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EDITOR’S MUSINGS

More than One Right Answer When it comes to design, it’s true that there is often more than one right answer. It must also be said that there are many wrong answers as well. One of my favourite Dabble columns (it’s really impossible to choose just one) is Take 3. I know I’m biased, because it’s a column I work on with design professionals Erin Mercer and Victoria Drainville. Nonetheless, I love it. I’m delighted to see a single space or idea transformed into multiple options. In addition, it gives our Creative Director and Head Photographer Simon Burn a chance to impress us with his stunning photography. Take 3 is also a great way to show our design clients that sometimes....there is more than one good answer to a decorating question. The same way there is more than one good recipe for brownies, but I defy you to find one that matches the deliciousness and decadence of Fiona Van Alstyne’s Salted Caramel Brownies in this issue. Isn’t it lucky to have options? Reach out to us and let us know what your favourite column is. After all, it’s you we want to satisfy with every new issue. Happy Dabbling wherever you are.

Watch Kimberley's Musings Kimberley Seldon

Editor in Chief

Follow me... t f

@kimberleyseldon www.facebook.com/KimberleySeldon

April/May 2012

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APR/MAY 2012

Kimberley Seldon Editor in Chief

Simon Burn Creative Director / Principal Photographer

Cheryl Horne Managing Editor

Victoria Drainville Executive Editor / Art Director

Bob Seldon Captain Crisis

Design Contributors Lisa Canning, Christine Da Costa, Nyla Free, Erin Mercer, Nicholas Rosaci, Janet Villeneuve, Joy Zaczyk

Travel Contributors Kathy Buckworth, Heather Greenwood Davis, Stephanie Gray, Beth Halstead, Jennifer Weatherhead

Food Contributors Corey Burgan, Jameson Fink, Fiona Van Alstyne

Design & Styling Team www.kimberleyseldon.com Kathy Seale, Linda Jennings

Advertising and Promotion Aysun Kuck aysun@dabblemag.com

Media and Public Relations media@dabblemag.com

Owned and Published by Kimberley Seldon Productions Inc. Cheryl Horne, Managing Director cheryl@kimberleyseldon.com

909 Mount Pleasant Road, Toronto, Ontario M4P 2Z6 101 California Ave, Santa Monica, California 90403

www.dabblemag.com info@dabblemag.com While every effort has been made to ensure that advertisements and articles appear correctly, Dabble Magazine and Kimberley Seldon Productions Inc. cannot accept responsibility for any loss or damage caused directly or indirectly by the contents of this publication. All material is intended for informational purposes only. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of its publisher or editor. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited without written permission from the publisher.

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y er ev in sue is

14 Dabble Here, Dabble There, Dabble Dabble Everywhere 15

On the Web

16

Dabble Digs

124 I dabble in... Grace Bonney 126 Just a Dab

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ON THE COVER: Benjamin Moore Feature Colour: Green Thumb CSP-870 The colourful Brita Thomas from Herringer Kiss Gallery is passionate about pairing original art with the right buyer.


design

22

Reality Check Buying Original Art

27

What’s Trending Florals

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Take 3 Coffee Table Time

50

DIY Guy Shim Wall

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Industry Profile Vicente Wolf

60 What's in Store Dragonette 61

Infusion Angela Auclair

HOME TOURS

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The Art of Living Jessica & Asher Richter

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Family Moments Sophie Vander

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At Dusk Nicholas Rosaci


DABBLE DOES BUDAPEST

travel

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Kimberley Seldon leads Dabble's Design Express group through a memorable trip to Budapest.

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Snapshot Seville and Granada

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Road Raves Thailand

102 Dabble Dare Vive le Vroom 104 Best Places For Tea 106 Exposure Focus on Safety

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food

FEATURED 112 A Day With Rob Rainford 118 SPECIAL FEATURE Food Truck Fever

110 Dabble Chef Potato Samosas 116 There’s an App for That Pâté 122 Sindulgence Salted Caramel Brownies

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CityLine

here there

Apr. 5

Kimberley Seldon hosts CityTV's CityLine for pal Tracy Moore who gets a well-deserved day off. Tune in. www.cityline.ca

BT Calgary Nyla Free talks original art for her Dabble appearance on Breakfast Television Calgary.

Apr. 10

www.btcalgary.ca

International Home Show

Apr. 12-15

Dabble's on stage. Join Editor in Chief Kimberley Seldon for Spring Decorating tips.

everywhere Find out what Dabble’s contributors have on the go this spring season.

Dabble's DIY Guy, Nicholas Rosaci, demonstrates the season's best do-it-yourself projects. www.internationalhomeshow.ca

Mom 2.0 Summit

May 3-5

Travel contributor Kathy Buckworth is in Miami, Florida speaking at this premier professional conference for influential mom bloggers and female entrepreneurs. www.mom2summit.com

Design Express 2012: Charleston & Savannah Join Kimberley Seldon for a truly unique travel experience. Immerse yourself in the land of southern hospitality. www.kimberleyseldon.com

Jun. 13-17


On the web...

t f

@dabblemag www.facebook.com/dabblemag

s on ti la tu Congra

Audrey Accent Chair Congratulations to Kim Boucher from Brooklin, ON who won a fabulous Audrey Accent Chair courtesy of Urban Barn. See more contests.

s on ti la tu Congra

Congratulation to the winner of the Design Express Trip for two to Charleston, SC and Savannah, GA taking place on June 13-17th with Kimberley Seldon. Courtesy Kimberley Seldon Travel Group and CityTV's CityLine. You can join them too!

Enter to Win

iPad 2 16GB Wi-Fi Model iPad 2 features incredible applications like Mail, Calendar, Notes, and Safari in a beautiful, thin and light design, so you stay productive anywhere. Retail Value: $519.00 CA Courtesy of Benjamin Moore. www.benjaminmoore.ca Enter contest...

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digs

Paloform Melt away all traces of winter with an outdoor fire pit. (Available in a variety of materials.) Bol Corten Fire Pit, CA$2,900, Paloform www.paloform.com Fresh Floral Creations New to gardening? Start small with these custom flower boxes—ideal for patios and balconies. www.freshflorals.com

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PHOTO BY: Larry Arnal

Spring forward with design contributor Lisa Canning who has hand-picked the design, travel and food must-haves for the warm weather ahead.


n ig Des

Spring Seat Punch up the patio with bold colour. IKEA PS VÅGÖ, CA$30, IKEA www.ikea.ca Floral Frames Surround your fave photos in a floral ring of blooming colour. Vintage Chic Series Photo Frames, CA$7-$10, Fresh Home Elements www.thefhegroup.com

Colourful Flock The well-feathered will flock towards these colourful bird domes. Globe Bird House, CA$10, Urban Barn www.urbanbarn.com

Work of Art Give your walls the royal treatment with regal prints, painted and printed onto French archival paper. Long live the Queen. Amsterdam Wallpaper, US$126, Nama Rococo www.namarococo.com Indoor / Outdoor Pillows The garden won’t be the only thing blooming when you introduce versatile indoor and outdoor pillows. Disco pillows, US$42, Liora Manne www.lioramanne.com

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digs

l ve Tra

Travel Pillow Bucky’s blooming travel pillow is a practical fashion accessory. Minnie Travel Pillow (Brambly), US$20, Bucky www.bucky.com

Bright Tag Black suitcases everywhere are begging to wear these stylish purple tags. Bag ID set, CA$20, Go-Travel products www.go-travelproducts.com

Quirky Journal Record your most memorable travel experiences between the pages of this artsy journal. I Was Here Travel Journal, CA$20, Indigo Chapters www.chapters.indigo.ca

Bobble and Go The inspired bento box design keeps a 13 oz. self-filtering water bottle and lunch in order. Hard Lunch Box, US$12, Bobble www.waterbobble.com

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Cute Cupcake These perky liners give icing a reason to be jealous. Spring Mix Cupcake Liners, CA$5, Shop Sweet Lulu www.shopsweetlulu.com

Pretty Pine Cones Get invited back. Graphic, organic cloth napkins are a lovely springtime hostess gift. Table napkins, CA$20, Schoolyard www.schoolyardstudio.com

Food

Happy Tumblers Aptly named, these colourful tumblers add a splash of happy to any occasion. Happy “O� Tumbler Giftset, US$60 set of 4, Riedel www.riedel.com

Sunny Side Up Add sunshine to your table with this yellow serving dish. Liquid round yellow bowl, CA$55, CB2 www.cb2.com Mortar and Pestle Bright rings of colour make food prep just a little more fun. Sawan Mortar and Pestle, US$120, Tahir Mahmood www.tahirmahmood.com

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We asked our designers...

Where would you incorporate a floral pattern in a space?

Lisa Canning “This spring I'll be incorporating floral patterns in silk pillows in my living room. It's so easy to insert colour and glamour with textiles.” Lisa is an interior stylist in Toronto specializing in chic, contemporary, personalized interiors with a focus on condos and kids. Lisa is the Market Editor for Dabble Magazine and is a regular interior expert on The Marilyn Denis Show.

www.lisacanning.ca @lisa_canning

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Nicholas Rosaci

Erin Mercer

Nicholas is an award-winning designer and often appears on CityTV’s CityLine as Dabble’s DIY Guy Guest Expert. As a designer, he creates chic, confident and glamorous environments.

Erin is an award-winning designer with Kimberley Seldon Design Group. In addition to managing projects and working with the design team, she produces sets for Home Day and Dabble Day on CityTV's CityLine. Erin is currently styling and writing Dabble's in-house column, Take 3.

www.rosaci.com @nicholasrosaci

www.dabblemag.com @erindabbles

“Accent walls in dining rooms, curtains in bright sunny kitchens, anywhere I want to inject a sense of liveliness and fun. Whether delicate and feminine or bold and contemporary, florals create a visual pop. Upholstering an ottoman in florals is a great way to bring some bloom into a room.”

“I love using patterns in unexpected areas. On ceilings, the backside of a chair or a band along the leading edge of a drape where it can provide a big impact in a subtle way.”


gn si de April/May 2012

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REALITY CHECK

The art of buying original ar t WORDS BY NYLA FREE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LORI ANDREWS

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DESIGN

Whether you’re new to the process or a longtime collector, purchasing art is thrilling. Step into the world of artists and galleries with interior designer Nyla Free and revive those tired walls.

Living room and dining room designed by Nyla Free. April/May 2012

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REALITY CHECK

Step 1: Birds of a Feather Flock Together

Step 4: Attend Openings

Step 2: Don’t Be Shy

Step 5: No Need to Match

Step 3:  Buy What You Love

Step 6:  Collected Approach

Art galleries are commonly located tightly within particular neighbourhoods, making them a strolling destination and an excellent way to enjoy an afternoon. The more artwork you see, the more you’ll define your tastes and interests.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Frequently, gallery owners keep inventory beyond what hangs on the walls. It’s perfectly fine to inquire about a favourite style and even a price point that works for you.

Listen to your heart when purchasing artwork. If a piece elicits an emotional reaction—a childhood memory, family vacation, or perfect moment—you’ll know you’ve found something worth purchasing. 

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With a party in full swing and a glass of wine in hand, a gallery’s intimidation factor is diminished. In addition, it’s a great way to meet the artists and hear about their process and inspiration. Ask to be added to the mailing list of favourite galleries.

Matching artwork to decor is not wrong, however it isn’t necessary either. Adding interesting combinations and little surprises reflects confidence, infusing a room with personality.

No matter the period or style, collecting art requires time and education. Enlist the help and advice of art enthusiasts and dealers who can help you build on your knowledge.


DESIGN

Large painting in the dining room by Barbara Milne. Photograph above the sideboard by David Burdeny.

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REALITY CHECK

Cover girl Brita holds up a painting by Ben van Netten for Nyla to see.

“Matching artwork to décor is not wrong, however it is not necessary.” Step 7: Gallery height

Step 9:  Bring Art Home

Step 8: Budget Wise

Step 10: Open Walls, Open Mind

Hanging photographs and paintings too high creates an unwelcome distance between the viewer and the artwork. Installing pieces at gallery height (54" to the centre of the artwork), or designer height (6"-12" from top of furniture item) is best.

Think of original artwork as an investment in your home, something that increases your living enjoyment. Prices vary widely and frequently there are payment plans available. Shop college and university art sales to get great pieces at relatively low cost. 26

April/May 2012

Indecisive about a particular piece of artwork? Most galleries allow pieces to go out ‘on approval’, allowing you to view an item in the space before committing to a purchase. Some galleries offer a rent to own option.

If you love a particular artist but have a specific concept in mind, you may want to commission an original piece. It’s fine to make a suggestion but often it’s best to allow for artistic freedom. The result may differ from your original thought, but speak more profoundly to you in the end.


what’sng trendi #florals WORDS BY CHRISTINE DA COSTA

The floral trend in home décor always springs up as soon as the warm weather arrives. This season, large florals are blooming in abundance. Whether in bold saturated hues or soft pastels, florals are the perfect way to add colour and fun into your home.

Wrap Your Walls (LEFT) Don’t be afraid to wrap walls in a vivacious floral wallpaper like this cheerful room. Jubilee Collection, Cayman Wallpaper (beige and pink) US$42/roll, Cayman Fabric US$90/yard, Thibaut Designs www.thibautdesigns.com

Thibaut Designs, Jubilee Collection, Cayman Wallpaper

A Bit of a Wallflower? You can still make a statement by using one impactful floral accessory like this gorgeous area rug by Marni in a dressing room designed by Abbott Moon Interior Design.

Flower Power Surround yourself every day in the allure and beauty of flowers. Fuchsia Peony Floret Chair, US$1450, Floral Art www.floralartla.com

Cool Finds Want the high-end dressing room look designed by Abbot Moon Interior Design for less? This beautiful floral rug adds a punch of colour to any room. Gloria’s Garden Rug, US$348+, Anthropologie www.anthropologie.com

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Take 3

Coffee Table Time WORDS BY ERIN MERCER

Good looking and functional, let’s agree that no living space is really complete without a serviceable coffee table standing by. But decorating its surface is a tricky task. Dabble’s in-house design team offers three display worthy solutions.

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DESIGN

One

Scale, Balance and Proportion

The centre of the room is a prime spot to display a grouping of favourite coffee table books to best advantage. Jazz up the scene by varying heights and colours and adding playful objects like the hand blown glass bowl for texture. The uniform, grid-like design keeps things tidy and adds whimsy to the formal space. Dabble Savvy: Swap out books for a collection of old records or photo albums. April/May 2012

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TAKE 3

Design Tip

In a family room, use a decorative bowl to house TV remotes in plain sight.

Go Big or Go Home

Give one large, fabulous item the attention it deserves. A matte finished copper bowl like this one complements the lime green surface of the coffee table.

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DESIGN

Two

April/May 2012

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TAKE 3

Three Tray Chic

Practical and stylish, the right tray gathers and grounds floating and unrelated items. When it’s party time, a tray is a fantastic tool for accommodating hors d’oeuvres or cocktails. Dabble Savvy: Contrast is important—mix round objects with square ones and short with tall to create a dynamic tabletop arrangement.

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DESIGN

the art of living

Young and hip, Jessica and Asher Richter are busy entrepreneurs and owners of Weego Home and Weego Baby in Santa Monica. The dynamic pair create work/life balance through colour, compromise and the company of their adorable dogs, Benny, Rosie and Coco Bean.

April/May 2012

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HOME TOUR

Jessica and Asher Richter relax in their colourful living room with three-year-old rescue, Coco Bean.

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DESIGN

THE ART OF RELAXATION Inviting, cozy and relaxing­­—words Jessica and Asher Richter use to describe their airy modern home. “We want our guests to relax and feel at ease,” says Jessica. The living room is filled with colour and eclectic accents like a 70s-style hanging basket chair and geometric patterned area rug. Plump pillows in vibrant floral patterns give the mink brown sofa its personality. “I have had the entrepreneurial bug and a love for interior design since childhood,” Asher says. Clearly his talents are all grown up though he’s quick to point out that he loves to have fun with decorating. In June 2003, Asher opened Weego Home on Main Street in Santa Monica. Customers couldn’t get enough of the store’s chic products and savvy design advice, so he teamed up with Jessica to open a second shop, Weego Baby.

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HOME TOUR

THE ART OF COLOUR “The kitchen is a natural gathering spot on the way from the living room to the back patio,� Jessica says. The magnetic chalkboard paint on the walls and pops of green colour on the glass tile backsplash create a fun vibe for guests (and resident pets).

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ABOVE The green glass tile back-

splash is a playful contrast to the sleek walnut countertop.

RIGHT Leafy greens bask in the

glow of under cabinet lighting.


DESIGN

April/May 2012

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HOME TOUR

THE ART OF COOL In the master bedroom, blue-grey walls and crisp white drapery create a mellow vibe for Benny, the couple’s English bulldog (seen relaxing on the cool cotton bedding). “The back patio doubles as our outdoor retreat and year-round dining room,” Asher says. When Rosie, the couple’s five-yearold rescue dog, sits outside, she stays cool near the large palm plants encased in sturdy cement planters. “And when it’s really hot,” Asher laughs, “she likes to doze in the shade under the teak dining table.” So how does a designing couple work and live together? Jessica is quick to respond, “We both respect each other’s style and opinion. In our home, the unspoken rule is . . . compromise.” Since adopting Rosie and Coco Bean as playmates for Benny, Asher and Jessica agree: “Our dogs bring us so much joy and truly make our house a home.”

ABOVE Seven-year old English

bulldog, Benny, strikes a pose.

RIGHT Rosie, a pit bull mix and

five-year-old rescue, out for a three-legged stroll in the shade of the back patio.

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DESIGN

Though compromise is key to the success of a designing couple, Jessica and Asher agree that blues and greens are perfect for home.

April/May 2012

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HOME TOUR

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DESIGN

Family Moments

In the Lakemont area of Bellevue, just a short distance from Seattle, Sophie and David Vander share a 4,200 square foot home with their children Imogen, Saskia, Estelle and Ana誰s . The house is nestled on Cougar Mountain and, despite reports of infrequent visits with cougars, Sophie was hooked on the place the moment she looked out the big bay window in the kitchen to the garden. She realized then, she was home.

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HOME TOUR

The fruitwood harvest table in the kitchen is one of Sophie and David’s first purchases together. “Although it isn’t a terribly expensive table, we love how it has aged over the 14 years we’ve been a couple.”

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DESIGN

There's plenty of room to chat around the 5' x 5' kitchen island.

The handsome coffered ceiling adds the visual weight required to balance the home’s existing dark oak floors.

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HOME TOUR

“The formal living room is mama’s refuge,” exclaims the busy mother of four. “When I need a ’moment’ this is where I come.” It’s a peaceful room, where David and I can talk—we tend to have serious conversations in this room for some reason. Although Sophie says she feels very grown up when she sits in this room, it’s not stuffy or overly done— it has flaws and quirks like all rooms should. Generous windows flank the fireplace, flooding the room with sunlight. Above the mantle is a painting of pink flamingos by AJ Power which Sophie found strangely intriguing. “I was grabbing a coffee in a café that showcased the work of local artists,” says Sophie. “It ended up being an expensive cup of coffee!” In the hallway, one of the couple’s collection of black-andwhite etchings by Jodie Coleman blends peacefully with the mix of antique and modern furnishings—some pricey and some secret cheapies.

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DESIGN

The wall colour throughout the formal living area is Benjamin Moore Elephant Gray 2109-50. April/May 2012

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HOME TOUR

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DESIGN

“I definitely love a little girl’s room that feels old-world but is still bright and happy,” says Sophie. For Estelle and Anaïs’s room the designing mom combined coral bed throws with vintage pieces with new finds. Though the Vanders attempt to keep toys to a minimum, there are books aplenty. Floor space is important in this household. There has to be room for an impromptu danceathon in every room in the house. The girls’ beds are Hillsboro by Wesley Allen from Carolina Rustica and the bedding is part of the Sari Blooms collection by Amy Butler for Welspun. A Surya ‘Goa 85’ round wool rug provides a soft place for the girls to play. The bird lamp, curtains and tie-backs are from Urban Outfitters.

“Everything in our house has a story.” ~ Sophie

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HOME TOUR

“The scent of camphor that has seeped into the wood takes me back to my childhood.” Since four girls tend to clutter every other corner of the house, Sophie wanted her bedroom to be simple. “I can only sleep on white sheets so the bed is fuss-free.” The bedside tables belonged to her grandparents. On David’s side, you can still see scratches from where her grandfather threw his watch and keys every night. When Sophie opens the cabinet doors the scent of camphor that has seeped into the wood takes her back to her childhood. The bedside lamps were from Sydney Antique Centre and the chaise and headboard are from Urban Outfitters. In the en suite, Sophie searched high and low for the right mirrors for above the sinks. “I knew what I wanted but couldn’t find it at any of the highend places,” she says. “I eventually found them at Lowes Hardware, would you believe?”

LEFT The Moravian star pendant above the Victoria and Albert York tub is from Antique Lighting in Seattle.

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DESIGN

April/May 2012

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y u G DIY shimmy

shimmy bang WORDS BY NICHOLAS ROSACI

“Bang for your buck?” asks DIY Guy Nicholas Rosaci. Paint, stain and inexpensive wood shims render a plain wall into a mosaic masterpiece. MATERIALS REQUIRED Nelson Pro-Line 8" Cedar Wood Shims (14 shims / package) LePage No More Nails adhesive glue Gator fine or medium coarse sanding sponges Paintbrush Foam paintbrush Paint (see Nicholas’ selections on opposite page)

OPTIONAL 3/4” 8’ x 4’ plywood sheets 50

April/May 2012

Nicholas' cat Kitney lays peacefully on the Cedric Sofa by Urban Barn.


DESIGN

1

Smooth Away

2

True Colours

3 4 5

Sand rough edges of the shims for a smooth finish and to help the stain penetrate more effectively into the wood.

Determine a pleasing colour pattern and set aside enough shims for each paint colour and/or stain to complete the design.

Paint or Stain

Using a paintbrush, paint the front and sides of each shim and let dry. Using a foam brush, apply the dark stain to the front and sides of one quarter of the shims. Rub off excess stain using a paper towel and let dry.

Quick Fix

Starting at the top row, glue the shims horizontally onto the wall in the colour pattern of your choice, making sure the shims point in the same direction. For the second row from the top, point the shims in the opposite direction and alternate this way all the way down.

Made To Measure

Cut the ends of the last shim, to ensure the shims fit onto the wall perfectly if required. Nicholas’ Paint Colour Picks: Saman Dark Oak Stain #112 8 oz. Benjamin Moore 2052-60 China Blue Flat paint - 1 quart Benjamin Moore 2056-50 Baby Boy Blue Flat paint - 1 quart Benjamin Moore CC460 Inukshuk Flat paint - 1 quart Benjamin Moore 2122-70 Snow White flat paint - 1 quart

Tip

Glue shims onto plywood sheets and fasten to the wall for a temporary or reusable wall feature.

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Industry Profile

Vicente Wolf We’re talking design and travelling the world with Cuban born, New York designer, Vicente Wolf.

Click here to read Vicente’s SNAPSHOT

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April/May 2012


DESIGN Get a first-hand story about Seville and Granada from Vicente on pages 64-67 as he shares a Snapshot on the Spanish culture. But first, see how travel has shaped and influenced Vicente’s design aesthetic.

DAB: Aside from design, travelling is one of your biggest passions. How has travel inspired your design aesthetic? VW: Travel has broadened my spectrum of vision by being able to see so many different cultures. You go to Paris, London, Rome and it’s all the same vein of thinking but when you are in Iran you see the Islamic art or when you’re in Papua New Guinea you see primitive art. It starts to really influence how you blend things in your environment. You get a bigger freedom of mixing things. DAB: Is there a specific culture that has had an impact on you? VW: They all have, but in the last few years it has been the Islamic culture because A) it opened my eyes to that culture and B) I admire its poetry of art.

I dabble in... Fine arts, photography, gardening, cooking... I always want to be learning and experiencing something new. When I travel, I’m young again, because learning keeps you young. DAB: What is the secret to mixing different styles and different periods of furniture in a room? VW: I do it instinctually. Depending on what speaks to what. A simple thing: if you have an Italian 18th century chair, to put an African stool next to it; they speak to each other. It’s like yin and yang. It’s a sense of opposites that work well together. If it’s something very elaborate, you put something very clean next to it. If somebody wears all one designer from head to toe, it loses. But if you take a Chanel suit and you put a Gap T-Shirt on, it starts to give it depth. Depth of vision and depth of thinking.

DAB: As much as you are a global traveller, you live in New York City. Is this your favourite city? VW: It’s the best city to execute the work that gathers these ideas from around the world. It’s an environment that is so receptive to that sort of global mentality. DAB: Is there a country you haven’t stamped on your passport but would like to? VW: I have a new passport; the old passport had four editions. It’s so demoralizing that I’ve lost my badge of courage…Mongolia, I want to go to Mustang, I want to travel through China, Libya and the Ivory Coast. DAB: Do you ever travel to shop specifically for your design projects? VW: I shop for things that I like. If they work in a project, great. I would say Paris would be the place where I shop if I’m shopping for particular clients. You don’t want a design to be preconceived or studied. You want it to come together naturally, to look like you’ve gathered these things throughout the years. DAB: Is there a particular object from one of your trips that is near and dear to you? VW: They all are but it’s about the next discovery. It’s about finding the next “oh wow, isn’t that amazing.” DAB: What new ideas are you using to inspire the world of design? VW: I am trying to take spaces and simplify them so it can give the people who live there a bigger sense of peacefulness. DAB: Are you constantly looking for new ways to define yourself or do you want clients to hire you for the Vicente Wolf “look”? VW: I want them to hire me for my aesthetic and then from there I incorporate that to who they are. I had a client who came in yesterday. I was presenting the living room (we had already done the family room and bedroom), and it’s soft, sensual…like a taffeta dress. And then the meeting after was another client, where everything is very minimal. If one were to enter the other one’s space they would not like it. It’s all still being done with the same sensibility, but they are completely different. I don’t want somebody coming in saying, “I want an 18th century period room,” but if they say, “I want the sense of an 18th century room through your sensibility,” that means yes, it’s slanted in a more traditional way but it still has quirky things that speak of now, very much in the present. April/May 2012

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HOME TOUR

AT DUSK

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DESIGN

At dusk....that’s when this newly transformed backyard looks its starlit best. How fitting, since the house in question belongs to crooner and jazz vocalist Matt Dusk. In designing an at-home retreat for the globe trotting musician, designer Nicholas Rosaci artfully combines two of his client’s passions—travel and vintage Hollywood.

April/May 2012

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HOME TOUR

Starting with a great backdrop helps any decorating project and Nicholas was pleased to see the combination of buff brick on the house and terracotta on the patio floor. Against these fixed elements, the daring designer added bold aqua blue and fiery orange to, “Ahem, jazz things up.” “Orange is current and urbane,” says Nicholas, “and it complements the watery blues of the

“I dabble in... entertaining. There’s nothing I like more than having my close friends over”. ~ Matt

swimming pool.” To give the casual dining area a sense of ceremony, Nicholas circled its perimeter with breezy white drapery panels by Sunbrite Drapery. Moroccan lanterns lend sparkle to evening events and set an exotic mood. Favourite element? “Oh, it has to be the tiki bar,” says Matt. “And I make a mean martini too.”

OPPOSITE TOP Matt prepares

tangy martinis at the tiki bar. OPPOSITE BOTTOM LEFT

Simple and stylish appetizers are crowd pleasers.

OPPOSITE BOTTOM RIGHT Send

a message to guests on slate plates from Crate and Barrel.

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DESIGN

t is yl la P ’s k us Matt D

You’d expect a guy with perfect pitch to come up with a playlist that rocks the house. Here it is: Kool & the Gang - Celebration Earth, Wind and Fire - September Mungo Jerry - In the Summertime Matt Dusk - On Vacation Matt Dusk - I Wouldn’t Change a Thing Matt Dusk - Good News

April/May 2012

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HOME TOUR

Orange and blue are complementary colours that work in harmony with the pool. 58

April/May 2012


DESIGN

Attention to detail is what really gives a home a feeling of quality and style. Every detail should work in harmony to create a space that truly sings. ~Nicholas

The World on a String Create a romantic mood by hanging all-weather light strings reminiscent of an Italian piazza or Tuscan courtyard. Dream a Little Dream Before purchasing a patio set, find some online design images for inspiration. End of season deals are always a possibility. The Best is Yet to Come Treat the patio with the same reverence as the living room. Dress the fence with art, mirrors and sculpture. Memories are Made of This Once the project is complete, christen it with friends and a festive celebration.

Dabble’s DIY Guy, Nicholas Rosaci takes a well-deserved seat in the lush setting he’s created for his client.

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what’s in store?

Dragonette 711 North La Cinega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA www.dragonetteltd.com Originality and swank—that’s what makes shopping at Dragonette a dream for design professionals and discerning collectors.

In its 15 year history, owner Patrick Dragonette buys only what he loves, searching meticulously for jaw-dropping furniture, original artwork and estate jewelry. “I ask myself,” says Patrick, “if it doesn’t sell, can I live with it?” Every object, piece of art and item of furniture is filtered through his eyes—and the man knows what he’s looking for. When Patrick decided to offer design services in addition to showroom offerings, Charles Tucker came on board and the applause from satisfied clients just keeps coming. Perhaps that’s because the offerings nearly always have a pedigree, like the pair of white lacquered chests which once belonged to design legend Dorothy Draper. (Rumoured to have fetched an estimated $35,000). More recently, Dragonette added its own collection of upholstered pieces in keeping with the shop’s 30s, 40s and 50s influence. A favourite item, a white tufted chair, is named for Kimber, a character on Nip/Tuck. Ahhhh, only in LA.

ABOVE Square pillows with signature “Billy Haines

tuft” dress the slipcovered white sofa. The oval “Romanesque” design Phillip and Kelvin LaVerrne cocktail table sits on an Edward Fields area carpet from the 70s.

Why we love it:

• Where else can you buy a coffee table that once belonged to Edward G. Robinson?

• One-of-a-kind accessories.

Really. Iconic furniture from design legends like Dorothy Draper and Billy Haines.

• Owner Patrick Dragonette

only buys what he’d have in his own home­—and his taste is exceptional.

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Infusion

Birds of a feather flock together, except when it comes to colour. Victoria Drainville finds inspiration from Angela Auclair’s tranquil photography.

676 spirit in the sky

HC-143 wythe blue

CSP-495 through the looking glass

1444 new age

059 orange creamsicle

2169-10 racing orange

2132-10 black A tern... just doing what birds do. But taking a look at the bigger picture, there is so much beauty in his actions. Take time to see what beautiful things are surrounding you right at this moment.

colour

shape

texture

Inject colour, pattern and playfulness with a bold orange pillow and handscreened yellowthroats.

This ducky might not float but it serves as a sleek toothbrush or toothpaste holder for kids.

Contemporary doesn’t have to be cold and austere. Add softness with a feathered lamp shade.

*Find a

store near you.

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We asked our travellers...

What's on your bucket list?

Vicente Wolf

“Traveling to Mongolia and China since I’ve never been to these countries, and re-visiting Indonesia and Iran. When I travel, I like to shop for my showroom, VW Home, and experience the culture of the country that I’m in.”

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Kimberley Seldon

"I'd love to wear a size 8 but I better fill my bucket with more attainable goals—travel India, survive Warrior Dash, walk Japan's 88 Temples, all 1200 km. That last one may help me kick the bucket.”

Interior designer Vicente Wolf has been at the top for over 35 years. From the spacious lightfilled loft in New York City, where his company is headquartered, Wolf and his team build on his passion for design that’s guided by integrity and simplicity. He maintains this focus throughout his many creative endeavours: photography, art collection, interior design and global travel.

Kimberley Seldon is a vibrant presence in the world of design, enjoying an international reputation as a designer, journalist, keynote speaker and broadcast personality. Now Kimberley gets to explore her three greatest passions, design, travel and food, as Editor in Chief of Dabble.

www.vicentewolf.com

www.kimberleyseldon.com @kimberleyseldon

April/May 2012

Simon Burn

“A year-long tour around southern Europe in a customized Land Rover Defender with a rooftop tent.” Simon is a creative director and photographer with 25 years' experience. He owns a branding and design studio, SDB Creative Group Inc., based out of Toronto. He presently divides his time providing branding and design consultation, and travelling for Dabble magazine, shooting travel, interiors and food throughout North America and Europe.

www.sdbimages.com @sdbimages


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SNAPSHOT

Seville & Granada WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY VICENTE WOLF

For many years I have travelled to Islamic countries and gained such appreciation for the culture, arts and architecture, which I consider poetic expressions of the native lifestyle and beliefs. I’ve experienced the Islamic culture in Turkey, Iran, Syria, Uzbekistan, Egypt and Tunisia and seen the remains of the Raj civilization in India. I even remember the first time I saw photos (as a child in Cuba) of the Moorish palaces in Spain and the courts of the last Muslim rulers in the country. Today I am excited to explore what Seville and Granada have to offer.

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TRAVEL My first stop is Seville, to see the The Royal Alcazar Palace. Originally a Moorish fort, it transformed into a palace under construction ordered by Abd Al Ramm III in the year 913. In the centuries that followed, it served as home to many monarchs and it was Ferdinand and Isabella’s last stop before conquering Granada as Spain’s Catholic monarchs. The palace’s Casa de Contratación (House of Trade), is where Christopher Columbus met with Ferdinand and Isabella after his second voyage to the New World. The profusion of fountains and gardens in the palace and the incredible craftsmanship on display excites me. In Seville, you see the extreme differences between the city’s European and Islamic influences. The great European cathedrals are austere and imposing, with very little colour…seeming a little dehumanizing. In contrast, the Islamic structures have a great amount of colour and lightness with flowing water and flowers, giving pleasure to all my senses. The train ride to Granada takes three hours through acres of sage green olive trees, orange groves and white houses, contrasting pleasantly with the colour of the earth. It brings to mind El Greco paintings, which feature silver-grey skies. I take a taxi from the train station to my hotel, Parador de San Francisco, in the heart of Alhambra, the palace and fortress complex in Granada. If you travel to Granada, it’s important to book a tour of the Alhambra in advance as it is always sold out. I recommend arriving in the afternoon to take a night tour, as seeing the palace in the evening gives you a very different perspective of the place. The Nasrid Palace is the only one you can see at night but it is magical. As I walk through, I am struck by the sound of water drifting through the rooms, encouraging a cool and tranquil feeling. The walls of the palace are adorned with incredible carved plaster juxtaposed with a great play of patterns and colours in the tiles. The materials themselves are not fancy, but with the hands of the great craftsmen who built the palace they become precious jewels to admire. At night you can imagine the full moon on the reflecting pools as jasmine perfume drifts through wood-carved windows into the space. I can picture Muhammad XII enjoying his harem, good food and soft music. My evening ends at the hotel where I enjoy glass of Rioja wine.

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SNAPSHOT

The Islamic structures have a great amount of colour and lightness with flowing water and flowers, giving pleasure to all my senses.

Court of Machuca

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My second day of the tour starts at 9:00 am. I book the first tour because as the day goes on the crowds get bigger, making it hard to fully enjoy the space. As I walk through the Alhambra, I see water utilized so many different ways. In the indoor Court of Machuca the water gurgles in a central pool set into the white marble floor, giving your eyes a cool view to focus. Simple white walls are contrasted by warmly-coloured walls trimmed with brightly-patterned tile. Next I walk through the Court of Lions. The lions come from an old Jewish palace and form the centrepiece of the court with its thin columns creating what looks to me like a marble forest. Entering this room is a set of stairs that has a canal in its centre, allowing water to enter the Court of Lions from adjoining rooms. The travelling water connects the interior and exterior spaces, giving the palace a great sense of openness. I imagine what it might have been like for a royal to travel through the courts…hearing the sound of water gurgling and seeing the gardens filled with roses of many varieties, scenting the air with fragrant beauty. There are vegetable gardens built on sides of the hills of the Generalife (one of the oldest surviving Moorish gardens) with an alley of flowering trees, fountains, tiles and carved wood. So many have been influenced by the design of the gardens and courtyards, including the great landscape designer Russell Page who incorporated many details from the Generalife into his own work. All in all, my first trip to Seville and Granada is an incredibly beautiful and cultural experience. I enjoy the new sights and sounds, arts and architecture, wonderful food and warm people. I hope to return again soon.

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ROAD RAVES

finding balance

in Thailand WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY HEATHER GREENWOOD DAVIS

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TRAVEL

Heather Greenwood Davis takes a year to travel with her husband and two sons. Her adventure continues here in Thailand.

Travelling as a family of four has its challenges. Travelling as the lone woman in a family of boys can be tough too. And the fact is that while I am far from the girly girl my parents thought they were getting, I do have a reputation for preferring luxe and lush to down and dirty. My boys (including my husband Ish), on the other hand, have yet to meet a mud pit or dark cave they didn’t need to explore. I love them dearly but it’s the kind of dynamic that can cause some tension when it comes to itinerary setting. In most of the countries we’ve explored, since leaving Canada for a year of family travel in July 2011, we’ve been able to find something for most of us. But Thailand, where we spent two weeks this winter, was the first spot where we all got everything we wanted and more. Part of it is geographical: at the tip of Southeast Asia, Thailand has the benefits of tropical climes and idyllic islands. The protected Gulf of Thailand provides plenty of opportunities for getting out on the water and the interior, with it’s jungle landscape to the north, offers the opportunity to get adventurous. You can live like a pauper without pain in a beach hut or homestay or live like a King or Queen at places that would cost you much, much more back home. The most difficult thing about a visit to Thailand is divvying up your time. Will you spend your days on jet skis and eating from street vendors or indulge in finer things? Our family was split (3-1) with me on the losing end—so we compromised. We started our adventure leg in Khao Sok, an area just north of Chiang Mai. I was okay when we got into the rubber dinghy; okay when I realized we were going through the mangroves; even okay when the boys wanted to sit up front. But Kong, our guide, was really pushing it when she suggested we look up.

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ROAD RAVES

“The most difficult thing about a visit to Thailand is divvying up your time. Will you spend your days on jet skis and eating from street vendors or indulge in some of the finer things. �

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“Do you see it? Up in the tree?” the obvious glee in Kong’s voice. “That’s a yellow diamond back python. He must be sleeping.” “Then why are you yelling?” I thought. “We don’t need him awake.” I look around me to see how many other members of my family are equally concerned by this woman who is now holding a stick and jabbing it in the snake’s direction to show us where it’s lying and I can’t find anyone who shares my fear. Instead two little boys who are itching to find a stick for themselves and a dad who is helping them look meet my horrified stare. And it was like that for days. At the Elephant Hills resort we stumbled on more than just the tree-sleeping pythons. We rode bamboo rafts across the murky waters, we swung on jungle vines and slipped and slid through a muddy junglescape on our way to the most unique lunch experience I’ve ever encountered. Meals were cooked over a makeshift fire and the cream for our curry came from a coconut picked on the spot.

On a sea canoe experience in the more touristy Phuket, we squeezed through cave entrances so small that our guide (who insisted we call him Little Buddha) had to let air out of the raft (while we were in it) to get us through. In northern Chiang Mai we zipped with the Flight of the Gibbon crew on lines that ran high above the ground …in a rain storm. And after spotting some young boys kickboxing on a rooftop above the night market in Chiang Mai city, I watched the boys learn the Muay Thai moves from former champ Burklerk Pinsinchai during impromptu lessons. At the end of each day we were tired, dirty and surprisingly happy, the boys more than me, but the adrenaline rush of this constant adventure did begin to win me over. Still, when we move over to the Four Seasons Chiang Mai I cement my faith in luxe living. Set among acres of working rice paddies with all of the comforts and service you expect from a Four Seasons resort and a jaw dropping landscape that makes you feel eons away from reality but completely in Thailand, this hotel won me over immediately. Then they opened the doors to our suite. April/May 2012

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About the size of an entire house in Canada, the suite was a welcome change from months of sharing a room or squeezing into tight apartments. Suddenly there was room for each of us and then some. Meals served on good china, fresh fruit waiting in our rooms, turn down service and a spa that still has my full attention. My heart soared again on a visit to the Mandarin Oriental Dhara Dhevi in Chiang Mai where temple-like buildings and private villas boast private plunge pools. And I believe I fell in love a little with my masseuse at the Evason Resort and spa where she not only kneaded out my knots but then invited me to bring the kids in for lessons on how to massage my neck when we get home. It wasn’t all pampering though. I had other plans for those boys. One of the things I’ve always wanted to do in Thailand is to learn to cook. I love food but cooking­—with two kids

underfoot and hungry, and the time it can require—is the bane of my existence. If I could get the kids (and hubby) interested in making meals, well ….win/win. We spent time with an Executive Chef at the Four Seasons in Chiang Mai and we took lessons again (we needed as much help as we could get ) at the “Cooking @Home” cooking school where Yui runs an intimate cooking school with a view from her home. The boys took to the lessons like champs and Ish was only threatened with a rolling pin once. We laughed and cooked and ate and admitted that my favourites weren’t as bad as they’d imagined. By the end of the trip we’d all gained something. A mix of adventure and pampering for sure, but time together as a family sharing what we loved made it the perfect place to create holiday memories.

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Follow Heather on her journey at: www.globetrottingmama.com


DABBLE DOES

Romantically described as the Pearl of the Danube, Budapest is a city of extremes. Pest’s dramatic skyline features St. Stephen’s Basilica at its centre.

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TRAVEL

es do e bl Dab

Budapest PRODUCED BY KIMBERLEY SELDON PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALINA SEAGAL

Before politics compromised Hungary’s influence, its capital twin cities—Buda and Pest­rivalled Paris as a centre for fine art and artistic and intellectual achievement. Though evidence of Budapest’s post-Nazi, post-Communist restoration is abundant, the process is by no means complete, leaving an opportunity for the curious traveller to witness the past while watching the future emerge.

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TRAVEL

Twin cities, Buda and Pest are divided by the Danube River. ABOVE The Gothic spires of the

Hungarian Parliament building in Pest.

OPPOSITE Baroque sculpture

on Buda’s Castle Hill.

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DABBLE DOES

There’s bound to be hilarity when across North America on a design filled with strudel stretching, wine a night at the opera.

Design Express Budapest and Pra in Chief, Kimberley Seldon. Learn and its upcoming trip to Charlesto

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n you take 30 home enthusiasts from n-lover’s tour of Budapest. Days were e tasting, architectural tours and even

ague is the twelfth trip lead by Editor n more about Dabble’s Design Express on and Savannah, June 13-17, 2012.

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DABBLE DOES

BUDAPEST ARCHITECTURE

Ernst Galeria owner Eleni Koranis strikes a pose beside a 1920s iron rocking chair from Vienna. Her Pest gallery specializes in furniture, paintings and ceramics from the turn of the 20th century. 80

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ARCHITECTURE

Architecture buffs may find Budapest’s range of styles somewhat head-spinning. Roman amphitheatres, Gothic and Neo-Gothic styled cathedrals, Turkish baths and Secessionist (Art Nouveau) buildings give the city an architectural ambiguity that only underscores its many charms.

1

Buda

Though the original Royal Palace with its Gothic and Renaissance foundations was destroyed and rebuilt many times, the Habsburgs built a completely new, small Baroque palace in the beginning of the 18th century. Today, Buda Castle (Kiralyi Palota) houses the largest collection of Hungarian fine art at its Hungarian National Gallery. Explore the gardens and nearby restaurants and make a half day of the visit. Dabble Savvy: Had history been different, we might know the names of Hungarian artists as well as we know Monet, VanGogh and Picasso. Hire a guide to enjoy the impressive collections.

2

Zsolnay ceramic vase.

A visit to the lobby of the Hilton Budapest Hotel nets a surprising glimpse into antiquity, as it’s built on top of the ruins of a medieval monastery. The UNESCO World Heritage Site is in the heart of the Buda Castle district, beside Fisherman’s Bastion and Matthias Church. If it’s time for lunch, the Icon Restaurant offers spectacular views of the Danube River, Chain Bridge and Hungarian Parliament building.

3

Like so much of Hungary’s finest architecture, Matthias Church (Mátyástemplom) is a victim of various invasions. Perhaps the most devastating, a century and a half of Turkish occupation, resulted in the whitewashing of ornate frescoes and confiscation of the church’s ecclesiastical treasures. One of the most striking features from the 19th century restoration is the church’s ornamental roof, covered in pyrogranite ceramic tiles developed by Zsolnay. Dabble Savvy: Father and son, Hungarian natives Miklós and Vilmos Zsolnay, received worldwide recognition for their porcelain and ceramics. The iridescent, frost-resistant tiles were a popular building material during the city’s prolific Art Nouveau period.

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ARCHITECTURE

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Pest

Admirers say Art Nouveau is stunningly beautiful, with its fanciful forms, shimmering colours and stylistic freedom. Detractors have a different opinion, suggesting the 19th century style is simply dreadful. Regardless of your position, Budapest offers some fine examples of the style which is frequently referred to as Secessionist. The Budapest Zoo is one such example, though some sections veer heavily towards kitsch. Dabble Savvy: It’s worth a stroll to see the front gates if you’re in the neighbourhood anyway. Budapest Zoo is near the Széchenyi Baths, Gundel Restaurant and Heroes’ Square.

2

Hungary’s most important church is St. Stephen’s Basilica (Szent István Bazilika). The 10th century neoclassic style church is named for Hungary’s first king, Stephen I. Avoid crowds and visit in the evening when the artfully lit exterior shames even a full moon. If you plan to do a daytime tour, there is a small fee. Dabble Savvy: Fans of the macabre may want to pay an additional fee to have the lights turned on in the ‘Chapel of the Holy Right’, to view the mummified fist of King Stephen. A stay at the Four Seasons Hotel Gresham Palace is a pampered experience. Every detail is perfection, every service exceptional—staff stand at attention as guests walk the hallway en route to rooms distinguished by carved walnut doors. Located near the foot of the Chain Bridge, the impressive Secessionist building has an illustrious history­— first as headquarters to the Gresham Insurance Company, then a girls’ home for etiquette and, during World War II, as barracks for Soviet soldiers who burned the furniture for warmth. Restored in 2001, the renovated staircases, stained glass and mosaic tiles by Zsolnay create a lasting impression.

3

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A distinctive onion dome atop the Moorish revival style Dohány Street Synagogue.


TRAVEL Every detail of the Four Seasons Hotel Gresham Palace is memorable. The lobby’s graceful Peacock Gates are in the Secessionist style (Art Nouveau).

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DABBLE DOES

SHOPPING

Buda 1

“Vintage Herend Porcelain, turn of the century objets d’art and fine oil paintings,” says Kimberley, “are just some of the goods I look for at Ecseri Flea Market.” Visit during offseason when prices are very favourable. However, do be prepared to find busts and portraits of Mussolini and Hitler in multiple stands (though these infamous items are tucked away during warm weather months when tourists are more plentiful). History buffs may appreciate communist memorabilia. The market is open on Saturday. Cash is king, though many vendors take credit cards.

2

Make sure to bring a good pair of walking shoes and wear sunscreen when you visit Szentendre, just outside of the city centre. It’s easy to lose track of time in this popular destination for visitors and local weekend pilgrimages. Nestled among the hills of Buda, the folksy village-turned-artistrefuge has shopping opportunities galore. Not to mention several museums, colourful restored buildings and restaurants decent enough to make spending four to five hours here a pleasant outing. Look for handmade pottery, jewelry, embroidered linen and hand blown glass to tempt your spending resolve.

3

Although the styles are diverse, Hungary has more than one famous ceramics house. In addition to Zsolnay’s Art Nouveau pieces (which are admittedly an acquired taste) there is the perennially pleasing Herend Porcelain. Founded in 1826, Herend specializes in hand-painted and gilded porcelain for a discerning worldwide clientele. Many of its classic patterns are still in production. RIGHT Kimberley negotiates

with an eager vendor at Ecseri Flea Market.

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Ready to give that credit card a workout? The good news is there are fewer temptations than you’d find in larger cities like Paris and New York. “The bad news is, there is none,” says Dabble’s Editor in Chief Kimberley Seldon. “Arrive early and bring cash. The selection can keep you busy for hours.”

BUDAPEST SHOPPING


TRAVEL

SHOPPING

Herend porcelain

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Pest

Closed to cars, Váci utca is Pest’s premier shopping street. Despite the usual suspects, like Italian department store Coin (Coincasa section has fun bedding and kitchenware) and the typical tourist spots where you’ll find Hungarian gifts no doubt produced in China, there are some lovely stores selling clothing, jewelry and porcelain. Don’t miss the chocolates at Csokoládé & Delikat (#15). Dabble Savvy: Chocolate shops are always air conditioned, making them a real draw on the hottest days. Bacchus (#23) is a wine shop with a good selection and attentive staff. Café Molnár’s (#31) sells kürtoskalác or rolled donuts with coconut, cinnamon, chocolate and almonds.

2

Sure it’s touristy, but there’s no way you come to Budapest without at least a cursory visit to Grand Market Hall, (Nagycsarnok). Most of the goods fall into the souvenir category, but there are some exceptions including lovely leather bags, Bavarian textiles and exceptional food. Find a lunch counter on the second floor and enjoy a spicy Hungarian sausage with red cabbage and cold beer. Then check out the selection of paprika on the main floor. Dabble Savvy: There is a clean, coed public toilet at the back of the market,130 HUF (US$0.60). Ernst Galeria owner Eleni Koranis (PHOTO PAGE 80) eagerly shares her enthusiasm for Hungary’s turn of the century artistic accomplishments. Her design-savvy shop is filled with fine art paintings, ceramics (including pieces from world-renowned Zsolnay), as well as sleek furnishings from Eastern Europe.

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DABBLE DOES

BUDAPEST TRAVEL Known as the “City of Spas,� no trip to Budapest is complete without at least one visit to a thermal bath. Depending on which of the 15 public baths you choose, plan to spend at least several hours enjoying indoor and outdoor pools, steam baths, saunas and other amenities such as massage.

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Budapest is a city famous for its geothermal baths, vestiges of a Turkish occupation which lasted more than 140 years. Navigating a modern day visit to one of these bathing sanctuaries is not uncomplicated, but it’s a worthwhile endeavour. Typically, a bather purchases a ticket and receives a plastic wristband, which acts as a key to enter and to a specific locker. Attendants are on site to guide the confused.

TRAVEL EXPERIENCES

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Buda

Built atop the city’s 70 million litres of warm thermal spring water, the Gellért Baths have been soothing souls and pruning toes since doors opened in 1918. Thermal baths, saunas, gender specific plunge pools and an open-air swimming pool with artificial waves provide hours of enjoyment. Design lovers will prefer the Gellért Baths to others, owing to the stained glass roof and Zsolnay tiles in the main hall. Dabble Savvy: Head to the Gellért Hotel and Spa from the Great Hall Market. It’s a short walk across the Liberty Bridge (Szabadság híd) and on approach you can admire the Art Nouveau beauty of this impressive hotel.

2

Kiscelli Múzeum consists of a collection of fine art from the 20th century to the present, housed in a mustard coloured Baroque mansion opposite Margit Island. Locals rent Kiscelli for private parties but visitors can tour the setting, complete with furniture and an eclectic art collection from the period. There are summer concerts as well, so ask your concierge for details. Dabble Savvy: It’s a wee climb so wear comfortable shoes. Fortunately, the wine cellars of Királyi Borok are steps from Buda Castle and the Funicular that can deliver a thirsty tourist back down to Pest after a visit...which is strictly for research purposes of course. Traditional Hungarian wines, known as Tokaji are pleasantly sweet and light tasting and there’s no lovelier setting to enjoy them.

3

Dabble Savvy: Bring a bathing suit and towel. If you forget, there are some stodgy suits for sale and a towel rental service. The“towels” however are more like a corner of a thin bed sheet, neither luxurious nor absorbent.

Dabble Savvy: If you plan to purchase, make sure to pick up a bubble sleeve, which protects your bottle in transit.

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TRAVEL EXPERIENCES

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Pest

Spend a cultural evening at the Hungarian State Opera where the music and skill of the performers will charm even reluctant opera goers. The magnificent Neo-Renaissance style building, completed in 1884 and modeled after the Vienna Opera House, is one of the city’s most beautiful. Dabble Savvy: Hungarians dress up to attend the opera. A simple black dress or an elegant pantsuit is a good choice.

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Folk Dancing is a popular Hungarian pastime and concerts are available throughout the city and even on boats which cruise the Danube. Ask your concierge for a recommendation as locations change frequently.

3

Széchenyi Bath and Spa is one of the largest medicial baths in Budapest with18 pools in total, 3 outdoor and 15 indoor. Rain or shine, locals and visitors take to the water, enjoying the healing benefits of the thermal water and some of the city’s best people watching.

4

The lyrical Moorish Revival style architecture makes Dohány Street Synagogue one of Budapest’s most recognizable buildings. Its history makes it one of the most memorable. Built between 1854 and 1859, the fanciful decoration derived from Islamic influences. A guided tour includes the Great Synagogue, the Heroes’ Memorial Temple, the graveyard, the Holocaust Memorial and the Jewish Museum. Dabble Savvy: Unless you wish to worship, avoid visiting on the Sabbath (Saturday) and holy days. LEFT Editor in Chief, Kimberley

Seldon, enjoys a gilded box at the Hungarian State Opera with Design Express travellers.

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TRAVEL Travellers keen to save some steps on the way up to Buda Castle can ride the funicular for 840 HUF (US $3.75) each way. On busy days, wait times can be up to half an hour, but it may be worthwhile if a 30-minute climb through parkland doesn’t appeal to you. Dabble Savvy: Sit in the lowest car to enjoy the best views of Pest as you head down the hill.

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Bronze Shoes There are no words to accurately describe the impact of the empty bronzed shoes. Echoes of the men, women and children forced to stand at the river’s edge to be shot, falling into the Danube, following World War II. Their stillness speaks volumes. For more Jewish history visit Dohåny Street Synagogue Holocaust Memorial Center.

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BUDAPEST FOOD

The For Sale Pub Restaurant might not actually be for sale but it does have an interesting dĂŠcor. There are peanut shells on the floor and business cards, boarding passes and paper on the ceiling and walls. 92

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RESTAURANTS & FOOD

Conversation flows as easily as the local Tokaj wines and lusty European beers. First time visitors are bound to leave with a newfound respect for hearty Hungarian food (chicken paprikás alone is worth the airfare) and the enthusiasm with which locals participate in the enjoyment of a good meal with friends.

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Buda

Look past the kitschy “medieval” atmosphere at Alabárdos Étterem and focus instead on the authentic home cooking, served fetchingly on fine Herend and Zsolnay china. The setting, inside a 400 year old Gothic building and opposite Matthias Church makes it an ideal location for an evening stroll before dinner.

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Fortuna 21 - Magyar Vendeglo (Hungarian kitchen) Stone walls and bleached oak floors provide a contemporary backdrop to this dynamic setting where visitors and locals order up traditional favourites such as the goulash soup served tableside in individual kettles. During the summer, sit on the patio and enjoy a cold glass of tokaji. Goulash, bread and wine come in under US$20, making this an affordable sit down experience. Dabble Savvy: Gratuity may be included on your bill. If not, allow 10%-15% extra and give the waiter the money, do not leave it on the table.

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The closest thing to a Dean & Deluca in Budapest is Baldaszti’s. The Buda location is tucked into the hillside, near the Funicular. If it’s lunchtime, sample the Hungarian platter with local meats and cheeses. LEFT Pancakes served with a trio of jams are a perfect breakfast treat. Shop for gourmet groceries in the basement.

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Gundel is likely the city’s best-known restaurant, certainly one of its most expensive. Admired for its fine cuisine, impeccable service and the early 20th century setting. Elegant dress is recommended. Dabble Savvy: Take time to admire the Hungarian masterpieces displayed on the walls while waiting for your meal.

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RESTAURANTS & FOOD

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Pest

A must-visit gem of Hungarian home cooking is Café Kör. The restaurant is fairly small, not terribly picturesque, and the staff is not overly affectionate. However, the meal makes these minor issues tolerable. Perfect goulash, sublime veal tenderloin and a Viennese style, thinly pounded wiener schnitzel with parsley potatoes are just a few favourites.

2

Klassz lives up to its name which means super rather than classy, as we initially guessed. The bistro style setting is cozy and contemporary and the food has an international rather than Hungarian vibe. Its location at 41 Andrássy út is another bonus, as it’s an ideal spot for a stroll before or after dinner.

3

Andrássy útca with its wide sidewalks and celebrity storefronts is the street locals like to think of as Budapest’s ChampsÉlysées. It’s also home to a second location of Baldaszti’s, the gourmet grocer and restaurant. Come for lunch and enjoy the lively industrial chic atmosphere.

4

Café Gerbaud is an iconic café but truth be told it feels lost in its history. Sit outside and have an iced coffee or enjoy an artisan pastry from the front counter. Otherwise, there are better places for a sit down meal.

5

Grocery Store gifts: Always a great resource, grocery stores frequently carry jams, sugars, and sweet treats that are gratefully received back home. For foodie friends, pick up a bag of poppy seeds for 449 F (US$2) or crushed walnuts 729 F (US$3.30) and pair with a cookbook to make traditional poppy seed or walnut pastry roll known as “beigli”.

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Warm strudel from the oven at Első Pesti Rétesház.


TRAVEL

Dabble travellers enjoy a group strudel stretching session.

FROM LEFT Debbie Fellows, Pamela Landry, Pat Pfrimmer,

Sharron Cook and Kimberley Seldon.

Caption goes here.

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DABBLE DOES

Dabble’s

1-2-3 days in Budapest

Day 1 MORNING Spend your first day in Pest and enjoy the flat terrain as you wander its most impressive sites. Start with a hearty breakfast of apple strudel and strong coffee at Első Pesti Rétesház just steps from the Four Seasons Hotel Gresham Palace and St. Stephen’s Basilica­­—two destinations at the top of your itinerary today. MID-MORNING Wander towards the Gothic Revival style Hungarian Parliament Building near the edge of the Danuble. The red star of communism was removed from the central steeple in 1990 and today the building is a symbol of Hungary’s solidarity. It’s worth a short side trip to cross over to the edge of the Danube from the Parliament Building and locate the Shoes on the Danube Promenade. NOON A tour of the Dohány Street Great Synagogue is a moving and sobering experience. Professional guides provide historic context and point out the area’s most moving monuments. AFTERNOON Next, hop a street car and exit at the Great Market Hall. Surely, you’re hungry by now? Order a cold beer and sausage with sauerkraut before taking in the souvenirs on display. EVENING Stroll along picturesque Andrássy útca en route to dinner and an opera. Café Callas neighbours the Hungarian State Opera House so you’ll have time to eat and make the 7:00 pm curtain.

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TRAVEL Buda Castle’s Danube terrace with Eugene of Savoy monument.

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DABBLE DOES

Day 2

MORNING Have an early breakfast at your hotel before heading to the Ecseri Flea Market. Hunt for vintage Herend porcelain and fine art oil paintings among rustic outdoor stands. Dabble Savvy: Bring cash and expect to bargain. LUNCH Ask the cab to drop you at Buda Castle and you’re steps from Alabárdos Étterem and a truly memorable meal. Authentic home cooking tastes even better served on fine Herend china. AFTERNOON Buda Castle’s majestic Hungarian National Gallery is the premier place to appreciate Hungary’s artistic achievements. The paintings rival Europe’s finest and a knowledgeable guide brings the experience to life. MID-AFTERNOON For culture of a different varietal, the cellars of Királyi Borok are steps from Buda Castle. EVENING Dinner at Café Kör is simply a must.

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TRAVEL

Day 3

MORNING Spend the morning shopping in the folksy village of Szentendre, a mere 30 minutes from the city centre. Stay for lunch and then grab a cab back into town. AFTERNOON What trip to Budapest would be complete without a visit to the Gellért Baths? Don’t forget your bathing suit and bring a towel from your hotel. EVENING It’s hard to resist the romantic pull of a Danube River cruise. There are dozens of boats leaving at various times, so ask your concierge for a recommendation. For those who prefer dry land, a meal at Gundel is memorable.

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DABBLE DOES

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TRAVEL

t รก l z Vis

The Chain Bridge was completed in 1849 and is one of the most beautiful bridges in Budapest. April/May 2012

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DABBLE DARE

Vive Le Vroom WORDS BY KATHY BUCKWORTH

Hold on tight. Dabble Dare contributor Kathy Buckworth gets taken for a ride. I’ve never quite understood the thrill associated with riding a motorcycle the way so many others do. In my overactive imagination I consider only the dark side; you know—death, dismemberment—that sort of thing. But when offered a ride on the back of a motorcycle scheduled to zoom through the vineyards of France, all of a sudden this seemed like a good idea. In fact, it seemed like it might be an incroyable adventure. Pinot what I mean? Maybe it was the confidence I had in my driver. Maybe the beauty of the French countryside in Medoc and, of course, the vineyards themselves. Or maybe (and far more likely) it was the fact that we stopped and sampled the grape offerings at historic vintners Château Lafite Rothschild, Château Mouton Rothschild, and Beychevelles. Who can say? All I know is, I forgot what I was supposed to be afraid of.

C’est la vie. Et le vroom.

Medoc Marathon

For more information on Medoc, visit www.tourisme-aquitaine.fr or www.rendezvousenfrance.com. The 2012 Medoc Marathon, September 8, runs through 59 châteaux. Air France flies to Bordeaux.

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TRAVEL

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for s ce la p best

TEA WORDS BY STEPHANIE GRAY AND JENNIFER WEATHERHEAD

Jennifer and Stephanie share a pot of tea at the Windsor Arms, Toronto.

Morocco

Drinking green tea is a cultural tradition in Morocco, but it’s not the savoury brew you’re probably familiar with. Instead this green tea is infused with plenty of sugar (about five teaspoons per teaspoon of tea) and fresh mint leaves. There’s no typical time tea is served—it follows every meal and is sipped throughout the day. If you’re ever served a glass, don’t refuse. Moroccans serve tea to guests as a sign of hospitality, so it’s disrespectful to say no. Known as Atai, the gunpowder green tea leaves are typically imported from China. An exaggerated above-the-glass serving style produces a slight foam at the top of the glass. Though it’s a sweet drink, it’s surprisingly refreshing, even on the hottest days. 104

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TRAVEL

South Africa

Relatively new in the world of tea, Rooibos is unlike other popular varieties since the Red Bush plant it’s derived from can only be grown in the Cederberg region of South Africa. Brought to the masses by a Russian settler in the early 1900s, it was previously consumed for health purposes by members of the South African Koishan tribe. Although Rooibos isn’t a true “tea” (it’s an herb), it does offer a variety of health benefits and is naturally caffeine-free. Perhaps the best way to enjoy this relaxing brew is at the spa. South Africa’s Arabella Hotel & Spa offers an African Rainforest Experience that includes a full 130 minutes of pampering exfoliation, therapeutic showers and saunas, then ends with an African Tea Ceremony.

Japan

There’s nothing quite like a traditional Japanese tea ceremony or Chanoyu. The rituals surrounding this highly detailed and symbolic practice originate from the 16th century and are strongly influenced by Zen Buddhism. In Japan, visitors can choose from tea ceremony rooms in hotels to special tea houses in public gardens. If you’re in Tokyo, consider tea time at the New Otani and you’ll also enjoy a delicious Japanese sweet.

England

Afternoon tea and scones are about as British as it gets. This tradition became a fashionable social occasion in the 19th century when upper-class and society women would dress up in gowns, gloves and hats for the late afternoon event. Tea time continues to be largely a ladies’ affair and the menu has evolved very little. Expect to receive a pot of tea, finger sandwiches, mini pastries, scones, jam and the deliciously rich clotted cream—served on the finest China, of course. Many London hotels offer Afternoon Tea. Traditionalists will love The Ritz London while the fashion forward may appreciate a more modern experience at The Berkeley. The award-winning tea room at Brown’s Hotel has a cozy interior with fireplaces, live piano music and two tea sommeliers to help you narrow down your selection. April/May 2012

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Exposure WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY SIMON BURN

DABBLE’S CREATIVE DIRECTOR & PRINCIPAL PHOTOGRAPHER SIMON BURN STEPS FROM BEHIND THE LENS TO SHARE SOME TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY SAFETY TIPS.

With so many tourists travelling with large bags loaded with expensive camera equipment, thieves are rejoicing. It’s not a recession for them, business is booming. Part of the problem is sheer noticeability; everything appears to have gotten bigger, lenses in particular, becoming more noticeable than yesteryear’s and requiring larger bags to accommodate them. Often, people also carry laptops and smartphones in their camera bags and backpacks and the thieves know it. Well-known photography brands emblazon their products with logos and cool icons—all announcing, “Expensive cameras inside!” A few months back, on a shoot in Barcelona, I witnessed a thief grabbing a heavily loaded backpack from the shoulder of a tourist. Off ran the nabber—in broad daylight with crowds of people around. Obviously, cities are the worst places for bag snatching—plentiful picking and distracted tourists. Over the years I’ve employed a number of measures to ensure I am never targeted. Thankfully, my techniques to avoid theft have worked well so far. I hope they help you too.

: s ip T ty fe Sa

• Replace your supplied manufacturer’s

camera strap with a plain black one. Don’t advertise the expense of your camera for all to see.

• Black out the logo and model number on

your camera and lens cap with black tape or permanent marker.

• Buy a camera bag that looks like an ordinary bag or backpack. Don’t purchase a camera bag with a fancy logo.

• Keep your bag securely on your person at

all times. Never put it down. Same with camera. If you wear your camera around your neck, twist it around and tuck it under your arm, with lens facing inwards.

• Don’t wear expensive designer brand clothing. Blending in with the locals makes you less of a target.

Dabble Savvy: Sometimes I try to look poor, even down-and-out, depending upon the location and situation. Ahem, friends tell me I don’t have to try. 106

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Focus on safety

All looks safe, but a bag snatching takes only 10 seconds. The lively Plaรงa del Portal de la Pau in Barcelona is typical of crowded city streets where pickpockets thrive. April/May 2012

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We asked our foodies...

What are your favourite toppings on a pizza?

Photo: Jackie Baisa

Rob Rainford

“Right now I’m partial to sundried tomatoes, artichokes and bocconcini cheese. It’s important to play with your combinations. You never know what surprises you can find all by yourself.” Rob is a professionally-trained Canadian Chef who was born in Jamaica and grew up in Toronto, surrounded by the smells of sizzling grills. He graduated from George Brown College and his professional career has taken him all over the world. Rob was host of the wildly popular Food Network TV show, Licence to Grill. www.robrainford.com @ChefRobRainford

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Corey Burgan

"My mom got me hooked on Hawaiian pizza when I was a kid. I can still remember sneaking out of school for lunch to grab a slice with pineapple, ham, mozzarella cheese and fresh tomato sauce." Corey fell in love with cooking when he was 13 and has been in the kitchen ever since. His passion is cooking for friends and family. It's just a bonus that it's also his career.

www.dabblemag.com @dabblechef

Jameson Fink

“Sausage and mushrooms for me. I like a two-topping max as I think you start gilding the lily when you add too many.” After dabbling in the food and wine industry in Chicago, Jameson moved to Seattle in 2004 to pursue his passion for wine. Currently he is the Wine Editor for Foodista and enjoys blogging about wine.

www.jamesonfink.com @jamesonfink


food April/May 2012

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FROM SCRATCH

Chef Corey Burgan says you’ll impress your guests with this modern take on traditional Indian samosas.

samosa patties f he C e bl Dab RECIPE BY COREY BURGAN

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FOOD POTATO patties INGREDIENTS 1 medium onion, diced 1 tsp salt (kosher) 1 tbsp oil 5 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1-2 chili peppers (to taste) 1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed ¼ cup lemon juice (or lime juice) 1 tbsp turmeric 3 tbsp Garam masala 1 tbsp cinnamon 1 tbsp paprika 3 cups day old mashed potatoes 1½ cups cilantro, finely chopped 2 tbsp honey Directions On medium to high heat, sauté onions in oil until they become transparent. Add salt to onions to bring out natural sugars. Add garlic, chili and chickpeas. Sauté for 5 minutes. Lower the temperature, then add lemon juice and all of the spices. Stir in mashed potatoes, cilantro and honey and cook for 5 minutes, making sure everything has been combined. Spread evenly on a baking sheet and place in the fridge to cool. Remove from fridge. Take 3 large spoonfuls of the mixture and form a ball in your hands. Form the ball into a patty by pressing down on it evenly with your palm. Place patties on a baking sheet and return to fridge. Makes 12 patties.

Almond cream sauce INGREDIENTS 1 medium carrot, shredded 1 tbsp oil ¼ tsp salt 4 tbsp sugar 500ml of 35% cream 1 cup sliced almonds Directions In a small saucepan, sauté the carrots in oil at medium heat. Add salt to bring out the natural sugars in the carrots. Add remaining ingredients and bring to a simmer. Cook for approximately 10 minutes or until the sauce thickens. Remove from heat.

samosa patties with almond cream sauce Directions Preheat oven to 325�F. On medium to high temperature, heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large sauté pan. When oil gets to its smoking point, slowly add in samosa patties. Cook for approximately 2 minutes on each side, then place each patty on a baking sheet. Place the baking sheet in the oven for 5 minutes. Take the patties out of the oven and place them directly onto a plate. Drizzle some savoury Almond Cream sauce on top and garnish plate with cilantro. Tip: Serve as an appetizer or side dish for a meal. Patties can be sealed in a zip lock bag and frozen for a later date.

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Some people are born to shop, some born to travel, but Rob Rainford, well... he was born to grill. This Jamaican born Torontonian, host of the Food Network Canada TV show Licence to Grill is now sharing his signature style, The Rainford Method in his latest book Born to Grill (May 2012).

A dayChef with

Rob Rainford

PHOTOGRAPHY BY Mike McColl

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FOOD

breakfast

Grilled Cornbread

“You gon’ to eat yo’ cornbread?” is one of my favourite lines from Life, a movie starring Eddie Murphy and Martin Lawrence. I think about it—and chuckle—every time I make this recipe. ½ cup unsalted butter ⅔ cup granulated sugar 2 eggs 1 cup buttermilk ½ tsp baking soda 1 cup extra-fine cornmeal 1 cup all-purpose flour ½ tsp kosher salt Fire up your charcoal grill and prep the grill for cooking over indirect heat. You need a medium-high temperature of around 350°F to grill the cornbread. For gas grills, preheat the grill to medium-high then turn off one burner to achieve indirect heat.

Grease a 9 x 5 inch loaf pan. Melt the butter in a small saucepan. Remove from heat and stir in the sugar. Whisk in the eggs until well combined. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and stir in the buttermilk and baking soda until well combined. Stir in the cornmeal, flour and salt until mostly combined with only a few lumps. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Place the pan on the cooler part of the grill and close the lid. Cook for 30 to 40 minutes or until a wooden skewer inserted in the centre comes out clean. Let the cornbread cool for 5 minutes in the pan on a wire rack, then turn out of pan and serve warm cut into slices. Serves 8

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A DAY WITH

Miami Short Rib Sandwich with Smoked Mozzarella

Miami-cut short ribs are a thin cut of beef rib. For best results they should be approximately ¼ inch thick. Ask your butcher for these. SHORT RIBS ⅓ cup low-sodium soy sauce ⅓ cup mirin (sweet cooking rice wine) ⅓ cup rice wine vinegar 3 tbsp olive oil (approximately) 1 tbsp liquid honey 1 tsp hot sauce 3 lb Miami-cut short ribs Sandwiches 2 crusty French baguettes 2 cups shredded smoked mozzarella Chives for garnishing Dry Rub 1 ½ tsp packed brown sugar 1 ½ tsp paprika 1 ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper 1 ½ tsp garlic powder 1 ½ tsp dried oregano leaves 1 ½ tsp ground cumin 1 ½ tsp dried thyme leaves 1 ½ tsp cayenne 1 ½ tsp dry mustard ¼ tsp kosher salt (approximately) For the short ribs, stir together the soy, mirin, rice wine vinegar, 2 tbsp olive oil, honey and hot sauce in a large bowl until combined. Place the ribs in the marinade mixture and marinate in the fridge for at least 2 hours, or up to 8 hours if time permits. Meanwhile, mix together all the ingredients for the dry rub. Fire up your charcoal or preheat your gas grill. You need a medium-high grilling temp of around 350°F. Prep the grill for cooking over direct heat. Shake off excess marinade from the ribs and pat them dry with paper towels. Brush the ribs lightly with the remaining olive oil and rub the spice mixture all over the meat. Place ribs on the grill and cook for 5 minutes per side for medium-rare. Trim the rounded ends from each baguette and cut the baguettes in half lengthwise. Remove the bones from the meat and discard. Pile the meat high on the bottom halves of the baguettes, top with cheese and sprinkle with chives. Replace the tops of the baguettes and cut each into five pieces. Tip: Don’t skip even the shortest quick marinating time here because a little flavour is better than no flavour. Avoid turning ribs too often; the meat will not scorch and will benefit from direct heat. Serves 10

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lunch


dinner Rotisserie Herb Prime Rib For maximum flavour allow the prime rib to sit in the thyme rub overnight, but don’t apply the salt until just before you start to cook it. 6 tbsp fresh thyme, finely chopped 10 cloves garlic, pushed through a garlic press 2 tbsp fresh rosemary, finely chopped 2 tbsp fresh oregano, finely chopped Freshly cracked black pepper to taste 7 to 10 lb bone-in prime rib roast ¼ cup grapeseed oil (or just enough to coat the prime rib) Kosher salt to taste

FOOD

Stir together the thyme, garlic, rosemary, oregano and pepper. Rub the prime rib all over with the oil then coat with the thyme mixture. Refrigerate overnight. Fire up your charcoal grill or preheat your gas grill and prep the grill for using the rotisserie. Grilling temp should be around 325°F. For charcoal grilling, you’re ready to grill when a thick white ash has appeared on the coals. Move most of the hot coals to the middle of the grill and place a few on either side to create heat in the middle of the grill where the meat will be rotating. Rub the prime rib with salt to taste and load it onto the rotisserie rod, doing your best to centre the roast. Finger tighten the rotisserie forks on either side of the prime rib (you may have to use a pair of pliers to tighten the forks securely). If you’re using a gas grill, place a drip pan directly on the grates in the middle section of the grill. This will help to catch any fats that drip from the prime rib. You can place a little water in the bottom of the drip pan to help create a moist environment if you wish. Just remember you will be cooking with the lid closed for about 1 ½ to 2 hours, depending on how you like your meat. Put the rotisserie rod on the grill, making sure the rod is secure. Close the lid, set the motor speed to low, then let your grill do the rest of the work. A good rule of thumb is to cook the prime rib for 20 minutes per pound. For medium-rare meat, you will be looking for an internal temperature of 135°F. Once your prime rib is done to your liking, take it off the rotisserie and let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes before slicing it. Serves 8

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There’s an app for that... WORDS BY JAMESON FINK

Hon hon hon, oui oui. Nothing tastes better than a pâté paired with a French wine and Dabble’s wine expert Jameson Fink knows exactly which two to combine. It’s hard to overstate the comforting decadence of a beautifully made pâté. Is it only the heartiest wines that can handle this French classic? Absolutely not. Surprisingly, a lighter-style red with some zip, like a well-made Beaujolais, easily cuts through all that richness. And when you have some traditional accompaniments like cornichons or spicy mustard, often a wine that has a good amount of acidity is the perfect bridge from the substantial pâté to its refreshing complements.

PHOTO BY: JACKIE BAISA

The quality of Beaujolais from producers like Chermette makes me want to beat the drum for drinking Beaujolais year-round. Look for the top Beaujolais from the best sites called "Crus" from the stellar 2009 vintage. Cru Beaujolais cellars beautifully, if you have the strength to resist its considerable charms. I recommend seeking out the Cuvée Traditionnelle as an introduction to Chermette's wines to enjoy while your Crus are tucked away safely for a few years. And if you can't find any of the excellent 2009s, Chermette is a producer who makes quality wines every vintage. Jameson enjoys a glass of Beaujolais at Quinn’s, Seattle, WA. 116

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FOOD

The App

Chicken Liver Pâté and Toasted Bread

Jameson’s Pick

Pierre-Marie Chermette Domaine du Vissoux Cuvée Traditionnelle Beaujolais 2009

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Food Truck Fever Practically the only place you won’t find a stationary food truck in LA is on one of its busy freeways. The mobile culinary craze is making its way coast to coast in North America. And unlike pizza cones (pizza dough shaped into an ice cream cone and filled with cheese, sauce and topping) food trucks are well past the expected 15 minutes of fame.

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FOOD

Who can say whether curbside cuisine started in Puerto Rico or LA? We only know that this rolling food revolution is coming soon to a city or town near you. April/May 2012

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SPECIAL FEATURE

A K A : ck ru T od Fo • Movable Feasts • Chowhound Pit Stops • Curbside Cuisine • Mobile Munching • Meals-On-Wheels • Street Eats • Mobile Truck Stops

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FOOD Years ago, traditional food trucks offered ubiquitous street eat staples like hot dogs and soft ice cream and you always knew where to find them—same ole spot, same ole time. Well, that was then. Now...food trucks are on a roll, offering fresh, even gourmet, samplings at a fraction of the cost of a restaurant meal. Thank our 21st century economy and social media for changing the rules. Food trucks are setting up shop almost everywhere. The smaller overhead (hey, a truck, a chef and a sous-chef) translates into affordable fare, but don’t be fooled. Street side offerings range from Asian delicacies to authentic Mexican tacos; sushi, Kobe beef skewers and even green salads make the scene. In Los Angeles, a food truck mecca, we’re talking burgers accompanied by double-dipped truffle frites with roasted garlic aïoli like the ones you’ll find at Grill ‘em All, winner of Season 1 of Food Network’s Great Food Truck Race. If the food isn’t temptation enough, the sassy names and ultra friendly service techniques like those favoured by Baby’s Badass Burgers (LOWER LEFT) just may seduce you. Seafood lovers follow the Lobsta Truck and Shrimp Pimp, And expect to wait in a long line at the popular Little Frenchie where the crêpes come in sweet and savoury. Got a sweet tooth? Then, pump-up-your-blood-sugar treats by trucks like Cupcakes a GoGo are just the ticket. I think you get the gist. The timing appears to be just right for these rolling cafeterias as studies show today’s office worker is more apt to grab lunch on the run than sit down to a leisurely meal. Just discovering food trucks? Heather Shous, author of Food Trucks: Dispatches and Recipes from the Best Kitchens on Wheels describes her book as a “travel companion for discovering memorable meals on minimal budgets.” The iPhone app Eat St. searches for vendors by location, popularity and type of cuisine. Tweet you there Facebook and Twitter fans love the food truck scene. Imagine this: you’re late for a Tuesday afternoon date with your fave food truck – you know, the one that serves those addictive garlic noodles? You arrive. No truck? No problem. Simply check Facebook and Twitter to find the truck’s next location—that’s right, they move. They’re mobile. (Credit Kogi, the Mexican-Korean taco truck as the first to mobilize its followers via Twitter.) As cuisine conscious consumers, we welcome the food truck movement for its daring “come and get it” attitude. And you know what? We will come and get it. It’s that good.

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e nc ge Sindul

Salted Caramel Brownies WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY FIONA VAN ALSTYNE

Makes 24 Prep Time 30 min. Preheat 350째F 122

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FOOD

Sinfully delicious caramel brownies. there’s no redemption required says our food goddess, fiona van alstyne. Salty, sweet, chewy and chocolatey—these squares of sticky goodness are easy to make and form the best brownie edges you will ever bite into. Enjoy them alone or warmed and topped with an oozy scoop of your favourite ice cream. Oh, and just try not to eat the whole pan at once...

INGREDIENTS

4oz unsweetened chocolate (99+% cacao) ¾ cup butter 2 cups sugar 1 tsp vanilla extract 2 tsp salt, divided 3 large eggs 1 cup flour 6oz semi-sweet chocolate chunks 14oz caramels, unwrapped ¼ cup heavy cream

INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 13 x 9 pan with foil and grease with cooking spray or butter. Place chocolate and butter in microwaveable bowl. Heat on HIGH for 1 ½ minutes, stirring occasionally until melted. Stir in sugar, vanilla and 1 teaspoon of salt. Beat in eggs one at a time. Stir in flour and chocolate chunks. Pour half batter mixture into pan and smooth with a spatula. Bake for 20 mins. Meanwhile, place caramels, heavy cream and remaining teaspoon of salt into a microwaveable bowl. Heat for 1 minute on HIGH or until caramels start to melt. Stir until smooth. Remove brownie batter from oven and pour caramel mixture over top. Smooth with a spatula. Spoon over remaining batter and smooth with a spatula. Bake for a further 30 mins or until just set. Do not over bake. Sprinkle a little salt on top of brownies. Allow to cool before cutting into squares. Serve with vanilla or espresso ice cream. Makes 24 brownies.

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I dabble in...

Grace Bonney is the founder and Editor in Chief of Design*Sponge, a daily blog dedicated to the creative life. Since its launch in 2004, Design*Sponge covers a wide range of topics and even hosts an annual scholarship for student designers and artists. Design*Sponge published its first newspaper and book this year, Design*Sponge at Home, which ended with a 30-city book tour to raise money for local arts charities across the country.

Follow Grace... f www.facebook.com/designsponge

t @designsponge

w www.designsponge.com

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...hockey “I grew up playing competitive field hockey through college and it’s still my favorite sport. I’ll watch and enjoy just about any form of hockey—ice, field and street. I played on a street hockey league on the Lower East Side of Manhattan for years.”


...punk rock “Most people who read my blog don’t know about my past with music. It’s always been a huge part of my life and I really enjoy going to see newer garage bands whenever I can. I saw a reader at a punk show in Portland last summer and I think she took a few moments to process the girly design person she read online with the one standing in front of her at the show. Both sides of me are real, they just rarely mix.”

“I’m always picking up plants and flowers and finding ways to integrate them into my home.” “If I had to stop blogging, one of the things I’d love to learn professionally is floral design. I’m always picking up plants and flowers and finding ways to integrate them into my home and office. I’m particularly interested in educating younger readers about heirloom breed plants and flowers.”

...floral design

DABBLE JUST TURNED ONE. HERE’S WHAT OUR READERS ARE SAYING ABOUT US:

Twitter:

@betterstyled - Feb. 28 Can’t believe it’s been a year! Time flies when you’re having fun! Happy Birthday @dabblemag @decormentor - Feb. 28 @meredithheron: congrats to @dabblemag on your 1st Birthday!! #goCanada!!! #dbc2012” Well done @kimberleyseldon +team! @angfromthedock - Feb. 28 @dabblemag happy birthday:). I think you are a pretty awesome Canadian mag:)) @FaulhaberPR - Feb. 29 Happy (belated) Birthday @dabblemag! A year and counting, congrats. FABULOUS work

Facebook:

Sharron Unsworth Cook Feb. 28 Happy Birthday Dabble! I’ve enjoyed your first year looking forward to watching you grow!

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Just a dab


Issue 7 - AprMay'12