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SOUTHWATERFRONT

FALL 2011 ARCHITECTURE UNDERGRADUATE THESIS PREP D A N I E L L E

THIREAULT

WATER

The Pacific Northwest has an abundance of water, a fact not fully appreciated. Greywater systems and rainwater collection systems are not new to this area, but water is still often wasted. Water is a resource that we can utilize to optimize heat and energy transfer both within and between building structures. Because water nourishes all life forms, and I will examine how it can be the center of a community. This resource can link between buildings as a network, both physically and conceptually.

THESIS INVESTIGATION How can we more effectively use abundant water resources and art activities to reinforce social, ecological, and economic sustainability? Ecodistricts are a progressive way to enrich our communities and decrease our impact on the local environment. These ecodistricts need to do more than just comprise of series of sustainable buildings. They need strong ecological connections, an interdependence with resource sharing, and a rich civic ecology built around a local economy and self governance. I have chosen the South Waterfront as an investigation site because of its strong relationship to the Willamette River and close proximity to natural ecosystems. Currently the area has made great progress in ecological planning and sustainable building, but it lacks the vibrant social life of a strong community. My thesis will explore how water and the arts can help develop internal neighborhood connections and links to the larger city.

PROPOSAL I propose to design an arts center that is part of a social network of resource sharing buildings. I will explore how the building design can use water to inspire sustainable behavior and support community interaction. As part of a ecodistrict network, I am striving to make my building a demonstration on how the sustainable strategies can be celebrated. So often people are desensitized to information. With the abundance on eco-friendly practices and statistics, there needs to be alternative ways to inspire sustainable behavior. My building design will celebrate water as a resource as well as demonstrate how it can be used to stimulate urban activity and community cohesion.


GOALS

TO CREATE A LIVABLE, VIBRANT NEIGHBORHOOD -Support healthy

bike and pedestrian transportation

-Design a clear hierarchical street system -Promote emphasis on retail vs. residential streets -Facilitate bicycle traffi c

-Create strong community -Public Gathering Space -Community Gardens -Local Market -Utilize Public Art for Communication

-Develop ecological

connections

sustainability

-Effi cient and expressive water collection -Resource sharing among buildings -Energy effi cient buildings

-Strengthen connections

to nature

-Green corridors linking to the waterfront -Increase awareness of the Willamette River Ecosystem -Strengthen habitat corridors

-Make the built environments.

environment expressive using artwork, art activities, and aesthetic

-To draw ettention to natural assets, such as water -To encourage sustainable living -To connect the neighborhood to the larger city


SITE 1 5

2 3

6

4 1

2

3

4

5

6


1936

South Waterfront Developmental History

1948

1955

1974

1980

1996

FLOOD

From Buster Simpson Greenway Development Plan

South Waterfront Developmental Projections

SITE

HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT South Waterfront Greenway Development Plan

Ankrom Moisan South Waterfront Plan


Corbett-Terwilliger-Lair Hill Neighborhood

SITE ANALYSIS

Access

Filtration

Activity Nodes

Site Mediation


SITE DEVELOPMENT EXISTING DEVELOPMENT

PROPOSED FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

I5


SUMMARY

My specific site is located next to OHSU, at the intersection of SW

Whitaker St and SW River Pkwy.

On my lot, I will develop an Educational

Art and Community

Center to engage the community.

This center will serve as a means

of connection between the city

and the river, the community and OHSU, and the existing apartments and future development.

The building activities will attract residents and visitors from diverse

backgrounds, connecting across generations, beliefs, and races.

The building will serve as a demonstration of sustainable strategies

in an engaging, artistic way, utilizing

art and education as a

communication tool.

There will be a housing tower adjacent to the Arts Academy to provide

residential space for student, professors, visiting professionals, and condos above to help fund and support the Academy.


USER PROFILES

Community

Bob and Alice

Denise and Nancy

Ashley and Thom

Activities: -Community Classes -Public Gallery Openings -Public Performances -Public Lectures Hours of Use -After Work - After 5pm -After School - After 3pm -Weekends

Academy

Will and Linda

Linda Wysong

International

Luis Camnitzer

Arunkumar H.G.

Colin Ives

Mark Salvatus

Activities: -Formal Art Education/ Artist-In-Residence -Eco Art Exploration -Performance Art and Practice Hours of Use -Primary work hours 9-5 -Evening Performances and Lectures -After Hour Project Development Activities: -Guest Lectures -Eco Art Exploration -Artist-In-Residence Programs -Housing Needs Hours of Use -Primary work hours 9-5 -After Hour Project Development


PROGRAM

COMMUNITYARTS A C A D E M Y

Recital Hall

Cafe

Metal and Wood Shops Waterfront Amphitheater

Gallery

Courtyard

Facility Services

-2 Floors Underground Parking -Child Care Center - 1 @ 800 sq ft -Lobby - 1 @ 1500 sq ft -Administrative/Offices - 6 @ 120 sq ft-Cafe - 1 @ 1500 sq ft -Trash/Recycling - 100 sq ft -Private Rentable Studios - 6 @ 200 sq ft -Facilities Services - 400 sq ft -Restrooms - 3 @ 200 sq ft

Performance Arts

-Music Practice Rooms - 4 @ 200 sq ft -Sound Booth - 1 @ 200 sq ft -Theater/ Lecture - 1 @ 3500 sq ft - 1 @ 1500 sq ft -Dressing Rooms/ Showers - 2 @ 800 sq ft -Dance Studio/Recital Space - 2400 sq ft

Dance Studio

Class

Ceramics

Child Care

Residential Lobby

Print Making

Class

W/C Facility S.

Theater/ Lecture Hall

Dressing Room

Admin.

Weaving

Class

Lounge

Lobby

Education

-Classrooms - 4 @ 800 sq ft -Gallery - 1 @ 300 sq ft - 1 @ 800 sq ft -Computer Lab - 1 @ 400 sq ft -Library - 1 @ 1500 sq ft -Output Room

Physical Art

-Ceramics + Kiln - 800 sq ft INT 400 sq ft EXT -Wood Shop - 2000 sq ft -Metal - 2000 sq ft -Weaving - 800 sq ft -Printmaking/Photography - 800 sq ft + 100 sq ft Dark Room

Outdoor

-Ampitheater -Sculpture Garden -Community Market/Gathering Space -Playground

Housing

-Residential Tower Adjacent -Cooperative Arts Student Housing -Artists-In-Residence -Condos Top Floors to Support Arts Academy


PROGRAM

VARIABLE USER ACCESSIBILITY

Community Classes Public Lectures

PUBLIC

Gallery Exhibitions Art Performances Formal Art Classes Eco Art Exploration Artist In Residence

PRIVATE

Performance Practice Housing Facilities MORNING

AFTERNOON

EVENING

NIGHT


ECO ART

POTENTIAL FRAMEWORK AND PRECEDENTS Buster Simpson’s Scrapyard Of Transformative Potential

Using excavated materials from the site as development continues, create a source for local artists to utilize. This material will provide a resource for artists to draw from and recycle to create public artworks throughout the South Waterfront Greenway and future commissioned and collaboration projects with private and public development.

Living Water Garden

The park was designed as a giant fish, with each part of the treatment system represented by a body part. The water’s journey starts when it is pumped from the river up a 20-foot high hill into the settling pond (eye of the fish). The water then enters the constructed wetlands (scales) planted with seven different water-purifying plants designed also to refer to Hang Long, a series of beautiful limestone pools cascading three kilometers down the nearby sacred Mt. Emei. http://www.keepersofthewaters.org/lwg_gal.cfm

Sculptures of Living Processes – Jackie Brookner

The Gift of Water - “Brookner’s sculpture features various mosses on a pair of large cupped hands. The mosses purify the water of the fountain and the sculpture itself represents the precious nature of the water that we use.” “The Roosevelt Community Center in San Jose is a LEED gold certified building and re-cycles storm water runoff from the roof. Two of Brookner’s installations do this filtering. In one of them (left) water is channeled into a basin-like sculpture that aerates the water as it drops into the basin below where it is filtered and recycled.” http://www.thethirdray.com/installation/sculptures-of-living-processes-jackie-brookner/


PRECEDENTS

Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts Providence, RI

Finn Center

Community School of Music and Arts Mountain View, CA

Mark Cavagnero Associates

The Center for Music and Arts Education is a 25,000 square-foot, state-of-the-art education facility. It will be the fi rst permanent home of the Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA), a 35-year-old nonprofi t organization in Mountain View, Calif. In addition to housing music classrooms and private music studios, the building provides visual arts studios, administration space, a recital hall and an outdoor performance space. This building is helpful in deciding what kind of programmatic elements would be benefi cial in my project.

A three-story, 38,815-squarefoot interdisciplinary arts center for a mix of Brown University’s departments, including theater, dance, music, and visual art. The building includes a 200-seat recital hall and screening facility, a multimedia lab, a recording studio, large multipurpose production studios, a wood shop, offi ces, and gallery space. A green in front of the main (west) facade features grass-covered steps and doubles as an outdoor amphitheater; a fl at swath of zinc paneling on the facade accommodates a projection screen. This building has a very similar size and features that I want to include in my project. It is a good reference on how education and the arts work together in a single facility, also in an urban setting.

Diller Scofidio + Renfro


3D INTERPRETATION


BIBLIOGRAPHY BedZED. “BioRegional Solutions for Sustainability” Web. http://www.bioregional.com/whatwe-do/our-work/one-planet-communities/. BedZED is a good reference for a sustainable community model. It unifies the community both on a resource sharing level, and a social level. The strategies applied will be a good source to see the effectiveness of certain design implementations. It is also a good reference for any housing components that may be integrated into the project. Benyus, Janine M. Innovation Inspired by Nature. Harper Perennial 1997. Print. Biomimicry is all about drawing inspiration in design from the natural efficiencies of nature. “Innovation Inspired by Nature” will help me to understand the full possibilities and implications of biomimicry structurally and socially. “District Energy Analysis: South Waterfront - North District.” Portland Sustainability Institute. Web. This document covers the main areas of current energy consumption and the reduction goals. It outlines the potential opportunities, benefits, and projected next steps. Although it mostly covers the northern region of the district, it will be a good tool for analysis and direction for my project. “EcoDistrict Summit.” Portland Sustainability Institute. Web. 17 Oct. 2011. <http://www.pdxinstitute.org/>. I attended the EcoDistrict Summit held in Portland on Wednesday 26 October 2011. There was an abundance of discussions on the different aspects of EcoDistricts, from community interaction resource infrastructure. One discussion which was especially helpful was about community programs such as a tool library or a neighborhood food harvesting group. McKenzie-Mohr, Ph.D, Doug “Fostering Sustainable Behavior” 2006-2010 Web. http://www. cbsm.com/public/world.lasso. This site has a wealth or articles relating to ecological concerns. It is an inspiration for how you can utilize community based social marketing to influence behavior. I will be using this source as a reference when designing the building systems and expressive water features related to the site ad community as a whole. Portland Parks and Recreation “South Waterfront Greenway Development Plan Design Component- Phase I” Dec. 8th 2004. Web. http://www.portlandonline.com/parks/index. cfm?c=45643&a=175890 This resource will be extremely helpful in integrating my design with the future greenway and park design anticipated for the South Waterfront. It also covers an plan for public art and how the current conditions and industrial remnants can potentially be integrated into future public spaces. Since I will be exploring the merits of the marriage of art and sustainable behaviors, the integration of the public realm is very important and this document will help inform that strategy.

Simpson, Buster “Portland South Waterfront Greenway Conceptual Schematic Design Phase” August 2004. This document goes into detail of a specific public art making plan. It covers strategies from erosion control to “Laboratories And Studios For Urban Pioneers” to “Scrapyard Of Transformative Potential”. Since I want to create an environment for individuals to create and stimulate ecological awareness, this proposal will allow me to integrate my design with strategies already being explored by the greenway plan, and let my project to encompass all the aspects of art and public art making. Sipes, James L. Sustainable Solutions for Water Resources. Hoboken (N.J.): John Wiley, 2010. Print. “Sustainable Solutions for Water Resources” focuses on real world case studies involving water management and covers the policies, planning, design, and implementation of water conservation and systems. Although the northwest does not have a shortage of water, it is an integral part of my design and I think this will have a lot of insight for me to design the most efficient water systems possible within the south waterfront. I also think this could be influential in thinking about water transportation and using water for resource (heat) transportation as well as just a resource itself.

‘South Waterfront Design Guidelines and South Waterfront Greenway Design Guidelines” City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. 2010. Web. This document thoroughly outlines the City of Portland’s goals and guidelines for design in the South Waterfront EcoDistrict. This will be a key reference for my project as the design develops and relates to the neighborhood.

Spaid, Sue. Ecovention exhibited June 21-August 18 at the Contemporary Arts Center of Cincinnati. Web. http://www.greenmuseum.org/c/ecovention/intro_frame.html. This text will be very informative on how artists are currently integrating sustainable practices, or promoting ecological awareness. I can use this resource to create a platform to promote artistic expression of eco-friendly behaviors.

“Willamette Riverbank Design Notebook”. City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services. May 2001. Web. This notebook is a tool produced to help foster design along the urban river edge which is beneficial to fish, wildlife, and people. The development of the river edge is extremely important for the site, as it is currently a recovered industrial site.


PROCESS DIAGRAM PROGRAMMING

DEFINE ECO ART FINALIZE PROGRAMMATIC ELEMENTS DETERMINE OCCUPANCY

SCHEMATIC DESIGN

PUBLIC INTERACTION: GREEN SPACES

SPATIAL DESIGN VARIATIONS

GATHERING SPACES

SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIES

MARKET DESIGN

URBAN CONTEXT DESIGN DESCRIBE LOCAL ECOLOGY AND RESPOND TO IT

DESIGN REVISION

SPECIFIC WATER FEATURES

DEFINE SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES

DESIGN EXPRESSIVE WATER FEATURES

FINALIZE DESIGN

EXPLORE PLANTING OPTIONS FOR WATER FILTRATION

INTEGRATION TO WATER INFLUENCES ON DESIGN

INTEGRATE RESIDENTIAL LOBBY/DENSITY

INTRODUCE STORM WATER MITIGATION

FACADE AND BUILDING FORM EXPRESSION


INITIAL PROCESS

Stormwater Control

To actively mediate stormwater as it meets the building surface, I have explored using a series of panels angled off of the building envelope to direct th flow of water. It is then channeled to a series of pockets, which when over flow, cascade down the facade ultimately into pockets of vegetation for filtering and flow control.

Glare/Light Treatment

The translucent glass panels not only serve as directional water flow control, but also as a means to reduce glare and heat gain of the interior of the building. There is also potential for more intense shading by changing material, or embedding louvres inside the panels to better manage light levels during summer months. Another option is also adding PV panels to the angled surface to harness some of the sun energy that it made be protecting the interior from.

Rain Flow Pattern

Flow Direction

WAT E R FLOW EXPLORATION


SITE ORGANIZATION PUBLIC

ACTIVITY NODES

The building organization is intended to provide activity nodes along the circulation through the building to provide moments or engagement with both the activities occuring inside the building, and the movement of water through the site.

MOVEMENT THROUGH THE SITE

Most anticipated movement through the site will be from the major pedestrian throughway planned for Gibbs St. and the waterrfont green way development

ACADEMIC

BUILDING PARTI

The major organizing parti is developed around the east west exis leading to the river. The most public area occuring on the west and becoming more academic when there is a stronger relationship to the water. The building also maintains a visual axis from entry to the Willamette


SITE WATER MEDIATION Approx. Yearly Water Collection Potential

S I T E WAT E R F L O W

G

IB

BS

ST

625, 475 Gallons

RIV

ER

PA

RK

WA

Y

Residential W/C Demand

1,350 Gallons Per Day

Podium W/C Demand

2,000 Gallons Per Day

Approx. Cistern Size 40,000 Cubic Feet


SITE ROOF PLAN

N

1” = 32’ 0”


FLOOR PLANS

N

1” = 32’ 0”

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


FLOOR PLANS

N

1” = 32’ 0”

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

N

1” = 32’ 0”

RESIDENTIAL FLOOR PLAN


LONGITUDINAL SECTION


SUSTAINABLE FEATURES Shading

Ventilation Winter Air Barrier

Summer Sun

Daylight

Summer Air Ventialtion

Double Skin Envelope WATER

-Intensive and Extensive Green Roofs -Cistern Water Catchment for Grey Water Use -Planted Filtration Beds -Public Display and Education

LIGHT

-South Elevation Light Shelves Shade and Diffuse Direct Summer Light and Allows Lower Winter Light to Inflitrate the Interior

VENTILATION

Winter Sun

-North Tower Elevation Double Skin Envelope -Operable Vents Allow Air to Circulate and Ventilate -Warm Air Out of the Building During the Summer -Vents Close in Winter to Create an Air Barrier to Further insulare the Residential Interior -Operable Windows


ELEVATIONS

NORTH ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION


APPROACH FROM GIBBS STREET


MAIN ENTRY LOBBY


CENTRAL COURTYARD


STUDENT LOUNGE

CLASSROOM WATERFRONT AMPHITHEATER

Final Thesis Book  

This is a compilation of my research and following design work for my terminal thesis architecture studio.

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