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2009-2010 Report Submitted: November 4, 2010

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SEAFOOD FOR THE FUTURE ANNUAL EVALUATION

2009-2010

01. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 02. INTRODUCTION 03. STRATEGIC INITIATIVES COMMERCIAL OUTREACH AT THE HEART OF THE ISSUE: FISHERY REVIEW COMMUNITY OUTREACH OUTREACH MATERIALS ELECTRONIC OUTREACH 2.0 MEDIA OUTREACH

04. LOOKING FORWARD 05. DESCRIPTION OF YEAR II EXPENSES

06. REFERENCES 07. APPENDIX 1


01. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY We’re eating fish to the point of their extinction. That’s the pure and simple truth. But Seafood for the Future wants to change that. Overfishing has pushed marine ecosystems to their ecological limits – devastating fish populations and changing the world’s oceans, perhaps forever. And one day our dinner plates might be just as devastated – where a meal of fish and chips is seen as a rare and expensive delicacy. The Aquarium of the Pacific’s Seafood for the Future (SFF) aims to avert this crisis. By collaborating with both consumers and suppliers, SFF has designed and implemented a comprehensive program that seeks to not only raise awareness about sustainable seafood, but to also influence the adoption of sustainable behaviors among consumers and suppliers alike. In meeting this goal, SFF has devised and implemented a comprehensive multi-pronged approach that addresses all sides of the issue. The program, which is comprised of essentially four main components – commercial, community, electronic and media outreach – has experienced an array of successes over the past year, which include: RESTAURANT OUTREACH • SFF has forged 72 strategic partnerships with restaurants spanning the Southern California coastline in addition to New Haven, Connecticut and Boston, Massachusetts. • Case Study: Parker’s Lighthouse and Gladstone’s increased their sale of sustainable menu items by 41% on average. • Of the 15,000 coupons distributed to partnering restaurants and the wider public, 48% were redeemed. • SFF has also educated chefs beyond the incentive-based restaurant program by holding a four-part Chef Workshop series over the past year. SUPPLY-SIDE OUTREACH & FISHERY REVIEW • To ensure the availability of sustainable resources for retailers, SFF developed partnerships with six distributors, two wholesalers and 17 producers. • This past year, SFF gained the title of being the first and only seafood advisory program to translate sustainability scores for any domestic fish stocks. • To reduce consumer and retailer confusion regarding the sustaina-

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bility of certain species, the program developed a comprehensive set of seafood recommendations using a variety of sources and labeling programs. COMMUNITY OUTREACH • Over the past year, SFF developed 37 total community partnerships, attended 43 targeted, large-scale community outreach events and reached well over 15,000 community members. • The program recruited and worked with seven exemplary interns and conducted several demos and presentations at area high schools and universities. OUTREACH MATERIALS & PROMOTIONAL ITEMS • 5,000 copies of SFF’s Inspired Choices were released earlier this spring and was also featured on an ABC 7 television news segment. • The program designed a schematic for a permanent, large - scale SFF exhibit to be placed in the Aquarium of the Pacific. • The program developed and distributed 2,000 printed restaurant cards, 1,400 high - quality reusable tote bags, and 1,400 customized spatulas featuring the SFF logo and website address. ELECTRONIC OUTREACH • 19,522 unique visitors have frequented the program website since February 3rd 2010. • Well above the industry average of around 20%, SFF boasts an average e-Newsletter open rate of 54% for the six newsletters sent in the past year. • SFF’s Facebook page boasts nearly 700 fans, or users who “like” the page. • Altogether, 70 blog posts have been written about the program across an array of organizations, resulting in 15,913 total reads. • The program has produced or been featured in a total of six YouTube videos, boasting a total of 1,483 views – which are posted on the program’s YouTube Channel. MEDIA OUTREACH • SFF achieved 18 high-profile, in-depth placements with over 36,611,859 impressions.


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02. INTRODUCTION Many species of fish are at risk of extinction due to overfishing.

In meeting this goal, SFF plays a critical role in filling the need for a

To address this critical issue, Seafood for the Future (SFF) aims to

robust sustainable seafood initiative in Southern California. While

encourage the consumption of sustainable fish sources, or those caught

there are a few existing initiatives, their reach is nominal for one of the

or farmed with consideration for the long-term availability of individual

nation’s largest seafood markets. In the greater Los Angeles Metropoli-

species and the ocean’s overall ecological balance. By collaborating with

tan area, seafood consumption is more than twice the national average,

both consumers and suppliers, SFF has designed and implemented a

while more than 80% of seafood is imported. By promoting the purchase

comprehensive program that seeks to not only raise awareness, but also

of sustainable seafood choices, SFF has and will continue to protect wild

influence the adoption of sustainable behaviors among consumers and

fish stocks and the marine environment, while also reducing the carbon

suppliers alike.

footprint associated with fish importation. The successful implementation of a program like SFF is no small feat in light of the myriad challenges that litter the current socioeconomic landscape. In a time of budget cuts and economic stagnation, many restaurants are unwilling to shift from unsustainable seafood sources to the more expensive sustainable options. The program is also competing in a market saturated with “sustainable” labeling and certifications leading to a “green malaise” infecting a large percentage of the public. Additionally, the current program budget does not allow for large-scale print advertising, necessitating the application of cost-effective internetbased marketing techniques. In overcoming these obstacles, SFF has devised and implemented a number of innovative strategies that have and will continue to creatively tackle these challenges. Taking a multi-pronged approach, SFF has activated the power of community dialogue, social networks, incentives and partnerships to both educate and change the purchasing behaviors of fish consumers and fish retailers. In a short two years, SFF has already laid the groundwork for the development of a culinary democracy within the Southern California basin, empowering every resident with the ability to vote with their fork.

“SFF has designed and implemented a comprehensive program that seeks to not only raise awareness, but also influence the adoption of sustainable behaviors among consumers and suppliers alike”

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03. STRATEGIC INITIATIVES COMMERCIAL OUTREACH Joining Hands with Local Restaurants: Overview Restaurants – social and cultural enclaves within their respected communities – serve as effective ambassadors in encouraging sustainable fish consumption behaviors among patrons. SFF has capitalized on this

In rolling out this program, SFF assists partnering restaurants in the procurement of sustainable fish to offer as menu items, which are accompanied by a logo indicating the “eco-friendly” nature of that particular dish. In addition to the logo, which serves as a visual indicator for patrons, wait-staff trained by SFF also explain the benefits of purchasing the showcased items over less sustainable sources to restaurant customers. Patrons who purchase the sustainable menu items are also awarded with a complimentary ticket to the Aquarium of the Pacific as an incentive.

opportunity by partnering with a slew of highly respected establishments to facilitate the process of both obtaining and offering sustainable fish choices.

MEET A FEW OF SFF’S PARTNERING CHEFS

Chef Jason Stein of Parker’s Lighthouse shows off the plate he created for SFF’s

Inspired Choices magazine. Savor Chef Jennifer Miniciello stands on the patio of the Aquarium’s Cafe Scuba.

Parker’s Lighthouse was able to use the SFF program to change their menu without suffering economically.

Chef Jesse Perez of Fuego

Chef Greg Griffie of 606 Congress,

with his Inspired Choices

located in the Renaissance Boston.

dish. The Fuego is located in

He is now the culinary director

the Hotel Maya, adjacent to

for all Renaissance operations

the Queen Mary, and boasts

nationwide.

one of the best views in Long Beach.

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Saying “I Do” to Sustainability: Restaurant Partnerships In the past year, the program has been extremely successful in developing strategic partnerships with a number of restaurants within Southern California and beyond. Overall, SFF has forged 72 strategic partnerships with restaurants spanning the California coastline from Santa Barbara in the north, to San Diego in the south (See Appendix 1 for a complete list of partnering restaurants). Outside of California, SFF has developed partnerships with a restaurant in New Haven, Connecticut as well as Boston, Massachusetts, allowing the program to gain an East Coast presence.

Measuring Results, Making the Sale

The menu at Gladstone’s displays the SFF logo.

As the old saying goes, the proof is in the pudding. In SFF’s case, the

Gladstone’s are both successful case studies elucidating the program’s

proof is in the purchase. Overall, SFF’s incentive-based program has

effect on patron purchasing behaviors. After joining the SFF program,

significantly increased the availability of sustainable seafood choices

both restaurants increased the sale of their sustainable menu items by

within partnering restaurants as well as the purchase of those sustai-

41% on average.

nable items by consumers. The restaurants Parker’s Lighthouse and

SFF Restaurant Parterships Across Southern California

SFF Restaurant Parterships Across the Nation

Boston, MA: 1 Restaurant Partnership

Santa Barbara: 13 Partnerships Los Angeles: 13 Partnerships

New Haven, CT: 1 Restaurant Partnership

Orange Country: 24 Partnerships

Long Beach: 18 Partnerships Southern CA: 70 Restaurant Partnerships

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San Diego: 2 Partnerships


The proof is in the purchase: Parker’s Lighthouse and Gladstone’s increased their sale of sustainable menu items by 41% on average SUSTAINABLE FISH DISHES SOLD BY SPECIES

1200

1106 923

800 600

Before Outreach

After Outreach

% Increase After Outreach

Barramundi

560

752

34%

Salmon

923

1106

20%

Mahi Mahi

50

89

78%

King Crab

30

40

33%

Species

752 560

400 200 50

0

Barramundi

Salmon

89

Mahi Mahi

30 40

King Crab

Fish Species Before Outreach

After Outreach

SUSTAINSBLE FISH DISHES SOLD BY RESTAURANT 2000

Before Outreach After Outreach

1762

1800

Number of Fish Dishes

Number of Dishes

1000

SUSTAINABLE FISH DISHES SOLD BY SPECIES (PARKER’S LIGHTHOUSE & GLADSTONE’S)

1600 1400

1414

1200 1000 800 600 400 200

149

225

0

Gladstone´s

Parker’s Lighthouse Restaurant

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TOTAL SUSTAINABLE FISH DISHES SOLD BY RESTAURANT Before Outreach

Restaurant

After Outreach

% Increase After Outreach

Parker´s Lighthouse

1414

1462

25%

Gladstone´s

149

225

46%

SUSTAINABLE FISH DISHES SOLD BEFORE AND AFTER OUTREACH Restaurant

Species

After Outreach

Before Outreach

% Increase After Outreach

Parker´s Lighthouse

Barramundi

560

752

34%

Parker´s Lighthouse

Salmon

854

1010

18%

Gladstone’s

Mahi Mahi

50

89

78%

Gladstone’s

Salmon

69

96

39%

Gladstone’s

King Crab

30

40

33%

Tracking Results through Aquarium Coupon Redemptions

partnership and ticket incentive, the market effect encourages the chef and restaurant owner to learn more about sustainability and provide better managed seafood.

The incentive piece also serves the dual purpose of reinforcing the sustainable messages of the program: patrons who redeem the tickets

Over the past year, 15,000 coupons have been distributed to partnering

to visit the Aquarium are exposed to a number of fish conservation

restaurants and the wider public. As of September 12, 2010, 5,898 free

messages throughout various exhibits. This feedback loop fulfills the

admissions and 1,347 of the $3/$1.50 discount admissions have been

program’s objective to meaningfully educate consumers on ocean con-

redeemed. This leads to a 48% redemption rate. Even more impressively,

servation. Additionally, Aquarium staff are regularly trained by SFF on

there has been a 343% increase in free admissions and a 301% increase

current issues and principles of sustainable seafood and are capable of

in paid admissions when compared year to date through August of last

delivering these messages to the thousands of visitors that they interact

year.

with daily. Therefore, the incentive not only acts on the desired behavior (purchasing sustainable seafood), but also provides added value by leveraging the program’s resources through the Aquarium to increase patron awareness regarding sustainable seafood best practices. Additionally, Aquarium coupons have also been the foundation of attracting many restaurants to the program. While the restaurant’s initial objective may have been to add value to their product through the

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Coming Back for Seconds: The program experienced a 48% Aquarium coupon redemption rate


% Increase over Year 1

301%

343%

Increase

Increase

PAID Admissions

FREE Admissions

AoP Aquarium Coupon Redemption Rate

9%

52% 48%

39%

Unredeemed Tickets Redeemed Free Tickets Redeemed Discount Tickets

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The ABCs of Restaurant Outreach: A Step-by-Step Approach

accommodate the individual needs of each establishment and to stay current with seasonal variations and sustainable fishing trends. This targeted approach will continue for the foreseeable future of the SFF

Identifying & Reaching Out to Restaurants: Recruiting and integrating

program.

restaurants into the program has proven to be a multi-step process that begins with identifying potential partners and then reaching out to chefs

Training Restaurant Staff: Once seafood items are selected, the restau-

and restaurant owners. Once a partner has been identified, SFF reviews

rant reprints their menus with the SFF logo and icons next to sustainable

the restaurant’s current menu and suggests alternative sources for

items. During this re-printing process, SFF holds comprehensive training

particular species.

sessions with restaurant staff and management to educate them on the SFF program as well as sustainable seafood best practices. SFF

In determining these alternative sources, SFF adheres to several steps

believes that by leveraging the outreach capabilities of restaurant wait

and guidelines to ensure an effective and tailored plan for each restau-

staff, the program’s promoted behaviors and message points will be

rant. These steps include: (1) communicating with the chef to determine

more effectively received by patrons than by printed materials (such as

their individual needs and constraints (2) communicating with the

the revised menus) alone. Numerous studies have demonstrated that

restaurant’s purveyors, and finally (3) reviewing resources to determine

personal contact, such as that provided by the trained wait staff, is the

the level of sustainability for certain products.

most powerful outreach mechanism in influencing individual attitudes and behaviors (McKenzie-Mohr and Smith 1999; Schultz 2002; Schultz

Given the high-impact, tailored approach SFF has taken to restau-

and Tabanico 2008). The absence of this meaningful person-to-person

rant outreach, menu reviews are considered an ongoing process to

education can act as a substantial barrier to behavior change, in this case, patron’s purchase of sustainable menu items.

Participating restaurant The Factory features ingredients that are sourced as near to the restaurant as possible.

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A key aspect of the training process, and the SFF program as a whole,

window decal distributed to participating restaurants. By placing the

is to describe the issue-area’s principles in clear and simple terms. Re-

decal within clear sight, neighboring restaurants are encouraged to

search has shown that clarity and simplicity are the two most important

join the program, thereby molding their behavior to the set of norms

markers of effective public education. Clear and simple message points

visibility inherent in the small microcosm of the local restaurant commu-

help to overcome the common barrier of overly complex and convoluted

nity. Social and cultural norms, or what is perceived as “the right thing

“information dumps” (UBC 2006). Research has also demonstrated that

to do or act,” help to form the basis of human behaviors, and restaurant

messages which are clearly articulated are more likely to be comprehen-

owners are no exception to this rule. SFF has effectively utilized these

ded and abided by than those that are more complex (Brunetti Tomasik

normative strategies through the window decal to encourage the parti-

and Taraba 2000; Regger, Wootan, Booth-Butterfeild and Smith 1998).

cipation of other restaurants by publicly demonstrating that not only is

Consequently, SFF has utilized these principles of effective communi-

their participation the “right thing to do,” but is also “what everyone else

cation throughout the program, from wait-staff trainings to interfacing

is doing” (Cialdini 2003; CIWMB 2004; UBC 2006).

with the public. For example, SFF developed small reference cards outlining basic information and message points, which are provided to restaurant wait staff. For more complex questions and concerns, a FAQ sheet is also provided and posted within each restaurant to serve as an additional reference.

Activating Incentives to Activate Sustainable Behaviors

“SFF is a program where everyone wins: consumers are educated and given complimentary gifts, restaurants see increased patronage, distributors enjoy increased sales in sustainable items and the ocean becomes a safer place to swim for at-risk species.” These incentives not only benefit the world’s oceans through patron and retailer participation, but the restaurants’ bottom-lines as well. The

SFF is a program where everyone wins: consumers are educated and

window decals, free Aquarium tickets and displays simultaneously act as

given complimentary gifts, restaurants see increased patronage,

effective marketing strategies, drawing customers into the restaurant.

distributors enjoy increased sales in sustainable items and the ocean

The free Aquarium tickets provide a significant incentive for a customer

becomes a safer place to swim for at-risk species. This win-win mentality

to frequent a participating restaurant, which effectively increases

is reflected by the program’s incentive structure, which benefits and

restaurant sales and visibility. The window decals and displays, appeal to

consequently activates the behaviors of all actors on both the supply

the “green consumers” who favor businesses with a sustainable focus,

and demand sides.

giving participating restaurants a competitive edge (Lyon and Maxwell 2007; Videras and Alverini 2000). Together, these incentives add value

For restaurant customers, the primary incentive is the free Aquarium

to a participating restaurant in the eyes of the consumer while also

ticket, which encourages their purchase of sustainable menu items.

setting that establishment apart from the competition.

For participating restaurants, SFF has also built in a number of other incentives to encourage their involvement. For example, participating

The program has also engaged in more traditional mutually-beneficial

restaurants are provided with a display piece and a window decal

marketing strategies. For example, SFF has rolled out a cross-promo-

indicating their commitment to the Aquarium and SFF. The clear window

tional marketing campaign through the program’s electronic mediums.

decal displaying the SFF logo serves both as a symbol of recognition for

Under the umbrella of this campaign, all participating restaurants are

the restaurant as well as a message to passersby that the establishment

featured on the program website with links to their website and sample

adheres to the SFF’s eco-friendly recommendations.

menus. SFF is also currently developing a profile page for each program partner, which will provide a partner biography, an overview of their

Incentives can act as powerful mechanisms to encourage the adoption

conservation efforts and collaboration with SFF. Finally, the program

of sustainable practices, especially when made visible and paired with a

has also developed a series of e-Newsletters, which feature partnering

social norm (CIWMB 1999; McKenzie-Mohr 1999: 103-105). This pairing

chef recipes for sustainable seafood and their tips for buying and eating

of both visibility and normative behavior is perfectly embodied by the

eco-friendly.

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Outside the Restaurant Doors: Chef Workshops Beyond the restaurant doors, SFF has also worked with chefs in a collective, interactive setting by designing and rolling out a successful four-part SFF Chef Workshop series. Educating chefs in a group setting is both a cost efficient and effective way to reach these influential stakeholders. By bringing top industry players and colleagues together, participants are able to learn from one another and influence each other to push SFF’s mission forward. In the past year, SFF has held four Chef Workshops, including:

SoCal Marriott Workshop • Noteworthy Participants: Cleanfish, SFF and Weiser • Total Number of Participants:25 SFF’s Andrew Gruel discusses fish farming concerns with the staff of Marine Harvest Canada.

Beyond the Traffic Light

SFF Seafood Seminar • Held at the Renaissance Long Beach Hotel • Noteworthy Participants: Alaskan Seafood Marketing Institute, Carlsbad Aquafarm, Pax Wineries, Status Seafood and Cleanfish.

Rather than relying on the “traffic light approach”, a short-sighted strategy that stops at the restaurant, SFF favors a more holistic method. Moving beyond the dining room table, the program focuses on the numerous points of purchase within the commodity chain: from the wholesaler, to the distributer, to the restaurant. Reaching out to every agent along the continuum provides a mechanism to ensure that sus-

SFF Luncheon • Held at Wildfish Seafood Grille • Noteworthy Participants: Great Taste Magazine and Status Seafood.

tainable choices will actually be available for participating restaurants. This approach is a significant point of departure from other sustainable seafood programs, which tend to duplicate the “traffic light” strategy across localities. In rolling out this effort, the program connects chefs and restaurants with reputable distributers, wholesalers, producers, fisherman and

Marriott Chef´s Meeting • Noteworthy Participants: Cleanfish, Purefishand City Sea Foods.

farmers who carry seafood products that are endorsed by at least one major seafood advisory program, which include branded wild or farmed products, MSC-certified wild products, and GAA certified farmed products. Developing these partnerships not only simplifies decisionmaking for chefs by directly connecting them with sustainable products, but it also increases transparency along the entire chain of distribution.

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6 Distributer Partnerships

17 Producer Partnerships

Securing Sustainable Sources, from Water to Table Developing partnerships between restaurants and distributors works from both ends of the seafood chain of custody - equally benefiting

2 Wholesaler Partnerships

the consumer and the supplier. For example, if a chef is aware of a particular product, he/she will oftentimes request the item from an existing distributor. This is often the case with a farmed product like Carlsbad Aquafarm shellfish. For instance, the products of one SFF

Distributer Partners: • Santa Monica Seafoods • City Seafoods • Status Seafoods • Slade Gorton • Long Beach Seafood • Cadena’s Fish

partner, Greene Prairie Shrimp of Alabama, were recognized as meeting

Producer Partners: • Kona Blue • Carlsbad Aquafarm • Marine Harvest Canada • The Abalone Farm • American Tuna • Cleanfish • Tropical Tilapia • Hama Hama Oyster Farm • Greene Prairie Aquafarm • Clean Seas Australia • Australis Barramundi • Status Marine • Taylor Bay Shellfish Co. • Copper River Salmon • Wild Pacific Albacore • GAA BAP-certified producers • Sea to Table

item is available.

Wholesaler Partnerships: • H&N Foods • Slade Gorton & Co.

tors. By fostering these close relationships with large suppliers, SFF

sustainability standards by a Canadian wholesaler participating in the Vancouver Aquarium’s Ocean Wise program. The wholesaler committed to purchasing Greene Prairie’s entire annual production to distribute to restaurants in Canada. Capitalizing on this common interaction, SFF liaisons seek to ensure that distributors carry a large portfolio of branded and certified products to increase the chances that a requested

SFF’s role is to act as a translator, a “confusion filter” – parceling out the accurate information from the inaccurate and providing trustworthy advice to agents across the seafood commodity chain Diving deeper into the seafood chain of custody, SFF also acts as a liaison between smaller distributors and wholesalers. The two largest wholesalers currently working with SFF are H&N Foods and Slade Gorton & Co. SFF has assisted each in sourcing specific products, evaluating existing reserves, and promoting products to both chefs and distribuis not only able to refer distributors to trusted sources, but also close the oftentimes gaping data gap with regard to a buyer’s application of sustainable seafood recommendations. For example, Slade Gorton &

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AT THE HEART OF THE ISSUE: FISHERY REVIEW Making a List, Checking it Twice Co. specializes in Barents Sea cod, a sub-stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). As a species, Atlantic cod has been considered unsustainable

Not all sustainable seafood guides are created equal. From Federal agen-

for several decades, and World Wildlife Fund (WWF) reports as recent

cies such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA)

as 2004 state that Barents Sea stocks are experiencing significant

to non-profit groups like the Marine Stewardship Council, sustainable

declines. However, the most current fisheries information from WWF

seafood advisories have originated from an array of organizations, each

and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) now indicate that the

with their own strengths and weaknesses. In this sea of oftentimes

Barents Sea groundfish stocks have rebounded and are managed within

contradicting information, how is the average consumer expected to

biological limits.

make sense of all this complex scientific information?

This example of confusing and conflicting information is not an isolated

Filling this neglected niche, specifically the chasm between information-

incident. Fish consumption advisories, like all scientific data, are typi-

overload to consumer-comprehensibility, is SFF. In meeting this demand,

cally ridden with complexities and inconsistencies that even a regular

the program has developed a comprehensive set of seafood recom-

practitioner would find bewildering. SFF’s role is to act as a translator, a

mendations using a variety of sources, including Sustainable Seafood

“confusion filter” – parceling out the accurate information from the in-

forum members, NOAA’s FishWatch program and advisory and labeling

accurate and providing trustworthy advice to agents across the seafood

programs such as those developed by the Monterey Bay Aquarium. By

commodity chain. In the example above, SFF worked with Slade Gorton

providing this clear and concise composite seafood advisory list, chefs,

to ensure that distributors and chefs alike were aware that Barents Sea

distributors and everyday people alike are armed with a comprehensible

cod products were both sustainable and available resources, contrary to

set of recommendations to encourage responsible seafood choices.

the advice stated in the outdated recommendation.

Although increased knowledge does not always result in behavior change, it is the first step in modifying the behaviors that drive supply and demand for sustainable seafood in Southern California and beyond.

SFF is the first and only seafood advisory program to translate sustainability scores for any domestic fish stocks The process of developing this composite list consisted of several elements. First, SFF researched and compiled existing recommendations. Of the scores of lists examined, SFF then selected those that best represented the principles of sustainability espoused by the SFF program, which are: (1) healthfulness, safety, and quality of each product must be Fish are weighed and inspected at the Marine Harvest farm site.

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controlled and documented, (2) production is managed under a plan of


A biologist at Marine Harvest Canada shows the titration plated used to test each batch of salmon eggs.

best current practices and compliant with applicable laws, (3) plans for

minimized so that the list could be used at any seafood seller, including

mitigation of effect of waste by catch and habitat damaged are enacted,

those who have not yet partnered with a seafood program.

(4) products support local communities and are sensitive to traditional and local cultural values.

Translating Complexity to Comprehensibility

After evaluating potential recommendations against this criteria, SFF eventually selected those authored by the following organizations, which

In addition to simplifying the complicated landscape of sustainable

represent a mix of non-profits, third party certification authorities, and

seafood choices through compilation, the program has also tackled this

various regulatory agencies, including: World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Blue

front through translation. In fact, SFF is the only major seafood advisory

Ocean Institute, The New England Aquarium, Monterey Bay’s Seafood

program to evaluate and translate the NMFS Fish Stock Sustainability

Watch, The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), Global Aquaculture

Index (FSSI) scores into a useable recommendation format for the

Alliance (GAA), The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and

general public.

California Department of Fish and Game (CA DFG). Finally, in refining the composite list, emphasis on region and production method were

The FSSI is essentially a performance measure for the sustainability of

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230 U.S. fish stocks selected for their importance to commercial and

Aquaculture Alliance (GAA).

recreational fisheries. A 4-point scale (4 being the most sustainable) is utilized to score the size of each particular fish stock in relation to the

The alliance, which is one of two certification programs for farmed se-

amount of fishing. This measurement system is the primary method for

afood, is rapidly becoming the “go-to� certification body for purchasers

which the NMFS assesses the sustainability of fish stocks managed in

of farmed seafood. For example, Walmart has recently committed to

domestic waters. Despite the comprehensive nature of this data, SFF

sourcing farmed seafood exclusively from GAA approved suppliers by

remains the first and only seafood advisory program to translate sustai-

2011. Many experts believe that this commitment will become a trend,

nability scores for any domestic fish stocks. Providing this service to the

in which an increasing number of retailers, chain restaurants, and food

public and scientific community therefore clearly fills a much neglected

service groups will elect to purchase certified products as opposed to

niche in the field of sustainable seafood as a whole.

developing a complex seafood sourcing policy. Thus, the involvement of SFF in the GAA is crucial in ensuring that certification standards remain

Sharing the Seafood for the Future Experience

meaningful and robust.

In addition to serving local interests throughout Southern California, SFF is always on the lookout for opportunities to contribute to the growing national discussion on sustainable seafood. One of the ways that the program has utilized its knowledge base to add to national efforts has been by serving on the Science Oversight Committee of the Global

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SFF participated in the Healthy Kids Summit in Long Beach, which brought together groups like the local school district, the Miller Children’s Hospital, and the local health department to discuss issues related to childhood nutrition and obesity. Nutrition and health have become increasingly important topics for SFF, serving as common ground with many other groups.


For the second year in a row, SFF participated in the Share Our Strength fundraiser in Newport Beach with some of the best chefs and restaurants in the area. SFF participated in a panel discussion at the Dwell Conference in Los Angeles. The panel was organized by Evan Kleiman, host of Good Food on KCRW, and included Chef Michael Cimarusti of Providence and Norm Abel of Carlsbad Aquafarm.

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COMMUNITY OUTREACH SFF understands that for a consumer-driven program to be successful, it is imperative to build a network of grassroots-level support around the issue. In building this support, SFF has designed and implemented a diverse outreach program predicated on the principles of direct community involvement, civic engagement and meaningful public interaction. As opposed to simply delivering a message to the community, SFF empowers the community itself to be the deliverer of those messages, creating a viral and sustainable latticework of awareness, education and targeted behavior change.

From the Community, To the Community Simply defined, community outreach is the practice of conducting local public awareness activities through targeted community interaction. SFF community outreach activities are those efforts that can directly affect the behavior of seafood consumers through local interaction. They are designed to educate the public about sustainable seafood issues by utilizing respected and locally relevant channels of communication. Behavior change research has shown that friends, family and other local channels of communication such as civic organizations, schools and environmental organizations are some of the most credible sources for delivering environmental messages (www.italladdsup.gov 2009). One of the reasons why these channels are perceived as more credible than others is because this type of outreach focuses on the issue’s relevance to the community and acknowledges the community’s challenges in addressing the issue. SFF harnessed these proven behavior change tactics in designing several elements of the program’s community outreach component.

Shelter Surf Shop in Long Beach and the American Institute of Wine and Food co-host a seafood taco dinner with SFF.

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37 COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Fish Contamination Education Collaborative California Trout Dive and Surf Dive Team Green Dot Public Schools School of Fish Shark Free Santa Barbara NOAA Fishwatch Marine Harvest UC Irvine Real Food Challenge USC Hedgecock Lab Hipcooks Global Aquaculture Alliance Southbay Fit Camp Sundiver Ocean Stewards Blue Ocean Tackle Beach Greens The SEA Lab The Gilly lab, Stanford University Eat Cleaner Wipes Leadership Long Beach Long Beach Health Department Long Beach Weed and Seed Program The Growing Experience CSUCI Anderson Lab American Institute of Wine and Food Power Scuba San Diego Proteus Environmental sustainablesushi.net Greenpeace FishChoice, Inc. Global Aquaculture Alliance Ty Warner Sea Center California Sustainable Seafood Initiative Carlsbad Aquafarm Purdue University

Environmental “Evangelism” The majority of public outreach programs simply focus on raising awareness, as opposed to creating widespread behavior change throughout the community. Contrary to the majority of outreach programs, SFF mapped out and implemented a number of self-replicating, behavior change strategies, all focused on pairing person-to-person outreach with credible information sources. One of these tactics was developing and rolling out a school outreach program at local universities and colleges over the past year. The goal of this program is not simply to increase the knowledge of the students reached, but to create a viral network of knowledge sharing on a peer-to-peer, word of mouth level. One of the highlights of the school outreach program was in SFF’s partnership with the University of California at Irvine (UCI) where the program educated more than 200 students during their Sustainability Series. During that time, SFF tasked students to distribute over 300 informational cards to local restaurants encouraging their participation in the program as well as their commitment to buying sustainable sources. By institutionalizing engagement directly into the program, students do not only feel more committed to the cause, but they are also able to grow the effort by creating a viral web of advocates.

Getting the Word Out, One Organization at a Time According to Douglas McKenzie-Mohr, the founder of community-based behavior change science: “the person who presents your message can have a dramatic impact on how it is received. In general, the more credible the person or organization delivering the message, the more influence there will be upon the audience.” In other words, the credibility of a message is reliant on the credibility of its source. With this axiom in mind, SFF developed partnerships with a number of relevant organizations who are all trusted voices within the local community and on a national level to help deliver the sustainable seafood message. Over the past year, SFF has developed 37 total community partnerships. From food-focused organizations, to sustainable seafood groups to environmental advocacy and marine protection organizations, SFF has built a targeted yet broad-based coalition of support. Most notably, over the past year the program has developed and/or maintained key partnerships with the following organizations:

19


FishChoice, Inc.: FishChoice serves the vital role of aggregating

In spite of having limited resources, the program has the support

various fish advisories on one centralized website. In doing so, the

of a number of restaurants, distributors, and food service groups.

program lists seafood distributors who offer products endorsed by

The Center has asked SFF to take over the management of the pro-

all of the major seafood advisory groups. In this role, FishChoice is

gram, while maintaining its identity as a regional seafood initiative.

well positioned to unite all seafood advisory recommendations into a single program. SFF is currently an affiliate of FishChoice and is

California Sustainable Seafood Initiative (CSSI): The CSSI is a

working to help make it a more robust and effective resource for

program implemented by the California Ocean Protection Council

chefs. A functional FishChoice site will be key in helping SFF gain

(OPC) under state legislation AB 1217. The bill directs the OPC to

the commitment of national food service groups like SMG.

develop a sustainable seafood labeling program for wild-caught seafood products landed in California. To facilitate this task, the

Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA): The GAA is a 3rd-party

OPC has assembled an advisory panel of industry members,

certifier that creates standards for Best Aquaculture Practices. The

scientists, and NGOs. SFF is utilizing its membership on the panel

standards are reviewed by the GAA’s Science Oversight Committee,

to advise the OPC to create a consumer-facing label that is suitable

which includes representatives from Monterey Bay Aquarium,

for certain California marine species.

the New England Aquarium, Sea Web, and the Aquarium of the Pacific. SFF frequently serves on this panel and contributes to the

Carlsbad Aquafarm: SFF’s strategy to provide practical informa-

standards. Organizations like Wal-Mart have committed to selling

tion to chefs includes the promotion of specific producers, such as

only GAA - certified farmed seafood products, and the opportunity

this modest shellfish farm north of San Diego. While other seafood

for SFF to work with other NGOs in this effort has been invaluable.

advisory programs generally recommend the consumption of oysters and mussels, SFF actively promotes Carlsbad’s products

Ty Warner Sea Center: The Ty Warner Sea Center founded the

directly to chefs. Ultimately, this shift of advice from “what types

Santa Barbara Sustainable Seafood Initiative several years ago.

of seafood are acceptable” to “what products to order” represents SFF’s niche in the seafood advisory industry. To signify their commitment to the program, each bag of Carlsbad Aquafarm products include the SFF logo on the label. •

Purdue University: Dr. Charles Santerre, a renowned food toxicologist at Purdue, has long advised SFF and the Aquarium on issues related to seafood and health, especially where mercury is concerned. Dr. Santerre was recently awarded a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) grant to compile a database of important regional seafood species and respective toxin levels. As a regional partner in this study, SFF will collect fish tissue samples and direct interviews with at-risk members of the population. SFF will also assist in packaging and disseminated findings from this landmark study.

The Weed and Seed program addresses issues of concern in some of the poorer areas of Long Beach, including nutrition and rudimentary culinary skills. SFF is organizing a nutrition fair for families with the Weed and Seed Program and other members of the Long Beach Healthy Kids Summit.

20


Chef Jason Stein prepares lobster tail with SFF at the Aquarium’s Sustainable Seafood Day.

In utilizing this relationship, SFF implemented the following tactics: •

Seafood for the Future Volunteer: SFF developed a sustainable seafood training program to convert regular Aquarium staff into sustainable seafood Volunteer messengers. Currently one Aquarium volunteer acts as the liaison and primary point of contact charged with educating the entire Aquarium staff on SFF’s message points. This liaison conducts trainings and check-ins at monthly volunteer meetings (which usually include about 100 people) in addition to speaking at individual department meetings. By building on the Aquarium requisite training programs and regular monthly meetings, SFF has been successful in transforming Aquarium staff into program Ambassadors, ready to educate the thousands of customers with whom they interact with on a daily.

to promote the program, SFF instructional material has become

Don’t Forget Your Own Back Yard

part of the mandatory staff training class. Staff members are then encouraged to wear the “Ask Me About Seafood For The Future”

In addition to partnering with a panorama of external organizations, SFF

buttons with their uniforms.

also leveraged its own internal relationships within the Aquarium of the Pacific. In terms of credibility with regard to local sustainable seafood issues, the Aquarium is arguably seen as one of the most trustworthy sources within the community. It is also a highly trafficked public space, with a projected 1.4 million visitors in 2010 alone (20% tourist and 80% local patrons). With such a large captive audience, SFF seized this unique opportunity to influence public attitudes and increase awareness

Buttons: As part of an Aquarium training program to enable staff

Blue Cavern Lecture Show: One of the well-attended presentations at the Aquarium - the Blue Cavern show - draws crowds of more than 50 people eight times a day. During this presentation, the moderator discusses the need for well managed seafood in addition to SFF program goals and activities.

of sustainable seafood choices.

Sea Fare is the Aquarium’s annual culinary event, featuring an increasing number of SFF’s partner restaurants.

21


On the Ground Community Outreach No consumer-based initiative would be complete without on the ground community outreach. Engaging the public through this person-toperson channel not only allows for direct education from the message source, but it also allows for SFF program staff to better understand the target audience through these personal interactions. As a result, SFF considers outreach events as a perfect forum for both public education and program learning. Through conversation and engagement in the field, program staff are provided with the opportunity to qualitatively observe and identify the unique barriers and motivators acting upon the target population’s seafood consumption behaviors to improve SFF functionality.

SFF co-sponsored a screening of the movie The Cove with a large scuba club in San Diego. The screening included Q&A sessions with Kelly Hu, actress and longtime proponent of ocean conservation.

Work Hard, Play Harder: Events, Festivals & Community Happenings Over the past year, SFF has attended 43 relevant events - ranging from festivals, to trade shows, to specific community events - reaching over 15,093 people (see Appendix 2 for a complete list of attended outreach SFF prepares sardines for the Aquarium board members in the Watershed Classroom.

events). This component of the overall Community Outreach program consists of three specific elements: (1) interacting directly with the public regarding sustainable seafood issues and best practices, (2)

“Over the past year, SFF has attended 43 relevant events - ranging from festivals, to trade shows, to specific community events - reaching over 15,093 people�

distributing program literature and (3) conducting sustainable seafood demos and presentations and providing sample dishes to the public. The demos are especially unique to SFF, and have proven to be an effective marketing tool in raising program awareness while also directly showing the public how they can prepare delicious sustainable seafood dishes at home. As mentioned earlier in this report, incentives such as these free samples have shown to be a powerful mechanism to encourage the adoption of sustainable practices, particularly when motivation to engage in those activities is low, or when individuals are not engaging in the activity as effectively as they could (McKenzie-Mohr 1999).

22


JANUARY 2010

TIMELINE KEY

= 100 People

4 events 1 event

FEBRUARY 2010

= 1000 People MARCH 2010

5 events 5 events 7 events

4 events 5 events 6 events 4 events

3 events TOTAL EVENTS: 43

APRIL 2010

MAY 2010

JUNE 2010

JULY 2010

AUGUST 2010

SEPTEMBER 2010

OCTOBER 2010

TOTAL REACHED: 15,093 23


“When I Was Your Age…” High School Outreach: Reaching citizens at an early age is a fundamental step in creating a more sustainable society. New research into the role of schools in developing more sustainable communities has shown that not only are many kids and teens passionate about environmental issues, but that they are also more than capable of driving forward environmental initiatives. Dr. Percy-Smith, a leading

Educational tools designed to reach a younger audience are

expert on the subject of youth environmental activism at the University

instrumental in delivering effective messages to families.

of West England asserts that “with their dynamism, energy and new ideas [young people] demonstrate considerable potential as agents of

University of Southern California (USC): SFF conducted a

change” and that as a society “we have to create opportunities where

DNA identification study to examine the frequency of mislabeled

young people can contribute to development within their community”

seafood in Southern California. The molecular work was conducted

(www.physorg.com 2009).

by undergraduate students and checked by graduate researchers. Findings were presented at the Southern California Academy of

In light of this research, SFF has sought to directly reach youth in an

Science Meeting in 2010, reaching several hundred state scientists

educational setting through the program’s School Outreach component.

and policy makers. The work has prompted discussions with

As a part of this sector of the larger outreach campaign, SFF conducted

administrative groups implementing sustainability programs on

sustainable seafood demonstrations followed by lectures on sustainabi-

the University Park Campus.

lity and marine biology at area high schools, reaching approximately 500 students in the past year.

Wrigley Marine Science Center, USC: SFF has participated in several events at the USC Wrigley Marine Science Center field

University Collaboration: The program has also educated local univer-

station, which directly reaches approximately 100 visitors every

sity students through joint lectures, demonstrations and partnerships,

day. Events in which SFF has participated are organized either by

including:

the education department onsite, visiting groups like Green Dot schools, or by SFF. The collaborations have encouraged Wrigley

University of California (UC) Irvine: As mentioned earlier, SFF

food service staff to be more conscientious regarding the seafood

spoke with 200 students at UCI for their Sustainability Series.

that is offered.

Students were given over 300 cards to distribute to restaurants asking them to think sustainably and join the SFF program.

California State University (CSU) Channel Islands: Dr. Sean Anderson addresses many of the same topics in his courses

“SFF conducted sustainable seafood demonstrations followed by lectures on sustainability and marine biology at area high schools, reaching approximately 500 students in the past year.”

as SFF: the effectiveness of sustainability programs, seafood awareness, mercury levels in seafood, seafood traceability, etc. SFF and Dr. Anderson have collaborated on advising the Ocean Protection Council (OPC) on specific issues related to seafood traceability, and SFF expects that multiple projects will be suitable for collaboration in the future. •

Le Cordon Blue Culinary School: The program is currently in the process of communicating with Le Cordon Blue School in Pasadena in an effort to integrate SFF materials into their education materials.

24


Growing the Program with Bright Young Minds

Wine and Food; two graphic artist volunteers; and two fisheries and marine biology interns who helped to assess fish stock data and determine

Perhaps one of the most meaningful ways that SFF has engaged youth

the SFF sustainability ratings. Collaborating with these interns resulted

in sustainable seafood issues has been through the Internship Program.

in two complimentary outcomes: not only did the program benefit from

In the past year, the program has been fortunate enough to work with

their fresh perspective and volunteerism, but these burgeoning minds

seven exemplary interns: two social media interns who assisted with

were also provided with the rare and unique opportunity to apply their

expanding the SFF Facebook page; one public relations and communi-

interests and passions in a real world setting.

cations intern who organized a joint event with the American Institute of

COMMUNITY OUTREACH RESULTS SNAPSHOT Developed

37strategic community partnerships

Transformed Aquarium staff into SFF Education volunteers

Attended

43 targeted community events

Reached

15,093 people during outreach events

Reached over Recruited

1,000 students through the school outreach program

7 program interns

Larry Fukuhara of the Cabrillo Aquarium lectures on fishing techniques at Fisherman Appreciation Day. Organized by a sub-organization of EPA, the event targeted a demographic that overlapped with one of SFF’s target audiences.

25


PRODUCTS, PROMPTS & OUTREACH MATERIALS Making Inspired Choices Showing Off: Aquarium Display Accompanying the program’s face-to-face outreach, SFF’s Inspired Choi-

ces magazine offers consumers a concise yet thorough compendium of

The Aquarium is a powerful resource in spreading SFF’s messages to the

recipes, buyer’s guides and general information related to sustainable

wider community. The Aquarium provides a number of unique opportu-

seafood. The magazine also provides a forum to highlight participating

nities to further program goals. One of the opportunities that the pro-

restaurants and chefs by acknowledging their commitments to sustaina-

gram has capitalized on is the development of a permanent, large scale

bility through their recipes and bios. The magazine, available in print and

SFF exhibit, strategically placed in the Northern Preview, clearly visible

online, brings the many components of the larger SFF program together

from the Aquarium’s Great Hall. Plans for the permanent SFF exhibit

through a single user-friendly, easily-accessible guide. As a result, the

include static signage as well as a digital display describing the program

magazine has become the program’s most valuable marketing and

and sustainable seafood as a whole. Both the design and content of the

educational tool for 2010.

display will include behavioral triggers and messages that encourage the community to engage in sustainable seafood practices. The exhibit will

5,000 copies of Issue I, released earlier this spring, have been distribu-

capture the attention of hundreds of community members every day at

ted through partner restaurants and the Aquarium. The magazine was

zero marginal cost.

also featured on an ABC 7 television news segment. The first issue will be followed by a series of editions already in the pre-production phase.

SFF Restaurant Signage

Special editions of Inspired Choices have already been shopped to large partners to showcase their chefs, products, and recipes.

As mentioned earlier, participating restaurants may choose to advertise their affiliation with SFF with a 4 inch x 6 inch window decal. Many restaurants also have a sign posted near their host/hostess stand to indicate their partnership with SFF. These signs can also be custom designed to include the logo of the restaurant as well as a few words describing the restaurant’s overall conservation efforts.

SFF “Booth in a Box” SFF has developed and compiled a number of general items featuring the SFF logo that can be used at a wide variety of events, such as customized banners, tablecloths and other signage. By creating this “booth in a box,” the program has been ready and able to organize a booth or cooking demo on short notice for any event to increase program and brand exposure, while educating the public.

Chef Art Gonzalez of McKenna’s on the Bay is a true artist. His work was featured on the cover of SFF’s Inspired Choices magazine.

26


Plans for SFF’s Permanent Display at the Aquarium of the Pacific

OPTI

18'-6" 11'-9" 1" 8'-11"

2'-9"

logo on stand-offs

curved panel with graphics

11'-2"

backframe/stand-off as per other “floating” mounted wall panels paint black THE GOOD NEWS

Sustainability Means Eating More of the Right Seafood With responsible fishing and farming, we can fulfill our need for healthy without being wasteful or destructive to communities, fish populations, or ecosystems.

Culinary Movement The majority of seafood consumed in the United States is eaten in restaurants, and a growing number of chefs are educating their guests about conserving the ocean without leaving the table.

Aquaculture's Growing Responsibility With many wild stocks of fish in peril, the value of aquaculture cannot be overstated. Fish farming can take pressure off wild stocks, while still providing healthy protein for a growing population.

Sustainable US Fish Stocks Fish managed under U.S. fishery management plans meet 10 national standards that ensure health fish stocks and long-term socioeconomic benefits to the nation are achieved. Always look for seafood labeled USA.

Lesser Known Species Are Delicious too! Changing up the menu is great way to help conserve the oceans. Consider these mouthwatering species: sardines, barramundi, arctic char, black cod, catfish, trout, California calamari, mussels, clams, oysters.

EATING MORE OF THE RIGHT TYPES OF SEAFOOD Seafood is one of the healthiest parts of a balanced diet. With its nutritional benefits, and a growing number of seafood restaurants, seafood consumption has risen dramatically in the past 15 years. Sadly, the increased demand for seafood, coupled with a growing population, has sent many commercial fish stocks into rapid decline. The good news is that we can reverse this trend. By dining or shopping at this Aquarium's partner restaurants and markets, we can minimize ecosystem damage while still eating more seafood. Seafood for the Future teaches chefs and consumers about the importance of conserving wild fish stocks. Our mission is to ensure that more sustainable and well-managed seafood is offered in Southern California.

LOOK FOR OUR LOGO at partner restaurants and markets in Southern California, and feel good about eating more seafood. Feel free to pick up cards at the visitor Information desk.

1'-8"

32” monitor (9/16 ratio) 1'-8 1/4"

6" 3" min. 0.7m (27.5”)

3"

3'-0" 3"

29"

32"

24'-2 3/4"

45"

SEAFOOD FOR THE FUTURE – SIDE ELEVATION

Seafood For The Future – Elevation (FLATTENED)

NORTHERN PACIFIC PREVIEW ALCOVE ELEVATION (FLATTENED) Scale: 1/2”=1’0”

SCALE: 1/4”=1’-0”

SCALE: 1”=1’0”

OPTION-A OPTION-A

18'-6"

11'-2"

1" 2'-9"

Monitor Enclosure

Brushed stainless steel with perf-metal sides

THE GOOD NEWS

Sustainability Means Eating More of the Right Seafood With responsible fishing and farming, we can fulfill our need for healthy seafood without being wasteful or destructive to communities, fish populations, or ecosystems.

Culinary Movement The majority of seafood consumed in the United States is eaten in restaurants, and a growing number of chefs are educating their guests about conserving the ocean without leaving the table.

Aquaculture's Growing Responsibility With many wild stocks of fish in peril, the value of aquaculture cannot be overstated. Fish farming can take pressure off wild stocks, while still providing healthy protein for a growing population.

Sustainable U.S. Fish Stocks Fish managed under U.S. fishery management plans meet 10 national standards that ensure healthy fish stocks and long-term socioeconomic benefits to the nation are achieved. Always look for seafood labeled USA.

Lesser Known Species Are Delicious too! Changing up the menu is a great way to help conserve the oceans. Consider these mouthwatering species: sardines, barramundi, arctic char, black cod, catfish, trout, California calamari, mussels, clams, oysters.

EATING MORE OF THE RIGHT TYPES OF SEAFOOD Seafood is one of the healthiest parts of a balanced diet. With its nutritional benefits, and a growing number of seafood restaurants, seafood consumption has risen dramatically in the past 15 years. Sadly, the increased demand for seafood, coupled with a growing population, has sent many commercial fish stocks into rapid decline. The good news is that we can reverse this trend. By dining or shopping at this Aquarium's partner restaurants and markets, we can minimize ecosystem damage while still eating more seafood. Seafood for the Future teaches chefs and consumers about the importance of conserving wild fish stocks. Our mission is to ensure that more sustainable and well-managed seafood is offered in Southern California.

LOOK FOR OUR LOGO at partner restaurants and markets in Southern California, and feel good about eating more seafood. sample card

Feel free to pick up cards at the Visitor Information desk.

21.25”

15’ 3

19’ 10

logo on stand-offs

logo on stand-offs

3/4” 28.5”

curved panel with graphics

SEAFOOD FOR THE FUTURE

Lesser Known Species Are Delicious too! Changing up the menu is great way to help conserve the oceans. Consider these mouthwatering species: sardines, barramundi, arctic char, black cod, catfish, trout, California calamari, mussels, clams, oysters.

ans h stocks on are

EATING MORE OF THE RIGHT TYPES OF SEAFOOD

1'-8"

Seafood is one of the healthiest parts of a balanced diet. With its nutritional benefits, and a growing number of seafood restaurants, seafood consumption has risen dramatically in the past 15 years. Sadly, the increased demand for seafood, coupled with a growing population, has sent many commercial fish stocks into rapid decline. The good news is that we can reverse this trend. By dining or shopping at this Aquarium's partner restaurants and markets, we can minimize ecosystem damage while still eating more seafood. Seafood for the Future teaches chefs and consumers about the importance of conserving wild fish stocks. Our mission is to ensure that more sustainable and well-managed seafood is offered in Southern California.

curved panel with graphics

backframe/stand-off as per other “floating” mounted wall panels paint black

backframe/stand-off as per other “floating” mounted wall panels paint black

32” monitor (9/16 ratio) 1'-8 1/4"

1'-8"

32” monitor (9/16 ratio) 1'-8 1/4"

6" 32”

3"

ENTER

6" 3"

1

min. 0.7m (27.5”)

3"

PLAN @ SFF KIOSK 3"

29"

3"

CURVED GRAPHICS PANEL

AQUARIUM OF THE PACIFIC

24'-2 3/4"

24'-2 3/4" A HACKLEY/BOWMAN PROJECT

Seafood For The Future Wall Kiosk SCALE: 1/4”=1’0” October 1, 2010

29"

DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS WITH DIFFERENT DISTANCES FROM THE WALL SEAFOOD FOR THE FUTURE – SIDE ELEVATION 32"

SCALE: 1/4”=1’-0”

Seafood For The Future – Elevation (FLATTENED)

32” MONITOR WITH METAL ENCLOSURE

45"

SEAFOOD FOR THE FUTURE – SIDE ELEVATION

Seafood For The Future – Elevation (FLATTENED)

SCALE: 1”=1’0”

min. 0.7m (27.5”)

3"

NOT TO SCALE

3'-0"

32"

45"

SCALE: 1/4”=1’-0”

Seafood For The Fut

SCALE: 1”=1’0”

11'-2"

11'-2" THE GOOD NEWS

Sustainability Means Eating More of the Right Seafood With responsible fishing and farming, we can fulfill our need for healthy seafood without being wasteful or destructive to communities, fish populations, or ecosystems.

Culinary Movement The majority of seafood consumed in the United States is eaten in restaurants, and a growing number of chefs are educating their guests about conserving the ocean without leaving the table.

Aquaculture's Growing Responsibility With many wild stocks of fish in peril, the value of aquaculture cannot be overstated. Fish farming can take pressure off wild stocks, while still providing healthy protein for a growing population.

Sustainable U.S. Fish Stocks Fish managed under U.S. fishery management plans meet 10 national standards that ensure healthy fish stocks and long-term socioeconomic benefits to the nation are achieved. Always look for seafood labeled USA.

Lesser Known Species Are Delicious too! Changing up the menu is a great way to help conserve the oceans. Consider these mouthwatering species: sardines, barramundi, arctic char, black cod, catfish, trout, California calamari, mussels, clams, oysters.

EATING MORE OF THE RIGHT TYPES OF SEAFOOD

THE GOOD NEWS

Means Eating LOOK FORSustainability OUR LOGO More of the Right Seafood at partner restaurants markets With responsibleand fishing and farming, we can fulfill our need for healthy seafood without being wasteful or destructive in Southern California, feelor ecosystems. to communities, fishand populations, good about eating more seafood. sample card

Feel free to pick up cards at the Visitor Information desk.

Seafood is one of the healthiest parts of a balanced

Culinary Movement Aquaculture's Growing Responsibility WithStates its nutritional benefits, and growing The majority of seafood consumed indiet. the United Withamany wild stocks of fish in peril, the value of is eaten in restaurants, and a growing number of aquaculture cannot be overstated. Fish farming can number ofchefs seafood restaurants, seafood consumption are educating their guests about conserving the ocean take pressure off wild stocks, while still providing has risen dramatically in the past 15 years. Sadly, without leaving the table. healthy protein for a growing population.

Sustainable U.S. Fish Stocks Fish managed under U.S. fishery management plans meet 10 national standards that ensure healthy fish stocks and long-term socioeconomic benefits to the nation are achieved. Always look for seafood labeled USA.

the increased demand for seafood, coupled with a growing population, has sent many commercial fish stocks into rapid decline. The good news is that we can reverse this trend. By dining or shopping at this Aquarium's partner restaurants and markets, we can minimize ecosystem damage while still eating more seafood. Seafood for the Future teaches chefs and consumers about the importance of conserving wild fish stocks. Our mission is to ensure that more LOOK FOR OUR LOGO sustainable and well-managed seafood is offeredat partner restaurants and markets in Southern California.

in Southern California, and feel good about eating more seafood. sample card

Feel free to pick up cards at the Visitor Information desk.

Lesser Known Species Are Delicious too! Changing up the menu is a great way to help conserve the oceans. Consider these mouthwatering species: sardines, barramundi, arctic char, black cod, catfish, trout, California calamari, mussels, clams, oysters.

EATING MORE OF THE RIGHT TYPES OF SEAFOOD Seafood is one of the healthiest parts of a balanced diet. With its nutritional benefits, and a growing number of seafood restaurants, seafood consumption has risen dramatically in the past 15 years. Sadly, the increased demand for seafood, coupled with a growing population, has sent many commercial fish stocks into rapid decline. The good news is that we can reverse this trend. By dining or shopping at this Aquarium's partner restaurants and markets, we can minimize ecosystem damage while still eating more seafood. Seafood for the Future teaches chefs and consumers about the importance of conserving wild fish stocks. Our mission is to ensure that more sustainable and well-managed seafood is offered in Southern California.

0”

19’ 1

KIOSK

1

PLAN @ SFF KIOSK NOT TO SCALE

CURVED GRAPHICS PANEL

CURVED GRAPHICS PANEL

32” MONITOR WITH METAL ENCLOSURE

DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS WITH DIFFERENT DISTANCES FROM THE WALL

DIMENSIONAL ELEMENTS WITH DIFFERENT DISTANCES FROM THE WALL

Seafood For The Future 32” MONITOR Exhibit WITH METAL ENCLOSURE

Seafood For The Future Exhibit 27


SWAG (Stuff We All Get): Promotional Products

prompts due to their proximity to the desired behavior; i.e. shopping bags and the act of shopping sustainably, and spatulas and the act of cooking sustainably.

Rich or poor, everybody likes to get free stuff. Or, as it is oftentimes referred to in the vernacular: SWAG (Stuff We All Get). SFF honed in on

Restaurant Cards: The program has developed and distributed

the effectiveness of incentives in terms of behavior change early on in

2,000 printed cards with the names and locations of restaurants

the program. From larger incentives like free Aquarium tickets for pur-

participating in the SFF program. One panel of the card is devoted

chasing sustainable meals, to smaller ones that drive messages home

to restaurants in the Santa Barbara Sustainable Seafood Initiative

at community events and festivals – these items effectively advertise

founded by the Ty Warner Sea Center, while the other panels are

the program and promote the SFF brand. More importantly, many of

devoted to LA, Orange County and Long Beach area restaurants.

the incentives distributed, such as the restaurant cards, shopping bags and spatulas described below, are closely tied to the desired behavior

Recycled SFF Shopping Totes: Approximately 1,400 high quality

(cooking or purchasing sustainable goods). By tying the incentive back

reusable tote bags were designed and produced to increase

to the desired behavior, it also serves the dual purpose of a prompt.

exposure to SFF’s brand and website address.

A prompt is a visual or auditory cue that reminds the observer of that

Spatulas: Complementing the tote bags, SFF developed and

prompt to engage in the desired behavior (McKenzie-Mohr 1998). When

produced 1,400 customized spatulas featuring the SFF logo and

a prompt is placed near the location of the desired behavior, its effecti-

website address. Distributed at cooking demonstrations and

veness increases. For the current work, the promo items/incentives also

outreach events, the spatula is a perfect example of how the

act as prompts because they remind the user to engage in the desired

program was able to create an incentive piece that simultaneously

behavior. These particular promo items are also especially effective

acts as a prompt by tying the object to the desired behavior of cooking sustainably.

SFF Products and Materials

5,000 issues of

2,000 restaurant cards

1,400 shopping totes

1,400 spatulas

Inspired Choices

28


ELECTRONIC OUTREACH 2.0 Given the multitude of collaborators, partners and community members, engaging SFF’s multiple and, at times, disparate stakeholders is critical to the success of the program. In meeting this challenge, SFF has implemented several innovative web-based tactics over the past year to simultaneously integrate and expand the program, pushing information out to the audience but also bringing them back to the website—the information hub of the program. visibility in Google search results. As a result of these efforts – building

Website Content & Thinking About Linking

content and anchoring that content within Google’s search results –

A strong website anchors any community outreach program. It provides

Email Marketing

19,522 unique visitors have frequented the site since February 3rd 2010.

stakeholders with a hub for information, appropriate contacts and developments. It is at once visible to the public yet remains unobtrusive.

In an effort to not only educate, but also drive community members to

And central to these characteristics is one common perquisite: content.

the website, SFF developed personalized emails to Aquarium members

The success, or failure of any website rises and sets on its content – not

introducing the program and its mission. Customer segmentation tech-

only in quantity, but quality, frequency and organization.

niques will be utilized in future email marketing campaigns to present targeted messages to each audience group.

Creating meaningful website content is a multi-pronged effort, comprised of essentially three basic components: evergreen content, updates

E-Newsletter

and links. Evergreen content makes up the majority of the site, covering sweeping and specific topics, from general program information, to

This quarterly edition seeks to foster community involvement and part-

recommended fish sources, to contacts. Updates refer to edits to the

ner integration by increasing the user’s access to SFF developments and

evergreen content (when necessary) in addition to the regularly updated

information. The newsletter also promotes website perusal by linking ar-

program blog. The blog contains relevant articles, opinion pieces and

ticles to relevant sections of the website. Over the past year, the program

user-generated content, creating a constantly evolving source for

has authored and sent six editions, which cover current events, relevant

information. SFF is currently working to marry these two components by

environmental issues, recipes, resources, chef highlights and coupons.

creating an e-learning center to serve as a regularly updated yet ever-

This engaging and interactive tool has not only served to accelerate

green resource for restaurants on sustainable seafood best practices.

stakeholder communication, but it has also created a targeted, regular link between the program and partnering chefs.

Finally, links to partnering organizations and additional resources direct users to external information sources. Links make up the smallest

Evidence of the success of this online, interactive tool is summed up in

portion of the website, although they are one of the most powerful and

two words: open rate. Well above the industry average of around 20%,

cost-effective ways to garner increased foot traffic. Cross-links have

SFF boasts an open rate double that figure at 54%. From November

become a central tenant of the website’s overall Search Engine Optimi-

2009 to August 2010, SFF maintained this high open rate throughout

zation (SEO) strategy, which aims to increase traffic as well as the site’s

the six newsletters sent.

29


NEWSLETTER OPEN RATE

55.81%

20,00%

44 emails

33 emails

60,47%

30,00%

43 emails

54,74%

40,00%

140 emails

54,74%

Open Rate %

50,00%

43 emails

138 emails

59,42%

60,00%

Jan. 2010

Apr.. 2010

Jun. 2010

45,24%

70,00%

10,00% 0,00% Nov. 2010

Jan. 2010

Aug. 2010

Date It’s Not a Monologue, It’s a Dialogue

content consumers into content producers. The application of these interactive elements in SFF’s electronic outreach efforts have effectively

SFF’s utilization of social media has allowed the program to not only

demonstrated how soliciting user participation has been an effective

reach but directly engage its target audience, transforming users from

tool in both delivering and unifying program messages.

YouTube

Twitter

6 videos 1,483 total views

1,000 + followers

59 SFF-authored blogs + 661

“likes” (fans)

Facebook

30

11 posts written by other bloggers = 70 total overall posts 15,913 total reads

Blog


Facebook One of the three components of SFF’s social media campaign, the program’s Facebook page is a forum where stakeholders and community members interested in SFF’s messages can communicate, connect and share their views. The Facebook wall is regularly updated by SFF with relevant information, resources and program happenings, in addition to a substantial amount of similarly focused user-generated content. The page also features program photos, links to the existing Aquarium of the Pacific page, contact and general program information. By October 2010, the page boasted nearly 700 fans, or users who “like” the SFF page.

SFF FACEBOOK INTERACTIONS & STATISTICS 14000 12,730

12000 44 emails

10000 8000 6000 4000 2,710

2000 0

337

661

121

Total Interactions

Total "Likes”

Comments

1,779

244

Posts

Total Page Views

Unique Page Views

Photo Views

Facebook Statistics HEAR WHAT SOME OF SFF’S FACEBOOK FANS HAVE TO SAY

31


Blogs The blog is a regularly updated content-driven forum, complete with links to relevant posts, original articles and photographs covering an array of related topics, and a message board where users can comment

Blog Posts on SFF Website

• 54 Posts • 10,813 Reads

Blog Posts About SFF on Partner sites

• 5 Posts • 5,100 Reads

Posts by Others About SFF on Partner Blogs

• 11 Posts • 12 Comments

on entries. The blog is hosted on the program website as opposed to an external platform so as to drive reader traffic directly to the site. To date, the site boasts 54 posts related to the program on the SFF website with 10,813 total reads. SFF has also partnered with other environmental and marine-oriented blogs to cross-comment and contribute to build a larger coalition of support and visibility. As a result, five articles have been posted to partner blogs, garnering 5,100 reads and 11 external blogs have authored posts about the program (See Appendix 3 for a complete list of the 11 external blog sites mentioned above). Altogether, 70 blog posts have been made about the program across an array of organizations, resulting in 15,913 total reads.

71

Views

148 Views

468 Views

366 Views

220 Views

240 Views

32

• SFF movie for Aquarium lecture series

YouTube The third component of the SFF’s social media campaign is the development of the program’s YouTube Channel. To this end, the program has

• Kaneohe Bay time lapse (on Dave Anderson’s SFF bio)

produced, participated in and uploaded videos exhibiting field research, cooking demonstrations,lectures and chef interviews. These videos are hosted on the SFF YouTube channel and have garnered viewership

• Wahoo’s Fish Tacos and SFF partnership

without promotion. For example, the SFF movie for Aquarium lecture series video has received 71 views, the Kaneohe Bay time lapse video on Dave Anderson’s SFF bio has received 148 views, and Wahoo’s Fish Tacos and SFF partnership video has received 468 views.

• Causecast Video How to Cook Sustainable Seafood

These efforts culminated in a video series the SFF team developed in conjunction with the nonprofit news and media organization Causecast. Through this collaboration, SFF produced a three - part video lecture

• Causecast Video How to Buy Sustainable Seafood • Causecast Video Health Benefits of Seafood

and demonstration series describing the overall program, how to cook and buy sustainably and the health benefits of seafood. These videos were then hosted to the Causecast YouTube channel and program website. All together, this video series had been viewed nearly 1,000 times by October 2010.


MEDIA OUTREACH SFF’s media strategy is simple: secure profile successes. By demonstrating that sustainable seafood is essential to the health of our oceans, our bodies and our pocketbooks, SFF seeks to influence positive consumer and supplier behavior change while positioning the program as the “go-to-source” for sustainable seafood information throughout the region. To this end, SFF has built relationships with influential reporters by providing trusted information and compelling story angles. As a result, over the past year the program has successfully engaged stakeholders through tailored media outreach, securing a total of 18 in-depth placements with over 36,611,859 impressions (See Appendix 4 for the complete media list).

Chef Brian Casey of Savor, at the 2009 Press Launch for the Seafood for the Future program.

SFF Media Coverage Distribution

6%

6%

9

PRINTS MEDIA

6%

50%

33%

18

9

BROADCAST MEDIA

6

PLACEMENTS

ONLINE MEDIA

36,611,859 IMPRESSIONS

Print media Online media Broadcast media Radio Online video

1

RADIO

1

ONLINE VIDEO

33


04. LOOKING FORWARD: Looking Forward- 2011 Goals and Objectives

on the basics of the program, consumer education and relevant seafood issues. •

The 2011 goals for Seafood for the Future are defined by five categories:

Integrate SFF exhibit into staff training - The SFF exhibit is being designed in such a way to continually update the screen (central focus of the display) with changing messages related to

Education

news, partnerships and Aquarium-related conservation issues. By

Commercial Outreach

coordinating the Aquarium message with this display, the program

Strategic Partnerships

can synergize efforts to educate guests on eating responsibly.

Marketing and Brand Awareness

Seafood for the Future Fiscal “Sustainability”

Establish Simple shopping guides - Clearly when shopping, the easier it is to choose responsibly, the better, but what about when

Education

choosing how to prepare a dish? In order to consolidate a singular message into the shopping cart, SFF will create shopping guides,

Seafood for the Future’s goal for education is to grow existing pro-

which pair the right species from each regional market with simple

grams and establish new platforms. This effort will increase consumer

preparation techniques and partner dishes.

knowledge regarding safe and sustainable seafood consumption in both Southern California and nation-wide.

Weekly YouTube series - This series will present “simple and sustainable” seafood cooking demos on a weekly basis.

To accomplish these educational goals, we will pursue the following objectives:

Community outreach - SFF will seek to increase the number of people targeted during community outreach events and cooking

Develop and print issues # 2 & 3 of Inspired Choices - The

demos to over 30,000 in year three.

first issue of Inspired Choices was a valuable tool in educating consumers on the basics of eating more seafood in a responsible

Website redesign - The website landing page currently acts as

manner. The subsequent issues will premier a similar message

a storefront for the program. By rearranging the landing page to

through the kitchens of new partner chefs and profile recipes.

include a changing news feed section, the site will: 1. serve a more beneficial purpose to visitors, 2. retain visitors and, 3. act as an

Sustainable Seafood Day- (March 12th) The Aquarium expects

online portal for consolidated news. SFF will also make use of the

the attendance of over 6,000 people for this year’s Sustainable

website’s statistics to expand the types of information visitors are

Seafood Day. This captive audience is an ideal market to distribute

looking for, i.e. culinary and scientific information.

simple messages regarding partner restaurants as well as how to

34

select and prepare more responsible seafood.

Commercial Outreach

Online training program for restaurant staff - One stan-

SFF’s outreach goal is to significantly grow the program’s portfolio of

dardized template will be built into SFF’s website for the use of

restaurant and retail partners to include over 150 commercial partners-

restaurant service and culinary staff. The template will focus

hips by the end of 2011.


To accomplish these goals, SFF will pursue the following objectives:

Strategic Partnerships

Fill positions for restaurant outreach volunteers - In order to

SFF’s goal in developing affiliations with the right partners will allow

efficiently grow the program’s network of chefs and restaurants,

SFF to realize successes that could not have been otherwise achieved

it is essential that SFF recruit a dedicated group of restaurant

individually. In tough recessionary economic conditions and with a

outreach volunteers whose primary focus is to manage partner

limited budget, this focus on partnership marketing is an excellent way

relationships.

to increase the reach of the program’s message.

Target multi-unit restaurant and retail companies - The mul-

To accomplish this goal, SFF will pursue the following objectives:

tiplier effect associated with a multi-unit restaurant partnership leverages the assets and efficiencies of a larger, structured, and

centralized marketing department into the SFF brand.

Partnerships with 5+ producers - Partnering with producers allows the program to place the Seafood for the Future logo on product packaging thus increasing both traceability and the ability

Chef profiles - By creating a profile for partner chefs, SFF can ex-

to ensure a responsible choice for chefs.

pand the benefits of cross-promotion to include every restaurant’s executive chef. In addition, this will create a mechanism through

Partnership with a culinary school - Partnering with a culinary

which “word of mouth” marketing can occur amongst a tight-knit

school fulfills the goal to increase creative partnerships by expan-

community of chefs as SFF taps into the “chef/ego effect”.

ding into new markets and also promotes education.

Formalize partnership with Santa Monica Bay Restoration

Partnerships with other regional sustainable seafood

Commission’s “Clean Bay Restaurant Program” - SFF has

initiatives - This includes the California state seafood labeling

been working with the Clean Bay Restaurant Program since March

program, the Santa Barbara Sustainable Seafood Initiative, and the

2010 in an effort to integrate SFF into their commercial project

large national seafood advisory programs. SFF continues to push

program. Currently they have over 200 restaurant partners that

for unified recommendations from the seafood advisory industry

are committed to working towards an ocean-focused green restau-

in order to reduce consumer confusion.

rant program and are in the process of integrating the SFF program into each restaurant’s “next step” requirement.

Aquaculture - SFF will continue to work with groups that assess and certify farmed seafood for sustainability and food safety

Utilize partner seafood sales reps - Towards the end of year two,

issues, including the state working group and various international

SFF was able to coordinate with the sales teams of various seafood

programs. The challenge is helping to increase the market aware-

distributors in order to have them “sell” the program. This strategy

ness and availability of these products.

proved successful and SFF will carry this over into year three. • •

Science - Beyond the fisheries reports and seafood health issues

Aquarium staff - The program will continue to work with internal

addressed on the SFF website, the program wants to increase the

Aquarium volunteers to help create and distribute the neces-

number of white papers produced from first hand research. In

sary outreach tools to Aquarium team members. This group of

particular, the program wants to be a better resource for policy

advocates can help to recruit more restaurants. SFF will publicize

makers by providing the information they require to make infor-

this success by providing restaurant gift certificates to successful

med policy decisions.

“deputies” and viraling these success stories through the website.

35


Marketing and Brand Awareness

Seafood for the Future “Sustainability”

SFF’s ongoing marketing goal is to establish awareness for the Seafood

SFF’s financial sustainability goal is to establish funding opportunities in

for the Future brand and message in both Southern California and

order to grow and maintain the program beyond year three (2011).

beyond. To accomplish this goal, SFF will pursue the following objectives: To accomplish this goal, SFF will pursue the following objectives: • •

Investigate new opportunities for grants - SFF has already

Realign brand strategy - Moving into year three, it is essen-

been involved in projects that are funded externally, such as the

tial that SFF realigns the central message with the program’s

USDA-funded regional mercury study through Purdue University.

marketing tools and target market. This will take place in January

SFF intends to increase these types of collaborations for defined

through various consumer-focused online surveys and partner-

projects that fill the needs of funding agencies.

focused interviews. • •

Develop formula for partnerships - The program realizes that

Grow social media network - Through active communication,

some partnerships and events have a tremendous payoff in terms

targeted facebook ads and encouraged user-generated content,

of garnering new fans and interest, while others are limited to

SFF can continue to efficiently and inexpensively increase aware-

the number of people physically present. In year three, SFF will

ness for the program.

develop a strategy based on lessons learned, so that the program’s exposure grows exponentially.

YouTube videos - See above section. •

Expand use of partners and volunteers - SFF now has a large

Targeted national press launch for early 2011 - SFF aims to

number of community partners who can provide skilled volunteers

increase their national press exposure and consequent reach by

for outreach, design work, event planning, and research. The

targeting various high profile print publications, online media

program has also become savvier in better utilizing volunteers and

resources, and radio shows.

helping them reach their goals.

Ongoing community relations activites - Active involvement

Fundraising - SFF’s ability to help raise support for other non-

in community events and Aquarium-related activities will increase

profits can be used in such a way that ultimately gains more ex-

the reach of the SFF brand while simultaneously fulfilling the

posure for the program. A great example is the recent Urban Farm

program’s education objectives.

Dinner to benefit a local community farm and work program. While SFF did not benefit financially from the fundraiser, the program did

Blogging/E-Newsletter - SFF will continue to penetrate consu-

gain a great deal of attention from the various groups involved and

mer markets by growing the program’s database of email-newslet-

people attending.

ter subscribers through social networking outlets, event outreach and regular blog posts. •

Develop a “virtual” media kit that resides on the SFF website - In this capacity, SFF will include the program’s history, mission and goals, brief profiles and photos of key partners and a downloadable PDF of the year-two evaluation.

36


05. DESCRIPTION OF YEAR II EXPENSES Description of Year 2 Expenses Deliverable/Activity

Description

Cost

Advertisement, Great Taste Magazine

Advertisements Great Taste Magazine is an industry focused magazine with a readership of 11,100 Outreach Materials & Promotional Items

$2,780

Inspired Choices Magazine

The magazine is the program's most valuable marketing and education tool for 2010. The magazine acts to simplify sustainability for both the consumer and the chef - engaging them with easy recipes and food tips, while taking them on a tour of the primary sustainable seafood issues. 5,000 copies of the magazine have been distributed through SFF's partner restaurants as well as at the Aquarium and is available as a pdf download from the program website. This magazine was also featured in SFF's ABC 7 news segment.

$18,000

Material Printing Costs

Printing of: brochures, kitchen "recommendations" posters, magazines, posters, event specific promotions, Aquarium tickets, mercury cards, business cards, and training materials

$4,460

SFF Branded Reusable Grocery Bags

1600 grocery bags have been distributed to consumers throughout Southern California. These bags will hold up for about two years, meaning that the 1600 bag recipients will become walking, talking SFF advertisements for a sustained time frame.

$2,700

SFF Branded Kitchen Spatulas

1,000 spatulas have been distributed at many SFF cooking events and seminars, bringing the SFF brand into the homes of both chefs and consumers.

$1,000

Design Projects

Graphic design projects

$16,650

Supplies

Supplies include cooking and storage equipment, fish for events, trade show materials, coolers, etc.

$13,000

Workshops & Events

Chef/Restaurant Workshop

Travel Automotive Fuel Administrative Costs

SFF's Chef’s luncheon is an opportunity to educate chefs, restaurant staff and servers about the benefits of a sustainable seafood purchasing program in one short event. SFF gained 8 new restaurant partners from this event and strengthened existing relationships. Travel Travel to various conferences; increasing brand awareness amongst industry players. Fuel associated with travel Administration Program administration Total Costs

$2,800

$3,500 $2,500 $4,000 $71,390

37


04. REFERENCES ALCALAY, R. & A. BELL. 2001. Strategies and practices in community-based

MCKENZIE-MOHR, D. & W. SMITH. 1999. Fostering Sustainable Behavior:

campaigns promoting nutrition and physical activity. Social Marketing

An Introduction to Community-Based Social Marketing. Gabriola Island,

Quarterly 7 (4): 3-15.

British Columbia: New Society Publishers.

BRUNETTI, G., H. H. TOMASIK & L. TARABA. 2000. Social marketing tools

NEIGER, B. L., R. THACKERAY, R. M. MERRIL, K. M. MINER, L. LARSEN

used to support the development of a community-based physical activity

and C. M. CHALKEY. 2001. The impact of social marketing on fruit and ve-

initiative. Social Marketing Quarterly 6 (3): 93-99.

getable consumption and physical activity among public health employees at the Utah department of health. Social Marketing Quarterly 2 (1): 10-28.

CIALDINI, R.B. 2003. Crafting Normative Messages to Protect the Environment. Current Directions in Psychological Science 12 (4): 105-109

REGER, B., M. G. WOOTAN, S. BOOTH-BUTTERFEILD & H. SMITH. 1998. 1% or less: A community-based nutrition campaign. Public Health Reports

CALIFORNIA INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT BOARD (CIWMB).

113: 410-419.

1994. Getting businesses involved. Sacramento: California Integrated Waste Management Board.

SCHULTZ, P. W. & J. J. TABANICO. 2008. Community-based social marketing and behavior change. In Handbook on Household Hazardous Waste,

CIWMB.1999. Local governments can help businesses prevent waste: A gui-

edited by A. Cabaniss, 133-156. Lanham, MD: Rowan and Littlefield.

de to getting started. Sacramento: California Integrated Waste Management Board.

“SCHOOL CHILDREN COULD LEAD THE WAY ON SUSTAINABILITY,” 2009. Last accessed on Oct. 30, 2010: http://www.physorg.com/

CIWMB. 2004. Motivating employees to change old habits. Sacramento:

news175327896.html

California Integrated Waste Management Board. UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (UBC). 2006. How do communities KASPERSON, R. 1986. Six propositions on public participation and their

change their culture towards more sustainable patterns of living, working

relevance for risk communication. Risk Analysis 6(3):275-281.

and learning? Okanagan: University of British Columbia.

LYON, T.P. & J.W. MAXWELL. 2007. Environmental public voluntary pro-

VIDERAS, J. & A. ALVERINI. 2000. The appeal of voluntary environmental

grams reconsidered. Policy Studies Journal 35(4):723-750.

programs: Which firms participate and why? Contemporary Economic Policy 18(4):449-461.

MCKENZIE-MOHR, D. 2000. Promoting sustainable behavior: An introduction to community-based social marketing. Journal of Social Issues 56 (3):

“WHAT IS COMMUNITY OUTREACH?” 2010. United States Department of

543-554.

Transportation, Federal Highway Administration. Last accessed on Oct. 30, 2010 http://www.italladdsup.gov/tools/resourcetoolkit/ResourceToolKit_J_

MCKENZIE-MOHR, D. 2000. Fostering sustainable behavior through

Outreach.asp

community-based social marketing. American Psychologist 55(5):531-537. WALSH, D. C., R. E. RUDD, B. A. MOEYKENS & T. W. MOLONEY. 1993. Social marketing for public health. Health Affairs 12 (2): 104-119.

38


07. APPENDIX

39


Appendix 1

Complete List of SFF Restaurant Partners

SFF Partnering Restaurant Details Restaurant Name

City

McCall’s Meat and Fish Market Nook Bistro Lucques Restaurant Providence Restaurant Spark Bistro Spark Bistro Pace Restaurant Eco Caters Villiage Idiot California Club Malibu Fish Grill Malibu Fish Grill Hillcrest Country Club Sip Lounge 33 Degrees Renaissance Hotel and Catering Gladstone’s Parker’s Lighthouse The Sky Room Feugo Restaurant Kavika’s Cafe Scuba Savor Long Beach Primal Alchemy Catering Michael’s on Naples McKenna’s on the Bay Long Beach Fish Grill The Factory Delius Nino’s Restaurant The Original Fish Company King’s Seafood Restaurants (15) Spark Bistro Malibu Fish Grill Malibu Fish Grill OC Mining Company Sorrento Grille

Los Feliz Santa Monica Hollywood Hollywood Beverly Hills Studio City West Hollywood Culver City Hollywood Los Angeles El Segundo Redondo Beach Los Angeles Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Long Beach Throughout OC Huntington Beach Huntington Beach Santa Ana Santa Ana Laguna Beach

Regional Partnerships

Los Angeles Region: 13 Partners

Long Beach Region: 18 Partners

Orange County Region: 24 Partners


Walt’s Wharf The Lido Deck Andrei’s Restaurant Haven Gastropub Mariott San Diego Sea Rocket Bistro Elements Restaurant and Bar Seagrass Restaurant Downey's Bouchon State & A, Bar and Grill Arts and Letters Cafe Aldo's Blue Agave Fresco Cafe Julienne Coast Square One Mac’s Fish and Chips Miya Sushi Congress 606

Seal Beach Newport Beach Irvine Orange San Diego San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara Santa Barbara New Haven, CT Boston, MA

San Diego Region: 2 Partners

Santa Barbara Region: 13 Partners

East Coast Region: 2 Partners


Appendix 2

Complete List of SFF Community Outreach Events from Jan. 2010 – Oct. 2010

SFF Community Outreach Events 2010 Event Description "End of the Line" screening at Aquarium of the Pacific

Attendees 60 people

Whole Foods Market Redondo Beach cooking class and sustainable seafood seminar

80 people

Whole Foods Market Torrance cooking class and sustainable seafood seminar

75 people

Whole Foods Market Long Beach cooking class and sustainable seafood seminar

50 people

Aquarium senior member sustainable seafood lecture and cooking demonstration

75 people

World Aquaculture Society triennial conference in San Diego

Unknown

Boston Seafood Show

5,000 attendees

Sustainable Seafood Day

5,500 people, 22 partner organizations, 12 partner restaurants

AAA Eastern Conference - Seafood for the Future Presentation (AAA rates restaurants and hotels)

150 CEO’ and executives

Aquarium/Savor Sustainable Seafood Dinner Series Eco Dive Club seafood lecture and tasting

40 people (press included) 100 people

Earth Day sustainable seafood dinner at Hotel Maya in Long Beach

25 people

Share out Strength Taste of the Nation in Orange County

500 people

Screening of the movie "The Cove" at Santa Monica Library

150 people

Urban Boat Cruise

40 people

Sensational Seafood Dinner at Ty Warner Sea Center in Santa Barbara

200 people

Month

Total # Events

Total # Reached

January

4

265 people

February

1

75 people

March

5

10,690 people

April

5

815 people

May

7

775 people


OPC California Sustainable Seafood Initiative Advisory Panel meeting

Unknown

Southern California Academy of Sciences presentation of the Seafood DNA Identification study results

50 people

Chef and restaurant workshop at Wildfish Seafood Grille

75 chef and managers

Aquatic Academy cooking demo and lecture at the Aquarium of the Pacific

50 people

UC Irvine sustainable seafood dinner and presentation sponsored by UCI Chapter of Real Food Challenge club

150 people

Green Dot Schools science fair Savor: Sustainable Seafood dinner series at Aquarium Sustainable seafood dinner at Parker’s Lighthouse restaurant Dwell Design Conference Panel Discussion Chef’s Dive Trip Catalina Island

250 students and teachers 75 people 50 people 50+ people 30 people

Parker’s Lighthouse/Santa Monica Seafood “Shuck and Swallow” oyster festival

200 people

Burbank Green Alliance screening of "End of the Line" and panel

100 people

Sustainable seafood presentation to Sony staff and “green series”

75 people

"The Cove" screening in San Diego Fisherman’s Appreciation Day event at Venice Pier

450 people 200 people

California Sustainable Seafood Initiative Advisory Panel meeting

Unknown

Mercury and Seafood workshop at the Aquarium of the Pacific

8 scientists and researchers

Sensational Seafood Dinner at Ty Warner Sea Center in Santa Barbara

200 people

USC Wrigley Marine Science Center Sustainable Seafood presentation and demo

35 people

June

4

205 people

July

5

1,025 people

August

6

363 people


UCLA Sociology of Food (graduate class) presentation and demo

20 students

American Institute of Wine and Food seafood event Hotel Currents grand opening seafood booth/cooking demo

100 people 300 people

Tour of Kona Blue hatchery and farm site operations with Sierra Club representatives

Unknown

Conference on Integrated Multitrophic Aquaculture Presentation at Marriott chef’s conference Wyland Living Green Fair/Long Beach Port Festival Kids’ Fun Run event/Long Beach Marathon Sea Fare Event at the Aquarium of the Pacific

40 scientists and NGO representatives 40 people and property chefs Unknown 200 + people 500 + people

September

4

380 people

October

3

> 500 people


Appendix 3

Blog Posts Authored by Other Organizations About SFF

Blog Posts Written About SFF Blog Site

Web Link

Comments

100 Miles

http://www.100miles.com/seafood-for-the-future/

10

Alaska Salmon's Blog

http://alaskasalmonranching.wordpress.com/2010/04/18/seafood-forthe-future-explains-aquaculture-efficiency-and-feeds/

0

La Times Blog

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/dailydish/2009/11/small-bites-sonaanniversary-dinner-palmina-wine-dinner-at-craft-fall-sandwiches-at-platinebakery.html

0

Science Creative Blog

http://blog.sciencecreative.com/tag/seafood-for-the-future/

Your Daily Thread

http://yourdailythread.com/2010/05/11/easy-orderin%E2%80%99-forocean-friendly-seafood

2

Fish Contamination Education Collaborative

http://pvsfish.org/blog/

0

Haven Gastropub Blog

http://www.havengastropub.com/blog.html

0

Weblog

http://www.marineharvestcanada.com/blog/

0

Dwell on Design Blog

http://www.dwellondesign.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=cate gory&layout=blog&id=88&Itemid=386

0

OC Register Blog

http://ocdeals.ocregister.com/tag/seafood-for-the-future/

0

LA Stormwater Team Effort Blog

http://lateameffort.blogspot.com/2010/07/win-two-free-tickets-to-longbeach.html

0


Appendix 4

2010 Media Coverage and Impressions

List of Media Coverage and Impressions Date

Outlet

Location

Topic

Impressions

Jan. 10, 2010

USC Digital News

www.neontommy.com

The Hunt for Sustainable Seafood Just Got Easier

500

Jan. 21, 2010

Daily Breeze

Torrance, CA

Seafood for the Future

216,690

Feb. 2010

CauseCast

www.causecast.org

What is Sustainable Seafood?

1,000

Mar. 1, 2010

Downtown Gazette

Long Beach, CA

Mar. 9, 2010

About.com Travel Blog

New York, NY

Mar. 18, 2010

Cityfeeds.com

Los Angeles, CA

Mar. 2010

GAA Magazine

International

Mar. 2010

L.A. Parent Magazine

Burbank, CA

Sustainable Seafood Day

255,000

Mar. 22, 2010

Downtown Gazette

Long Beach, CA

Sustainable Seafood Dinner - Shark Nights

88,500

Mar. 25, 2010

Press Telegram

Long Beach, CA

Seafood for the Future Partner

286,728

Apr. 8, 2010

Press Telegram

Long Beach, CA

Sustainable Seafood at Parker's Lighthouse Restaurant

315,597

Apr. 22, 2010

Press Telegram

Long Beach, CA

Seafood for the Future Dinner at Hotel Maya

315,597

Sustainable Seafood Day Sustainable Seafood Program - Free Aquarium Tickets Free Aquarium Ticket for Eating Sustainable Seafood Aquarium Supports Aquaculture

Total Placements

Total Impressions

18

34,611,859

88,500 32,944,747 Unknown 100,000


May. 25, 2010

Everything Long Beach

www.everythinglongbeach.com

Parker's Lighthouse Restaurant Showcases Sustainable Seafood

Unknown

Jun. 4, 2010

KPCC - SoCal Public Radio

Los Angeles, CA

Seafood for the Future with AoP

Unknown

Jul. 28, 2010

Everything Long Beach

www.everythinglongbeach.com

American Institute of Wine and Food/SFF Event

Unknown

Jul. 2010

4th Street Long Beach

www.4thstreetlongbeach.com

American Institute of Wine and Food/SFF Event

Unknown

Aug. 4, 2010

KABC 7 Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CA

What Are the Best Types of Fish to Eat? SFF and Parker's Lighthouse

Unknown

Sep. 17, 2010

Everything Long Beach

www.everythinglongbeach.com

Farm Dinner

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Seafood for the future annual evaluation 1