilion | Farid Hernandez, Gaurav Goel The Milan Expo 2015 theme Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life; involves sustainability, technology and thematic experiences created for the visitors. UK government´s pavilion brief was interpreted as a pavilion with interactive experience to enhance visitor´s emotional connection within proposed spaces, rising awareness about food waste, hunger and lack of food around the world along with a structure which is sustainable and reusable. This directed our ideas for treating the pavilion as a whole interactive space that includes a non-stopping monetary and food donation every day. Simultaneously project explores a biomimetic façade inspired by pinecone´s responsive ability to its surrounding environment. Following this a movable facade mechanism made of steel and tensile membranes was developed. This façade opens or closes to optimize the needs for light and ventilation in each

space. Visitors experience starts in a projection space where they will be informed about hunger and food waste. Further these visitors can purchase an empty food capsule to write a message and fill it with food grains, later they could be harnessed and lifted up to install these capsule modules on the façade lattice. This would generate a food bank which will be donated after the Milan Expo 2015 ends. At the end this pavilion structure will be transported and reused to created community spaces in villages.

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david nicolson cole

Y5-S2 MArch sustainable TALL BUILDINGS

advanced tall buildings. blackfriars, London The Advanced Tall Buildings (ATB) studio of the Sustainable Tall Buildings course requires the students to reach a higher level of difficulty than in first semester. For sites, we look at our own capital city. London has a vibrant economy with plenty of locations for tall buildings. The prime tall building locations are based around transport nodes and governed by a viewing line framework, which permits tall buildings into clusters like the Square Mile, Blackfriars, London Bridge etc, retaining long distant views of St Pauls from key locations. For 2014, we chose the South Bank, on a 2.5 hectare site redeveloping the entire Shell Centre between the London Eye and Waterloo station. This very real project, happening now, requires a composition of eight mixed use towers, from 6-40 storeys, retaining only the original Shell Tower, maintaining a permeable ground plane, introducing a multitude of urban uses, and considering the viewing framework seriously. We evolve our own briefs from the general brief of Lambeth, Squire and KPF, retaining the good spirit, but freeing the students to re-interpret. The first weeks were spent on context, culture and climate analysis in two large groups plus site model building. The middle period was progressive master planning in eight smaller groups, moving up from 1000th to 500th scale. Finally, they had to choose a building for more detailed study. The brief includes a new HQ for Shell UK, and we asked the students to focus down onto the highest or their most interesting buildings in their master plan. A guiding philosophy of the studio is ‘Feng-Guang’, meaning Air and Light. We aim for bioclimatic design, interpreted appropriately, whether for residential, office or cultural. For the Shell headquarters, security issues are important, as are the creation of large modern trading floors. For the residential, views are important, as is the provision of different market sectors, for social, affordable and luxury housing, and social spaces to

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match. The ground plane has to be devoted to tourism, with landscaping, coffee shops, exhibition space. We avoided large podiums, but we aimed for elements of a ‘sky-world’ at high altitude. Below the ground plane is a vast multilevel service and parking basement, including the underground station for Waterloo. An overhead footbridge runs through the site connecting Waterloo to Hungerford Bridge. Students are keen to try special added difficulties, and identify themes. Apogee, Skylink and Fan groups made a composition of mixed use towers with megastructural sky bridges connecting them, parks and gardens in the sky, and deeply worked out facade solutions. The Twisting Trio did the same with exploration of the structural notion of twisting towers. Jay group combined a Shell headquarters with a new high-technology college. Extempore group offered a stunningly impressive realisation of ultra-tall mixed housing above Shell headquarters, with balconies and overflowing gardens, and dedication to renewable energy. Voidarity perched a luxury sport and conference hotel high above Jubilee Gardens in an impressive sky bridge megastructure. Zen group focused on the Shell HQ offices but with a major commitment to biotechnology and vertical farming. All these projects were well backed up with detailed technical reports on primary structure, systems, energy generation, construction, core design, fire engineering, renewable energy, green planting strategies, facade technology reports.


sustainable TALL BUILDINGS Y5-S2 MArch

MArch Design Biying Lin, Dan Wu, Wan Zhuo Zhang, Yuan Wu, Ning Wang, Yue Wang, Fan Xia, Fie Fian Yan, Sonal Parakh, Dawa Masil, Venkatesh Rajamanickam Kumaravel, Jiejian Yan MArch Tech Maryam Bazghaleh, Suvirnath Swaminathan, Hitesh Gujar, Santhosh Raja, Oneyekachi Igbokwe MArch STB Khushboo Bansal, Harsh Varshneya, Chujie Jay Wang, Sanjiv Saini VISITING CRITICS Guvenc Topcuoglu [ucl] Matther Stratford [Ward Cole] Andrew Rowson [Haworth Tompkins] Jeongho Son [JHP Design] Philip Hayes [Philip Hayes Architects]

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[1] Y5-S2 MArch sustainable TALL BUILDINGS [2]

[1-3] Shell Campus in South Bank | Chujie Jay Wang This project is a real project for Shell Company, which is located next to London Eye in south bank. It aims to develop a new complex cluster in waterloo area in order to inspire economy and culture in the historical area. In this project, we focus on new shell company campus design, including a new shell office tower and restructure the existing shell tower faรงade. That is a wonderful chance to build a campus for Energy Company, exhibiting advance technology. This campus is developed in high-tech building style, which is efficient for office tower and aesthetic compared to surrounding urban context.

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sustainable TALL BUILDINGS Y5-S2 MArch [4]

[5]

[5] The Sky Link Towers | Kachi Santhosh The project is set along the Southbank in the city of London. It was important to create a complex that is permeable to pedestrians due to the high pedestrian foot fall around the site because of its proximity to the Jubilee gardens and the London Eye. A central courtyard at the ground level with a water feature complements the greenery of the Jubilee Gardens. This serves as a social area at height to offer occupants a view of the city of London from the Southbank while they engage in activities. The residential component is kept slender to allow views from each residence to different key views in the city of London. The building’s façades are exposed to the sun to enable it harness the solar energy which respond to the position of the sun by way of automation. This exposure allows the air within the balconies of the residential component to be heated to temper the air coming into the apartments. 197


Y5-S2 MArch sustainable TALL BUILDINGS [6]

[7] [4]

[4,6] The Extempore | Harsh Varshneya Situated on the Southbank in the capital city of London, “THE EXTEMPORE” is a 295m high mixed use tower as a part of the new SHELL campus. The built fabric around the site gave way for a COURTYARD style with high rises being planned around a central courtyard. The masterplanning is inspired by the existing Shell Centre building which lends its FORMALITY to the new development on its outer edges and INFORMALITY is taken on the inner edges of the entire scheme overlooking a central courtyard, creating an “URBAN ROOM”. “THE EXTEMPORE” has a welcoming double height entrance with public exhibition spaces overlooking the historic arches of the famous Hungerford Bridge. Large trading floors occupy the lower 8 floors of 198

the building and the building splits into two separate towers at the 9th level, forming the first skylobby level. The tower facing the Thames is 20 stories high providing office spaces. The rear tower on the York Street has office spaces till the 23rd level and then converts into social and luxury housing at the upper levels which is favoured by the reduction in floor plate area due to the building inclination from two sides. Public Deck at the 73rd floor acts an attraction for the general public providing infinite views across the London city.


sustainable TALL BUILDINGS Y5-S2 MArch [7] [8]

[7,8] The Twisting Trio | Sanjiv Kumar Saini, Hitesh Gujar, Fie Fian Yang “The Twisting Trio� is a unique twisting complex located in the iconic location besides The London Eye. The design aims to complement this prime site location. The tower accommodates a mix of functions, offices, social housing, Studio apartments Duplex and Penthouses. The design concept rests upon three fundamental principles: VIEW: The site in the context of viewing corridors creates mesh of sight lines in the London sky. The floor plates are rotated to offer wide city views. In addition, the strategically placed atrium provide the views of Westminster, St. Paul`s and Shard.

ICON: The twisting towers will enhance and be an icon itself for London skyline and act as the shadow of the London Eye. WIND: The twisting geometry of the tower will confuse the wind and allow it to pass around the building. In terms of environmental performance, these twisting towers are influenced by Passivhaus Performance, criteria. In addition, the Nano wind skins are incorporated at the crown of the building which not only acts as a wind screen but also mini wind turbines generating energy. The office blocks have North atrium to avoid deep interiors and residential apartments face the south, with balconies to maximise the solar gain. 199


Dr Lucelia Rodrigues

Y5-S2 MArch Environmental Design

SUSTAINABILITY AND RESILIENCE THROUGH DESIGN: THE REGENERATION OF the BAKEWELL ROAD. MATLOCK, DERBYSHIRE. The increasing proportion of people living in urban areas has led to a range of environmental issues and sustainability challenges. These are in relation to climate change adaptation and mitigation, natural resources shortage, and the consequences of unmanageable development. In order to ensure that urban living is sustainable and that towns and cities have the resilience to cope with change these challenges must be met. Urban planning and building design affect human and natural systems, and therefore require an approach that reflects the interdependencies inherent within these social-ecological structures in order to build resilience and sustainability. These interdependencies were the focus of this studio. This was explored through the redevelopment of an area of Matlock, the county town of Derbyshire (UK). Matlock is located in the largely rural area of the Derbyshire Dales on the edge of the Peak District National Park. With a population approaching 11,000 it is the largest town in the Derbyshire Dales, and serves a catchment area of some 43,000 people. Whilst Matlock is the largest centre of population and employment in the Derbyshire Dales, its city centre needs to be revitalised. Small towns in the UK, such as Matlock, are facing a crisis. Competition from national ‘chain’stores, located in characterless perimeter retail ‘parks’, have resulted in the demise of town centre businesses. This weakening of the commercial heart of many market towns is often made worse by lack of investment in community facilities, resulting in marginalisation of vulnerable groups (the old and the young). The lack of casual public interaction and control over the public realm results in a lower quality of life and well-being.

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This process also undermines attempts at regeneration from within. Campaigns to ‘save the High Street’ have reached national TV. Many communities feel that the character and life of their town centre is changing for the worse and they are powerless to do anything about it. The key challenge facing Matlock is for the town centre to become an area where local people can live, work, shop and socialise, and a place where visitors will be drawn back to again and again. This project explored the potential synergy between small business, housing and the provision of community facilities within the context of this changing town centre within the UK, how urban design and architecture can contribute to town centre regeneration, and what is meant by ‘sustainable development’ in this context. The project involved the development of a small masterplan and the design of mix-use buildings at Bakewell Road, close to the town centre and by the River Derwent, a site of great beauty and immense potential but that is currently underused and undervalued.


Environmental Design Y5-S2 MArch

MArch Environmental Design Tippa Chetan, Haoyan Deng, Zhiqi Ding, Nadia Vashti Lasrindy, Mauricio Lecaro, Xu Li, Christina Valentina Montoya Castillo, Heba Nazer, Nawshin Abdullah Pritha, Malsawmtluangi Sathing, Cong Wang, Liwei Yu INVITED TUTORS Professor Mark Gillott Professor Nick Ebbs Professor Brian Ford Graham Rennie Ben Hopkins Tom Bennett Laura Alvarez

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[1,3,11] Regeneration project in Matlock | Haoyan Deng

[2] Regeneration of the Bakewell road | Abdullah Pritha

This project is the central part of our master plan which was a regeneration scheme designed by two-student group for Matlock, UK. The project includes a green slope, some multi-use stages, a sunken library and a service apartment. An overall environmental strategy was considered during the design progress. After calculated in SAP, the result shown that this building achieved level 6 (zero carbon) in Breeam. The concept of this project was to transform the original car park to a green slope, which provided opportunities for enjoying local natural scenes and different activities. Original car park was hidden under the slope and a service apartment was floating above the slope. By this way, the original negative space was transformed to a positive stage for local people and visitors.

Based on the site analysis and the project brief provided by the district council some aspects were deemed to be essential to foster regeneration of the neighbourhood. These include - the creation of a connection and the provision of an attractive pedestrian walkway Bakewell Road, Imperial Road and the river side area. Additionally to maximize the potential of the riverside location and create a high quality riverside development with a mix of uses including major retail and residential. As a result, the aims of the project are to create a strong connection (physical, visual and social) between the roads, riverside and its surrounding areas by developing new public spaces including a riverfront plaza, market surrounded by open courtyard and retail.


Y5-S2 MArch

Environmental Design

[5]

[6]

[4] The Garden-Housing concept | Malsawmtluangi Sathing This concept focuses on that garden as a feature of family life allowing balconies with views and planters while maintaining privacy for neighbourhood occupants. Orientation towards north-west to ensure direct sunlight on the back and front of the house for growing food. It is envisioned that a certain proportion of food will be grown in the balcony planters and rooftop garden. A bank of PV cells and Biomass Plant will provide providing a clean and cheap heat which would also be provided for the surrounding buildings. The growing areas will also serve as a barrier for privacy.

[5] Matlock public learning and community hub | Vashti Lasrindy, Mauricio Lecaro This project is located at nostalgic area, Matlock (part of the Peak District attraction) regeneration master plan develop by team of two environmental design course students, Lasrindy and Lecaro. The reuse existing bus station structure to minimize structure cost becomes the first step towards sustainable design library for Matlock. The building is also designed to repeat the Bakewell Road architectural language rhythm. Sunspace lobby facing the Bakewell Road is used as a sound buffer and to provide passive heating during winter time. During summer, it filters the polluted air by the foliage inside the sunspace. 203


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Y5-S2 MArch

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Environmental Design

[6,12,13] Riverside project | Liwei Yu This design project is about the regeneration of the town centre of Matlock, which is located in the largely rural area of the Derbyshire Dales on the south eastern edge of the Peak District National Park. Over the past few years Matlock has seen a number of significant new developments in and around the town centre. The competition from national ‘chain’ stores have resulted in the demise of town centre businesses. The lack of casual public interaction and control over the public realm results in a lower quality of life and well-being. Our design concept focuses on creating an interesting and attractive gateway for Matlock. A roof outdoor market was proposed in line with the history of the site and to provide the residents with new and muchneeded facilities. The interaction of the newly-defined buildings and 204

public realm will bring the town centre businesses prosperity. We want our design to support wellbeing and a high-quality lifestyle. My individual work which is the riverside project mainly consists of housing, hotel and winter garden in the middle. The aim of it is to maintain a decent micro-climate within the site and to provide a good living space and also a leisure space that can allow many activities to be happened throughout the year.


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Environmental Design

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[7-10] Generation-Spanning Homes for Matlock | Mauricio Lecaro Matlock is a small town located in Derbyshire. Formerly, Matlock was renowned as ‘spa town’ but currently - despite its natural beauty - it has been overshadowed by the touristic attractions of nearby towns (e.g. Bakewell and Matlock-Bath). This, has translated into a plunge in its tourism and therefore, a drop in their jobs and economy. In order to regenerate the town, a master plan whose base is the environment’s well-being was proposed. The housing proposal considers a very thorough climatic and physical analysis of the proposed site. The site’s topography, winds, sun path and views generated four narrow blocks of housing, each buffered by winter gardens, acting both as the main entrances and private gardens where community life is encouraged.

Two main housing types were designed, (i.e. flats and studios) considering their accessibility - by all – a key factor. The building, taking advantage of the topography, proposes a partially earthsheltered solution; all houses are oriented towards the south and buffered by sunspaces – designed to increase solar access during winter and provide shading during summer. Through these sunspaces, good daylighting and the possibility to naturally ventilate the space is provided, all while exploiting Matlock’s scenery. Very high thermal insulation levels - in order to provide thermal comfort throughout the year – were considered and renewable energy sources were integrated to greatly lessen the environmental impact, while enhancing the inhabitant’s quality of life. 205


Dr. Wang Qi

Dr. Laura Hanks

Y5-S1 MARCH Building project 206

Building Project The Revitalization of Bashan Reservoir. BASHAN, CHINA. The Building Project enables students on the MArch Theory and Design and MArch in Design to develop a design project focusing on site analysis, strategic planning, architectural design, environmental design and landscape design. Within this complex context, essential design theories should be fully developed and embodied through professional final graphical presentation. The project should have a strong conceptual underpinning, and provide a critical and rigorous response to the specific site, with full respect to the local context. By employing advanced theoretical/practical inputs, students are encouraged to adopt professional approaches to the generation of design concepts, and to develop these in detail in response to the circumstances of both the physical and cultural context of the project.

All schemes have been asked to deliver high quality works based on the following approaches:

Funded by the Administration of Bashan Reservoir, Yishui County, Shandong Province, China, this project intends to deliver high quality design work for the redevelopment of the Bashan Reservoir area, which is a live project promoted by the Yishui County Government. The project covered strategic master-planning and key building design, in which not only the theoretical study of cultural background and place narrative but also the practical study of ecological and sustainable design should be considered as key drives. To support the execution of the project, sufficient funds have been invested by the administration of Bashan Reservoir, which supported the students and staff on essential international travels, and provided local stipends and consumables. The outputs have been published as a special projects exhibition in the summer of 2014 in China. The top project has been awarded the first prize of 200 pounds.

2. Environmental Approach Along with the key architectural design, environmental issues was considered as crucial preconditions, influential inspirations and concrete applications. Sustainable design strategies like natural day-lighting, passive cooling, natural ventilation, rain water harvest, solar power system, wind power system, geothermic resources, subterranean river net, and biomass, and so on, have applied and integrated in the design process through appropriate architectural means.

1. Humanities Approach All architectural and planning outcomes have been produced with sufficient application of certain key theoretical analysis on humanities aspects. Key theories like spatial narrative and hermeneutics, landscape and townscape, images and interpretation, story and discourse, structuralism and deconstruction, metaphor and rhetoric, phenomenology and architectural language, etc. have been not only well selected and explored to cultivate the major concept but also well implemented as main drive to create and deliver the scheme.

3. Landscape Approach Careful site reading focusing on the location of the key building has been well developed as the integrated aspect of the building complex. Key landscape issues include habitat protection and creation, the local fauna and flora, local materials, soil, water, geological features, identity, and the ways in which people have engaged with the landscape both as local inhabitants and tourists.


Building project Y5-S1 MARCH

MArch (Design) Shuo Qiu, Siyi Wang, Jing Li, Yuan Yang, Maoting Zeng, Kaiqi Chen, Wenyan Zhou, Ahmed Al-Jahdhami, Lucia Pramanti MArch (Theory and Design) Nama’a Qudah, Sogol Zafari, Richen Zan REGULAR CRITICS Dr. Lauara Hanks Dr. Wang Qi Dr. Yanhui Lei Mr Benson Lau Dr. Nicole Porter

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Y5-S1 MARCH Building project [2] [4]

[1,4,5] The Power of Nature | Yuan Yang, Maoting Zeng Bashan Reservoir area is featured by bio-diverse swamp and one of the five distinguish geological characters in China - Gu, which is a particular type of flat-top hill only found in the local spot. Therefore, we try to celebrate the creation of such great natural beauties. Firstly a large wetland is allocated under the Dam where a series of different water landscapes are designed on different levels. Cascade, brooks, ponds, lakes and shoals are well weaved together by a subtle network of skywalks. Then a unique Gu-top culture centre is designed to cut into the cliff rock of Prince Gu, where versatile functions like geological museum, sky opera, restaurant and market can be enjoyed by tourists.

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Building project

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[2,3] Golden Bull ecological Holiday Village | Shuo Qiu, Lucia Pramanti Bashan reservoir has a strategic location between six existing AAAA tourist attractions in the county, also hugs crystal clear water and scenic topography such as Gu and farm terraces, etc.

used between each row of rooms. These swales create a natural environment (plants, birds, insects, fishes) that is not only enjoyable, but also eliminate pollutions.

We decided to design a luxury hotel on the Golden Bull Island, where the rooms can have a good view to both the water body and hills on the south side. Cascading arrangement using the existing contour blends the hotel with the nature and provides each room with natural light and natural ventilation. To overcome problems with the waste, bio-swales that purifies water using natural processes (with gravity, soil and plants) are 209


[5]

Y5-S1 MARCH Building project [6] [4]

[6-9] National Village Memorial Centre | Nama’a Qudah, Sogol Zafari The thing that stood out the most in Bashan as a foreigner visiting China for the first time were the local villages. For those reasons, we chose to design a memorial that celebrates the village in all of its characteristics, ranging between the physical and tangible aspects to the less tangible aspects. Another part of the design will try to focus on an existing village and try to show the importance and beauty of it. In Chinese traditional architecture wherever they had a beautiful scenery, they used to frame it. Therefore we tried to use framing to focus on the beautiful and unique parts of the village, from a nice landscape viewed in the village to very small details of Chinese architecture, and even making a framed stage for showing traditional ceremonies of Chinese culture. 210


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Building project

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yan zhu

prof tim heath

Y6-S2 MArch infusing the city

urban design project: infusing the city ng7 This module aims to enable students to pull together the various strands of urban design thought - visual, social, functional, environmental and economic - which together constitute the full extent of urban design action. The students should understand the importance of the design process as a fundamental component of achieving a high quality public realm. Students are expected to deliver a comprehensive urban design proposal which reflects social, cultural, environmental and economic demands of urban sustainability using an ‘Integrated Design Approach’. The main focus for this module is a mixed-use development in an urban context. The project site, the MediPARK@NG7 will be one of a cluster of worldclass medical science research facilities co-located with a leading teaching hospital in the UK. It is intended that MediPARK@NG7will be an exemplar initiative located in the close vicinity to the Queen’s Medical Centre, the UKs 4th largest teaching hospital with a number of internationally, renowned departments (see figures 3.1 and 3.2) It is planned that MediPARK@NG7 will be an environment for research and collaborative economic activity between small and larger organisations that need co-location. The design studio project involves social, economic, environmental considerations related to the urban design process. In addition to the traditional design process some quantitative assessment tools are introduced to justify the design solution in terms of the physical and environmental performance of the comprehensive design proposals. This is a live project that will stimulate fresh ideas for this exciting development close to the University. As such, the reviews are held by the design tutors and staff from Nottingham Regeneration Limited, the developer of the MediPARK@ NG7.

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infusing the city Y6-S2 MArch

YEAR 5 Malathe Gamal Mahmoud Hamid, Adriyan Kusuma, Zhihao Li, Chang Liu, Nicole Rogers, Feifan Yin, Chaochen Yin.

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[1,3] MediPark @Ng7 | Hamid This design proposal is for a new medical science park to the east of the QMC in Nottingham, with total built up area of 51,000 m2. . It comprises three clusters of Laboratories, research and office buildings all for the medical field research, together with mixed use facilities: new landscaped public realm, restaurants, cafes, exhibitions and public parking underground. The design concept emphasizes that a working environment must not be separated from the surrounding, but as an integral part of it, which will add a place that is unique, memorable and interesting either to the employees or the public. The design reflects these principles in the public/private urban spaces and in linking the site with its adjacent urban contexts; via landscape, connections and its relation to the 214

tram. It fits the tram as if it is one of the main design components; it considers its main lines as strong lines of the landscape as if they dissolve in the landscape or emerge from it. The design aims to refresh the urban context by using interesting colours for the building thus adding a unique aesthetical dimension that will result in identifying MediPark as a unique and attractive life science community.


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infusing the city

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[2,7] Medipark | Kusuma Nottingham has planned to set up world class medical research facilities with a link to the UK’s hospitals. Medipark @ NG7 is going to be developed at the site next to the Queens Medical Centre’s hospital which has been renowned for its leading teaching hospital status with international reputation.

Strategy: • Engage the river front and integrate it to the site as a place for activities, promoting the site’s prominence by providing place and destination for public not just for the workers. Providing interactive water crossing beside a common crossing bridge.

The design propose a solution to seam the whole urban fabric by providing good permeability, enhancing the access and linkages. The site is designed to engage the surrounding existing area.

• Mixed use design approach to keep the balance of the live site • Emphasize the path along the tram line, creating strong access and linkage as well as orientation and wayfinding • Design the left over space under the elevated tram way, and integrate it with active frontage along the river bank 215


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Y6-S2 MArch infusing the city [3]

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[4-6,8,9] MediPARK | Feifan Yin The purpose of this project was to understand the various stands of urban design. The main focus of the design was to have a mixed-use development in an urban context. The site is located close to the east of the QMC site and covers 3.7 hectares. Now, there is a mixture of employment uses occupying the site, together with approximately 1.4 hectares of land used for QMC staff car parking. The area suffers inactivity, since the site does not have good connections with its surroundings and lack high quality public space. Besides, the new tram line impacts the site to some extent. In this project, a comprehensive proposal which reflected social, environmental, and economical urban sustainability was produced. In order to enhance the connections from its surroundings, pedestrian 216

and cycling routes were designed into the site. Besides, there was a pedestrian along the tram line to link the site and the nearest tram station. What is more, main high quality public spaces were added along the canal and in to the centre of the site to provide more opportunities to create activities. Finally, the function of the site changed from industrial use to mixed-use to improve the economy.


Y6-S2 MArch

infusing the city

[8]

[7] [9]

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Year Six STUDIO 1 Dr Katharina Borsi Tim Collett Nick Haynes URBAN MEDIATIONS. CITY FRINGE: PERSISTENCE AND TRANSFORMATION STUDIO 2 Professor Michael Stacey Frances Stacey Laura Gaskell Sheldon Brown John Morgan MARS [MAKING ARCHITECTURE RESEARCH STUDIO]

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Part Two Year Six Katharina Borsi In their final year of study, students explore their own interests, ethos and design agenda through the development of a yearlong design thesis. Research studios provide an intellectual framework for architectural experimentation and critical reflection. The themes of the individual studios offer an initial impetus to the student’s individual design thesis. Students refine their research skills and develop proposals into comprehensive design portfolios reflecting the year’s endeavors. In so doing, students begin to define their individual architectural ethos and declare the individual academic agendas that will carry them into their future professional careers. In the first semester, design research evolves through a balanced combination of individual and group based research. Seminars, lectures and workshops support the research process. An iterative design process is promoted through analytical drawing and making in a range of media, underpinned by theoretical and philosophical investigation. At the end of the first semester, students have formulated a brief that articulates the intellectual agenda of their final design project and that declares its contribution to architectural knowledge – be that cultural, social, political, formal, tectonic or environmental. The second semester serves to develop an architectural proposition that responds to the intellectual, speculative and creative context of the research theme. The development of the proposal is supported by specialist tutorials in the areas of history and theory, structures, construction and environmental design. The following pages show work from the two research studios offered in the academic year 2013/14. Studio 1, Urban Mediations, taught by Katharina Borsi, Tim Collett & Nick Haynes focused on a critical investigation of urbanism and the response of architecture to the urban condition. Studio 2, Making Architecture Research Studio, taught by Michael Stacey, Sheldon Brown and Laura Gaskell, focused on making as the primary mode of design research.

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KATHARINA BORSI

TIM COLLETT

NICK HAYNES

Y6 MArch STUDIO 1

STUDIO 1: URBAN MEDIATIONS. CITY FRINGE: PERSISTENCE AND TRANSFORMATION LONDON. The studio is concerned with an in-depth investigation into the urban condition and the response of architecture as a catalyst. It understands architecture and urbanism as series of interlinked spaces, interstices and voids that deliver platforms and infrastructures for multiple, changing scenarios of occupation. The studio is a laboratory that seeks to explore how to draw, notate, model and diagram ideas, concepts and performances of architectural and urban spaces across scales. In the academic year 2013/14, the Studio Urban Mediations continued to pose the question: What is the city? This question was explored through design research across a range of scales: from a reading of the ‘City Fringe’, to the study of architectural concepts, to a design project rooted in construction and materiality in semester 2. Aldo Rossi described the city as humankind’s greatest artifact, both persisting over time and subject to continuous transformation. ‘City Fringe: Persistence and Transformation’ explored a number of urban artefacts in London – a street: Brick Lane; a void: Hoxton Market and a Megabuilding: Smithfield Market. The study analyzed the urban process as the dynamic interrelationship between the city as an artifact and the city as an organism. The drawings explored the relationship between the artefact’s spatiality and it’s ‘life’, that is, its pattern of inhabitation, the subjectivities and collectivities of its inhabitants; the experiencing and acting out of difference and conflict; the shifting thresholds between individual and collective life worlds.

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The urban study framed the context of the student’s individual research themes, developed in the second semester into Urban Catalyst –, a building whose formal articulation, spatial organisation and programme responds to and activates the urban process. The range of projects in this publication demonstrate the richness of an exploration grounded in intellectual inquiry, reasoned across scales and delivered as poetic, tectonic, responsive artefact in their own right.


STUDIO 1 Y6 MArch

YEAR 6 Samantha Bracey, Vasiliki Chatzikonstantinou, John Comer, Philip Gilder, Alisdair Gray, Philippa Griffiths, Edward Higgins, Claire Humphrey, Matthew Humphreys, Lewis Kirk, Robert Neal, Michael Photiou, Rebekka Ranjan, Shashwat Sahay, Thomas Simmons, Jeffrey Smith, William Thomas, Joseph Yates A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO OUR GUEST CRITICS Deborah Saunts (DSDHA) Professor David Porter (Clemens & Porter) Matthias Kunz (David Chipperfield Architects) Pat West (James Gorst Architects) Bernd Schmutz (Caruso St. John Architects) Christiane Felber (David Chipperfield Architects) Chris Schulte (Allies & Morrison Architects) Jo Fairfax (Jo Fairfax studio)

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[1,5,14] Montessori school for Hoxton square | Joseph Yates The existing primary school at the North of Hoxton Square is the weak point programmatically and architecturally, providing the dual objectives for my brief: to design a facade which completes the square; and to provide a means for the school to connect to the culture of the area to the south. The design of a new Montessori Primary School provides a suitable means for the children to connect with the creative culture of Hoxton Square. This is enhanced through the provision of practical studios for art-based workshops and lessons along Hoxton Street, and a gallery on Hoxton Square that functions as the public interface for the development. 224

Consideration of the varied contexts of the primary elevations provides a means to explore my thesis through considered faรงade design.


STUDIO 1 Y6 MArch [2]

[2,4,20] Memory & Mending in the Palimpsest City | Robert J P Neal From a conceptual foundation in a Japanese material philosophy of mending, the thesis research evolves a critique of what constitutes a mend to the tangible and intangible elements of a city, namely Berlin. The archive, writing facility and performance program utilises an existing theatre which has stood devoid of function since 1935 since its Jewish owners and occupiers were surgically removed from the city. The proposal affords a legacy to the theatre to allow it to contribute towards a mend to the intangible memory of the city. The lack of palpable evidence of the vast quantity of Jewish restitution properties within the district of Mitte is addressed and forms the basis for the urban configuration. The extrapolation of the typical urban figures of vast Banderw채nde (windowless fire walls), courtyards and city voids help to define the massing and public realm between the 3 objects; the

archive, the bookshop and the writing & recital theatre. Using an architectural framework grounded in the concepts of overlapping transparency, the relationship between new and old fabric is spatially interrogated and the existing theatre space is reimagined as a recital hall for the recounting of some of Germanys autobiographical stories. The writing and printing facilities for the encoding of this information into manuscripts are housed in the plinth structure which unifies the seemingly distinct above ground formal urban elements. The programmatic, urban and architectural strategies are engaged to fight amnesia in the collective unconscious of the city.

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[3]

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R E TA I L S PA C E / / The retail space connects the process of manufacturing the furniture with the buying of it through views up in to the teaching workshop and down, through the display wall, into the machine room.

STUDIO 1 [4]

[3,16] The Shoreditch Furniture Trade | Thomas Simmons This thesis considers the modern relevance that the history of Shoreditch can have in light of the current context of globalisation. In particular, the homogenising effects that put at risk the intricacies and peculiarities that give Shoreditch its distinctive character and sense of place. The design project proposes a Civic Furniture Hub within the heart of Shoreditch, re-establishing the craft and acting as a re-affirmation of place. This includes a public and private block, centred around a large atrium space, with an exhibition tower standing as a landmark on the prominent corner of the site. The building is a celebration of the furniture trade which is expressed through visual interactions and connections between multiple spaces and stages of production. 226

[5]

[6] Changing Urban Nature: Using the Biophilia Hypothesis | Edward Higgins Increasing research as has indicated that exposure to nature is essential for human psychological and physical health, and indeed we crave nature as part of our mentality, this is known as Biophilia; our urge to affiliate with plants and other lifeforms. As we move more into cities the segregation between Urban and Nature gets ever greater, but this needs not be the case, Changing Urban Nature aims to address this unbalance. Located within a new botanical garden which links historically with the fruit gardens that previously occupied the site, the scheme provided a green addition to the city where one can learn and reconnect with nature.


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[8,10] The threshold of north and south Hoxton | John Comer

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This proposal has emerged from my thesis and urban study work throughout the year, which focused on the thresholds both in the urban realm of Hoxton and in the small scale experiences of our buildings. I concluded that there was an established division between the north and south of Hoxton immediately evident in the North side of Hoxton Square.

mirrors the existing south entrance. The shared programme presents a public theatre and a performing arts extension to the existing Hackney College adjacent to the site. As well as addressing the physical divide evident in the existing site, the proposal should challenge the perceived negative thresholds in the area by encouraging social interaction.

The physical defensive architecture, building type/use, history and social perceptions have isolated the communities in the estates from the cultural gentrification of the arts movement in Hoxton Square. My proposal situated on the north east corner of Hoxton Square seeks to re-establish a connection to the isolated estates to the north by introducing an ‘urban promenade’ directly into Hoxton Square, which

The layout of the plan is carefully thought out both in the new external connections and internal relationships between the two programmes. The elevations and tectonics hope to create a gradual threshold between the north and south which is sensitive to Hoxton Square square’s history and status as opposed to the current precise threshold (sudden contrast) which currently exists.


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[9] Light and Shadow | Michael Photiou Ever since the beginning of civilizations, light has had some sort of meaning to the peoples of this Earth. Light has always been related to the sacred, religious, spiritual and cosmological beliefs. Light, quintessentially, is a stimulating force and architects have long realised its potential for moving the human soul. Architecture is only architecture because light allows us to see the buildings and structures around us, without light we would not be able to perceive objects as forms and it is this perception that gives space an architectural quality and meaning.

space and it is what allows light to be the shape of space. The thesis aims to understand the reason behind the illuminatory differences of sacred structures between Christian buildings. Light in Saint Mark’s Basilica, York Minster Cathedral, the Monastery of La Tourette and Notre Dame du Haut are compared respectively, in order to understand why and how light has been used in very different ways to inspire the interior qualities of buildings.

This thesis study focuses on religious structures as the architecture of the sacred has always had a strong affinity with light. Light is what gives us the knowledge of architecture, it is what channels us through 229


[11]

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[12] How the urban form supports artists and the role of the artist studio within the redevelopment of cities | Jeffrey Smith In today’s financially fragile society, art and creativity have become key drivers for economic growth, and artists have found themselves playing a critical role in the redevelopment of the urban fabric. The art movement in the East end marked the beginning of an influential creative community. This began at the centre of London, and then spread away to areas further north and east. Several factors contributed to both the initial success of the art movement in Hoxton and Shoreditch and its gradual decline. These areas were once vibrant artistic centres but became commercialised and overpriced. Now, with the saturation of London, the sustainability of the creative industry depends on the expansion further north. Several potential disadvantages of the continued art movement can be identified, such

ection through art studios, art walkway and art therapy studios

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as those seen in Hoxton but there are identifiable solutions. One key factor is the use of social art alongside visual art, more specifically looking at Art Therapy. While visual art and creativity can be a catalyst for development in urban areas, so can social art & art therapy be a catalyst for individual personal development, allowing questions and issues that arise to be discussed.


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[13] Safeguarding Smithfield | Lewis Kirk The design portion of the thesis project focuses on Smithfield market. Smithfield Market is the last market in London still operating in wholesale on its original site and therefore provides a scenario for redevelopment similar to Covent Garden in the 1960’s. The project casts a critical eye over proposed schemes for the General Market block from both John McAslan + Partners and Save. The two schemes are polar opposites in their attitudes to heritage, conservation and function.

The scheme introduces a culinary and butchering school to the General Market which in conjunction with a new retail market and restaurant provide services vital to the continued existence of the market as well as providing a new public interface to reinforce the status of the market with the local community of workers. The project aims to allow urban progressiveness as well as the conservation of the most valuable elements of the existing market.

The proposed scheme presents a third scenario which aims to uphold the values and rules laid out in the Thesis Research document with the goal of producing an entity which will propagate the functioning of the existing market within a changing urban context. 231


[15]

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[15] Self build Education Centre | Alisdair Gray M AC H I N E RO O M / /

After meetings with local residents, I became aware of the pressing need for Lifelong Learning facilities in the Spitalfields and Banglatown Wards of the Borough of Tower Hamlets in London. Thinking about how such an Education Centre building might be procured, it became clear that the usual approaches of commissioning or renting were not viable. Consequently, in conjunction with the locally-based Attlee Foundation, I decided to explore the financial and practical potential of some form of self-build project.

The communal machine room occupies the entire basement floor. A void at ground floor level enables views up from the workspace to the canopy of the trees in the adjacent garden. The windows to the right are the display cases of the retail space, allowing views past the furniture and in to the machine room, decreasing the perceived distance between the manufacture and purchasing of furniture and promoting local production.

My thesis examined the community context, the skills and resources available, and the viability & design of community self-build projects both here in the UK and overseas. I designed a structural system and associated modular faรงade system, which would enable a team 232

of community members to build the required facilities, supported and trained by small number of professionals The resulting project delivers a 1000m2 Education Centre on the southern half of the site and a 200-seat Auditorium on the northern half. Each building comprises a professionally-completed structural core, made from reclaimed masonry and masonry gabions, and designed to enable the construction by the amateur team of several modular lightweight wings which enhance, extend and develop the teaching spaces. The buildings have a lightweight facade constructed primarily from a newly-designed system of glass, polycarbonate and timber solar shading louvres supported by a timber frame.


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[18,19] Home & House – Responsive Architecture for the Brick Lane Communities | Phil Gilder The thesis emerged following an in depth study into the urban corridor of Brick Lane. Historically associated with various waves of migrant communities, the area is in a constant state of flux. Through extended reading of Aldo Rossi, I conclude that some buildings can be defined as artefacts as a result of the urban process. Each artefact continues to have an evolving relationship with the communities around them, yet most housing in the area stands in contrast and comes and goes with each new wave of migrant arrivals. Also relating to wider issues identified in the housing market, Responsive Architecture is a response to the existing site condition and is seen as a longer-term mass housing solution. The chosen site,

to the west of Brick Lane, has a rich history of new housing typologies. Built-in adaptability gave rise to a structural hierarchy, allowing the built form to change in response to family circumstance, gentrification, and social and technological evolution. Included in the scheme are a variety of public buildings and spaces, each with a specific programme and character. A weekly market showcases the wares of a community kitchen and arts centre, bringing life back onto the streets of the once bustling urban block.

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[20]

BARCH/MENG UNIT 1A [21]

[7,17,21] GNR Warehouse | Matthew Humphreys The Great Northern Railway Warehouse, Nottingham, designed by Thomas Chambers Hine, and listed in 1983 is a monument to the past era of industrial superiority in Nottingham. The thesis research offers criteria for reappropriation through precedent study of various classifications from examples of the most permanent to the most transient and then also in their tectonic manifestation in the form of encapsulation, insertion, and supplementation. This proposal seeks to preserve the collective memory of the ruin and offer a nuance treatment to it through an exploration of these varying reappropriation classifications. The program works in conjunction with the Creative Quarter initiative in Nottingham, in which the site lies, and also responding to the theatrical nature of the ruin. Thus providing a 234

thrust-stage producing theatre with in-house set-design workshop and studios and a café. The design strategy evokes a landscape condition within the ruin, with the programmatic volumes interacting with the ruin that acts as a unifying ribbon. Each space meets the ruin in a different condition coupled with a differing architectural tectonic and intent. The café addresses the ruin both internally and externally. In its manifestation it activates the ruin through openings in the existing brick façade, providing a tangible, tactile experience of the ruin and giving the existing a sense of permeability. The Thrust-Theatre sits a top the North façade, both supplementing the ruin and exhibiting itself as a monolithic insertion within the ruin.


STUDIO 1 Y6 MArch [22]

[23]

[11,22,23] Terrain Vague:Brick Lane - The Depository | Vasiliki Chatzikonstantinou The thesis contemplates upon the notion and theory of the terrain vague, described as an unchartered topography of obsolescence within the settled city composed by urban voids. Introducing an introverted urbanism opposing by nature the totalitarian manner with which the city expands and perceiving a network of unapparent spaces suspended in the state of ruin, an invisible city is revealed laying inbetween the settled one.

previous loss of spaces for literacy groups in the area. The Depository is a product of an act of slotting a bookcase on-site. It is a constructed terrain vague, a world of intermediate spaces that come together to provide for the creative industry and think tanks groups that push the contemporary boundaries in a cultural hive. Contributing to its function, a system of satellites offer spaces for introversion for such groups to expand within the city.

The theory of the terrain vague is applied on Brick Lane and through a process of identification and further classification of the found spaces; the intention is to introduce an architecture that is born from narratives of the past responding to the closure of Whitechapel Library and to the 235


PROFESSOR MICHAEL STACEY

FRANCES STACEY

LAURA GASKELL

SHELDON BROWN

Y6 MArch STUDIO 2: MARS

MARS [MAKING ARCHITECTURE RESEARCH STUDIO] An intertwining set of themes runs throughout this studio, exploring a critical and creative dialogue between abstraction and situation, technique and tactility, art and architecture, the analogue and the digital. The studio emphasises the strength of the group by working collectively to generate an informed discourse on contemporary architecture, while valuing the diversity of invention by each student. Thesis projects ranged from a Street School in Woolwich by Emma Eady, via Stillness & Voices in Nottingham by Samuel Critchlow to a Music and Story Telling Loci for St Ives by Peter Blundy. The participants in the studio are encouraged to be radical and situated in their design practice, the primary mode of design research is making. A fundamental well spring of MARS is making and how the decisions related to architecture develop as physical realisation is approached. Sverre Fehn eloquently states ‘all architecture is dependent on construction. Construction seeks the earth; it falls upon it. The eye, light, and thought, that which spatially disturbs these words, [is] construction.’ The tutors of MARS believe that architecture is much more like literature than a reductive process. Architecture is full of opportunity and invention whilst addressing the needs of humankind, including our collective cultural needs. MARS is interested in architecture as fact and fiction. In the design of possible futures that may or may not become reality, but have the power to move people and potentially change the world for better. A key aim of the pedagogy of the studio is the development of an empathetic imagination, as clearly articulated by William Hazlitt (1805) ‘The imagination, by means of which alone I can anticipate future objects, or be interested in them, must carry me out of myself into the feelings of others by one and the same process by which I am thrown forward as it were into my future being.’

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MARS engages in an iterative design process, making to draw and drawing to make architecture. Drawing by hand is explored as a key skill, ‘used as a direct, spontaneous yet considered means to pitch construction against deconstruction, macro against micro, polished against raw, fragile against concrete’ . Workshops ranged from drawing through printmaking, paper modelling to casting concrete in fabric formwork. Analysis and making of case study houses progressed to a live Dolls House Competition. This years MARS field trip went to Ontario Canada where the studio with, Michael Stacey Architects, assembled the third stage of Prototyping Architecture Exhibition in the Cambridge Galleries. This exhibition opened in conjunction with ACADIA Adaptive Architecture 2013 Conference (http://2013.acadia.org), which the studio had the pleasure of attending. Prototyping Architecture has been shortlisted for RIBA President Medal for Research 2014. ‘MARS zooms out from dolls houses to mega-structures’ ‘Michael Ramwell’s inhabited concrete bridge over the Lower Thames has a muscular ambition’. Robert Evans, Architects Journal, 25 July 2014


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Quoted by Per Plaf Fjeld, The Pattern of Thoughts, 2009, Monacelli Press, p182

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William Hazlitt, An Essay on the Principles of Human Action (1805), facsimile reprint (Gainsville, FL: Scholars’ Facsimiles & Reprints, 1969), p. 3.

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Frances Stacey, Jerwood Drawing Prize 2009, eds. Anita Taylor and Siobhán Kneale, 2009,Jerwood V.A., p.130

iii

YEAR 6 Amarveer Singh Bains, Peter Blundy, Samuel Critchlow, Jonathan Davidson, Joel Day, Emma Eady, Matthew Fielding, Benjamin Fisher, Anthony Kong, Yang Lu, Luis Mejias Castellano, Nimesh Mistry, Yasen Nedyalkov, Nicole Ong, Natalie Panayidou, Minesh Patel, Vikash Patel, Michael Ramwell, Katherine Tokarski, Dominic Ward ASSOCIATE TUTORS Ben Stanforth Jenny Grewcock Rachel Delargey GUEST CRITIC Mark Hines

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[1-5] RIVER ROOM: An architecture for the Thames | Micheal Ramwell My thesis proposal investigated ‘an architecture for the Thames’ by observing the life and history of the Thames, its waterfront buildings and bridges - this was an observation of how life meets the river, its use, and how it has evolved in time. My pursuit was to create an architectural response that engages with the river and allows a new reading and appropriation of the Thames. The proposal, an inhabited bridge, creates new land between Beckton and Thamesmead in east London, acting as an architectural response to the need for infrastructure, housing, local amenities, places of work, places of worth, as well as a response to the Thames as an undervalued, under utilised river in our growing capital city. This is not a self-referential response but a reading of the needs and histories of 238

London as a growing capital. Infrastructure is perceived as a catalyst for architecture and place making. A sense of monumentality was embraced to emphasise this as a cultural destination east of our capital city. The proposal acts not only as a crossing but a destination in its own right, which draws life, culture, new economy, and new ways to appreciate the river Thames. It is programmatically built up by local amenities, housing, public squares and gardens, an art institute named the ‘Young Tate’, art studio collectives, and a mixed-use tower. This play on typology works together to create a working and meaningful place. This ‘River Room’ architecture acts to re-appropriate the Thames once again.


STUDIO 2: MARS Y6 MArch [2]

[2,19,20,21] A New School of Making | Dominic Ward Traditionally craftsmanship was perceived as the physical work performed by a skilled hand. Skilled tradesman, who had developed their skills over years of practice, used their learned knowledge to craft architectural junctions and details. Today, material and tectonic understanding is the responsibility of the architect. With the architect’s increasing reliance on digital technologies they are becoming more and more disconnected with the physicality of architecture. The thesis proposes a New School of Making for The Bartlett School of Architecture. This new school aims to encourage students to become more engaged with the practice of making, reflecting on both traditional timber craft techniques and contemporary practices. Through a constant physical interaction with materials the students will

be able to gain a more enriched tectonic understanding outside of their computer and sketchbook. Located on Shoreditch High Street, the school acknowledges the site’s rich heritage of craftsmanship and encourages student/public interaction. The limited palette of materials creates moments which celebrate the beautiful qualities of timber. Concrete and brass plinths along the High Street rise from the floor slab to elevate the crafted work. The delicate oak roof truss supports north lights which flood the workshops with diffused natural light.

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INHABITED INFRASTRUCTURE River Thames, structure, inhabited rooms, and public realm

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[6] Memory and Invention: Place Making | Matthew Fielding

My thesis began considering the UK at a time of economic stratification, whereby London and the South-East have emerged from the economic downturn, while much of the UK, particularly the northern industrial towns continue their relative decline. Focussing my research on the west midlands, once known as the workshop of the world, I began researching urban regeneration that had the intentions of stimulating these areas, however the ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach has often rendered these places with a sense of placelessness. RDS NEW PUBLIC SPACE

University and proposes the redevelopment of the declining south-west corner making the University part of the city again. The creation of a new public space, which connects to the existing market, a green corridor which breaks down the ‘concrete-collar’ of the ring-road attempts to remake the city. I have proposed a new business school and live/work block for start up businesses to create the necessary agglomeration that can foster the innovation of Wolverhampton’s industrial heritage.

Using critical regionalism as a theoretical grounding for my work, I began investigating the civic role universities have in urban renewal. Situating my project in Wolverhampton, the proposed university development stops the anti-urban northward development of the 241


Y6 MArch STUDIO 2: MARS [7]

[7] A Platform for Stillness and Voices | Samuel Critchlow The project looks to remake a meaningful join with the city through Weekday Cross, beginning a composition that creates a framework for the rich hive of developing local networks and activities, whilst acting as a catalyst for future change across the Broad Marsh. Gardens are held at the heart of the thesis project, framed by a forum that transforms a site of historical civic contention, into a platform for openness and collaboration. The programme and nature of the project has been allowed to emerge in direct response to an understanding of a presence of place, arrived at through a composite reading of contemporary and historical conditions. Throughout the 1700s, Nottingham was beautifully picturesque and known nationally as The Garden Town. The topography raised the town as if it were a jewelled crown set upon a rolling landscape, the urban and topographical 242

compositions working together to enhance one another, supporting this local identity. Changes within Nottingham’s urban fabric and social climate interfered with this balance and in response, the built programme of the project is woven through a public landscape that knits this threshold back together in a manor that seeks to amplify a contextual presence.


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[8]

[9]

[10]

[8,9] Fabric Formwork | Vikash Patel, Emma Eady, Dominic Ward

[10] Inverted Vault | Amarveer Bains, Anthony Kong

Inspired by Anne-Mette’s Ambiguous Chairs we decided to design and make a bench. Her series of works challenge the users perceptions of material by suggesting the chairs are soft and have similar properties to traditional upholstered chairs such as the Chesterfield. Constrained to the use of concrete we wanted to explore the tactile perception of concrete. The initial designs were inspired by the fluid properties of concrete and how they may influence the form when the concrete was poured into the fabric formwork. The strength of the design and method in which it could be formed was successful and that came through in the final product. In making the bench we used and learnt a number of techniques, which will be useful in the future. Using fabric allowed us to create forms that would be very hard to make using conventional formwork.

The concrete vault was made during the Canada field trip at university of Waterloo. Our studio unit MARS (Michael Stacey) was assigned to experiment with concrete and fabric framework for the exhibition. My team, me, Amar Bains and Ben Fisher choice to make a concrete vault. The idea of the design was to create a curve vault structure similar to a vault one can find in a church ceiling. Using fabric and two set of wood mould, we made two identical piece. The inverted part was due to the size (thinnest part of the concrete) and the time (2 days), the vault size was limited therefore two inverting vaults was made instead.

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[11]

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[11,27] Woolwich Street School | Emma Eady

[12] Open House | Michael Ramwell, Peter Blundy, Samuel Critchlow

Woolwich Street School is a cultural based programme that acknowledges that enterprise is the driving factor in the regeneration of many high streets today. The students will attend workshop classes at the school and also get the opportunity to sell their produce and work in the adjoining shops.

A dolls house inspired by Adolf Loos’ Villa Müller in Prague. Playing on Loos’ Raumplan ideals, which were most clearly apparent in the Müller family home, the dolls house named ‘Open House’ is articulated by operable volumes and interior linings. The closed mass is articulated by coloured planes, which identify the operable elements. Sliding sections, hinged volumes, and a removable chair create a realm for play. An idea of the ‘lining’ has been acted upon by creating a set of themed rooms by using printed nets. These can then be designed by the child, creating their own set of rooms, restricted only by the possibilities of their imagination.

The school will sell education as much as it sells its produce, the shop windows will be split to exhibit the schools teaching facilities and workshops aswell as the sold goods. A browse through the school campus will allow you to identify what skills you could gain at this school and promote education as a way in which people can develop. Much like a market, the school becomes a site of interaction and vibrancy full of opportunity and locality. 244


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[13]

[14]

[13,16] Celtic Threads, Stories of People and Place | Peter Blundy

[14] M(ARINA) A(ABRAMOVIC) I(NSTITUTE) | Natalie Panayidou

The thesis remodels the existing St Ives Museum and adds an adjacent extension which houses a new music school and performance space, answering the towns need for a principle performance space. This project explores the untold history of the town. The re-modelling of the existing run down St Ives museum is the starting point for the retelling of the towns untold story by way of an architecture for St Ives that brings together stories of people and place.

My thesis explores the relation of the human body with its surrounding environment; most specifically how the senses work with each other and how they perceive the different architectural qualities of a space that we perceive as an experience. I Focused into the analysis of outdoor spaces and also the anatomy and proportion of the human body, I have found myself interested in the work of a world- wide famous performance artist; Marina Abramovic. Abramovic as one of the pioneers, in the world of the performing arts, is using her own body as a vehicle to push mental and physical boundaries. Through her performances she is embracing the human-to-human interaction but also strengthening the performances by choosing a space that will either make people be aware of the presence of other human beings or really tight spaces where people will have to go through uncomfortable situations.

Where the current museum Shyly occupies the old promontory, the extension, conceived as three slate volumes, acts to complete the edge of the town as well as enclosing a new public performance space. This new Square echoes the old Squares of St Ives that have seasonally played host to music, poetry and story.

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[15,17] Dolls house | Emma Eady, Vikash Patel, Dominic Ward The initial concept of the design was to make a dolls house that could be changed and adapted, promoting the clients act of invention and creativity. Looking at the way in which children play with their toys we understood that they create stories and they act out those stories through the toys and spaces around them. The spaces inside can be adapted and the cassettes can be kept as a record of the child’s creative development. The Dolls House itself becomes a ‘scrapbook’ of memories.

[18] Learning from Letchworth: Towards a new [compact] garden city | Minesh Patel This thesis explores garden cities as a possible solution to the housing crisis. The first garden city of Letchworth, along with other examples were studied and analysed to inform the design of my own proposed new ‘garden city’ on a greenfield site in East Cambridgeshire. One of the primary aims for the housing scheme was to create a strong sense of community, achieved through the design of the communal gardens and landscaping. The layout and construction of the houses also ensured a flexible house type with a long life span which is able to adapt to the towns changing needs over the years. The designs of the houses were based on the traditional Georgian terrace – a typology common to Cambridge. 247


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[19] Live/work-Shop/work | Amarveer Singh Bains Coventry city was once a place in which the manufacturing industry was hugely successful. Through history the city has had a rich heritage of making and craftsmanship that has took place throughout the city. From the weavers cottages, watch makers houses right through to the modern day car factories, Coventry has seen an evolving cycle of industries experiencing their periods of success and demise. Present day Coventry has forgotten its glorious heritage in making, and through this thesis I aim to exploit the value of making by situating an architectural intervention in a key part of the city centre. By reinterpreting the live/work house I have designed an architecture that celebrates the craftsman by integrating a sense of community interaction between the public and the maker. 248

Workshops become exposed to the public on key routes through the city centre, allowing for views into spaces in which the craftsmen can be seen making their bespoke products. The shop unit atop of which the craftsmen live, becomes a space for the public to meander into and experience the quality products. The dwelling becomes a space that is distinct from the workshop, tectonically it pays homage to the industrial aesthetic, whilst remaining warm and comfortable to live within.


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beyond the studio

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end of year show [2] [1]

[1-2] UON End of Year Show 2014 We were fortunate to be able to celebrate this year’s work from across the school at the end of year show awards and exhibition on a fine summer’s evening in June. Again over 30 awards were given out most of which were sponsored by industry or friends of the Department. A special presentation was made this year to Nicola Gerber, who has been running the year 2 & 3 studio modules for over 10 years, and who left us this summer to undertake a fresh challenge in India with her family.

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arhitecture matters [4]

[3-6] Architecture Matters Lecture Series | John Morgan Before reflecting on the recent slate of lectures, thanks must be offered. First, to each guest lecturer; your making time to journey to Nottingham and spending time with students is warmly appreciated. Then, just as importantly, to the audience, is our gratitude for the consistently high turnout from across the department. That is a healthy sign of a collective desire to expand your learning experiences beyond the curriculum’s core offer. Such consistent interest valorises the very purpose of AM. While the lectures are deemed extra-curricular – the reason for including this summary under the yearbook’s events section and not alongside the studios’ output, this perhaps serves to obscure AM’s mandate. Broadly speaking, the intent is to educate and to inspire the audience. 254

Further, content is designed to enhance the studios’ primary teaching objectives, namely to explore ideas that generate the spaces and forms of architecture. And while it is true that attending AM does not equate to credit in the official curricular sense, it provides added value by being an outlet for the exposure to ‘new’ things in a live format. In this sense, a single lecture will expose you to an outsider (to our university) whose task is to present a distinct insight into their projects within the realms of architecture. However, by attending regularly, that exposure is multiplied; more guest lecturers’ points of view enables scope for building up a deeper understanding of contemporary practices in design and research. This mental construction is therefore contingent upon articulating differences. For this series, guest lecturers were told that the overarching theme was ‘making’. To help them fit its meaning with their own exemplary work, each was given leeway to explore the practical application of making at diverse scales: up at the city as urban organism, or zooming into that


beyond the studio arhitecture matters

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of a building, or further still to its material details. Added to that, inviting lecturers from backgrounds beyond the architectural profession to include engineers, landscape architects, writers and urbanists reinforced the plan to draw lecture content from the widest range of sources. To appreciate the full effect, attendance for most or all lectures was imperative. For those students who did so, your patience and loyalty is commendable. For those who did not, or could not, be present regularly, some highlights are offered. Over the eleven lectures, the series offered some fascinating connections. For instance, Stephen Taylor’s lecture included his material explorations into the potential of slurry concrete as rustic columns and the exploitation of compact void spaces to relieve building sections; by contrast, Dominic Papa, of S333 Architecture + Urbanism, presented projects that spanned scales from urban masterplanning to innovative stacked housing. Jamie Fobert’s lecture followed his progression from

designing intimate displays of art exhibitions towards the well-crafted scheme to extend Tate St. Ives’ galleries. Two Honorary Professors, Peter Clegg and Mark Whitby, also joined us; the former explored the challenges surrounding the design of energy sustainable buildings, while the latter recounted the integrated collaboration between architects and engineers (Piano/ Rogers/ Rice) behind the Pompidou Centre in Paris. Rounding out proceedings, Paul Williams discussed Stanton Williams’s approach to design in terms of tectonics, working materials and the experiential effect of spatial atmospheres. Architecture Matters will return in the coming session for its third series. Its mandate of aiming to educate and to inspire will continue to guide us forward. Our challenge is to keep the content fresh, current and relevant to the contemporary scene.Your challenge, as the student audience, is to take advantage of this unique learning resource. 255


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beginnings, middles and ends [8] [7-9] Beginnings, Middles & Ends | Lecture Series

Beginnings, Middles & Ends is a series of exhibitions that explore how some of the leading UK architectural practices develop their conceptual ideas, through design and construction development into a realized building. A new exhibition space was created at the beginning of this year to house this new series of exhibitions in the foyer of the EEC. The exhibitions are designed to show how different architects take their work from an initial concept, through the detailed design and construction stage to completion of the building. The idea for this project started out as being something that would have great pedagogic value for students within the department. Each practice is asked to show, through their different approaches and styles of drawings, how they undertake their work. Students are able to see how ideas develop into the reality of the building and how things can change and the type of drawings and 256

therefore information that is the focus of the project at key progression stages. The framework for each exhibition is as follows: [1] The Concept | Evidence of concept sketches and how these are rationalised or evidenced by diagrams, sketches and strategies [2] Design Development | Evidence of the process of design [3] Final Design | The design drawings at detailed planning stage Working Drawings | Key constructional drawings including general arrangement drawings, key constructional details and a bay/base drawing of part elevation, plan & section or equivalent.


beyond the studio beginnings, middles and ends [9]

[4] Work on site | Key architects instructions highlighting important and informed decisions (not essential but might be interesting for students) plus images that could be projected of the progress of the build

architects involved in each case. This year the exhibitions showcased the work of three leading UK practices; Birds Portchmouth Russum, Cullinan Studio and Hopkins Architects.

[5] Final Resolution | Images projected of the finished project as built. In association with each exhibition opening, the Practice is invited to talk about the project and their work and the lead Director has also been interviewed by our students. These interviews and lectures have been recorded and will in themselves become an additional teaching resource. Finally it is the intention to produce a small text that will critically review the work and compare different working practices illustrated by drawings and images shown in the exhibitions and through conversations with the 257


[10]

Beyond the studio t&G [11]

[10-15] Tongue & Groove Architect’s Lectures Society, most often called Tongue and Groove, is the social community of the Architecture Department. Rather than being an outright society, we often work alongside the department to organise socials and events, including the end of year exhibition and the end of term parties. Aside from the socials, T&G coordinate workshops and informal lectures to improve the broader scope of architectural skills. This includes photography, public speaking and drawing. Students can take a break from studio work, learn and share with students from all year groups and have one or two free beers while they’re at it.

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The biggest contribution by the society is the End Of Year Ball, organised just before students leave for their summer break. Last year 250 students showed up to a black tie, three course meal, with entertainers, musicians and DJs.


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Society Committee 2014 President | Alex Balchin Vice President | James Fitzgerald Treasurer | Jasmine Che Publicity Officer | Haniyyah Rashid Social Sec | Kristian Bjerre Secretary | Raluca Burlacu First Year Rep | Sebastian Chambers

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Façade workshop

[16-19] Fifth Year Façade workshop | Toby Blackman This year, the department ran a non-assessed, exploratory workshop enabling fifth year students to study a chosen material’s potential as a vertical surface, combining two-dimensional composition and threedimensional relief.

into vacuum-formed, layered acrylic assembly, Professor John Chilton and Dr Paolo Beccarelli guided some wonderful work in fabric, and Toby Blackman’s students combined layered analogue and digital metal fabrication techniques.

Students are guided by tutors in developing a design sensitivity which accommodates the fabrication and construction process (and the potential for material deformation), a design sensitivity which differentiated between fabrication and assembly tolerances, and towards achieving a final, designed alignment and surface formation.

The students produced some excellent work, demonstrating a developing understanding of the parameters to be balanced at the interstices of Design Intent, Fabrication and Assembly. The very best studies demonstrate successful ideas at two scales: at the organisational, compositional scale of a building’s façade, and at the haptic, humane scale of the space in-between our buildings. Toby would like to thank all who contributed to this immersive workshop: students, staff, and industry partners.

Dr Stephen Parnell and Guillermo Guzman led explorations of formwork, tone and relief in concrete, Dik Jarman and John Morgan led investigations 260


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field trips

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[20-23] Field Trip | Amsterdam 1st year B/Arch and M/Eng students travel to Amsterdam in November 2013.

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[24-27] Field Trip | Berlin 2nd and 3rd year B/Arch and M/Eng students from Unit 4 travel to Berlin in February 2014.

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FIELD TRIPS

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[28-32] Field Trip | Copenhagen 2nd and 3rd year B/Arch and M/Eng students from Units 1A, 3A and 5B travel to Copenhagen in February 2014.

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FIELD TRIPS

[33-37] Field Trip | Madrid 2nd and 3rd year B/Arch and M/Eng students from Unit 1B travel to Madrid in February 2014.

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beyond the studio FIELD TRIPS [39] [7]

[38] 6th Year Field Trip - France

[39] 6th Year Field Trip - Canada

Over a seven day period in December 2013, Unit One took a tour of several notable Le Corbusier designed buildings in France whilst taking in a host of other significant sites en-route. Cities visited included Paris, Lyon and Marseille, with a few supplementary excursions to neighbouring towns along the way.

In October 2013, the students of the studio MARS flew to Canada for ten days. The group stayed with Architecture students from the University of Waterloo in Cambridge, Ontario.

The tour was structured from Nottingham through France from North to South, travelling entirely b rail. This itinerary meant that students experienced Le Corbusier’s body of work chronologically. A focus on analytical drawing allowed students to evauate to what extent Le Corbusier’s theory and philosophy of design evolved through Maison La Roche,Villa Savoye, Unite d’Habitation to the Convent of Sainte Marie de La Tourette

Studio MARS participated in a two day Fabric Formwork workshop as well as a three day construction workshop at Philip Beesleys installation; Protocell Mesh (for the Prototyping Architecture exhibition). The group also attended the three day confrence ACADIA 2013 Adaptive Architecture. Students also visited Toronto to see Philip Beesley’s studio, watch a basketball game and visit Niagra Falls before heading back to Nottingham. 265


[40]

beyond the studio TIANJIN [41]

[40-44] UON / Tianjin University Tall Building Joint Studio & Exhibition The first semester tall building studio of 2013/14 was a project jointly hosted by the Department of Architecture and Built Environment, University of Nottingham, and the School of Architecture, Tianjin University, China, with financial support from Pomeroy Studio Singapore and Aecom. The main question asked of students was how can the tall building typology respond to the unique characteristics, qualities and challenges of China, and in particular Tianjin? In order to answer this question, eight Diploma in Architecture students travelled to Tianjin in October 2013 to visit one of the new centres of global tall building construction: the Tianjin Binhai New Area - a region that epitomises the unprecedented scale of China’s current urbanisation with hundreds of skyscrapers being built in a former 266

industrial area. This pace of development is occurring at a speed at which architecture is struggling to keep up with. The Chinese skyscraper is a relatively immature typology, having only been around for a few decades, meaning it hasn’t evolved to its greatest potential and opportunities to relate tall buildings to the unique context of China haven’t been adequately explored. Many of the thousands of residential towers built or under construction in the country (and in fact, in virtually all countries) are the simple repetition of efficient floorplates, with thousands of identical towers lacking any element of site specificity. Commercial high-rise design has shown more opportunities to relate to place, such as the pagoda-inspired literal cultural symbolism of SOM’s Jin Mao Tower in Shanghai, to the controversial and more abstract CCTV HQ in Beijing


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beyond the studio TIANJIN

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by Rem Koolhaas and OMA. Despite this, the North American-inspired glass box remains the standard model for high-rise construction in China. Working in groups with peers from Tianjin University, students undertook detailed site analysis of the Binhai area, including cultural tours in city to understand how high-rise architecture can better respond to the local climate, culture and context of the region. After a few days of intensive research, site studies were presented and the students set off for four days in Beijing in order to visit key cultural and architectural sites, such as the Great Wall of China, Tian An Men Square and the Beijing Olympic Stadium as well as exemplar tall buildings such as the recently completed CCTV Tower.

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Fast-forward three months of intensive design and model-making, and in January 2014, the University of Nottingham welcomed Professor Zou, Dr. Sheng and ten architecture students from the University of Tianjin to the UK in order to take part in an exhibition marking the culmination of the studio, presenting both universities’ tall building dramatic designs for the Binhai area. The exhibition showcased 18 projects in all, showing a remarkable variety of design intentions, creativity and technical skill and understanding. Overall the studio was a remarkable success, not only in reimagining the role the tall building can play in urban China, but also providing a platform for students and academics from the both universities to meet and engage in architectural design, research and social activities. 267


[45]

beyond the studio UNIVERSITAS 21 [46]

[45-47] Universitas 21 | The International Student Exchange As a member of the Universitas 21 network, the University presents numerous opportunities for students to engage with the built environment within an international context. Student exchange programs, international fieldtrips, summer schools and exposure to the diverse internationally linked research activities of staff form an essential part of the Nottingham student experience. By hosting students from afar, we benefit from additional cultural perspectives and approaches to architecture, and as our students returning to Nottingham attest, going on exchange brings new challenges, new people and places to learn from‌ and a great adventure. In 2013 – 14, a select number of year 2 and year 5 students exchanged between Delft, Auckland, Singapore, and a number of universities in 268

Australia. We welcomed our first Intercampus exchange architecture students from the Ningbo campus, and had our first Nottingham campus M.Eng student study at Ningbo. Student Perspective | Delft “When I got the opportunity to go to the TU Delft on exchange I did not need a lot of time to think about it. Getting the chance to supplement my education with experience from another world class institution, along with the excitement of living in a new country made the choice easy. Before I left, I was well looked after by the exchange coordinator at the University of Nottingham and at the TU Delft regarding travel and accomodation issues. The program has been a very positive experience for me: gaining new insight and learning new methods of approaching architecture will aid


beyond the studio UNIVERSITAS 21 [47]

me in my future studies in Nottingham. As a city, Delft is not as vibrant or event packed as Nottingham, but it’s a very pleasant place to live and enjoy the city and the studies on offer.“ Kristian Bjerre, Delft exchange 2013_14. U21 Co-Ordinator Perspective | Summer School, UNSW In July 2014 the University of New South Wales (UNSW) hosted the ‘Shaping the Future City’ Summer School, which I attended along with architecture student Rebecca Floyd. This was a fantastic multidisciplinary event where students engaged in 5 key topics affecting the future of cities: connectivity, inclusiveness, resilience, health and beauty. Sydney served as their laboratory, complemented by presentations by leading local academics and policy-makers. Alongside the academic program, the

summer school included many networking and social events with plenty of Australian sparkling wine to share. Dr Nicole Porter, U21 representative Students can apply to study for one semester at one of several world leading partner institutions. Prospective future students can find out more about out all our exchange programs at www.Nottingham.ac.uk/internationalstudents/exchanges/index.aspx or by contacting Dr Nicole Porter at Nicole.Porter@Nottingham.ac.uk [45] U21 social events complement the academic program! [46] U21 summer school, UNSW, including architecture student Rebecca Floyd (second from right) [47] Indigenous Welcome performance – U21 summer school 269


beyond the studio Nott: Just a City

[48-51] Nott Just a City: A Collaborative Architectural Vision for Nottingham Following on from the first exhibition in 2012, the second edition of this event celebrating Nottingham’s architectureal past, present and future was bigger, better and more successful than ever. Organised by the Nottingham & Derby Society of Architects (NDSA), the exhibition was a two-week long pop-up shop designed to celebrate local architecture and display the work of both local professionals and students. All projects presented were based in the city of Nottingham, thus providing a collaborative vision for how architecture has, and could, impact the city and the lives of those who live and work there. In exhibiting this work as a public exhibition it provided a platform for architects and students to open up a dialogue with the general public about how they see the future of Nottingham, what they feel is absent and how they think local architecture can be improved. 270

Located in a vacant retail unit in Nottingham’s city centre, the exhibition presented the work of 14 of our students; from 1st years making their first forays into the subject, to 6th year students concluding their architectural education. Student projects ranged from a plastic bottle recycling facility, to the envisioning of the local Bennerley Viaduct as cycling infrastructure. The exhibition was manned by local architects and students who provided advice and informal discussions with the hundreds of people who visited the shop over its 14 days. Other events included a fantastic lecture by Chris Watson of Witherford Watson Mann talking about the Stirling Prize winning Astely Castle, personalised brick making with Ibstock and the construction of jelly bean towers with local engineers Elliott Wood. The event concluded with a social, attended by students and organised by T&G.


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Nott: Just a City

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EXHIBITING STUDENTS Alisdair Gray Samuel Critchlow Amarveer Singh Bains Vikash Patel Emma Eady Funsho Parrot Jack Broad Jo Hart Joseph Yates Josephine Dorling Josh Hovey Kaplan Pirgon Martynas Vielavicius Matthew Humphreys 271


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[52] [52-58] The Completion of the Creative Energy Homes

Our Architecture, Climate and Environment (ACE) Research Group is part of the Infrastructure, Geomatics and Architecture Research Division within the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Nottingham. The ACE research group aims to inform the sustainable practice of architecture and engineering in order to enhance the quality of the built environment through world leading fundamental and applied collaborative research. The work undertaken by the group is predominantly related to mitigating the impacts of, and adapting to, climate change, reducing energy use in the built environment and enhancing comfort, productivity and wellbeing of building users.

The Creative Energy Homes project, developed and managed by the group, is a key resource to study micro-smart grids, energy storage, demand-side management and occupants’ acceptance of innovative technologies. The project is yielding results that inform both national policy and high quality research outputs, recognised recently through the ICE’s Trevithick Prize. The group has also received several other awards (e.g. Rushlight, UK Engineer Technology and Innovation), two new technology transfer licences and three new patents. It has taken time and effort but the Creative Energy Homes are finally ready: this year saw the completion of the Nottingham H.O.U.S.E. and of the Mark Group EcoHouse. 273


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beyond the studio ecohomes [54]

The Nottingham H.O.U.S.E (Home Optimising the Use of Solar Energy) is the result of academics, researchers and students from the the Department of Architecture and Built Environment collaborating with a select group of industrial sponsors and specialist consultants. It was designed to compete in the Solar Decathlon 2010 in Madrid, an international competition aiming to advance the knowledge of sustainable homes, and built twice (in Madrid and London) before finding its final home on Green Close. This full-scale family home was designed to some of the world’s most stringent design standards such as the German Passivhaus, the UK Code for Sustainable Homes (Level 6 Zero-carbon), the Lifetime Homes and Secured by Design. This is the first time all these codes have been combined within a house of this type. This massive challenge was met by our students 274

who designed and built this home as part of their learning experience at Nottingham. The home embodies a clear, spatially concise and sustainably efficient design from concept to reality. It is designed to be affordable and meet the requirements of dense urban sustainable living. The Mark Group EcoHouse is a four-bedroom detached property with three floors including a basement. It was designed by interdisciplinary members of the teaching staff and a construction workforce of undergraduate students studying architecture and building technology who gained valuable experience of construction practices whilst working on aspects of the build. Students and staff have undertaken a number of research studies associated with the construction of the


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home. In addition to Mark Group’s products installed (Solar PV, Solar Hot Water, Loft Insulation, External Wall Insulation, Timber/Steel frame Insulation and an Air Source Heat Pump) the house features several other complimentary products to create a concept house for energy efficient future living.

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[53,58] The Ecohomes are modelled by staff in the 3D Workshop [54] The Ecohomes Team outside the Nottingham H.O.U.S.E [55] The Team wins the BREEAM Education Energy Technologies Building award [56] The Nottingham H.O.U.S.E is officially opened [57] Aerial view of Green Close

For more informatio, you can find us at www.nottingham.ac.uk/Creative-Energy-Homes www.facebook.com/CreativeEnergyHomes

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beyond the studio uNIT 1a [59] [59] Architectural Humanities Research Group

The work of the Architectural Humanities Research Group focuses on the history and theory of modern and contemporary architectural culture, with three distinct areas of research strength: architecture of museums; relationships between architecture, technology and human embodiment; architectural hermeneutics (architectural and urban interpretation, theory and criticism). Members have excellent international links and also engage with other researchers in related disciplines, ranging from Philosophy and Geography to Art History and Computer Science. The group aims to carry out world-leading work in architectural and urban history, theory, culture and design.

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Members are active in producing, disseminating and supervising high quality research across each of following thematic areas: History of architectural theory and criticism Architecture and embodiment Philosophy of technology, tectonics and materiality Museum and gallery culture and design Digital media in museums and exhibitions History and theory of modern and contemporary architecture and urbanism Urban design


[ESSAY] ‘Experiencing’ the Saw Swee Hock Student Centre by O’donnell

and Tuomey Architects in Central London | Emily Danou | Y2

As the role of the human body in terms of architecture has been transformed through history, from Renaissance architects to the Vitruvian figure, the desire to dwell and connect emotionally within space has remained. Despite the strong advocacy favouring a dualistic approach, where mind and body are separate, purely visual architecture is being supported through many examples relating to the full body our senses can create an emotional connection and a more sensual experience in spaces within architecture, sentimentality in architecture is unfolded. When did the experience of architecture come to be of importance? The following essay examines the phenomenological approach towards architecture, focusing on the interpretive study of human experience.

overall experience perceived by the body? Do modern architects manage to create architecture that is actively part of the experience and not just a space in which things happen? Dealing with modern architecture, the following essay studies the deconstruction of a Victorian building to a brand new, innovative construction of O’Donnell and Tuomey. The new building refers to an active Student Union, the appearance and contemporary character of which should be inviting, welcoming and even provoking to the students. The challenge was to work with the students as clients and meet their needs and demands to the maximum whilst creating the best possible design. In The Architects Report both architects describe the project in the following words “...Our aspiration is for a democratic, every day,

According to Lisa Heschong in ‘Thermal Delight in Architecture’ (1979), “The most vivid, most powerful experiences are those involving all of the senses at once.” Perceptions, formed from the senses, are the basis for the experience of place. Architecture, as well as art, is experienced through the medium of the senses, which is influenced by space, light and the material palette. Therefore, what the building is made from, and how it comes together is crucial to how the building is actually experienced. Architects and philosophers are still interested on how we express this kind of experience. Generating experience is creating atmosphere and going back to history,Vitruvius noted that since the human body is the measure of architecture, it is also that which determines atmospheric

beyond the studio

qualities. Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl, a Germal philosopher, believed that ‘lived experience’ does not exist, however one his students, Martin Heidegger, came with his early work to turn the phenomenological methods away from Husser’s abstract ‘essenses’ and bring them closer to the ‘meaning of being’. As stated in Jonathan Hale’s book ‘Building Ideas’ (page 78) “The first hints of phenomenology as a ‘philosophy of bodily experience’” can be found in Heideggers book ‘Being and Time’ (1927). As Merleau Ponty investigates in his book ‘Phenomenology of Perception’ (1945), sensory experience could add a very motivating and fascinating element to design. Through his sensory experience. Citing Marleau-Ponty’s theory, in my opinion human being is fundamentally related to space. To experience a space in its complete entirety, a person must physically be present at the site so he can sense light, materiality, sounds and air. However, how is architecture and human figure combined to enhance the

exemplary essay

unusual architecture of useful beauty”. Always referencing their work back to Steen Eiler Rasmussen’s book ‘Experiencing Architecture’, their purpose of “creating architecture is not only to build something to see but to experience as well”, and that theory is discussed in the following essay. Does the building meet its initial objectives? A Critique of the architecture of the ‘experience’, ‘convergence’ and ‘beauty’, with reference to the themes of ‘art’ and ‘phenomenology’ in accordance to architecture is followed. O’ Donnell and Tuomey Architects, who were selected following an international design competition for the proposal of the LSE new Students’ Centre, came up with the aforementioned building bringing it into the next century. The Centre was named after Professor Saw Swee Hock, an LSE alumni who has had a long association with the School. The £32.5 million six-story building plus two basement levels was built in London’s Aldwych at the junction of Sheffield Street and Portsmouth Street. The desire of the University’s Student Union was to cooperate with the School directly to shape the future of the campus and the student experience at the LSE. The target was to create a space that is “nonprofit, intellectual and for the public good” and “an attractive, usable environment for our students”, as noted by the Director. Upon getting in touch with the students of the University, a present student expressed his thoughts to my inquiry about their own demands as clients; “It’s true that we needed more and better facilities to expand and develop, we wanted bigger and more ambitious events, we needed our university to be committed to the students’ experience”. To achieve this kind of experience, the architects aimed on creating a sophisticated environment, not simply by the structure itself but most

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importantly by designing the students’ movements, feelings and behaviors within the spaces. Based on ancient Romans, architecture is all about creating a sense, either a sense of calmness, a sense of securing or even a sense of fear. Both O’donnell and Tuomey start from creating the sense of experience over a journey through each threshold, from room to room. Based on the book ‘The Lives of Spaces’ “Circulation in a building is more properly called journey” (La Biennale di Venezia, 2008). Much attention has been given to designing the plan, which feels entirely different from floor to floor. The 6,100sq m centre provides space for the student union and will have an event space in the basement, a bar at ground level, a “Learning Café” perched within the glazed corner of the building on the first floor and, higher up, student TV and radio stations. On the top floor, a juice bar will lead to an open terrace. When visiting each room you can find every scrap of space in loving, concerted, comfortable, use.

beyond the studio

Julian Robinson, the LSE’s director of design and development states that “circulation is absolutely central to the success of the project”. The aim was to make space flow freely in horizontal plan as well as in section. That was achieved upon placing an open staircase around the central lift shaft that forms a skewering pivot-point at the centre of gravity of the plan. “What I like about the building is that its functional spaces feel porous,” says Richard Sennett (The Guardian Fberuary 2014), who teaches on the LSE’s Cities programme. “Walking through it you sense many things happening at once, just as on a live street.” Your senses are sharpened as moving through the spaces, and you sense that despite the building being physically there and not moving, “Everything flows. Even a solid man” as Heaney suggests through his poetry. When visiting the building for the first time I felt an enthusiasm upon using the spaces, a pleasure of being there, an ease to walk through, and this is how ‘experience’, in my opinion, is achieved.

means more than just functional.” Function and form, technology and design must go hand in hand, therefore similarly the architects managed to combine utility and beauty in all of the spaces and all the details of the construction. Usefulness and beauty is combined even in small details like the poured-concrete spiral staircases with their curved sides and their visible joints. Based on Kenneth Frampton, a further influence of phenomenological thinking is shown, by shifting towards architectural detail, as the expressive potential of a building’s materiality is enriching the experience of form and space. Therefore the architects used robust materials to inform the aforesaid ‘experience’ for student spaces - handmade brick, vitreous enamel, oak, terrazzo, concrete were some of the rough materials used. The rhythm and orientation of the building internally is determined by colors such as the yellow of the café, the green of the gym and the multicolour patchwork panting on the lift shaft. In my opinion, the sense of experiencing the space through materiality and colours can bring a feeling of positivism for both the students and the teachers. I cited Aristotle’s opinion that the materiality is driving the design, contradicting Plato who proposed that the truth lies in immaterial objects. Referring back to Frampton in ‘Modern Architecture; a criticial history’, I link the way O’Donnell and Tuomey address the idea of place through the use of local materials and craft skills. Since London is the city of bricks, the use of hand-formed bricks, resulted in a facade that is both striking and very unusual for central London (image 10). “They ave an urban feel,

exemplary essay

The architects were successful to their mission since Saw Swee Hock building can be characterized as a vibrant building, without losing its structural meaning, providing a dynamic and pleasant environment externally and internally. This building vigorously transmits energy to its context and brought a new era and value to the area, becoming a key landmark to its generation. Being the product of a clever game, playing with the basic architectural principles of space, light and mass, the building is very stimulating and welcoming to all, full of life, energy and movement. As stated in O’Donnell and Tuomey’s ‘Selected works’ (2006) “useful connecting students back to the city.” Says Regan. Tuomey and O’donnell feel more and more the necessity of returning the body to the real world, because the body has existence only within the world, thus the two cannot be separated. Always having in mind that their buildings must be closely related to the spaces in between and the wider world around them, they managed to achieve the ‘convergence’ of their design through convergence of architecture and place. They wanted their building to seem as an existing building on the site, to seem familiar with the surrounding and that is achieved through the use of brick. The proposed building has a faceted facade that consists of solid brickwork, open latticed brickwork and glazed timber screens. The open lattice is achieved by a punctured Flemish bond with headers removed to allow light and ventilation to the accommodation behind. This also provides solar shading and maintains the continuity of the taut brick outer skin. The architect is seeking a handmade, crafted character to the building, and to this end all of the brick cladding, including the perforated brick, will be manually laid. Three types of brick were used: a standard brick; half bricks made with their own specific angle to avoid any cutting, and filler brick of between 10 and 12 different sizes. The practice has specified an extremely robust handmade brick to achieve the required durability, strength and frost resistance, while meeting its visual requirements. The folded, chamfered, canted and faceted façade is tailored in and from street corner perspectives. Like a Japanese puzzle, the design is carefully assembled to make one coherent volume from a complex set of interdependent component parts. Julian Robinson, Director of Estates at LSE, said “At night the building continues to delight becoming a glowing lantern. It will transform the student experience at LSE.” Discussing also Steven Holl’s architecture, we can see that the dimensions

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Except from materials, textures and surfaces, daylight is another key aspect of the aforementioned experience. A building, like the Saw Swee Hock, that gives you shadow, bright and relentless light is considered as good experience. Referring back to Rasmussen book ‘Experiencing Architecture’ (1962), a room without uniform lighting resulting in shadows is far more interesting than uniformly lit spaces. ‘The devices are important with respect to the quality of light rather than the quantity of light’. The impressive lightness of the building depends on its fabrication technique but also on its internal design and its strategic transparency. Daylight is only admitted through perforations in the brick walls but also by the high glass and timber screens situated in the social spaces of the building.

Given a doubtful triangular site, the building has to be stabilized beneath a wave of invisible restrictions, one of which was its neighbours’ rights to light. “We took these limits as a corset, not a form-giver,” says John Tuomey, explaining how they made a mould which was used as the maximum possible envelope they could create. The architects started off with the challenge of the existing site, a congested little campus where the streets are packed, in order to create a meeting point in the centre of the campus. The initial thought was “…to make a club house in the convergence of these routes so it might start climbing out of these routes as if the streets themselves climb through the building”.

In this building, the convergence of place and design provides a visualtisation of the ‘genius loci’. The spirit of place, in this example of architecture, is settled at the crossroad of small streets. In the context of modern architectural theory, genius loci has profound implications for place-making, falling within the philosophical branch of “phenomenology”. This field of architectural discourse is explored most notably by the theorist Christian Norberg-Schulz in his book, Genius Loci: Towards a Phenomenology of Architecture. Schulz identified four levels of existential space, with the role of the house playing a central role in human experience. “The House, therefore, remains the central place of human existence, the place where the child learns to understand his being in the world, and the place from which man departs and to which he returns.” Likewise Saw Swee Hock building became the place where the students expand their knowledge and enhance their student life. O’Donnell +

exemplary essay

Tuomey’s piece of work, like all of their work, is characterised by the responsiveness of its form to the site and its expression of sense of that place. They considered that architectural response to place is the result of their ability to see poetry around them, something that modern architects in our society neglect to do. Poetry through space is a logical analysis of the particular identity of each individual location and the sense of the surrounding landscape, highlighting the friendly qualities of the setting, micro-climate and eco-system. Land is not just a space to be used but the residue of cultural memory and an indication of genius loci, the spirit of a place. What O’donnell and Tuomey did was first to identify the site and recognize a place, which is a matter of witnessing the forces that are at play to shape the ‘character’ of a place. The form was then sculpted according to views down the narrow winding streets. Applying this theory, both Tuomey and O’donnell researched, analysed and put thought before designing and thus they managed to dismiss the formlessness of most contemporary, supposedly great architecture.

beyond the studio

of his exploration of perception include the ‘unmeshed experience,’ color, light, sound, time, detail and proportion. This is what relates to the Saw Swee Hock building’s bodily experience. The user’s experiences comes from the building’s freshness, lightness, openness and sculptural form. Open work steel trusses or ribbed concrete slabs cross the big spaces with solid wooden floors underfoot. Lightweight partitions made of clear and coloured glass and timber have sliding screens for flexibility in use. Circular steel columns prop office floors between the large span volumes and punctuate the open floor plan of the café. Stairs are made of terrazzo and plate steel. Concrete ceilings contribute thermal mass with acoustic clouds suspended to soften the sound. There are no closed-in corridors. Every hallway has daylight and views in at least one direction and workspaces have views to the outside world. The basement floor area is lit from clerestory windows and roof lights to allow for daytime use. And all of these details contribute to the initial objective of creating a sense of experience through body, rather than just creating motionless spaces.

As I walk around the building its beauty inside and out – ‘an architectural tour de force’ strikes me. The interplay of complex geometry, a carefully selected palette of materials and the limitations of this site have produced a remarkable building. The building is a sublime construction that reminds how people can make inspiring buildings through good architecture. In particular, as stated by Cesare Pivain the book “Nevertheless there is this thing called architecture” (2013) ‘architecture has a greater relationship with human existence’ managing to accomplish that by embodying experience in all dimensions of his design. The architects by taking a heroic artistic risk managed to fulfil the university’s ambitions and their own ambition to create a piece of sculpture. To conclude ‘it is architecture that demand to be experienced at first hand’ and this is established by the Saw Swee Hock building. [/ESSAY] ‘Experiencing’ the Saw Swee Hock Student Centre by O’donnell

and Tuomey Architects in Central London | Emily Danou | Y2

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beyond the studio [60] [2]

[60] University of Nottingham | The Studios Studio culture is an important part of how we work here at Nottingham. Each year group will have two dedicated studio tutoring days allocated to them per week. Although year 1 and year 2 students share facilities we try to encourage year 3 students to work in a dedicated studio space undisturbed to benefit from peer mentoring and learning. We are constantly striving to improve the studio experience and in adjacent spaces, this year has seen the creation of a gallery space housing rotating exhibitions of leading UK practices work, a kitchen and a resource area carrying 12 contemporary architectural magazines.

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beyond the studio 3d wORKSHOP [61]

[61] University of Nottingham | The Center for 3D Design It has been yet another exciting year of challenges and development at the Centre for 3D Design. Having recently moved in to the Centre from the old Z Block Workshop, and the expansion that this entailed, it became apparent that not only did we need to take on more staff but also we had to do everything we could to make the equipment we had run to the maximum efficiency. So we started the new term in September with a new member of staff. Sam came to us straight from school as part of the Faculty Trainee scheme, and we are pleased he has just past his first year of day release at college. We also introduced training session for laser cutting and 3D Printing which seemed to be received well, and have definitely improved efficiency. In January we completed the ‘Creative Energy Homes’

model for the Technology Demonstrator exhibition, this can now be found by the front door of the Mark Group House. Tony was especially busy in February and March, starting with IDA workshops for the first Years and then supporting the IDA concrete workshop, after this we continued with the introduction of skills workshops for the second years that were going to South Africa on the SA3 project, we were pleased at the end of march when the funding was approved for Tony to become a full time member of staff. CENTRE FOR 3D DESIGN STAFF Malcolm Dugdale James Hazzledine Sarah Thomas Scott Wheaver 281


UNIT 1 Rebecca Ajayi Almuataz Al-Nabri Dayana Anastasova Jemima Ashton-Harris Luke Bryant Sebastian Chambers Yin Chun John Chan Morgane Copp Jiuxuan Ding Matthew Drewitt Antonia Georgiou Charlotte Grasselli Philip Hawkins Peter Howle Ran Lu Max Mackay Abbie McCammond Samantha Mooney Steban Morales Rachel Morgan Nikoo Najafian David Ogilvie Daniel Paigge Holly Poulton Arshana Rajaratnam Olivia Redman Thomas Rose Ashleigh Simpson Naimish Thanki James Varley Yin Jun Edwin Wong

UNIT 2 Atarah Adams Andrea Alvarez Ferreira Alessandra Amato George Badman Jiaqiang Chen Christopher Clarke Shane Collins Thomas Davison James de Leyser Arianne Dermawan Isabella Di Tora Alexandra Earland Ayoyimika Edun Mark Freeman Charlotte Hagerty Dante Hall Alicia Hollis Nicol Ioannou Josh Mallins Sean Martin Maria McMurray Martin Nice Leong Pang Thomas Parker Siu Man Pun Ella Quinton Jessica Rust Mariyana Sinigerova Charlotte Stoney Liva Suna James Taylor 282

UNIT 5

UNIT 3 Eric Atkinson Raluca Andreea Burlacu Songge (Francis) Chai An Ching Tiffany Chan China Chapman Laura Duffey Rhys Evans Elizabeth Horsey Boyan Hristov Xiaoying (Amy) Huang Victoria Johnson Maria - Fernanta Karali Elin Keyser Stephanie Kyle Ang Li Rachel Li Rebecca Manning Duncan McGoldrick Michael McGuinness Addico Japheth Ohatey Adam Plastow Valentina Rivolta Sarah Rogers Ben Sharma Jessica St Clair Jamie Stevens Naomi White Samuel Whitehead Christopher John Woodford

UNIT 4 Oluwaseyi Adewole Emmanuel Adjei Natasha Banks Sacha Bennett-Ford Nyamdorj Boldbaatar Jay Brooking De-Yola Alice Chadwick Dieu-An Jasmine Che Benjamin Clarke Georgina Edwards Georgia Hamp Anna Helliar Jiang Hai Hu Thomas Jeavons Clement Laurencio Anqi Li Matthew Marsden Daniel Miller Sambuunyam Oyunbileg Ioana Pantelimon Avneesh Poonia Julia Radka Nikolay Runtev Connie Shorrocks Nikola Shtetinski Annette Sibthorp Raluca Sozanskyj Wesley Stone Andria Strongylou James Talbot - Bagnall Andrew White

Michael Bax Hannah Bergstrand Fabio Bragoli Charlotte Brown Andy Cheng Margaux Cohen Michael Constantinides Liam Donaldson Bradley Hague Jennifer Hall Alice Hardy Nansi Jones Sara Lohse Iris Margaritte Ng Eoin Michael O’Brien Chae Park Aaron Perry Goda Pletkute Lucy Roberts Margarita Samouridou Roshan Sehra Kiran Shah Vikita Shah Ana Taylor Ioana Alexandra Ungureanu Claire Walduck Peter Wheatcroft Peiwen Xie Kai Hang Yau


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UNIT 2B | DIK JARMAN

UNIT 1A | ALASDAIR RUSSELL Y2 Charlotte Anthony Sophie Barks Jacqueline Beracha Alec Crisp [M/Eng] Filippos Glibbery Hoi Kwan Alexander Lau [M/Eng] Arun Milton Oluwakayode Oguntayo [M/Eng] Electra Pangalou Benjamin Retchless Sam Robinson Shogo Suzuki Ana Tuica Rhys Waring Samantha Wilson Jiecheng Zhou Y3 Katie Ball Pak Choi Heather Clifton Wangsu Ding Yi Dong Tianqi Guo James Innes-Wilkin [M/Eng] Stephanie Ioannidis Yaling Li Yi Lu Natasha Marks Khelsea Robinson [M/Eng] Joshua Sharp Kathryn Thomas Janko Todorovic Estibalitz Urquidi Ferreira David Whitehead Jiachen Yu Di Yuan

UNIT 1B | JIM HUTCHESON Y2 Sophie Collier [M/Eng] Hong Chung Jonathan Fairbairn [M/Eng] Sandra da Fonseca Faaizah Hosein HanruI Jiang Kelvin Lam Francesca Levey James Lowsley Williams Samuel Ocock [M/Eng] Hugh Potter [M/Eng] Nicolle Skett Maria Tsvetkova Joshua Ward-Penny Robert Waters Mikaela Wigstrom Kefei Yang Y3 Ahjeev Ananthasivam Alexander Bell Jack Broad 284

Jack Cambridge Pak Chung Josephine Dorling Benjamin Gess[M/Eng] Joanne Hart Chen He Shan Lee Tingting Li Jason Passmore Dilminder Rai Denice Toyinbo Thien Tran Timothy Tsung Nicola Wernham Nicolas Yiasemis[M/Eng] Hang Zhou

UNIT 2A | ALISON DAVIES JOHN RAMSAY Y2 Kaitlin Allen [M/Eng] Balraj Bains Olivia Birnbaum Dominic Blake Alexander Bradley Jessica Chapman [M/Eng] Toby Cope Bryn Davies [M/Eng] Alexander Douglas [M/Eng] Hang Du Stephanie Ete Damilola Gbadamosi Mikhil Haria Danielle Hart Jack Hobbs Joseph Hollis Rebecca Lane Bianca Latini [M/Eng] Hiu Leung Dominic Li Rebecca Lipscombe Pak Ma Eve Mason [M/Eng] Stavrini Mouktari Catherine O’Leary [M/Eng] Georgios Partalidis Silvi Popova Aala Sharfi Thomas Sheldon ‘Afifah Abdullah Soefri Lydia Stott Ben Tipson Holly Trehearn Oliver Weldon Pui Wong Jiejia Yan Wen Zhu

Y2 Maria Bitsou Lucie de la Mothe Gorkem Diges [M/Eng] Bethan Hall [M/Eng] Andrew Jowitt Chrystal King Philip Krentos Jake Lenahan [M/Eng] Zhizhou Liu Anur Mbaya Toan Nguyen Salim Popoola Kekai Ren Haoxiang Wei Yida Xu Zihao Xu Y3 Oluseyi Ajewole Daniel Buban Ngu [M/Eng] Chang Chen Vivien Cheung [M/Eng] Arun Chopra Rachel Clubb [M/Eng] Hongzhi Cui Ross Elliston Jacob Maddocks Oliver Mortimer Oluwaseyi Obagun Zhefan Pan Simrit Panaich Mark Roberts Yufan Wang Katherine Whitehead [M/Eng] Jennifer Yu [M/Eng] Herong Zhou

UNIT 3A | NICOLA GERBER Y2 William Atkins Loic Delnatte Tyler Gordon [M/Eng] Ioanna Grigoriou Man Lam Calven Lee [M/Eng] Monique Leybourne Long Lo Xinming Ma Sara Martinez Barnaby Miles [M/Eng] Eleni Mitzali Jason Sayer Jialing Shi Haya Zabaneh

Y3 William Brouwer Emily Buckland Matthew Butler Neeraj Chandi Lingdi Chen Konstantinos Fetsis Laurence Flint Rebecca Floyd Emma Fraser Carmen Hwangbo Xinzhi Jiang Chen Man Grace Mitchell Krishan Pilch Nicholas Salthouse [M/Eng] Teodora Stefanova Yusi Wang Ching Wong Emilia-Loana Zipis

`UNIT 3B | WARREN MCFADDEN Y2 Seyi Adelekun Matthew Austin Oliver Cammell [M/Eng] Matthew Chamberlain Emily Danou Stavros Georgiou Anna Hadjimitsi Charles Harris Sofia Jassim Michaela Li Sally Lofthouse [M/Eng] Robert Marshall [M/Eng] Fathima Mohammed Hairu Georgia Roberts Rafaela Sampaio Agapito Fernandes [M/Eng] Olivia Thomas Charles Waddington Y3 Constantina Avraamides Oliver Beddard Stephanie Bott Alexander Bramhill Rebecca Chim Matthew Cobb Hannah Deacon Christopher DeWeever Samuel Garson Stephan Humphrey-Gaskin Daniel Maguire Luke Moran Callum Murphy Daniela Salgado Silva Christina Stavrou Magdalena Steflova Benjamin Tynegate Orthodoxia Varnava `


UNIT 4 | DAVID SHORT Y2 Noora Al-Mulla Cristina Carbajo Wing Chan Saskia Collins Alice Dammery-Quigley Carlos De Felipe Pena[M/Eng] Stamatina Dimaraki Timothy Fentem Michael Field Malika-Zaynah Grant Shijing Hou Katie Hutchinson Karolina Kaminskaite Min Kang Belma Kapetanovic Sheryl Lam Pui Lin Yue Man Thomas Mclean Madeleine Moore[M/Eng] Stefan Mocanu Alice Moxon Josephine Reining Shona Sivamohan Natalie Smith Toma Sova Matheus Stolarski Mayer [M/Eng] Lucy Stone Chiara Torregrossa Martynas Vielavicius Talia Yilmaz Chen Wang Ruijing Zhang Y3 Steve Back Roshni Bhudia Leah Bingham Laura Brain Fletcher Cooper Daniel Fleming Christopher Halfacree Francesca Harding Safora Karimzada Myungbum Kim Kunal Koshal Sou Leung Ying Li Andrei-Cristian Negrea Pui Ng Nelson Nip Ivan Popov Karim Rouabah Barbara-Cristina Sandulescu Katherine Scott Eleanor Shelley [M/Eng] Eleanor Sillett David Simmons Phillip Sims Shamiso Sithole Hugh Stant ChloĂŤ Thirkell Amy Turner Rachel Wakelin [M/Eng] Yui Wong

UNIT 5B | FARIDA MAKKI Y2 Rhiarna Dhaliwal Andrew Edwards Vaishnavi Geevarajah Kate Hosking [M/Eng] Siyao Huang (Gwen) Chun Lam (Martin) Philip Mosscrop Grace Thomson [M/Eng] Christiana Torto Nicholas Ward Hana Barnes [M/Eng] Maximilian Lewis [M/Eng]

UNIT 5A | TOBY BLACKMAN Y2 Samuel Chai[M/Eng] Pui Chan Zhenzi Chen Tao Dong Chin Ee Kerry Fox Themba Fraser Yitao Ge Fiona Grieve Alice Jones [M/Eng] Peter Macnaughton [M/Eng] James Price Sirage Saudi Ibreek [M/Eng] Colin Smith Matthew St Leger Xianming Yang

Y3 Lewis Baker Laura Brett Alexander Chapman [M/Eng] Alla Elmahadi [M/Eng] Sally Downey Lydia Gibbs Sophie Jordan Carolyn Kirschner Ben Mitchell Annabel Prentice Tahima Rahman Oliver Reynolds Akshey Shah [M/Eng] Jacob Stapleton Henry Svendsen Mai Ta Esha Thapar Emma Warbrick Hiu-Yuen Yip (Matthew)

Y3 Joshua Bull Rosemary Colver [M/Eng] Shaun Davey David Edward Dominic Eley Michael Gibbs [M/Eng] Daniel Hawkins [M/Eng] Portia Heley [M/Eng] Samuel Homer Nicholas Keen Punit Modha Yasmin Nally [M/Eng] Luke Nichols Benjamin Oakley Emily Phillips Amye Stead Rory Wood [M/Eng]

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HEAD OF DEPARTMENT Robin Wilson CHAIR OF TEACHING & LEARNING COMMITTEE Sergio Altomonte CHAIR OF THE DEPARTMENT FACILITIES COMMITTEE Mark Gillott SENIOR TUTOR Phil Oldfield COURSE DIRECTORS B/Arch Architecture | David Short BA Architectural Studies | Guillermo Guzman B/Eng Architectural Environment Engineering | Ed Cooper M/Eng Architecure & Environmental Engineering | Yupeng (Jack) Wu BA Sustainable Built Environment | Shenyi Wu M/Arch & Dip/Arch Part 2 | Katharina Borsi M/Arc Sustainable Urban Design | Yue (Amy) Tong M/Arch Digital Design & Tectonics | Chantelle Niblock M/Arch Sustainable Tall Buildings | David Nicholson-Cole & Phil Oldfield

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ACADEMIC STAFF Sergio Altomonte Paolo Beccarelli Toby Blackman Katharina Borsi Rabah Boukhanouf Liz Bromley-Smith Valeria Carnevale John Chilton Edward Cooper Jo Darkwa Alison Davies John Edmonds Didem Ekici Brian Ford Mohamed Gadi Guohui Gan Mark Gillott Rachel Grigor Guillermo Guzman Jonathan Hale Matthew Hall Laura Hanks Amanda Harmer Tim Heath James Hutcheson Dik Jarman Ben Jones Jeffrey Keays Benson Lau Hao Liu Chunxao (Sean) Lu Farida Makki Warren McFadden Parham Mirzaei John Morgan Margaret Mulcahy Chantelle Niblock David Nicholson-Cole Phil Oldfield Siddig Omer Steve Parnell Nicole Porter John Ramsay Saffa Riffat Patrizia Riganti Darren Robinson Lucelia Rodrigues Alisdair Russell Peter Rutherford David Short Michael Stacey Matt Strong Yuehong Su Amy Tang Derek Trowell Qi Wang Robin Wilson Chris Woods Shenyi Wu Yupeng (Jack) Wu Yuying Yan Jie Zhu Yan Zhu

CENTRE FOR 3D DESIGN STAFF Malcolm Dugdale James Hazzledine Sarah Thomas Scott Wheaver DABE OFFICE STAFF Lauren Halstead Lyn Shaw Lindsay Shepperson ESLC - TEACHING QUALITY TEAM Emma Clews (Deputy) Donna Collins Claire Davies Caroline Dolby Nicola Gudelajtis Clare Hollingworth Emma Hopkins (Manager) Mandy Hosker Jack Iliffe Charlotte Jones Charlotte Lush Liz Murphy Kim O’Reilly Matt Orton (Deputy) Indre Petrauskaite Haylee Richardson Mae Rischer Hilary Shrewsbury Amy Smith Dee Stirland Natalie Sullivan Helen Turner ESLC - STUDENT EXPERIENCE TEAM Marzena Allen Caroline Dolby Nicola Gudelajtis Mary Ho Jack Iliffe Charlotte Jones Charlotte Lush (Deputy) Kim O’Reilly (Deputy) Indre Petrauskaite Lyn Shaw Hilary Shrewsbury Amy Smith Dee Stirland (Manager) Helen Turner SUPPORT STAFF Lindsay Shepperson Helen Giberson Laura Conkey Clare Hayes-Gill & Frea Waninge Lynne Mills Jackie Pedley Chris Sprange Lucy Rose Julia Crowson Rachel Bird Jemma Higney Andy Smith James Bonnyman Steve Greedy

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Dabe Yearbook 2013 14  

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