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is not giving solutions to the writers. Our work consists of mirroring, evaluating and giving the information writers need to make their own choices. We all have opinions and tastes but, as story editors, we have to put them aside. What truly matters is helping authors find their own way and guiding them to the place they want. Of course, we can make suggestions but we cannot block writers’ ideas and push ours. Can you tell me about your experience at the Torino Film Lab? Britta: The most important part of the training is participating in the group sessions. Usually there are 3 to 5 writers/directors in each group led by a tutor/story editor. Each project is then reviewed, its problems analyzed and solution schemes are developed together. is works amazingly well and because there are 5-7 heads involved, a lot of valuable input can arise from these sessions. Anna: Mostly it was a very intimate interaction within the group of writers/directors with our brilliant and outstanding tutor, Marietta von Hausswolf. e whole group was so passionate and eager to share everything about our life experiences and personal or professional knowledge to make the colleague’s project better, deeper and stronger.I still remember this feeling of being close and helpful – and in the end, really useful to each other. I believe that working in a small group, when there’s a kind of collective brain, is really one of the most effective ways to discover your story and yourself, to overcome some painful problems and to become a real master of your project. Ariadna: As a story editor trainee, I was able to participate in the script development of the four projects of the group I was assigned to, always under the supervision of a tutor. ere was an excellent work environment that enhanced creativity. At the end of the last workshop, I remember looking back and realizing how positive the evolution of the projects I was involved with had been. 42 WOSH by Daazo.com

What was the most crucial message of the training? Britta: Watch, read, observe, discuss - as a story editor you should expose yourself to the world of storytelling and those who deal with it as much as possible. Anna: Filmmaking is a group work. Sharing is happiness. Forget yourself and care about the script. And – you never know… Ariadna: Sometimes story editors must help writers find the truths of their projects. Other times, story editors have to help writers to not lose during the scriptwriting process the truths they have already found. What would you advise to a young filmmaker unfamiliar with the work of the story editor? Britta: As a young filmmaker chances are that you will profit a great deal from working with a script editor. Maybe look at your last film and review the reactions including your own - if you feel that you did not really manage to take your story to where you initially wanted it to go, or that your audience just did not really get it then you should definitely give it a try. Anna: Find the right person. It’s a precious chance – to have someone who will be there for you during the whole period of your film’s realization. Learn to trust. Learn to listen – to yourself and to the other person. Learn to be very sincere – first of all to yourself. Be honest and answer the unpleasant and painful questions – but this is exactly what will make your film perfect and outstanding. Ariadna: Young filmmakers are expected to be able to tell a consistent story and do it in their own particular way in order to prove that they have a unique vision. It is, indeed, a big challenge. Story editing can help young filmmakers discover what is most valuable in their projects and guide them to reinforce it along the script development process, which can be complex, distressing but exciting at the same time.

World of Shorts - the Berlinale 2015 issue  

World of Shorts (WOSH), the magazine published by Daazo.

World of Shorts - the Berlinale 2015 issue  

World of Shorts (WOSH), the magazine published by Daazo.

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