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d.confestival the book September 20 –22, 2012 Hasso-Plattner-Institut Potsdam


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Table of Contents

InTRODUCTION HASSO PLATTNER Christoph Meinel DAVID KELLEY ULRICH WEINBERG MAKING OF D.CONFESTIVAL D.CONFESTIVAL MAP D.CONFESTIVAL PROGRAM D.Notes Welcome to the HPI d.confestival The Difference between Design Thinking & Design Implementing Design Thinking in a Company Does Design Thinking Change Your Life? Miracles of thinking Making Global Change Visible Cradle-to-Cradle Design Thinking the FuturE One big family – different futures

6 8 10 14 16 – 20 22 24 – 28

32 38 – 40

Management Presentations Banking & Finance 70 Telecommunications 74 – 76 MOBILITY 78 Health 82 Retail & logistics 84 Learning Presentations Elementary School 88 – 90 d.school 92 University 98 Professional Training 100 The Future is in Beta 106

44 – 46 48 50 52– 54 58– 60 62 – 64

Research Presentations Frame CReATION Why design? Why Now? Experience Values and Service Design Defining »designership« Design Thinking Research

112 114 118 120 124 – 126

Workshops Rapid Experience Design A.k.a. Designing a moment Taming the Elephant – Gaining Emphathy Implementing Design Thinking in a Corporate Environment The Role of Design in Value Co-Creation & Innovation Design Thinking for social innovations Jointly Separated Frame Creation Game design as prototyping method

130 – 132 134 138 140 142 – 144 146 148 150

SPecial Events Experiencing Music between 154 Rules & ChanCe d.collective: Connect and Share 156 D.ictionary 158 MEET THE GURU 166 – 168 INNOVATION ACCELERATOR 170 THE FUTURE OF COLLABORATION 176 d.circus@night: MAGIC MOMENTS 178 – 180 Movie Park Tour & 182 Movie-Making Workshop

Global CHallenge Redesign your City Credits D.CONFESTIVAL Steering team DESIGN THINKING at HPI D.CONFESTIVAL Speakers List D.CONFESTIVAL List of PARTICIPATING companies D.Confestival PRODUCTION CREDITS D.CONFESTIVAL SUPPORTED BY IMPRINT

186 –194

198 200 202 – 206 208 210 212 – 214 216


INTRODUCTION


6

INTRODUCTION

HASSO PLATTNER

Hasso Plattner, Co-Founder of SAP AG, Head of Advisory Board, SAP

“If you have several people and they have different perspectives and they’re not all from the same kind, you get a much better perspective… because it doesn’t matter anymore if you’re a great mechanical engineer or computer scientist or artifcial intelligence… this is something new.” - Hasso Plattner


8

INTRODUCTION

Christoph Meinel

W

e were delighted that so many creative lateral thinkers and innovators from all over the world and from completely different fields accepted our invitation to join us. For a period of three days we had the opportunity to take part in passionate discussions and debates and together we created something new and exciting.

Christoph Meinel President, CEO and Scientific Director Hasso-Plattner-Institut for IT-Systems Engineering

“It is only through innovation that society and the economy can master the challenges of an ever-faster changing world.” - Christoph Meinel

On the fifth birthday of our HPI School of Design Thinking, we wanted to give this global meeting a special setting. Therefore, we came up with a new, interactive event format combining the seriousness of a scientific conference with the lightheartedness of a festival. As an innovation method and culture, how does Design Thinking inspire change and renewal processes and creates new and truly customized products and services? This was the central question that concerned us at the d.confestival 2012. One thing is clear: it is only through innovation that society and the economy can master the challenges of an everfaster changing world. Dynamic change cannot tolerate rigid thinking and acting any more than it can tolerate antiquated structures or processes. Digitalization and global internetworking challenge us to find new analytical and creative solutions – especially for the workplace  of the future.

Welcome to the d.confestival Design Thinking is an excellent approach because it unites the analytical side with the creative side of the innovation process. Thus, forward-looking solutions for complex problems and sustainable growth potential can be tapped and developed.The d.confestival was a great opportunity to get to know other Design Thinkers, entrepreneurs, and innovators from all over the world. We hope you had as much fun as we did, enjoyed thinking laterally, acting creatively in teams and connecting ideas. Keep “design thinking” the future!


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INTRODUCTION

DAVID KELLEY

“The cathartic thing that happens is that you or your team succeeds in making a creative leap, coming up with something that surprises you. You weren’t expecting to get to that point…” - David Kelley

David Kelley, Co-Founder of the Stanford d.school


INTRODUCTION


14

INTRODUCTION

ULRICH WEINBERG

“Magic happens when you are mindful of the place, the process and the people.” - Ulrich Weinberg

Five years of HPI School of Design Thinking Ulrich Weinberg, Chair d.confestival 2012 Head of HPI School of Design Thinking

W

hen we started the HPI School of Design Thinking (D-School) Potsdam in 2007, we were actually not sure if Design Thinking and a D-School would work in Germany at all. Now, seven years later, we have students from more than 20 nations, most of them coming from Germany and other European countries but also from Sao Paulo, Shanghai, Sydney or Toronto. They are at the D-School in Potsdam for only two days per week and they do not come to earn credits or other academic honors – so why do they come? It is because they want to experience the incredible energy which is unleashed by multidisciplinary teams working with their full mental power, activating both parts of their brain, the analytical and the

creative, intuitive part to solve complex problems. The students attempt to find answers to the burning questions of our time with the right set of tools. They do it with an amazing personal commitment and enthusiasm while collaborating in a specially designed environment, sharing ideas and building prototypes.

pressure to change in a globally networked world. They want to learn how to get closer to their customers’ needs and how to build better and more sustainable products and services. They want to renew their work environments and focus on team activities instead of individual power.

We are experiencing the same thing with professionals from all fields. For four years high level managers have spent two or more days of their valuable time to play around with sticky notes and learn about radical ways to re-think their business. Ten out of the 20 largest German companies have already booked student projects or professional training workshops at the HPI. What are they looking for? They are all experiencing increasing

Through the last years we got a lot of visitors from other countries, interested in how we set up a flexible learning environment for students and professionals. We started to support the setup of the first D-Schools in China and Malaysia and I am happy to see a global network of like-minded institutions developing around the world.


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INTRODUCTION

Ulrich Weinberg

MAKING OF D.CONFESTIVAL

“An inspiring event where 677 participants, 143 Speakers, 59 Volunteers from 355 companies and 31 Nations could meet and feel at home.” - Ulrich Weinberg

I

n September 2012, the first international gathering of Design Thinkers, the d.confestival took place on the campus of the Hasso-Plattner-Institut in Potsdam, near Berlin. Three days of Design Thinking and exciting events for more than 800 people from 30 nations. Under the motto “Design Thinking the Future” the d.confestival was a conference and a festival at the same time, a multi-layer forum for Design Thinkers and innovators. 150 leading experts, international coaches and fellow participants shared their experiences in presentations and interactive workshops where multidisciplinary teamwork could be witnessed firsthand. In five different program tracks, more than 50 events took place showing the present and future opportunities Design Thinking can offer. Some of the most prominent trailblazers of Design Thinking pesented the big picture in the d.notes. More than 20 presentations showcased the newest developments and applications of Design Thinking in

the areas of management, learning, and research. Numerous workshops provided hands-on opportunities to get to know and apply the various methods of Design Thinking. Last but not least, there were many special events and evening entertainment full of surprises. The d.circus, a huge circus tent built specifically for the occasion, was the central location of the d.confestival. 50 volunteers helped to support the participants and documented most of the

events with photos, videos, and words. This book is the result of their work and is meant to be a documentation of the first d.confestival in history. Please enjoy it in conjunction with the pictures and videos, which you can find at: http://media.hpi. dconfestival.net/ A big Thank You goes to all the people who have contributed to this book, especially to Harry, Gloria, Joe, Katharina, Ulla, and Isabel.


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MAKING OF D.CONFESTIVAL

INTRODUCTION

D-School Students Projects

“A project can only create real impact when it is based on true empathy.” - D-School Student T

he theme of the HPI d.confestival is “Design Thinking the Future”. In order to set up an event that includes people from various backgrounds and of different ages, the D-School Potsdam recruited their own students to get involved in the planning. The D-School structures its curriculum in projects, so four student teams, two teams over the course of 12 weeks and two in a 6 week long project, came up with interesting ideas for the d.confestival. The Empact Meter: How to measure Design Thinking projects? A project can only create real impact when it is based on true empathy. The Empact Meter app allows everyone to evaluate projects with simple and intuitive interactions based on five criteria: first impressions, human centeredness, simplicity, power of idea, and viability. The app leads users through these different criteria using a playful graphic interface, then interprets the qualitative data and

produces a measurable quantitative rating. Design Thinking teens: How to involve teens at the d.confestival? Every step of the Design Thinking process is given a dedicated individual space at the d.confestival in the form of igloos with interior designs individually customized to each step. Here, teens have the possibility of deep diving one step at a time.

For example, in the Point of View igloo, teens can build a window puppet with their own personas in 3D, triggering their imagination to the maximum. They are free to go from igloo to igloo in order to play with different design methods. The Hosting Experience: How to host the HPI d.confestival? Two teams worked on the challenge “Redesign the hosting experience for


20

MAKING OF D.CONFESTIVAL

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION

D-School Student Projects

the d.confestival”. One of the teams identified fundamental principles for the d.confestival volunteers hosting the event: 1. Giving your time and support with the pure intention of ensuring that someone else has a satisfying experience encourages a positive feeling of “doing good”. 2. Going fishing together and other experiential and collaborative tasks ensure connections between people, thereby developing friendships and networks. 3. Being a part of the first ever d.confestival creates feelings of excitement and of being a part of something new. The idea that your work does not only extend to the HPI School of Design Thinking, but to the global family of Design Thinkers stimulates the feeling of working for a higher purpose. 4. Our focus on experiential tasks was designed to encourage hosts to feel that their work is meaningful. 5. Hosting, after all, should mean having fun.

The second team recommended three aspects to support the hosts: Real-time feedback, the co-creation challenge, and the picnic-space. Real-time feedback consisted of a button machine enabling the hosts to make their own buttons in order to give each other feedback. The main goal was to make the volunteers feel honored by each other and to carry their qualities on themselves. The second idea was about integrating the Design Thinking experience into the hosting experience with a working space designed for the hosts to work on a challenge about the future of Design Thinking. Their space consisted of a big whiteboard large enough for each of the six steps of the Design Thinking process.

For each step, a detailed plan would be prepared for the hosts, so that they could immediately get to work with no preparation – even if they had been away for some time. The idea was that the hosts could (re)learn how to use the Design Thinking process and have fun while using it at the d.confestival. Our goal was also that the participants could observe the hosts working on a Design Thinking challenge and integrate themselves in the process. The last prototype, which includes the others, was the picnic space. This space was meant to be a relaxing space for the hosts and also a place to meet and mingle with participants.


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InTRODUCTIOn

D.ConfesTIval MaP

Lecture Halls Presentations

d.sport

Registration

Parking

d.circus d.notes Presentations Main Building Global Challenge Exhibition Workshops d.dome Special Event


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INTRODUCTION

D.CONFESTIVAL PROGRAM

Zeit

Presentations Management

Learning

Workshops

9:00

10:00

11:00

Registration & Breakfast

Welcome D.Circus

12:00

Special Events

Global Challenge

Time

Zeit

Time

9:00 am

9:00

10:00 am

10:00

11:00 am

11:00

11:00 am

12:00 am

12:00

12:00 am

Research

Welcome to the HPI d.confestival

9:00 am

Registration & Breakfast

10:00 am

David Kelley, Christoph Meinel, Ulrich Weinberg

Design Thinking for Future Business Design Thinking – Helping to Reinvent Enterprise Computing Hasso Plattner d.note

d.Circus Design Thinking – Driving Customer Centric Innovation at SAP Jim Hagemann Snabe

13:00

14:00

15:00

16:00

17:00

18:00

Lunch Banking & Finance

DekaBank, Deutsche Bank, PostFinance, Zürcher Kantonalbank

ESBZ Berlin, K12 Lab d.school Stanford, we school Khajuraho

d.Circus

Lecture Hall 1

20:00

Frame Creation Kees Dorst

Lecture Hall 3

Why design? Why now? Patrick Whitney Lecture Hall 3

SAP

Thomas Both, Zaki Omar, Adam Royalty

WorkShop Space 1

Telecommunications Deutsche Telekom, Swisscom, Telefonica

13:00

2:00 pm

14:00

3:00 pm

15:00

4:00 pm

16:00

Experiencing Music between Rules and Chance Kammerakademie Potsdam Lecture Hall 2

WorkShop Space 3

D-School Beijing, Paris, Potsdam, Stanford, Tokyo

Lecture Hall 1

Experience Values and Service Design Yong Se Kim Lecture Hall 3

Defining “Designership” Rick Schuhmann Lecture Hall 3

Taming the Elephant – Gaining Emphathy

Implementing Design Thinking in a Corporate Environment

Brand Driven Innovation

Tiefenschärfe

Deutsche Bank

WorkShop Space 1

WorkShop Space 2

3 WorkShop Space 1

5:00 pm

17:00

6:00 pm

18:00

The Difference between Design Thinking and Design

Night@d.circus

Kammerakademie Potsdam / Magic Moment

George Kembel, Oliviero Toscani

19:00

d.collective Connect and Share

Redesign your City! Workshop

D.Collective D-School Potsdam

ESBZ Teens Berlin

D.Dome

Exhibition Area

Meet the Guru:

Chat with David Kelley

Coffee

2:00 pm

3:00 pm

4:00 pm

Workshop Space 3

Redesign your City! Workshop

ESBZ Teens Berlin

Exhibition Area

7:00 pm

d.note d.Circus

Flavia Beuel, Anna Isselburg, Hedi Pottag, Katharina Müller

MetaDesign & Anne Prib

Dinner

1:00 pm

Lunch

D.Ictionary

20:30

23:30

Rapid Experience Design aka Design Acts of Kindness

10 Commandments for Nurturing Innovation Teams

Coffee

Lecture Hall 2

19:00

Elementary School

1:00 pm

5:00 pm

6:00 pm

Exhibition Area

7:00 pm

Dinner

8:00 pm

20:00

8:00 pm

8:30 pm

20:30

8:30 pm

11:30 pm

23:30

11:30 pm


26 Zeit

Presentations Learning

Management

9:00

10:00

INTRODUCTION

D.CONFESTIVAL PROGRAM

Workshops

Special Events

Zeit

Global Challenge

Time

Research

9:00 am

9:00

10:00 am

10:00

Design Thinking 11:00 am for Social Innovations

11:00

12:00 am

12:00

1:00 pm

13:00

2:00 pm

14:00

Breakfast Implementing Design Thinking in a Company Changing Perspectives! Cafer Tosun & Project Partners d.note

9:00 am

Breakfast

10:00 am

d.Circus Design Thinking meets SAP Software Development Gordon Mühl, Hanswerner Dreissigacker

11:00

Mobility

Daimler (tbc), Deutsche Bahn, Fraport

University

Istanbul, Koblenz, Moscow, Porto, Singapur, St. Gallen

d.Circus

14:00

15:00

Lecture Hall 1

17:00

18:00

Health

Charité, Janssen-Cilag, SAP, Siemens

Professional Training

Dark Horse, d.school Stanford, gravity, HPI Academy Lecture Hall 1

20:00 20:30

23:30

Lecture Hall 3

Arne van Oosterom

Impact Solutions & Steven Ney

WorkShop Space 2

WorkShop Space 3

Design Thinking Research – Paper Presentations 2

Jointly Separated

Global Education Team

Redesign our Company from the Inside Out

Frame Creation

WorkShop Space 2

Retail & Logistics DHL, Gravis, Metro

Museums as Learning Environment Rhonda Rubinstein The Future is in Beta Erik Spiekermann Lecture Hall 2

Design Thinking Research – Paper Presentations 3

Design Thinking and Product Go Live in Six Months

FORTH Innovation Expedition

WorkShop Space 1

WorkShop Space 2

Gijs van Wulfen

3:00 pm

15:00

4:00 pm

16:00

Frame Creation

5:00 pm

11:00 am

12:00 am

1:00 pm

Lunch Innovation Accelerator

Redesign your City! Presentation

Bandung, Bangalore, ESBZ Teens Berlin, Kolding

D.Ictionary

Flavia Beuel, Anna Isselburg, Hedi Pottag, Katharina Müller

Meet the Guru:

Chat with David Kelley

2:00 pm

3:00 pm

Exhibition Area

Coffee

4:00 pm

Workshop Space 3

Redesign your City!

5:00 pm

Feedback Lounge

18:00

WorkShop Space 3

6:00 pm Exhibition Area

7:00 pm

Welcome Speech Henning Heidemanns Party@d.circus Matchmaking Event / Bands / DJs

Exhibition Area

Kees Dorst

6:00 pm

Does Design Thinking Change Your Life? Bernie Roth

Outdoor

Part 2

Dinner d.note d.Circus

Andry Widyowijatnoko

Lecture Hall 2

17:00

Redesign your City! Presentation

Bandung, Bangalore, ESBZ Teens Berlin, Kolding

WorkShop Space 3

SAP

Lecture Hall 3

Dwinita Larasati, Fiki Satari, Eku Wand,

Kees Dorst

Point Blank International

Lecture Hall 3

Angklung Warm-Up & Bamboo – The Tree of Visions

SAP Innovation Center

Part 1

Coffee

Lecture Hall 1

19:00

Lecture Hall 3

Lunch

d.Circus

16:00

The Role of Design in Value Co-Creation and Innovation

Design Thinking Research – Paper Presentations 1

12:00

13:00

Design Thinking Research Christoph Meinel

19:00

Exhibition Area

7:00 pm

Dinner

8:00 pm

20:00

8:00 pm

8:30 pm

20:30

8:30 pm

11:30 pm

23:30 23:00

11:30 pm


28 Zeit 9:00

Presentations

Miracles of Thinking (in German) d.circus

Making Global Change Visible Lutz Engelke D.Circus

11:20

13:00

14:00

Create a Global Design Thinking Network Designechos

Game Design as Prototyping Method

d.bing

Zeit

9:00 am

9:00

10:00 am

10:00

10:40 am

Victor BedĂś

WorkShop Space 2

Special Events

10:40

Global Challenge

Collaboration in Digital Spaces Tele-Board

Designing the Future of Collaboration foresee

Time 9:00 am

Breakfast

Lecture Hall 1

Redesign your City!

Feedback Lounge

Lecture Hall 1

11:20 am WorkShop Space 1

Design Thinking the Future d.note Members of the d.confestival’s Steering Team

Lunch

Time

Gruppenbing!

Cradle-to-Cradle Michael Braungart d.circus

12:00

Workshops

Breakfast

10:00 10:40

INTRODUCTION

D.CONFESTIVAL PROGRAM

11:20 am

11:20

WorkShop Space 3

Exhibition Area

12:00 am

12:00

1:00 pm

13:00

2:00 pm

14:00

12:00 am

Lunch Movie Park Tour

1:00 pm

2:00 pm

Filmpark Babelsberg

15:00

3:00 pm

15:00

16:00

4:00 pm

16:00

3:00 pm Filmpark Babelsberg

Making Movie

4:00 pm

Filmpark Babelsberg

17:00

5:00 pm

17:00

5:00 pm

18:00

6:00 pm

18:00

6:00 pm Filmpark Babelsberg


D.NOTES PRESENTATIONs


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WelCoMe To THe HPi D.ConFeSTiVAl

Christoph Meinel, ulrich Weinberg

in the circus tent, the D-School family piles up boxes into a big “d.” in time lapse. it’s a symbol for how Design Thinking works: prototyping and failing – but everything finally leads to an inspiring result.

Christoph Meinel, President, Ceo and Scientific Director, Hasso-Plattner-institut for iT-Systems engineering

Ulrich Weinberg, Chair d.confestival 2012 and Head of HPi School of Design Thinking

A

n empty lawn in front of the Hasso-Plattner-institut. A gentle breeze goes through the leaves of a tree. The sun twinkles over the green field. This is how the welcome session of the first d.confestival officially starts. on a big screen, which grabs the attention of the audience

From the middle of the arena, Christoph Meinel, the director of the HPI, introduces the audience to the history of the HPi, an institute that is unique in germany. unique not only because of its great iT education, but also because of the D-School. in discussion with uli Weinberg, they explain how it all started five years ago. David kelly, founder of iDeo and the d.school Stanford, holds a welcome note via video. in unison all three underline one very important thing: it is due to Hasso Plattner that Design Thinking has taken off in the world. The birthday party can begin and the participants celebrate the further dispersion of a culture of empathy around the world. Written by Moritz Gekeler

D.NOTES

“How Design Thinking works: Prototyping and failing – but everything finally leads to an inspiring result.” - Moritz Gekeler


34

Design Thinking for Future Business

“We have to radically rethink how - Hasso Plattner we run companies”

H

asso Plattner, Co-Founder and Head of the Advisory Board of SAP, dreams of a world in which any information can be recalled and displayed in three seconds, and of meaningful real-time collaboration in the absence of hierarchy. But reality is, so often, filled with endless pontificating through PowerPoint presentations and the slow recall and compilation of data at every level, funneled through chains of command and the familiar slow processes that fill up the days of the year, consuming time and money. HANA is the technology that Hasso Plattner thinks will turn the status quo in corporate databases upside down. But the development and adoption of a radically optimized solution that was designed using Design Thinking was not without challenges.

Hasso Plattner spoke about the difficulties in bringing Design Thinking to a classic corporate world populated by credentialed, accomplished people who reached the corner office, and of the structures and processes of business today which don’t necessarily support innovation or expedience. For example, a tool that cuts back dramatically on time spent processing data can be seen by some as a threat, who don’t necessarily want to think of something else to do with all the resources that are suddenly freed up. “We have to radically rethink how we run companies” after we radically innovate. Some cultures and people are more willing to adapt to change than others. Design Thinking can help companies learn to restructure their management and work flow to make the most of innovation.

Hasso Plattner, Co-Founder of SAP AG, Head of Advisory Board SAP

D.NOTESPRESENTATION D.NOTES


36

Design Thinking for Future Business

“Success is a potential innovation killer because it can seduce you to stop challenging yourself.” - Jim Hagemann Snabe

D.NOTES

Jim Hagemann Snabe, Co-CEO SAP

Jim Hagemann Snabe, Co-CEO of SAP, is celebrating the 40th birthday of SAP but is also wondering how to turn it back into a teenager. Success, he says, is a potential innovation killer because it can seduce you to stop challenging yourself. Mr. Snabe wants to inspire SAP to adapt the idea of dream teams, which can make massive impact, by “[making] all teams dream” and by encouraging Design Thinking when it comes to remembering the customer. An innovative software which runs processes at unprecedented speeds, for example, might solve a lot of the client’s problems, but not if the installation itself is a major drain on resources. What does the client really want to do with a product? How do they really use it? At SAP, Mr. Snabe describes innovation accomplished by a lean and agile

process of rapid iteration cycles by small, empowered teams. The principles at work are not new in small companies, but are revolutionary in large corporations. “Don’t start coding until you have a point of view” sums up a list of tips he believes in for kindling relevant innovation on a large scale, which includes warnings not be religious (it’s all about intent, not dogma), finding strong sponsors, and not starting before you really understand. Written by Sirje Müller-Viise


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The Difference between Design Thinking & Design

George Kembel and Oliviero Toscani

D.NOTES

“Creativity is simply a consequence of the wonderful opportunity that takes place between your heart and your brain.” - Oliviero Toscani T

here’s a huge, happy buzzing crowd gathered at the end of the first day. Director of the HPI School of Design Thinking, Uli Weinberg, introduces the d.note by remarking that about once a week, he receives an e-mail from someone asking him for help with a corporate identity or logo. Indeed, the precise difference is not always apparent to those not well acquainted with design or Design Thinking. Or even those who are!

“How can we measure the success of creative intent or of beautiful design that does not really help people?” – George Kembel

Oliviero Toscani, Italian photographer and designer, chafes visibly at the idea of bad design: design for the sake of design, communication with nothing to say or, worse, for pure profit. He eschews the routine of “design without thinking,“ and beautifully describes the insecure process of creativity, as “simply a consequence of the wonderful opportunity that takes

place between your heart and your brain.“ But how do we foster such opportunity? Is it even possible? Young people come to Toscani’s studio and announce that they are full of ideas. A bad sign, he thinks, since “creative people don’t have ideas: They are creative.“ Yet sparking this creative state of being is very much a mission of Design Thinking. George Kembel, Co-Founder and Executive Director of the d.school at Stanford University, admits that he sometimes mixes up design, Design Thinking and creativity, and wonders whether they might mean the same thing. He wonders: What do they have in common? And how can we measure the success of creative intent, or of beautiful design that does not really help people?

George Kembel, Co-Founder and Executive Director, d.school Stanford University

Oliviero Toscani, Italian photographer, designer of the controversial advertising campaign for United Colors of Benetton


40

george kembel and oliviero Toscani

THe DiFFerenCe BeTWeen DeSign THinking & DeSign

“Creative people don’t have ideas: They are creative” - Olivero Toscani

Mr. Kembel believes we’ve been over associating creativity with the arts, which is a huge injustice to the latent creativity in every person. Design is a creative act, he says, but it’s not necessarily art. even policies and managerial decisions can be creative. And perhaps, he says, Design Thinking has become over associated with marketing and business. But Design Thinking is simply a creative mindset, which enables design (a creative act) and creativity (the creative spirit). What about failure? What about trial and error? asks one of the crowd.

Mr. Toscani responds that all of his work has been a magnificent failure, and that he would not compromise for a mediocre success. Mr. kembel believes that failure, plus integrity, has given him the freedom to do what he truly believes in. The audience came to hear about the differences between design and Design Thinking, but perhaps the greater discovery is that both are at their best when done with integrity, thoughtfulness and heart. Written by Sirje Müller-Viise

D.NOTESPRESENTATION D.NOTES


D.NOTES


44

D.NOTES

Implementing Design Thinking in a Company

D

esign Thinking the future? In a corporation? With more than 65,000 people? Not the easiest undertaking, but it is possible. P&G managed to do it, and so does SAP. Gordon Mühl, SAP’s Senior Vice President for Architecture Governance and Standards, talked about how the company from Walldorf deployed a design attitude for software development in its subsidies all over the world. All of it started with just eight little projects, expert coaches, and the creation of enabling spaces. After many coaching cycles and the extension to up to 40 projects, 30 design spaces and 72 coaches, the responsibility is now given to the developing units themselves.

“In former times it was hard to fiind the right people at SAP when you had a problem. Today they fiind you to know your problems. It’s much more fun now!” - Gordon Mühl

Cafer Tosun, Managing Director and SVP, SAP Innovation Center

Michael Gutsmann, Chief Financial, Officer Bigpoint

Gordon Mühl, SVP SAP and Global Sponsor Design Thinking, SAP

Hanswerner Dreissigacker, Head of Frontrunner Innovation Team, SAP

Hanswerner Dreissigacker, SAP’s Design Thinking veteran, added that igniting people usually gets you a bloody nose. Particularly successful units in the organization may be especially resistant to change. So he recommends finding the people who have already failed repeatedly and know that they can’t succeed anymore using their old ways. Thinking about its many skeptics, SAP also conducted internal research on Design Thinking’s impact for

project success and quality. The results clearly showed improvements in creativity and feasibility compared to the use of traditional approaches, he added. How impressive those results can be, driven by the ongoing fusion of Design Thinking and lean development, was showcased by Cafer Tosun (Senior Vice President, SAP Innovation Center), Christian RA Regenbrecht (Institute of Pathology & Comprehensive Cancer Center,


46

Implementing Design Thinking in a Company

Cafer Tosun, Michael Gutsmann, Gordon Mühl, Hanswerner Dreissigacker

Charité), and Michael Gutsmann (CFO, Bigpoint). Cafer Tosun highlighted the importance of Design Thinking in the development of HANA, an inmemory computing platform, which dramatically accelerate analytics and business processes.

“Make use of the ‘tried anything phenomenon’! Desperate people may be the most open ones to Design Thinking.” - Hanswerner Dreissigacker

Mr. Regenbrecht and Mr. Gutsmann presented applications: The HANA oncolizer, which gives back time for patient care by analyzing complex data in real time, and an incredibly clever system to activate casual online gamers for in-game purchases by running light-speed analysis of three million users with just a few taps on an iPad. These are just two examples of many emerging out of the new spirit, Tosun emphasized. Because the system is so new and still beyond imagination for so many, SAP now proactively approaches existing and prospective customers for co-creating and discovering possible user scenarios: A Design Thinking attitude on all fronts and at all levels. Written by Jan Schmiedgen

D.NOTESPRESENTATION D.NOTES


48

D.NOTES

Does Design Thinking Change Your Life?

“Roth! Engineering is about things, not people!” - Bill Moggridge

Bernard Roth, Academic Director, d.school Stanford University

B

ernard Roth, the Director of the d.school at Stanford University, gave perhaps the most moving and remarkable d.note of this year’s d.confestival. No other speech had such a strong human and emotional touch. The entire d.circus was spellbound as he told stories in remembrance of Bill Moggridge that usually aren’t known to the broader public. For him, and for many others, Bill wasn’t just the designer of the first laptop or one of IDEO’s early co-founders. He was also a friend, a father and an incredibly inspiring and empowering person. It was especially this last characteristic that Roth considers the most important. “In the end it is all about empowerment, about making people feel good about themselves – something Bill was very good at.” Just how important the experience of empowerment, as a kind of prerequisite for, but also as an outcome of design (thinking)

for his development was, Bernard Roth showed by sharing some very interesting and often quite funny insights into his own life. Being part of the 60’s “human potential movement” in California and confronted with the sudden death of his senior professor, he and some other rather inexperienced young faculty members had to develop a new curriculum for the mechanical engineering faculty. The results turned out to be quite unusual, prompting his direct superior to say: “Roth! Engineering is about things, not people!” Nowadays, such a statement may sound like an anachronism but back then, he went on, this was a prevalent way of thinking. Only the constant stream of coincidences provoking constant experimentation and perpetually dealing with new situations turned Prof. Roth into who he is today.

“In the end”, he said, “freaky weird stuff is what led me to the d.school.” And this is exactly what he also encourages his students to do. There are no rules set in stone, there is no slavish devotion to teaching plans, curricula, methods or tools – what matters to him is the transformation of the students. The methodology may be a catalyst, but in the end it is up to us how we transform our own personal lives and Design Thinking itself. As he concluded: “If we don’t change it, it is already dead! […] We want you to join the Design Thinking movement. But don’t be like us. It is a new way to free yourself!” Written by Jan Schmiedgen


50

Miracles of thinking

B

ernhard von Mutius is a philosophical thinker among doers. According to him, the multiple crises that we are currently experiencing in society and the economy are, at their core, a crisis of thinking. In a world where, as he quotes the German author Hans-Magnus Enzensberger, “turbulences are the normal condition of the atmosphere,“ we cannot stick to the linear concept of progress and the calculated rationality that still form the basis of business and management teaching today.

What we need, says von Mutius, is a really creative and sustainable way of thinking and problem solving that allows us to deal with our world’s complexity more sensibly and responsibly than we do now. What might such a way of thinking, such a mindset, look like? Or, in short, how should we think? Von Mutius’ presentation is a manifesto for a new way of thinking that sees chaos and order not as opposites but as complementary, with a new sense of aesthetics. He uses a double pendulum to show that in nature and society, chaos and order often go hand in hand. And maybe complexity even furthers innovation. The human brain is an example of a highly complex organ without a storage center or individual compart-

ments. The human brain works in connections - „in between“ - and maybe this is the reason for its incredible innovation capacity. Like new thoughts in our brain, innovation in business and society can emerge only at borders, through cooperation and combination, through conscientious border crossings. It has more to do with miracles and surprises, with confusion and failure than with rational planning or business theories. Innovative thinking is “closer to a mountain path than to a freeway“ and thus some chaos should be allowed in our heads and in our organisations. In addition to a new appreciation for chaos, we also need a new aesthetic sense. According to von Mutius, we are experiencing a paradigm shift from a “demystification of the world“ (Max Weber) to a “remystification of the world.“ Aesthetics can trump efficiency, as can be seen from the success of Apple products. We can orient ourselves with a circle: the circular form is a metaphor for sustainable business as well as deep collaboration. The d.confestival is a good place to start making circles out of boxes. Written by Claire Luzia Leifert

D.NOTES

“A mindset that combines the thinking of chaos and order is an ability we need in the future for dealing with complexity, creativity, and especially change.” - Bernhard von Mutius

Bernhard von Mutius, Social Scientist, Philosopher, Author, and Consultant


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D.NOTES

Making Global Change Visible

“Are we like the frog in the glass which sees the temperature rising and its living conditions deteriorating, but does not expect its death?” - Lutz Engelke How can design and Design Thinking help us address the systemic challenges of the future? Lutz Engelke starts his presentation by describing change and he finds that most of change is invisible – we are unconscious of it happening, but we will be hit hard if it becomes unbearable to us. The example of a frog in a glass with rising temperature is a symbol for this phenomenon: While the temperature in the glass is rising, the frog will not notice any change until it dies from a heart attack at 80°C. Lutz Engelke asks: Are we like the frog in the glass which sees the temperature rising and its living conditions deteriorating but does not expect its death? In the last decades, the world population has risen enormously and industrial

Lutz Engelke, Founder, CEO and Creative Director, Triad Berlin

production did accordingly: While in 2010, there were 700 million cars worldwide, the forecast for 2050 estimates 2-3 billion cars. If everyone of us used as much energy as the average US citizen, we would need eight planets. Moreover, since 1974, 50% of the polar ice caps have melted. For Lutz Engelke, all this shows that “nothing has changed, but a lot has changed“: While the infrastructure and our lifestyle have altered completely, the political framework seems to be static. We are aware of the problems, but this does not seem to affect our behaviour.


54

Making Global Change Visible

Lutz Engelke

D.NOTES He fears that instead of producing a political action plan, the design business mainly produces a new design bourgeoisie. This new creative class develops products for Starbucks and McDonald’s and enjoys to stay at nice hotels in New York and Beijing but leaves the important questions to others.

That is why for Engelke the biggest concern of our time is the question of how to translate our knowledge about economic, social, and environmental limits and crises into action and finally into the creation of a new, better system. More specifically, at the d.confestival Engelke asks: How can design become part of this global change and of a political discourse, that inspires and encourages us to change our behaviour? Design is the interface between different worlds of knowledge and could therefore have a crucial role in what Engelke calls “marketing for a consciousness change“. However, Engelke is sceptical about the interest of designers in assuming this role and developing strategies of change.

This is where Design Thinking comes in. For Engelke, Design Thinking is to rethink all kinds of relations, to rethink information and what is implicit and what explicit. Design, understood as a new form of participation, playing and thinking can become the key to an interdisciplinary future and part of the movement of a new global generation. To get there, design needs to be interlinked and volatile instead of isolated; transnational instead of local. Eventually, design should concern everyone since as Bruce Mau formulated: “Massive change is not about the world of design; it’s about the design of the world.“ With their work, designers should do what Engelke calls “marketing for a consciousness change“. Of course, there is no action plan that will lead to predictable outcomes. But, if everyone watches and listens attentively to the changing face of the world - and above all: acts accordingly - we can make a big leap forward to systemic and sustainable change. Written by Claire Luzia Leifert


D.NOTES


58

D.NOTES

CrADle-To-CrADle

“Please protect the environment, reduce your water consumption,“ “Please protect the environment, don’t drive your car that often,“ “Please protect the environment, reduce your energy bill.“

Michael Braungart, Founder and Scientific Director, ePeA

“i

magine a world in which we can actually be pleased about the benefits our consumption has on the environment“ - This is the promise that attracts people to Michael Braungart’s presentation in the d.circus. But today, Michael Braungart does not want to talk about “bloody boring sustainability“. Today, he wants to talk about innovation and quality. And about beauty. Traditionally, so Braungart, we make things, take things, and put them into landfills.

These are just three phrases we have learned from the environmental Movement. And we internalized their inherent logic that it is environmental protection if we destroy a little less. However, it is this logic of eco-efficiency, of being ‘less bad’ for the environment, which will be deconstructed and grimly fought with a mix of scientific facts and irony in the next 40 minutes: “You are not protecting [the environment], you are just destroying a little less. It is like I am telling you: ‘Please protect your child, please beat it only three times instead of five times.’“ According to Braungart, the environmental movement made us think the best would be if we were not here and that is why we feel so bad on this planet that we want to reduce

“Let’s re-invent all the things. But not from ‘less bad’ but from ‘supporting to be good’ because for ‘less bad’ we are far too many people on this planet.“ - Michael Braungart

our traces. The alternative paradigm is eco-effectiveness or cradle-tocradle, meaning that we become beneficial instead of ‘less bad’ for the environment, with all-encompassing quality and usefulness as the overall goals to be strived for. For cradle-to-cradle, it is moreover important to distinguish between two different cycles, the biological and the technical cycle. There are materials, like copper, which are extremely toxic in the biological cycle, but

extremely valuable and reusable in the technical cycle. The two approaches are illustrated using the example of the diaper: A baby needs 5000 diapers per year. Ambassadors of eco-efficiency would want to reduce them to 4000. But this is irrelevant, it will be compensated in China within a second. exponents of eco-effectiveness, in turn, would change the materials of a diaper into something which is bio-degradable, so that perspectively one diaper can grow 150 trees “and


60

Cradle-to-Cradle

“We want to be good for economy, we want to be good for society, but when it comes to environment, the highest goal is not to exist. Instead of being beneffiical. The other species are beneffiical for the world, we are ‘less bad’. Where is our positive footprint?“ - Michael Braungart the baby can be carbon positive from the beginning“. In the city of Berlin, 20% of the municipal waste stream are diapers, so this could become a big forestation project. But for now, people talk about ‘low carbon’ and ‘carbon neutral’ and Berlin wants to be carbon neutral in 2040. However, 95% of all the materials which we need, need carbon. You can only be carbon neutral if you do not exist. That is why Braungart calls for the end of the “blaming and shaming period“. Instead of only talking about avoiding, reducing, minimizing, with cradle-to-cradle we can now set positive goals and we can even make money with them: As the diaper example shows, the

more of my eco-effective products will be bought, the faster we will reach our environmental goals. Next to many new materials developed by EPEA in cooperation with several companies around the world, there are 100 million euro now and a whole support program for cradle-tocradle projects funded by the European Union. There also is a Cradleto-Cradle Day in California, every 9th of June. Hence, Michael Braungart, the self-proclaimed “material boy among the designers“, has initiated at the very least a ‘friendly Tsunami’, if not a real paradigm change, with his invention of the cradle-to-cradle design approach. Written by Claire Luzia Leifert

Michael Braungart

D.NOTES


62

Design Thinking the Future One big family – different futures

Members of the d.confestival´s Steering Team

“D

on’t be too religious about Design Thinking in its current form,” said Arne van Oosterom (DesignThinkers.nl) at the brilliant closing note on the d.confestival’s last day, where members of the steering committee, guest speakers, and all the other participants were invited to talk about the future of Design Thinking.

“Design Thinking is rather an innovator-centered approach: People ffiirst, methodology second!” - George Kembel

The discussion turned out to be as diverse and lively as the whole d.confestival itself, with reactions in the auditorium and the panel ranging from highly emotional to hardheaded. Apart from »the methodology’s« obvious advantages and the commonly felt need to further diffuse a Design Thinking attitude to as many people and organizations as possible, a variety of interesting themes emerged which may really have a profound impact on its evolution. Many participants, for example, had

D.NOTES


64

DeSign THinking THe FuTure one Big FAMilY – DiFFerenT FuTureS

Members of the d.confestival Steering Team

D.NOTES

“We have to bring design thinking out to the people!” - Participant

the impression that there were only a few visible attendees from the service design community, or voices from the business model innovation discourse. How can this be? Why do these communities, who seem to have so much in common, still seem so disconnected?

innovate how innovators connect!” This was just one of many examples of the wonderful dynamic that accompanied the whole d.confestival. in only three days, as many new design challenges have been discovered as could fill the slots of all future d.confestivals.

moving forward. So, make! Do! learn!” Design Thinking means being innovative about applying the process your own, and Design Thinking is a process that should perpetually be adapted to the context it is being applied in. This ultimately means it will have many futures, not just one.

The desire for greater connectivity with other interest groups also brought forward the question of how to better integrate the many various networks of Design Thinkers, or as Eku Wand (Braunschweig University of Art) put it: “I’m just overwhelmed. Shall I use LinkedIn, SDN, DTN or Facebook? We need one international network!” “Ok, then the challenge is set,” said Bettina von Stamm (LSE), “let’s

There was a consensus to continue bringing the »d.spirit« to as many people as possible, keeping in mind that creative confidence is only possible if no line is drawn between »Design Thinkers« and »other« people.

That’s why the greatest consensus was reached by not viewing it as a methodology with ‘fixed rules’, but as a mindset, which requires fewer and fewer rules, and more and more empowerment. or as Bernie roth and george kembel put it, over and over: “People first, methodology second. if you don’t change it, it is already dead!”

george kembel (d.school Stanford) stated, “We are still students. We can meet, we can have great conferences! But the best you can do is just keep

Written by by Jan Schmiedgen


MANAGEMENT PRESENTATIONs


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MANAGEMENT

„We had no idea what we were doing, but decided to just see“ - Katharina Berger

Banking & Finance DekaBank, Deutsche Bank, PostFinance, Zürcher kantonalbank

Volkmar Weckesser, ciO, DekaBank

Katharina Berger, Head of Design Thinking, Deutsche Bank

Ralf Stüber, Head of Business Development for Business customers, PostFinance

Peter Schliephake, Head Supply Management Ressources, Head Design Thinking, Zürcher kantonalbank

i

n the d.circus, a group mostly comprised of people working in corporate environments has gathered to hear presentations and a panel discussion of four representatives of the banking and finance industries from germany and Switzerland. The presentations begin with Volkmar Weckesser, CIO of DekaBank, who briefly presents his company and then light-heartedly describes the difficulties in integrating Design Thinking into daily life of a bank,

where processes and change are highly regimented, often out of necessity, with people who have lived intensely in a world of rules and regulations. Mr. Weckesser approached the School of Design Thinking for help with a sales problem after the initial financial crisis: How to better understand customer interaction and explain the bank’s products. Katharina Berger, Head of Design Thinking at Deutsche Bank, collaborated with the University of St. gallen


70

Banking & Finance

DekaBank, Deutsche Bank, PostFinance, Zürcher Kantonalbank

MANAGEMENT

“Everyone has risk managers. Nobody has opportunity managers.” - Ralf Stüber in 2008 to professionalize the bank’s process of innovation, and to improve client interaction. With coaches from the US, she then set up an embedded Design Thinking lab within Deutsche Bank. Ms. Berger says they “had no idea what we were doing, but decided to just see,“ which seems to have been a wise investment for the bank, which is at the fore of innovative client interaction with a service center (Q110 in Berlin-Mitte) and sleeker tools for customers and employees. Interestingly, adopting a pillar of the Design Thinking process – going to the customer to observe and ask questions – is seen as revolutionary in this industry. Head of Business Development for Business Customers at PostFinance Ralf Stüber says “Everyone has risk managers. Nobody has opportunity managers.“ Mr. Stüber was drawn to Design Thinking because his company faced some new challenges: new competitors, new communications, and new technology. PostFinance sent four teams of bankers to a Design Thinking workshop, where

they experienced such a contrast to their daily experiences in Switzerland that it was like “brain squeezing.“ Fortunately, this sensation was accompanied by a happy exhaustion, and 60% of the participants reported applying Design Thinking when they returned to work to make positive change. However, Mr. Stüber warns, banks want results. Change can be a challenge. Peter Schliephake, Head of Supply Management Resources and Head of

Design Thinking at Zürcher Kantonalbank, is a big supporter of Design Thinking, not least because he believes in learning by doing, which he thinks to be a much more effective means of learning generally. In today’s world of product complexity and digital industry and commerce, Mr. Schliephake recognizes that relationship management is a major challenge, but one he believes can be addressed by Design Thinking. Written by Sirje Müller-Viise


72

MANAGEMENT


74

TelecOMMUnicaTiOnS

Deutsche Telekom, Swisscom, Telefonica

MANAGEMENT

“If you want to promote innovation, I recommend space as a catalyst.” - Lars Stalling

Raimund Schmolze, Vice President Research & innovation, Head of creation center, Deutsche Telekom innovation laboratories

Andreas Erbe, Senior experience Design coach, Swisscom

Lars Stalling, innovating Services and Digital experiences

T

he way people communicate with each other has undergone significant changes in the last decade. Mobile phones have become our everyday companions, and telecommunication companies have to think about what communication in the future might be like. Raimund Schmolze, Lars Stalling and Andreas Erbe came together to present the use of Design Thinking within their companies and illustrate how their approach could change the

future of the whole industry. Before the creation center of Deutsche Telekom was established, Raimund Schmolze said at the beginning of his presentation, the company’s headquarter was characterized by a dark, conservative, structured working environment. Today, the creation center, also referred to as “Post-It Center,“ sets new standards for Deutsche Telekom. Schmolze, who is head of the creation center, is convinced that the colorful and vivid working space helped to bring


76

TelecOMMUnicaTiOnS

innovation to the company sustainably. There, using toys and crafting materials that might just as easily be found in a kindergarten, new product prototypes are built. Very close to the customer, the center comes up with state-of-the-art ideas. One example: 101 etiquettes, how to behave in the digital world – a webpage for digital natives and immigrants. Lars Stalling, who works in the “emerging Business Unit“ of Telefónica in Barcelona, also mentioned the challenge of implementing Design Thinking into a large, wellestablished company like Telefónica. For him, it is not so much the methodology, but the spirit of Design Thinking that triggers the creative engine of his company. again, Stalling emphasized the importance of space and flexibility in order to innovate.

Deutsche Telekom, Swisscom, Telefonica

Andreas Erbe, experience Design coach of Swisscom, showed how important Design Thinking is for their work by giving examples of products they launched pre-Design Thinking – which proved to be “magnificent failures.“ like this one: customer surveys indicated that people wished for a device to write text messages via a fixed line network. But what Swisscom ultimately created, an “ugly blackberry,“ was not exactly what users actually wanted. eventually, Swisscom approached iDeO to learn about Design Thinking, and later implemented some of their ideas, e.g. creating separated spaces, and methods like storytelling or customer journey maps. customer-oriented innovation is what they want to achieve. The speakers agreed on one central point concerning the use of Design Thinking: Space, space and once again space is what you need to come up with out-of-the-box solutions. Written by Theo Gerstenmaier

MANAGEMENT

“Swisscom with Design Thinking: It works! But it took us 4 years to do it.“ - Andreas Erbe

“We make Deutsche Telekom jump into the real world.“ - Raimund Schmolze


78

MOBiliTY

T

he future of mobility will be much more than just bringing people from a to B. There will be a lot of changes driven by the need for sustainability and technological and psychological improvements. Representatives of two of the biggest mobility companies in germany, Sabine Groeben from Deutsche Bahn and Marcel Plaum from Fraport, shared their experiences in using Design Thinking to define their way to the future. Both see themselves as “beginners in Design Thinking,” but when they explained how they already use the method in their companies and what kind of perspectives they see for the future, it was clear they are not beginners.

“Why not grasping information directly from customers during their waiting time?” - Suggestion from audience

MANAGEMENT

Deutsche Bahn, Fraport

The way each company started to use Design Thinking was different. Deutsche Bahn was motivated to change something in its company culture when it learned that those employees in closest contact with the customers’ needs don´t have the feeling that management is interested in their ideas. in response, they sent a “dream team” of Deutsche Bahn employees to the D-School in Potsdam, where they made great experiences working as a colourful multidisciplinary team, opening up new perspectives and building amazing prototypes especially for direct customer contact.

“The kind of research we are doing always has a lack of empathy.” - Sabine Groeben Fraport, on the other hand, set up a challenge for a D-School student team together with a few partner companies. in their first Design Thinking project, Fraport addressed the topic of security, which is one of the biggest aspects to consider when designing future airports. Designing for security affects changes in usage of space, which is also influenced by technological improvements or non-aviation services. Besides the technical aspects, Marcel Plaum sees the question of how to create an atmosphere and special passenger experiences as one of the biggest challenges for designing future airports. Both Sabine Groeben and Marcel Plaum deal with the challenge of how to bring Design Thinking “back to their company”. With their many questions, the audience seemed particularly interested in how to overcome similar obstacles themselves, and how it might be possible to use Design Thinking in a broader approach, including customers in the process. even though they haven’t

found the perfect solution yet, both Sabine Groeben and Marcel Plaum have already had successes with Design Thinking and see their companies on the right track. They are convinced that Design Thinking works to create a future of mobility. Written by Cleo Schmid

Sabine Groeben, Head of Department, DB Mobility logistics, DB Training

Marcel Plaum, Senior executive Manager, Fraport


MANAGEMENT


82

C

“We are using Design Thinking to bring customers into our central mindset.” - Michael Meyer

MANAGEMENT

Charité, Janssen-Cilag, SAP, Siemens

Health

an Design Thinking bring innovation to products, services or processes in the health industry? Can it contribute to higher living standards and even lead to an improved well-being of people? Four men with expertises in different fields of health care presented their parallels with Design Thinking and how they assess its future impact. Georg Duda is the director of the Julius Wolf Institute at the Charité in Berlin and a studied engineer. His stated goal is to bring people faster on to their feet. In the BerlinBrandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies (BCRT), one of Duda’s

working places, people try to come up with solutions that aim towards this exact purpose. With innovative therapies, like stem cell transplantation, they already achieved major successes. In order to get to this point, Duda mentioned during his presentation, experts from many fields (e.g. biologists, medical doctors, engineers) were needed. As Design Thinking also uses this approach, it seemed worthy for him to explore it further. He sent a group of PHDs to the HPI to learn about Design Thinking. They were immediately fascinated and are now ambitious to bring the concept into real life sciences.

“Design Thinking as one very innovative idea to further innovation.” - Marcus Stüttgen

Marcus Stüttgen works for JannsenCilag, a pharmaceutical enterprise, in the area of innovation. As they did not only want to produce medication, but also deliver services to the customer, their vision shifted from a classical pharmaceutical to a comprehensive healthcare company. They therefore needed to become more customer-oriented. Together with the HPI D-School in Potsdam they worked on the task of how to help cancer patients and hence, came up with a wide spectrum of innovative ideas. Now, the management of JanssenCilag now even wants to build a D-School for the company. Also Peter Langkafel, medical doctor and employee at SAP, said he is convinced that Design Thinking is a useful way for a better customer understanding and interaction. The ”Aha”-effect he experienced when using Design Thinking for the first time is a great benefit to work in diverse, multi-disciplinary teams. The last speaker was Michael Meyer, who works at Siemens, stated that Siemens Healthcare had turned into a real believer in D-Thinking. They first got in contact with this way of thinking when 30 of the most important decision makers of Siemens came together in Munich and got an introduction into Design Thinking by D-School director Ulrich Weinberg. In contrast to typical business presentations and expert panels, they were shown how to collaboratively solve

business problems with innovative tools. Enthusiastic feedback from the participants supported Meyer’s opinion that Design Thinking was the right methodology to implement into the innovation process of Siemens. Although the speakers’ credos for Design Thinking in their companies and in health care in general were positive, they addressed one major issue: The top management has to be engaged into the whole topic. Otherwise Design Thinking cannot bring its full potential. Written by Theo Gerstenmaier

Georg Duda, Professor, Director Julius Wolff Institute, Charité

Marcus Stüttgen, Director New Business Development & Vaccines, Janssen-Cilag

Peter Langkafel, Industry Director Healthcare EMEA, SAP

Michael Meyer, Vice President, Clinical Products and Business Development Strategy Germany, Siemens


84

Retail & logistics

T

he discussion on “Retail & Logistics” was moderated by Fritz Lietsch and revolved around the question “How can companies in the retail and logistic sector optimize processes and develop new retail strategies?” Frank Rehme, Head of Innovation Services at Metro, shared his experience with the audience on how Metro tackled the issue with Design Thinking. Starting in 2008, Rehme cooperated with the D-School several times to get a better understanding of what Metro customers’ needs actually are. Building onto the idea of a D-School project, Metro launched a pick-upstation in Hannover that takes into account the busy and demanding lifestyle of the modern grocery shopper. Admitting that it takes some time to implement innovative ideas in big companies Rehme said that timing is a crucial strategy when introducing a new concept into the market. “Design Thinking ideas are ahead of their time” Rehme stated, and indicates the importance of knowing whether or not the market is ready to receive the product or service. Martin Wegner, VP at the Research & Innovation Department at DHL, told the audience about his goal to create a culture of innovation at DHL.

MANAGEMENT

Metro, DHL, Gravis

To do so, the Innovation Centre at DHL was established serving not only as a showroom for best practices, but also as a facilitator for innovative ideas. So far ten design challenges have, both on national and international level, brought together DHL employees, D-School students and the Design Thinking agency Dark Horse. Finally, Archibald Horlitz, founder of the retail chain Gravis, admitted that he had not been involved in any Design Thinking activities thus far. However, over the course of the discussion it became clear that Gravis has already developed their very own innovation management strategy. While avoiding hierarchies, Gravis regularly organises off-site events and workshops to actively encourage employees to think further. In contrast to Frank Rehme, Horlitz said that he did not mind being ahead of time with new ideas. Given the increased speed of the market, Horlitz said that they have to reinvent the company every year. All speakers in the round agreed that the main driving forces for innovative change come from understanding the needs and wishes of the customers, and knowing when a strategy should be undertaken as a company to guarantee success. Written by Nurith Mörsberger

“We have to reinvent the company every year.” - Archibald Horlitz

Archibald Horlitz, Founder and CEO, GRAVIS

Frank Rehme, Head of Innovation Services, Metro

Martin Wegner, VP Solutions and Innovation, DHL


LEARNING PRESENTATIONs


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eLeMenTarY sChOOL

esBZ Berlin, K12 Lab d.school stanford, we school Khajuraho

LEARNING

“We have an action problem in the world: We have to learn to act, not only to acquire knowledge.“

- Margret Rasfeld

Margret Rasfeld, Director, evangelische schule Berlin Zentrum Adam Royalty, K12 Lab, d.school stanford Ulrike Reinhard, founder, We school Khajuraho Matteo Vignoli, The reggio approach

in the panel on elementary schools, four experienced educators from four different countries discussed their use of Design Thinking in elementary schools. Margret Rasfeld, principal of the ev. schule Berlin-Zentrum (esBZ), presented her school’s ambitious goal to change the national educational system by being a model for a new learning paradigm, teaching students

in diverse teams across age groups and learning abilities. Kids at esBZ learn how to live according to a spirit of collaboration instead of competition by taking up small tasks for the school community, by helping each other, and by discussing important issues during weekly assemblies. The real world is a gigantic classroom where the students take up social tasks or organize international outdoor trips.


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eLeMenTarY sChOOL

“We transform lessons into a learning experience – learning in life“ - Margret Rasfeld

esBZ Berlin, K12 Lab d.school stanford, we school Khajuraho

research has shown that while analytic confidence rises with age, creative confidence decreases. K-12 Lab, presented by Adam Royalty, builds up kids’ creative and analytic confidence with the help of Design Thinking, especially via their successful teacher training program, based on two pillars: “Teachers are natural Designers” empowers teachers to see themselves as designers of learning experiences; “Design empowers students” is about developing high motivation through design. in the future, more stakeholders will be included in the program. Ulrike Reinhard related the story of how Design Thinking can play a role in founding a school, as with her project We sChOOL in Khajuraho, india, co-designed with and tailored to the needs of the local rural community. The process includes setting up an educational computer system for the kids, and a workshop to design the school uniforms in cooperation

LEARNING

with the Kalkutta fashion Design school. The Reggio Approach (RA) is a wellknown educational approach used in kindergartens around the world. Matteo Vignoli from the university of Modena researches the adaptation of ra to high school and university contexts. ra educators believe that all children have innate strengths and abilities that should be fostered through artistic activities and kinesthetic, physical learning. Their teachers, in turn, become ethnographers of the creative development of the children, closely observing them in order to design relevant, tailored learning plans. The motto of the d.confestival - Design Thinking the future – was amply illustrated in these vivid examples of how schools of the future could be designed now. Written by Claire Luzia Leifert


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D.sChOOL

LEARNING

Beijing, Paris, Potsdam, stanford, Tokyo

therefore i am” has to be shaped into a more open-minded thinking.

s

ince the whole d.confestival is a celebration of D-school spirit spreading around the world, it is natural to have different institutions from different countries present their different approaches. Moderated by Uli Weinberg and Fritz Lietsch, representatives of five different institutions sit together to tell their stories. Bernie Roth, Academic Director of the d.school at Stanford, explains the overall aim of the d.school effort: “We wanted to include everyone in the university,” he said. Out of this multidisciplinary approach, a great energy evolves, which, according to him, is the most important thing in Design Thinking. The other panelists show their agreement to this statement by introducing the audience to their concepts. Véronique Hillen, Director of d.thinking Paris, emphasizes the cultural differences between California and france. her main challenge is to help the french students to get rid of their typical attitude: “i criticize,

To Claudia Nicolai, Program Director of the D-School in Potsdam, Design Thinking is like a “subculture” that is now spreading around the world. she also emphasizes the high energy in D- school classes that helps students follow their hearts in order to become innovators. Fumiko Ichikava, Assistant Director of the University of Tokyo, explains the concept of the i.school. This school’s goal is to give “the dream of what technology accomplishes” back to its students. especially after the great earthquake and tsunami of 2011 in Japan, it is a very important goal to help inspire people to create meaningful innovation. finally, Song Ge from CUC Beijing lays out the plans of what will hopefully become the D-school Beijing. When the panel is opened up for questions from the audience, many of them focus on the aspect of cultural differences. One question is “how to establish a D-school at a university in any other country?” in answer to that question Véronique Hillen lays out her simple master plan. Written by Moritz Gekeler

“Start doing Design Thinking under the radar, so none of the officials see it. Find believers in companies. Have real projects to show. And, finally, find money to fund the whole thing.” - Véronique Hillen.

Ulrich Weinberg, Director, hPi D-school, Potsdam

Claudia Nicolai, Program Director, hPi D-school, Potsdam

Huang Xinyuan/Song Ge, Dean of school of animation and Digital arts (CuC), Beijing

George Kembel, Co-founder and executive Director, d.school, stanford university

Fumiko Ichikawa, assistant Director, university of Tokyo

Véronique Hillen, Director, Director d.thinking Paris, ecole des Ponts Paris Tech


LEARNING


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LEARNING

uniVersiTY Nader Nada,

istanbul, Koblenz, Moscow, Porto, singapur, st. Gallen

Professor, Master Program in innovation and entrepreneurship, fatih university, istanbul

Harald von Kortzfleisch, Professor, university of Koblenz-Landau

Anna Ploskonos, Design Thinking Lab, Moscow

Katja Tschimmel, adjunct Professor, esaD, Porto, Portugal

Stuart Smith, Deputy Chief, service innovation, institute of systems science, national university of singapore

Walter Brenner, Professor and executive Director, institute of information Management, university of st. Gallen

T

he most diverse and international event at the d.confestival was probably the “university“ presentation on friday morning, with six speakers from six different countries presenting their Design Thinking activities: Nader Nada, Chair of the Master program in Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the Fatih University in Istanbul, started the presentation by talking about his inspiring home country. “Turkey is aiming to become

one of the top ten economic centres of the world (...) and the vibrant city of istanbul is a cultural hot spot!” Harald von Kortzfleisch, Professor at the University of Koblenz-Landau, was next on stage. he pointed out the connection between Design Thinking and entrepreneurship which his university emphasises in its curriculum. “Design Thinking is missing implementation, which is why we try to add business components like the Business Model Canvas into our Design Thinking process.“


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uniVersiTY

“Design Thinking is not one method or one Tool. Instead, it is a mindset that is affected by its context and surrounding.” - Stuart Smith The next speaker was a former d.school student. Anna Ploskonos studied in stanford in 2007 and is now part of the Design Thinking Lab in Moscow. she reported on the challenge of implementing Design Thinking in russia. “Measure seven times, cut once“ is a russian proverb, which reflects the tendency of russians to be accurate and correct as opposed to open for failure. next onstage was Katja Tschimmel, Professor at ESAD in Porto, one of the best art and design schools in Portugal. she talked about esaD’s approach of using Design Thinking as an innovation method. “We use our E-model which consists of four phases: Empathy, Experimentation, Elaboration and Exit.“

istanbul, Koblenz, Moscow, Porto, singapore, st. Gallen

Stuart Smith was next. He is the Deputy Chief at the Institute of Systems Science at the National University of Singapore and said that collaboration between students is rather difficult. “Teaching in singapore is one-way communication, which is not much like Design Thinking.“ The last speaker was Walter Brenner, professor at the Institute of Information Management at the University of St. Gallen. he fell in love with Design Thinking when he visited stanford eight years ago and has been implementing Design Thinking into the business studies at the university of st. Gallen since then. after six speakers talked about the same topic - how they use and teach Design Thinking - one thing was clear: Design Thinking is not ONE method or ONE Tool. Instead, it is a mindset that is affected by its context and surrounding. it might be a designer or an engineer from switzerland or istanbul, it might be a first-semester student or a profes-

sional. When doing and teaching Design Thinking, these factors must be taken into consideration! Or as stuart smith from singapore brought it to the point: “Who thinks the western way of innovating is the way to innovate... that is bullshit!“. Written by Johannes Seibel

LEARNING


100 h

PrOfessiOnaL TraininG

Dark horse, d.school stanford, gravity, hPi academy

LEARNING

ow can established professionals learn to use Design Thinking?

“You can’t talk your CEO into innovation, you have to inspire him.”

This question, which occupies the minds of many Design Thinking coaches and consultants, was at the center of the panel on Professional Training. four experienced Design Thinking educators presented challenges and recipes for success from their daily work. initially, every course at the d.school Stanford’s executive education program was tailor-made for each company. Today, George Kembel says, the d.school offers executive trainings for professionals from many different companies from around the country. Curriculum is built on past trainings, including warm-ups to introduce a common language of Design Thinking, mini lectures and demonstrations, and sessions for peer and alumni advising and feedback. Judith Hufnagel from the strategic design agency gravity starts her work for every company with the question “What do they want to learn from us?” she breaks down her experience from some years of Design Thinking trainings with companies into three points: first, clients want help bringing common sense back into their organization. second, they want to calculate the

- George Kembel human factor back into all the facts and numbers that usually ground their decisions. Third, they understand that they should not try to make reality fit their projects, but accept reality as the basis for their decisions. all in all, Design Thinking brings to them a different quality of information. Gravity’s preferred methods for executive trainings are immersion and role-playing, putting clients in their customer’s shoes. The interdisciplinary innovation consultancy Dark Horse is a start-up of hPi D-school Potsdam alumni who wanted to keep working on Design Thinking projects. Today, Dark horse sells good workspace designs. Sascha Wolff from Dark horse says they succeeded despite doing “everything wrong” according to the business

books: They founded a company with thirty friends and only invested 50% of their time, working on other projects on the side. The audience posed many practical questions obviously motivated from their own experiences, especially in convincing a company to adopt Design Thinking. The panel suggested getting at least one cheerleader for Design Thinking from within, organizing management workshops, and, if possible, creating specific physical spaces for Design Thinking. Or, by using “guerilla warfare,” the Design Thinking can be applied but without calling it Design Thinking. This builds up curiosity and paves the way for further engagement. Written by Claire Luzia

Timm Krohn, Managing Director, hPi academy

George Kembel, Co-founder and executive Director, d.school, stanford university

Sascha Wolff, Co-founder, Dark horse

Judith Hufnagel, Partner, gravity


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LEARNING

“The department is the neighbourhood, the team the community; In other words Find good people and help them do what they do best.” - Erik Spiekermann

The future is in Beta Erik Spiekermann, Creative Director, Managing Partner, EdenSpiekermann

F

inding a seat was difficult in lecture room one for those who wanted to hear what Erik Spiekermann, managing partner of EdenSpiekermann had to say about the future. Spiekermann opens his presentation on the scary topic of the future with an apology for being rude by starting on time – after all not everybody is German. Also he mentions that he swears quite a bit when speaking English. So why is this 60+ year old worrying about the future instead of collecting stamps or tasting wines in the South of France?

Well, after 40 years of running design studios everything needs to be reinvented. The world has changed: Speed and depth go hand in hand; cooperation doesn’t mean consensus; the generation of ideas doesn’t equal the selection and most importantly (and difficult for law abiding Germans) failure is part of the process. This he describes as a paradigm shift, a “Kulturwandel” from corporate to social, meaning a shift from a hierarchical, structured world of restricted knowledge, gradually leading to products – to a social and spontaneous environment where sharing amongst equals results in a real time creation of services.


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LEARNING

The Future is in Beta

“We don’t need leaders, but moderators. We don’t need motivation, but inspiration” - Erik Spiekermann

What he has noticed is that “we’ve been moving towards Design Thinking and doing Service Design for forever” – Now it just has a name (and is billable). Spiekermann’s area of expertise (besides graduating in history) lies in brand design as well as digital products and services. Service Design has always been a part of these, now it has its own distinction. Introducing the “Rundbüro” he shows us his dream of the ideal agency. Centered around the coffee and the copy machines it’s a highly collaborative working space in which I would like to be working too. Unfortunately Berlin doesn’t offer the kind of building required for the Rundbüro, but Spiekerman did a great job of implementing his ideas in the space EdenSpiekermann did find … It’s just not as round. This rings true of Design Thinking, even more so as he describes the “agile design process” with tools such as GIT and the scrum method used by the team members on a project and how they include users from the beginning of development. And this isn’t all just for clients at EdenSpiekermann. They eat their own dog food, for instance in the development of the homepage in a pizza fueled 36 hour run.

When it comes to clients Spiekermann implores on keeping the deliverables lean, light and desirable and rounds off the presentation with a reminder that collaboration isn’t just between designers and developers but also with the client, by showing us the Spiekermann rules clients agree too. 1. We work for your customers. We may have to take their side at times. 2. Challenge us. Complacency is the enemy of great work. 3. We don’t give answers. Unless we can explore your questions. 4. We are not suppliers. Partnership gets the best results. 5. Talk to us. We thrive on feedback. 6. Trust us. You hired us because we can do something you cannot do. 7. Pay us. Our work adds to your bottom line, so invest in our future. Oh yes this was Spiekermann’s personal opinion, his lawyers advised him to mention that! Written By Joe Murphy


RESEARCH PRESENTATIONs


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RESEARCH

“The goal must be to build frame creation ability into organisations! In the end one can view companies as a series of frames: Frames for resilience.” - Kees Dorst

Frame

Creation Kees Dorst, Professor, University of Technology, Sydney

I

n his research, Kees Dorst found that design-like approaches and practices to problem-solving are especially powerful in situations where a problem ‘owner’ succumbs to the ‘tried anything phenomenon’ which was already mentioned by SAP’s Design Thinking veteran Hanswerner Dreissigacker at the beginning of the d.confestival. In a worst case, problems can’t be owned, and they are open, highly complex, dynamic and networked – in

short ‘wicked’. It makes sense in these cases to use design practices to search for a solution. This, he explains, has to do with the fact that problems can never be solved in the contexts in which they arose. Experienced designers aren’t interested in unhesitatingly solving problems, per se. Instead, they ask themselves how new contexts and frames may help in approaching issues from another perspective. Based on these observations of expert design procedure, Kees Dorst found nine distinct but

overlapping phases, which he put up for discussion: Archeology - paradox - context - problem arena - themes - frames - futures - transformation connections. He explains how the methodologies at each of these stages can be used successfully by presenting some insightful real-world examples. His ‘Designing out Crime’ program is an especially interesting example of how frame creation may shift perspective and even the problem


112

Kees Dorst, Professor, University of Technology, Sydney

Frame CReATION

RESEARCH

“Expert designers rarely brainstorm. But they intuitively know whether a frame leads to - Kees Dorst ‘something’.” “Frames are new approaches to issues.” - Kees Dorst owner: responsibility for ‘crime’ (public urination, young people fighting due to the overcrowded streets, drug and alcohol abuse, etc.) in Sydney’s entertainment and nightlife district Kings Cross once belonged to city police, but now is the responsibility of the city council. Why? Because the issues to solve weren’t really related to ‘crime’. Once the new frame of ‘organizing a music festival’ was applied to the problem, most of the ‘criminal incidents’ suddenly disappeared...

Written by Jan Schmiedgen

“If a mechanism for evaluation is coming from an old context, you kill ideas in brainstorming.” - Kees Dorst


114

WHY DeSIGn? WHY noW?

Patrick Whitney, Professor and Dean, Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology

what holistic design is meant to be. He explains this ‘typical design underestimation trap’ using an analysis-synthesis bridge model to illustrate HP’s process: analysis of the current situation and the competitive space, followed by the immediate creation of a solution.

o

ver the last years, a lot has been written and spoken about the importance of design. At the d.confestival, a major highlight is hearing about design’s future from the perspective of the dean of an institute that has one of the longest traditions in teaching and preaching Design Thinking: Patrick Whitney from the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology. right from the beginning of his presentation, mr. Whitney provokes a lot of amusement in the audience by showing Ceo of Hewlett Packard meg Whitman’s apparent understanding of ‘design’: Pretty Apple-lookalike hardware with nice features, merely competing on the surface level of

“What HP misses here” he says “is the abstraction of the design problem.” The most integral part of the design process is reframing the problem, and thereby moving innovation processes into the abstract realm of identifying patterns and generating alternative options. This, he continues, is what Apple did when it prepared itself for disrupting the music industry. Apple was quite late to the mP3 scene, but it didn’t just try to build a better, feature-rich player. Instead, it asked: what is it that people really want and what do they really do with this new technology? The problem was reframed as a question “How might we change the way how people experience music?” The rest of the story is history.

RESEARCH

“Companies now know how to build anything, but they don’t know what to build.” - Patrick Whitney Apple’s initial thoughtfulness and willingness to experiment with iTunes (which came out even before the iPod) laid the groundwork for its later platform strategy and its resilient ecosystem, which so far has not been attacked, let alone copied. For mr. Whitney, the real power of design is therefore manifest in the process of rejecting and reframing initial problem definitions. This, he concludes, leads to better decisions and less wasting of energy in organizations that are in the need of innovation. or, as he puts it: “We [are moving] from an economy of scale to an economy of choice. […] Companies may now know how to build anything, but all too often they don’t know what to build.” Written by Jan Schmiedgen


RESEARCH


118

eXPerIenCe VALUeS AnD SerVICe DeSIGn

Yong Se Kim, Professor and Director, Creative, Design Institute, Sungkyunkwan University

“Ideally, in PSS, service issues should be dominant rather than product issues. The key in PSS design would be designing activities of various stakeholders considering interaction with other stakeholders as well as products.”

service-dominant logic, known as SDlogic) should guide every design process, claims Yong Se Kim. People are first – people and their subjective, context-dependent experiences!

- Yong Se Kim

P

roduct Service Systems (PSS) are nothing new – they have existed in a wide variety ever since we could think. However, the focus of design has historically often been on the product, with a mere attachment to service. Today, this is probably a bad idea, as the sheer mass of available options and product attributes alone practically guarantees a lack of differentiation. “But that is not all”, says Yong Se Kim, Director of the Creative Design Institute and Professor of mechanical engineering at Sungkyunkwan University, Korea. ”What is even more important to consider is the perceived value for the customer!” In today’s development of PSS, a human values-focused service mindset (or

To show participants what that means, exactly, he introduces his e3 value concept, which covers three main types of value: Economical, Ecological and Experience. experience has been paid to particularly little regard in the past.

RESEARCH

a ‘clothing donation’ experience in Korea: nowadays, rather unaesthetic donation containers are usually placed on dark side roads. That’s why, especially during evening hours, women approaching the containers alone might worry about their safety when donating clothing. In order to improve and promote the value of the experience for clothing donors, the location context for the activity has to change.

A design researcher through and through, Yong Se Kim theoretically breaks this concept down into sub-categories (extrinsic value with functional and extrinsic social value as well as intrinsic value with emotional, intrinsic social and epistemic value) and then further elucidates its function with context-based activity modeling. next, he gives further illustrative examples in how far the alteration of ‘mere’ experience value can radically change the success of a PSS.

Therefore, popular franchise convenience stores have been chosen as the perfect new donation environment. Donation box models have been improved, and now also cleverly feature many elements of co-creation (pre-washing at home, self-labeling, etc.). The new, safe environment provides the perfect location context for the box, for the user and not least of all for the shop owners. It is a perfect example of systemic activity design for and with various stakeholders that focuses on the experience, but creates value on all levels.

one of many service design cases he presents is the improvement of

Written by Jan Schmiedgen


120

rick Schuhmann, Program manager and Senior Lecturer, massachusetts Institute of Technology (mIT)

DeFInInG »DeSIGnerSHIP«

‘world leader of environmental pollution’, a doping sportsman or even a criminal citizen locked up in prison. once one adds the little suffix ‘–ship’, however, things look totally different. Sportsmanship stands for ethical and exemplary behavior and practice. Leadership is usually associated with skill, integrity, responsibility, determination and many other traits with positive connotations.

W

hat constitutes a ‘good’ designer? And what do citizens, sportsmen and leaders have in common with good designers? These were just few of the questions Rick Schuhmann, Program manager and Senior Lecturer at the massachusetts Institute of Technology, posed to the initially perplexed auditorium. But it soon became clear where the philosophical discourse that he and his colleagues have been wrestling with for 15 years was headed: The personal responsibility and awareness of the designer. But let’s start at the beginning: According to rick Schuhmann, being a leader, sportsman or citizen doesn’t imply ethical and moral standards. one can be the

If we apply the same principle to design – ergo designership – will we have to assess the positive value of design differently? Apple may be conceived as a design leader, but it is also a leader in planned obsolescence. Is this good designership? And what does designership mean, anyway?

“Design is driven by the user – but in the end also by who the designer is!” - Rick Schuhmann

In his search for ideas and characteristics that might describe designership, rick Schuhmann looked into the world views of many different experts, including Dieter Rams and his famous ten principles of a good designer. These principles were the foundation of a lively open-ended discussion with d.confestival participants. There was broad agreement that designers act as change agents that move the world into new direc-

tions, cast consciously or unconsciously in a leadership role whether they like it or not. Such leadership carries with it responsibility for people and their surroundings. Therefore, designership includes not only the designing of products and systems with a purpose, but also the act of doing so with the least possible negative impact on our environment. most of the attendees sympathized with the basic idea of designership as a striving for value-creating solu-

RESEARCH

tions that have a positive impact on society and the world. one participant put it very well by saying “It is about looking into the future and caring. We need more leadership and more designership.” So it is up to every designer individually (as it is up to every leader) to take it upon him or herself to follow the principles that a little suffix carries with it. Written by Jan Schmiedgen


RESEARCH


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Thomas Beyhl , Hasso-Plattner-Institut Svenja Bickert, University of London Bettina Bruder, University of New South Wales Lutz Gericke, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Raja Gumienny, Hasso-Plattner-Institut

RESEARCH

Design Thinking Research

Grace Hawthorne, d.school Stanford University Alexander Luebbe, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Christoph Meinel, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Holger Rhinow, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Adam Royalty, d.school Stanford University Christine Schnaithmann, HU Berlin Bastian Steinert, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Julia von Thienen, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Anna Thies, Stockholm University Pieter Vermaas, Delft University of Technology Christophe Vetterli, University of St. Gallen Rodger Watson, University of Technology Sydney Blaz Zupan, University of Ljubljana

“Can Design Thinking improve programming?� - Participant


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RESEARCH

Design Thinking Research

W

ith the overall topic in mind of Design Thinking the future, the research session of the d.confestival started with a talk by Christoph Meinel on the Hasso Plattner Design Thinking Research Program (HPDTRP). The main questions of the morning were on how will Design Thinking research be done in the future, concerning the feasibility? How do teams work in a Design Thinking environment and how can Design Thinking inspire the more traditional work in engineering and science. A main highlight is the open publication source for Design Thinkers, the Electronic Colloquium on Design Thinking research (http:// ecdtr.hpi-web.de/) that is a forum to publish scientific work.

Thomas Beyhl presented his interdisciplinary work on “Connecting Design and Engineering Activities”. When working with engineers the main concern is the loss of information from the Design Thinking process to the actual engineering. In order to improve that, new documentation methods need to be developed, so information does not get lost from designers to engineers.

Holger Rhinow showed his work on prototypes “From Prototype to Innovation”, where he defines two different prototypes in the Design Thinking way of working: the converging prototype, that closes an existing idea, and the diverging prototypes, that open the user and the Design Thinker to new, non-existing ideas.

Adam Royalty showed his work on the impact of the Design Thinking School on Stanford students. His main conclusion was that d.alumni risk more and have what he calls creative confidence, even when considering career changes. Creative environments shape creative outcomes, with an effect on creative actions.

Julia von Thienen talked about the application of the Tele-Board on medicine. The new research of the Tele-Board for medicine wants to make patient files more transparent, by clustering information, and thus making patients as well feel safer about medical treatments.

Bastian Steinert addressed the following question: “Can Design

Thinking improve programming?” The biggest challenge on having programmers changing their way of writing programs is the risk and the costs involved in changing a running software system.

a corporation, the different ways of prototyping and how can innovation originate from that, made clear that there are still a lot of open questions and researchers needed in Design Thinking.

After the presentations and during the Question & Answers, insights and discussions on how to measure the efficacy of Design Thinking in

Written by Eva Barbosa Pfannes


WORKSHOPS


130

WORKSHOPS

Rapid Experience Design a.k.a. Designing a Moment

Thomas Both, Experience and Curriculum Designer

Zaki Omar, Braunschweig University of Art

T

he workshop “Rapid Experience Design a.k.a. Designing a Moment“ by Thomas Both and Zakiah Omar challenged participants to create a moment for somebody at the d.confestival.

each of which the participants should keep in mind during a later engagereframe-create process, during which participants got the chance to implement their own ideas and concepts at the d.confestival.

Thomas Both emphasized the value of personal creativity in his introduction to the topic and gave some examples and background information. He focused on three core values: subjectivity, obsession and beauty,

During the one-hour workshop, the participants were very active, talking in smaller groups about whom they would like to address and what kind of ideas first came to their mind about it. Some thought about how


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WORKSHOPS

Rapid Experience Design

“Create things that help to create experience - Thomas Both

people at the d.confestival might get into contact with each other more easily, others had an idea about showing the diversity of countries and professions represented. With some concrete ideas in their minds, participants next entered into a calm, productive mood, deeply redefining their ideas. In terms of implementation, the variety ranged from videos, photographs and papercrafts, to cups and even the cardboard d.confestival cubes. Finally, everybody prepared to implement their designed experience and the group shared results in a concluding group conversation. Written by Cleo Schmid

“It’s a lot of fun, I could do it the whole day.” - Participant


134

Taming the Elephant — Gaining Emphathy

Bettina Michl, Robin Mehra, Tiefenschärfe: Agentur für erfinderisches Entwickeln, and Hedi Pottag

WORKSHOPS WORKSHOPS

“We really need to reflact upon our assumptions and take into account that every reality has its own truth.” - Bettina Michl

E

mpathy is something that is often missing in projects, says Bettina Michl. But to truly understand the user, it is necessary not only to look and ask for his reality, but to experience it oneself. That’s why the agency for creative development Tiefenschärfe set up the empathy workshop. Paired up in twos, participants were given simple, but effective physical restrictions: Some were blindfolded;

“I felt very exposed being blind. It is strange when people know more about you than you know about them,” said one participant; others had stiff wooden sticks bound to their legs with cling film. Observed by their partners, the handicapped participants had to tackle different challenges, like ordering food or getting a business card from a stranger. Strong emotional experiences and deep insights were revealed in a feedback round:

“This experience really changed my perception of myself,” was another comment. Workshop members agreed that this experience was an important and helpful step towards developing methods for a better understanding of the user. Written by Juliane Löffler


136

WORKSHOPS


138

Implementing Design Thinking in a Corporate Environment

Katharina Berger, Head of Design Thinking, Deutsche Bank Ahmet Emre Acar, Strategy & Cooperations, HIIG

WORKSHOPS

Deutsche Bank implements Design Thinking T

he workshop on ‘Implementing Design Thinking in a Corporate Environment’ was meant to handle 20 participants, but after participant number 40 eagerly squeezed into the room, moderators Katharina Berger, Head of Design Thinking at Deutsche Bank and Ahmet Emre Açar, of the Humboldt Institut für Internet und Gesellschaft (HIIG), decide to simply adapt to the overwhelming interest, and let everyone come and see. The group gathered here is made up of people from a wide variety of backgrounds and industries: marketers, industrial designers, consultants, recruiters, managers, researchers, academics, and IT types from industries throughout Europe. Most already have some experience with implementing Design Thinking in their workplaces, and have come with some specific questions on how to enable exchange and availability, how to build effective teams, and more.

After a brief presentation with practical tips on easing the cultural gap between Design Thinking cultures and strongly process-oriented corporate environments, moderators split everyone into smaller groups, and the room is a buzz with collaboration, brainstorming and laughter as people share their experiences and learn together. Written by Sirje Müller-Viise

Katharina Berger Head of Design Thinking, Deutsche Bank

Ahmet Emre Acar, Strategy & Cooperations, HIIG


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WORKSHOPS

tHE RolE oF DEsign in vAlUE Co-CREAtion & innovAtion

Arne van Oosterom, CEo Designthinkers group, Founder Design thinking network

“Come up with a company and what it would look like a ten years from now.” - Arne van Oosterom

Inês Gonçalve, Brian Ling, employees at Designthinkers group

W

hat makes a company successful and how can you satisfy your customers? Arne van oosterom and two of his co-workers from the Designthinkers group addressed this question in the workshop called “the Role of Design in value Co-Creation and innovation”. By initiating a roleplay, participants had the chance to experience the difficulties of establishing a wellthought-out company and at the same time meet the customers’ expectations. Five groups of around ten participants formed and received a toolkit, which contained basic information for the roleplay. While teams acted in virtual environments of different industries (e.g. health, hotel,

food), group members were divided into company workers and customers. therefore, groups had to deal with two different tasks: on the one hand creating a company with common values and a corporate culture and on the other hand involving the customer’s needs in the generation of the business idea. “The whole exercise is about alignment of value and vision to customer goal.” one group, playing a start-up in the hotel industry, dealt with challenges, when its employees encountered resistance

from customer personas: they had other ideas of a perfect hotel experience. After taking these expectations into consideration, the hotel employees rethought their business model – successfully. Eventually, when each group had to pitch their business idea together with their customers’ point-of-view, the “second Home”- Hotel group was voted second place by venture Capitalists, played by neutral workshop participants. Written by Theo Gerstenmaier


142

DEsign tHinking FoR soCiAl innovAtions

Creative processes for Entrepreneurship and societal transformation

Tell Münzing and Shamim Rafat,

Managing Directors, impact solutions

Steven Ney,

professor, Jacobs University, Bremen

Marcos L. Rosa,

Alfred Herrhausen society

t

he workshop “Design thinking for social innovation” explored the question of what roles entrepreneurs and companies play in solving the great challenges of sustainability today. Tell Münzing and Shamim Rafat of Impact Solutions, which aims to transform sustainability challenges into new social and business solutions, explained that companies can engage in sustainable business by respecting the triple bottom line of people, planet, and profit. Marcos L. Rosa presented case studies from the Urban Age Award program from the Alfred Herrhausen Society, which encourages urban

dwellers to take responsibility for their cities. A project shortlisted for the award in 2012 is “Thrive,” where recycled garbage in Capetown can be exchanged for cash. Steven Ney said that through its human-centeredness, Design thinking blurs the lines between what we consider to be social, business, or political entrepreneurship, allowing us to reframe situations of all kinds in a way that lets us see opportunities where others see problems. it therefore has the potential to make all of us entrepreneurs. After the presentations, participants were encouraged to interview each other, asking questions like “What are the sources of social problems or innovation?” and “Who is responsible for social innovation?” Findings were collected and clustered in small groups and storyboards were developed and presented. Written by Claire Luzia

WORKSHOPS

“Design Thinking blurs the lines between what we consider to be social, business, or political entrepreneurship, allowing us to reframe situations of all kinds in a way that let us see opportunities where others see problems.” - Steven Ney


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146

Jointly sEpARAtED

WORKSHOPS

global Education team

“Developing a concept via skype is - Participant far from fun!” Marco Eisenberg,

global Education team

Cornie Scheffer,

University of stellenbosch

Les Sztandera

University of philadelphia

W

orking together as a team but spread all over the world creates a whole new set of challenges. Sharing experiences and developing solutions for the future of globally working teams was the purpose of Marco Eisenbergs workshop “Jointly Separated”. First, Marco Eisenberg asked attendees to use the red couch to share their experiences. Most of the participants had already worked in a global team. The difficulties they have experiences ranged broadly. For example, different time zones which make it complicated to find meeting times together. Then there is a lack of personal, especially non-verbal, conversation, which makes it hard to talk about problems casually.

While sharing experiences, the workshop participants clustered their insights into overlaying topics such as “infrastructural constraints,” “missing personal touch/ empathy” or “culture.” The second part of the workshop was designed to generate solutions for the challenges that had been discovered. Attendees worked in groups, with each group addressing one topic. They worked out great concepts, such as creating virtual

profiles during global projects for sharing private adventures and emotions digitally. To sum it up, the workshop offered a great chance for everyone to get in contact with people working under similar conditions – to share challenges, needs, and future concepts. Written by Cleo Schmid


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FRAME CREAtion

kees Dorst, professor, University of technology, sydney and Founder of the Frame Creation Method

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ollowing his presentation on Frame Creation, Kees Dorst, industrial designer and professor from the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia, gave an additional two hour workshop where participants had the opportunity to get advanced insights into his frame creation method. During the session he introduced more cases of wicked problems and projects in which the frame creation method has already been applied.

“Which prerequisites, in terms of knowledge, skills, tools and methods, does one need in order to create new frames and innovate like an expert designer?” - Kees Dorst

one of the examples was the Sydney opera house, whose roof often gets »abused« by environmental activist campaigns. two guest speakers from the city council and the police department of sydney described the associated challenges that the opera house administration faces in detail. Both also helped explain the several successive phases of the frame creation method that was applied in more depth. Afterwards, attendees formed small groups, each picking one of the distinct phases of the frame creation method. their task then was to gather

WORKSHOPS

and list activities that, from their understanding, happen in that stage. in other words, they answered the question: “Which prerequisites, in terms of knowledge, skills, tools and methods, does one need in order to create new frames and innovate like an expert designer?” Everyone noticeably enjoyed the insightful exercise and one participant from vW research finally stated: “i will definitely bring this back to my team!” Written by Jan Schmiedgen

“I will definitely bring this back to my team!” - Participant


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Game design as prototyping method

WORKSHOPS

Vikor Bedö, Invisible Playground

“We created games AND played them in under half an hour. And they weren’t bad games.” - Participant It’s Playtime with Viktor Bedö, an urban games inventor from Invisible Playground. His workshop kicked off with a short presentation of who he is, what urban games are and how we can come to see the invisible playground. A game is being played on a beach, as the tide changes so does the game board. This is the essence of urban gaming. Finding a place and then inventing a game that integrates the factors of the environment you’re in. So now we know what Viktor does, it is our turn to invent a game. We have half an hour, a persona and time constraints. So how might we provide massively multitasking Denisa with a working place which enables her to focus on her research while staying in touch with new friends and surrounding urban cultures… and turn that into a game? Well we created a storyline, gave her the superpower of being able to stop time and then used the cubes and

The other team’s game was more fun, but then again we were playing that one: throwing balls at each other and building a tower to the ceiling.

developed, had potential and were based more upon our surroundings and the items we found in the room, than on the heavy persona-scenario we started with. We were amazed at ourselves, what we had created and how easy it had seemed. It is a great way to prototype — so lets play some more!

So after just 30 minutes we had created games which, whilst not fully

Written by Joe Murphy

balls in the room to create a game, changing the rules and modifying the sequence with each round of the game.


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154

Experiencing Music between Rules & ChanCe

“That is a good question. I should not spoil it with an answer.” - John Cage

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Kammerakademie Potsdam

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hat can a Design Thinker learn from the experimental music composer John Cage?

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o answer that question, a small part of the orchestra of the Kammerakademie Potsdam, directed by Rainer Neugebauer, performed a challenging mix of lecture and music performance. The music of John Cage is not easily accessible. For example, the song “Radio Music” performed that afternoon, is a composition of four radios wildly tuned and mixed together. Instead of predictable compositions, Cage arranged an almost anarchistic style of sound. With these experimental forms, the composer searched for new creative means of perception and creation of music, using a method of randomness and disorder called “planned chance.” He can thus be seen as a true Design Thinker. Openness to new forms and risk taking are probably the strongest similarities between Cage’s compositions and Design Thinking: The biggest difference might be the treatment of the user. Cage did not search for what the audience wanted in a commercial way, instead preferring to challenge his listeners.

Questioned “Is that even music?” John Cage once gave the answer “If you think it isn’t music then give it a different name.” Even though the complex music performance was a real challenge for the audience, Cage can be seen as an inspiration for creative and new ways of perception and performance. Written by Juliane Loeffler

Bettina Lange, Tobias Lampelzammer, Friedemann Werzlau, Kammerakademie Potsdam

Rainer Neugebauer, John-Cage-Orgel-Stiftung Halberstadt


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d.collective: Connect and Share

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D.Collective, D-School Potsdam

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requently during the three days of the d.confestival, you could observe a bunch of people sitting together outside in the grass in front of an oversized igloo-shaped tent, surrounded by whiteboards. They obviously had intense discussions there about... well, something d.related. In fact, it was the d.collective who invited visitors to ‘Connect and Share’. “D.collective is an initiative by DSchool alumni that is in the process of building an entrepreneurial home for Design Thinkers.“ explains Jörg, one of the d.collective initiators. „And we have already found a space in Berlin where we will move into soon and where we will design think the world a better place… not just on whiteboards!“ adds Nathalia, D-School alumna and initiator of d.collective. “Our goal as the d.collective is to connect people and learn from each other,“ explains Jörg, “which is why we invite people to connect and share here at the d.confestival!“

The ‘Sharing’ happened when people sat together in the grass, talking about different topics like ‘Make space. What should a space for Design Thinking look like?’ and ‘Connecting’ happened once you entered the igloo, where about 50 black cardboard squares hung from the ceiling. Visitors were invited to fill out a profile including information about themselves, what they could offer and what they are looking for, and glued this profile on one of the black squares. Then, a visitor could

check out the other profiles hanging in the tent and connect to them by tying an orange string from his own profile to all the other profiles he found to be interesting. The result was a huge analog network consisting of over 50 profiles and more than 180 connecting strings. On Friday afternoon, everyone who had put up a profile was invited to come to the igloo to finally meet up with everybody in person. Written by Johannes Seibel


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D.ictionary

Flavia Beuel, Anna Isselburg, Hedi Pottag, Katharina Müller

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he question that Flavia Bleuel, Hedi Pottag, Katharina Müller and Anna Isselburg asked the participants of their d.ictionary was: What do Design Thinkers mean, when they use magic expressions like “Observe,” “POV” or “Teamwork”? This is the protocol of a first hand user experience - I had the pleasure to participate in the d.ictionary myself. Entering the exhibition space dedicated to the d.ictionary, guests were asked to choose a card. Mine said “Get together.” Hedi, who guided me through the adventure, asked me to sketch my understanding of this expression. I threw my sorrows overboard and tried my ugly drawing: Two people in a bar drinking beer. On the next card I wrote: “How to...!” Hedi politely asked me to explain into a microphone what that meant to me. “Hmh... ‘How to’ is the starting point for all things,” I said, and added some rather theoretical amendments. Finally, I drew the last card: “Rehearse.” I should perform this

expression in front of a camera, Hedi explained. Unfortunately, I thought it would be funny to “rehearse” my handstand skills … which is how I ripped my pants. It was pretty cold that night, dancing in the circus tent. I hope the documentation that comes out of this physical effort will be worth it. The experience of doing it was really fun! Written by Moritz Gekeler

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162 as founder of iDEO, David Kelley built the company that created many icons of the digital generation—the first mouse, the first treo, the thumbs up/thumbs down button on your tivo’s remote control, to name a few. but what matters even more to him is unlocking the creative potential of people and organizations so they can innovate routinely. David’s most enduring contributions to the field of design are a humancentered methodology and culture of innovation. More recently, he led the creation of the groundbreaking d.school at stanford, the hassoplattner-institute of Design.

Question from the audience (QFA): you said that at d.school in standford you focus on the individual, and at iDEO you focus on teams. how might they fit together? David Kelley (DK): d.school does not ignore teams; all our projects are team based. nevertheless, the focus of a university is to educate individuals. we put them in teams, but only to the service of bringing skills and confidence to the individuals. in a corporation there is not

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“People are going to be in many teams during all their lives, and they’re going to move from team to team. We try to make them a good team member” - David Kelley

MEEt thE guru interview with David Kelley, co-Founder of the stanford d.school

one central “persona,” there is an entire organization. i think that the end goal is that we really focus on the individual at the d.school, because we want people to go out and make an impact in the world, and we work on the individual’s confidence. i talk a lot about creative confidence, and an organization can have creative confidence in its culture. QFA: we’re talking a lot here at the d.confestival about the future of education. in the future, i would like to see

that schools and universities focus much more on team effort. ten years from now, all universities should focus much more on team aspects and collaboration than they do right now. DK: people are going to be in many teams during all their lives, and they’re going to move from team to team. we try to make them a good team member. we usually label the dysfunctions of team players, but when we’re having a discussion with a team member, we don’t have


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MEEt thE guru

“the best way to convince a company to get on board is by letting them know that we take all the risk.” - David Kelley

to be personal. we have to keep doing better and better to make individuals better team members. life is like a team sport, and the more we can help people to get better in teams, the more highly functional those teams will be. QFA: i worked at a corporation very recently which was very profit-oriented, very closed-minded, and not open to new things. i tried to introduce Design thinking and coach them through some workshops, but they were not that inspired. if Design thinking is for everyone, where does it go from here? how do we penetrate the corporate world? how do we get people to do it? DK: there are places where Design thinking is a big deal, and still in most places it is not. For people like you and me, what we have to do when we are inside an organization that works only with the analytical and serious side of the brain is this: when you get an assign-

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interview with David Kelley

ment, you must do the project the way the boss wants you to do it. Otherwise it would be a big difficulty with lots of fighting. you do the project the way that the boss wants the project to be done, and you also work extra hard on a parallel project using Design thinking methods. at the end, when you present the projects’ results with a normal product on one side and on the other side maybe with a great innovation, you ask the boss: “so, which one do you prefer?” so what i suggest is that you show all your efforts and everyone will see the better ideas themselves. QFA: how does iDEO convince and involve new clients and companies from different sectors to switch to Design thinking? DK: in some way they must believe a little bit in Design thinking because they are willing to pay iDEO to solve their problems. Only companies that see some value in using Design thinking come to iDEO. On the other hand, the best way to convince a company to get on board is by letting them know that we take all the risk. using Design thinking we would ask “why is the company not engaging with Design thinking?” the reply to that answer could be fear that it can be a waste of time and/or fear that it will cost a lot of money. what we should do

in those situations is to remove the fear. you might ask yourself “how do you remove their fear?” we at iDEO say that we take all the risk. the client does not pay us anything while we come up with ideas; they pay us if they like the ideas. we remove fears by showing ideas first. some other companies are just afraid of new ideas. in these cases you can show them new ideas in a way that they can understand and slowly digest them. whenever i go to meet a client and i want to convince them about one particular idea, i show them three ideas, and i put one idea on either side of the one that i want them to pick. i know in the end they’ll pick the one in the middle, which was the one i wanted them to choose. QFA: i come from brazil, where there is currently a lot of interest in innovation in the field of advertising. how might new approach to advertising be made using Design thinking? DK: the old way of advertisement is not here anymore. nowadays people are moving more and more towards a leaner way of doing things. people do multiple prototypes and they build on them. More and more, we see that advertising and Design thinking are moving in the same direction. i think it’s best to understand what resonates with the people you are advertising for. you have to show the

advertisement to these people and have them react to that. in the past, when you involved all the creatives and graphic designers to make an ad, it was like they were making a painting and revealed it only at the end. today, more and more, there’s a Design thinking element of rapid prototyping. people are making quick sketches, showing it to people and asking for feedback before the actual end product is finalized. you have to understand your user. it’s a humancentered attitude. QFA: clients sometimes expect us to have a big solution right from the beginning. Every time we ask them to invest in a prototype, they expect a big solution from the team immediately. how do you convince clients that they are supposed to give this process some time and actually test the prototypes? DK: prototypes should convince presidents of companies to implement your ideas, but you should also show them that you want to incorporate their ideas into the project. they cannot expect that if you don’t show them something along the way. you have to set the client’s expectations. show them a finished idea from another project as an example. tell them that in some months from now you will be there with an end product as nice as the one that you are showing them now. tell them that you do not show something like an end product in first cli-


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“The old way of advertisement is not here anymore. Nowadays people are moving more and more towards a leaner way of doing things.” - David Kelley ent meetings, but put in their mind that eventually you will show them a finished product. And then along the way, show them lots of prototypes and show them that you want to include their ideas in the product. You are showing them a prototype and they will perceive it as that, because that is how you will bring their ideas into the final product. QFA: Some company leaders are afraid of being involved and taking responsibility. How can you get them to contribute to projects and take them away from this position of always wanting to be presented with something, rather than being involved? DK: When we’re having a workshop and the businessmen are there with their business suits on, and we want them to do something creative, cut card board, jump around or do some role play to test a service, these business people have a fear of being judged by other people, and they do not want other people to see them feeling uncomfortable. When we ask them to use a prototype it seems we’re asking them to go and sing karaoke.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Interview with David Kelley

You start by inviting them to come to a meeting, inviting them to watch and see how other people are doing it. Then for the next meeting you already invite them to try the prototype. First they observe something going on inside a room with glass walls, and then they’re invited to actually enter the room. I am a big fan of the Professor Albert Bendura, who creates methodologies for curing people’s phobias and fears. These businesspeople fear making mistakes and being judged for the failure. Bandura uses a process he calls “Guided Mastery,” which means that somebody masters the ability to do things. Bendura does it with a series of small steps in facing phobias, like spiders or snakes. In the end people actually feel they were successful because they faced their fear.

Thinking for 35 years, and it’s just now that people have started to talk about it more. When I think about the future, it’s not so much about getting designers to understand about Design Thinking, because this is natural for designers already, it is the way they normally think. The future of Design Thinking to me is as a tool for anyone to use. For doctors, lawyers, businesspeople or educators, this is a tool that you should have. They should listen to designers, and actually hear and care about what designers think and do, and value their work, and to learn to think a little bit like a designer. Doctors, engineers and educators usually trust their analytical mind much more. The challenge for Design Thinking in the future is to get people who need to solve something really important in their lives to use intuitive thinking. So that they don’t get serious, they get emotional. I think science is going to start to prove that big decisions and big ideas come from using your intuitive mind.

QFA: Regarding the main focus of the d.confestival (“for criminals” as you mentioned in the d.note welcome speech), “Design Thinking the future,” what are, in your point of view, the main challenges that Design Thinking will face in the future?

Students at Standford at the d.school who have been mathematicians, engineers, doctors or lawyers all their lives, they start trusting their intuitive mind, coming up with new ideas which they would generally not have come up with, and then they feel really good about it.

There is a physical fear of being judged. The only way we know how to deal with this is by making them go through a series of successes, like little baby steps.

DK: I’ve been talking about Design


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the challenge for the future is to affect as many people as possible, to get them to trust their intuition. QFA: as one of the inventors of this concept of Design thinking, what would you say are the main advantages and disadvantages of the method, and what would be the further developments? DK: Design thinking is like a mindset, it’s a tool, it’s the reaction to the way that everybody is thinking when he’s being analytical. Design thinking is just a way to come up with new and different ideas. My way of looking at it is that we’re very good with our analytical brains, but we don’t trust our intuition. all the important decisions and problems we have can be solved with a Design thinking mindset. when i started to spread Design thinking i wanted to explain to everybody how designers think, and how everybody should try to think like that. QFA: are we going towards “Engineering Empathy”? a few years from now could we call this “Empathic Engineering”? are we creating a game with rules to be empathic? DK: we hope that this isn’t like a cookbook. we use the steps because people want to trust their analytical minds. it would be impossible to do it without following rules. but it’s like riding a bicycle: you think about it a lot when you learn

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interview with David Kelley

MEEt thE guru

“We’re very good with our analytical brains but we don’t trust our intuition.” - David Kelley it, but then you have the confidence to do it without thinking about how to do it. we want people to use these tools to unlock their minds, so that it then becomes normal for them. QFA: i recently watched a documentary called “Design and thinking,” which you are featured in. it’s about issues like the “Occupy” Movement and some of the bigger challenges that are happening all around the globe today. how can Design thinking be used to solve world problems and get world leaders to work with innovation tools? DK: we have aspirations for this. we think that the “radical collaboration” of Design thinking is already supporting these new ideas. we all have to build on the ideas of others. My idea can take into account what i think is wrong about someone else’s idea, but then i come up with a positive solution building on that other person’s idea. For example, iDEO has an education project in peru. we went there and used teams with people from industry and education, and together we designed new tools, and we

are now building 200 new schools. Everyone wants education for kids. in getting people together you have to break their habits. what happens in a lot of meetings is that everyone keeps talking about their point of view and they don’t listen to the other side, to what the other person is actually saying. when people are in the Design thinking mindset, they start to visualize things better and it can be easier to implement change. Design thinking is special because it is a positive approach. people from different points of view are surprising themselves with their great ideas. so why not surprise themselves with good ideas about peace and poverty?

QFA: how do you decide how to organize teams with people coming from such different backgrounds? DK: we first think about team sizes. then we want to make them evenly distributed, and we focus on the diversity of the backgrounds. we want to organize the teams with backgrounds that have usually not been put together before. this is the unusual element that sparks ideas to go to a different direction. in the end, the most important thing is to make sure that we include someone that represents technology, business, and human values. Written by Glória Matos da Costa


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innOvatiOn accElEratOr

the innovation accelerator gave a pitching platform to six exciting big data startups at the SAP Startup Forum in Berlin - just one of fifteen SAP Startup Forums all over the world. the startups explained how their software can change our lives and how the sap application platform hana will help them to turn their ideas into market-ready solutions. after pitching, the start ups had the chance to get the audiences’ feedback. Dennis Wetzig from Pixray in potsdam, for example, explained how images spread online and why it is important for website and image rights owners to know how and where these images are being spread. approximately 70% of images online are being used without a

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cafer tosun, cEO sap innovation center

proper license. wetzig pointed out that stolen pictures create a competitive disadvantage because rightful content owners don’t know where their pictures or products are being discussed, which means they are missing valuable insights about their users. plus, users don’t know where the real content owner’s website is. One of pixray’s two products, pixray seeker, searches the web for stolen images at the speed of 48 million pictures a day, analyzing the visual content of pictures. pixray seeker does not only find the original images in original dimensions, it also tracks down images that have been cut, cropped, re-sized, recolored, or that have had text added to it. another interesting software solution was presented by bodo lange, cEO of Alacris Theranostics, a company that specializes in the personalized treatment of cancer patients. alacris develops comprehensive computational models of diseases to identify individualized therapies for patients based on their genetic blueprint. “virtual patient models” and “virtual clinical studies” allow the analysis of genetic codes and diseases to match

“... and our traffic is growing like hell!” – Dennis Wetzig the appropriate drugs with. the software delivers predictions for better treatments, reduces side effects, lowers treatment costs, and reduces animal testing. the other startups featured products that ranged from music and image synchronization solutions (Piranha Womex), to tools for better management of energy consumption (Acteno Energy), data-based online marketing (Next Audience) and improving customer loyality (Gameinside). the presentations of these different ideas were very tangible and interactive. however, the information technology details of some of the presentations and parts of the discussions afterwards were very specific and not easily understood by people not in the it branch.

Written by Svenja Kersken


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THE FUTURE OF COLLABORATION “I can easily imagine this system dramatically decreasing the language barrier. Amazing!� - Participant

I Raja Gumlenny PhD Candidate, Hasso-Plattner Institut

Frank Sonder, Forsee

n the Collaboration Room, two examples of sharing and teamwork were shown. Both the Tele-Board from the Hasso-Plattner-Institut and the InteracTable from foresee are systems whereby teams sitting long distances apart (even on different continents) can work together. Teleconference systems connected via the internet and with interactive boards make this possible. During the


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THE FUTURE OF COLLABORATION

Raja Gumienny, PhD Student, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Frank Sonder, Foresee

“Cultural Exchange”

- Participant Tele-Board presentation, listeners could give instant feedback using the Sticky Pad App for tablets and mobile phones. With this app, one can write or draw a comment on a virtual sticky note that is then “posted”on the online white board of the TeleBoard Web Application. Using this application, two different teams located in different areas can work and brainstorm on the same virtual whiteboard. It is not only possible to write and post on this whiteboard, but even to move and cluster sticky notes – even for asynchronous creative work. There are also sketching and constructing capabilities, which makes the Tele-Board a valuable application for engineers. Along these lines, foresee wants to change modern office environments by enabling more interactivity in meetings and discussions. The company designs applications for several clients using their multi functional InteracTable, a table with a screen installed with the latest multitouch technology. For a Swiss bank they

created an InteracTable device where financial and other documents could be easily opened and arranged for discussing in client consultations. This way, in a meeting, both client and consultant have a real overview of all pertinent documents, and can also view risk analysis, real time market data and then save the meeting and results of the discussion. Another of many applications for the InteracTable is a map application

that opens maps of a city area in a high definition video mode, which can be drawn upon and re-scaled, an exciting device for architects and city planners. Both presentations showed how feasible it is for teams to brainstorm, discuss and do Design Thinking even when not all members are sitting in the same room. Written by Eva Pfannes

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d.circus at night: MAGIC MOMENTS

Kammerakadamie Potsdam What would Harry do? – D-School alumni

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t the end of an amazing and inspiring first day of the d.confestival, “What Would Harry Do?” presented a warm-up special. Everybody was asked to meet outside and find all other people who had the same colour on their nametags, and form teams with them. So first everybody had to search for his or her randomly mixed group. Then each group had to find something that all members have in common. The challenge offered a great chance to get together and to learn more about other d.confestival attendees.The very last event of the day was a glamorous performance held by the

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Kammerakademie Potsdam. The relaxed and inspiring atmosphere at the d.circus invited everyone to tango or to Charleston, to share their experiences of the day or to listen silently. It was a great end to the day. With their last song, “Nachtexpress nach Warschau,” the Kammerakademie Potsdam prepared for their own way home and wrapped up the day. Written by Cleo Schmid


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d.circus@night: MAGIC MOMENTS

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he claim of the d.confestival was to be a mixture of conference and festival. The festival style was shown in many details over the three days. Like the warm ups in the sun, the installations outside and inside the D-School building etc. One event especially helped create this festival atmosphere, though: the magic moment event on Friday evening. After a warm introduction by State Secretary Henning Heidemanns, who himself is enthusiastic about Design Thinking since he took a workshop at the D-School, the improv theater group frei.wild summarized the d.confestival in a humorous and playful manner that really fit well into the overall atmosphere. Holding a mirror up to the audience they showed the most secret and funniest crankinesses of the Design Thinking crowd. Parodies of how people interact with each other were followed by ultrafast real time scenes. The audience had a good laugh and dancing until late at night they probably still had a whispering voice in their heads asking them to be aware: “Pssst, SAP is everywhere...”. Written by Moritz Gekeler

Henning Heidemanns, State Secretary of Economics and European Affairs; frei.wild improvisation theater group

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“Pssst, SAP is everywhere...”

- frei.wild


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Movie Park Tour & Movie-Making Workshop

“and... ACTION!”

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Filmpark Babelsberg

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he weather was quite chilly after the lunch break of the last day of the d.confestival, but a big group was gathered for the Babelsberg Filmpark, the movie park located near the famous Babelsberg studios. When the walk to the park started, even the sun showed its face, and the group faced the wind and marched in the direction of entertainment. At the entrance of the park, a kind guide was waiting, and walked with the group through the main hot spots of Babelsberg. Since it was a Saturday, the whole park was full with kids. Janosch, Sandmann, Gute Zeiten Schlechte Zeiten, Marlene Dietrich Hall; the draft of a screenplay, special effects, artists working with make-up and paintings… All of this to bring the world of cinema fantasy to the screen in a as realistic way as possible. The tour went through streets of old Berlin, Paris and Prag, anywhere the imagination of the writer and the requests of the director went. Streets with fake stones, fake houses, fake entrances, but to the eye, all quite real. The charm and the mystery of those scenic streets increased because we couldn’t take photos. The Design Thinkers would need to keep all this beautiful art alive in their imaginations.

The tour ended in the 4D movie where, armed with 3D glasses, everyone entered the room and sat. When the galaxy tour started and the chairs started moving and wind started blowing, it was like being in a real rollercoaster. There was a smile on every face after this adventure. But there was more to come: A movie-making workshop took place directly after the tour, where teams could make their own television spot. The main topic of the spots was: Design Thinking! Some groups made a commercial for the d.confestival, others had the d.circus as a theme. Time was running out, so after a short

introduction on film making, teams had around two hours to create a concept for the commercial, plan shots and camera positions, select the actors, the camera (wo)man and the director. And Action!! Take one, take two, and suddenly the whole afternoon was over, and with it, the d.confestival, ended in a flash. No better way to finish it than with a workshop that brought the creativity from the Design Thinkers to the screen. Written by Eva Pfannes


GLOBAL CHALLENGE


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GLOBAL CHALLENGE

Redesign your City

Global Challenge redesign your city

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esign Thinking finds wide application in the business world, but what about the immediate impact on the local level? The Global Challenge raised the question on how to redesign cities for the future, in order to provide a better, more sustainable, urban environment for each and every one of us. Responding ideas came from all sides of the widespread international Design Thinking community and were presented at the second day of the d.confestival.

The event Global Challenge was kicked off by Moritz Gekeler, Project Manager at HPI D-School Potsdam, who gave a thorough overview on the challenge of “Redesigning the City� with a follow-up presentation and a well-delivered speech. The presentation space served as a feedback lounge in the exhibition hall. A space which was set up by deople e.V., an organization of the HPI D-School alumni, with the


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GLOBAL CHALLENGE

REdEsiGN yOuR City

possibility of gathering some valuable live feedback via different media channels and direct dialog. in the course of the presentation, this concept proved to be very stimulating for presenters as well as the audience. during the first slot which went from 11 am to 1 pm the main focus was put on the question: “How might we enable young people to change their environment for the better?” terry Winograd, who is a founding faculty member of d.school stanford, gave an inspiring presentation on a project where small interdisciplinary student teams of stanford university collaborated with students of the university of nairobi and nGo partners in nairobi, Kenya. the chal-

lenge was to invent and prototype applications of mobile technologies that can help in problem areas of health and economic development. the partnership of the institutes proved to be fruitful, producing a mobile phone application called “Mpesa”. it allows people to have access to money transfer, although infrastructure does not allow them to take part in the traditional banking system. Furthermore, additional innovations for the developing world “umanda trust” and the “iHub” sprung from the very same partnership; once again confirming the beneficial outcome of knowledge transfer. the presentation of terry Winograd was followed by a locally conducted project. in cooperation with Evangelische schule Berlin Zentrum (EsBZ), the agency Creative Confidence, represented by andrea scheer and elias barrasch, conducted a design thinking workshop with pupils of the esbZ. the agency and students worked on the challenge in berlin “Redesign your City for school trips” with the goal to allow pupils to experience democracy firsthand. the results of this workshop were presented by the esbZ-teens themselves, showing very innovative solutions on how to make an important topic of our society fun to learn and understand.

“How might we enable young people to change their environment for the better?” - Audience task


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GLOBAL CHALLENGE

Redesign your City

Surely not each and every idea was realistic or implementable, however, it was evident that all pupils had not only enjoyed working with Design Thinking, but had also acquired a deep understanding of the importance of democracy. Another interesting approach on how to enable young people to change their environment positively was presented by Lakshman Pachineela Seshadri, Director and Head of Innovation SAP Global Delivery. The project called “The Inclusive Group Foundation” (TGIF) is an initiative in rural areas around Bangalore that aims to spark children’s entrepreneurial spirit with the goal to create economic self-sufficiency, in order to prevent them from ending up as cheap labour in the nearby urban areas. The idea behind the concept is to create innovative local solutions for local problems with local people. With the help of the Design Thinking the students produced products that fit the needs of the local market, such as a wooden toothbrush or a water quality control system for water trucks. Not only do the participating students get educated on how to develop product ideas, but local problems are being solved at the same time; creating a win-win situation for everybody involved.

“We saw some concrete changes and were able to percieve possibilites we’d never even considered before.” - Participant

The fourth and final presenter was D-School alumnus Eskinder Mamo from Make Sense (Berlin/Ethiopia). The geographical focus of his project lies on Africa. Just like Terry Winogard, he recognized the potential of mobile-based application in the African market. With a background of high-level youth unemployment, Ethiopia has to face a yet unsolved problem for the future.

Eskinder Mamo and his businesspartner, therefore, developed a mobile-based application that aims at teachig and training students in mathematics, english and entrepreneurial skills. Evidently, this venture is not driven by financial interest, but rather a will to change things for the better by enabling young students to take control of their country’s and their own destiny.


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Global GLOBAL CHALLENGE challenge

Redesign your City

“The future has already begun, in Cities and with Design Thinking. Let’s keep it going.” - Participant After two hours of intensive input, not only by the audience, but also the speakers who had listened zealously to the presentations of their colleagues, it took a much needed break to process all that had been seen and heard. The second slot of the global challenge presentations proved to be just as exciting as the first. International speakers took the stage who had traveled from as far as Indonesia. Focus of this round of presentations, again, was put on the overall challenge “Redesigning the City” with an emphasis on the perspective of city planners. Andreas Krüger, one of the founders of MODULOR Berlin, opened up this round by giving a detailed overview on how MODULOR Berlin, an innovative shop for arts and handicrafts, has grown from being a shop to becoming a facilitator and catalyst in reviving Moritzplatz, Berlin. When MODULOR entered the scene in

Berlin, Moritzplatz had been a seemingly forgotten area between the high-class Friedrichstraße and the bohemian Kreuzberg. With the help and moderation abilities of MODULOR Berlin, numerous businesses and initiatives located themselves around Moritzplatz, amongst them the famous Prinzessinenngarten, Betahaus, etsy.com, and innovative clubs. The new tenants slowly but surely shaped the area to become an

exemplary hotspot for innovation and creative businesses in Berlin. A very different approach to city planning and local involvement was presented shortly after. Dwinta Larasati, a member of the Bandung Creative City Forum (BCCF), Indonesia, gave a presentation on what the organization calls design action. The Bandung Creative City Forum is an organization that has been founded


194

GLOBAL CHALLENGE

REdEsiGN yOuR City ability with new forms of cooperation and innovation through design. With the help of design thinking, problems one encounters during the process of place making were successfully solved. one of the main challenges was to communicate the vision for the central district to local stakeholders. this challenge has been solved by setting up a temporary building made of containers, the largest of its kind, which will function as a temporary project communication platform and live icon for the strategy and vision while the district is being built. by individuals, businesses, nGos and communities with the main focus on community creativity, creative economy, and creative infrastructure. one of the organization’s main concerns is the matter of public space. bCCF uses a very well chosen metaphor for their community intervention programs in which they refer to their actions as “urban Acupuncture”. Wherever there is a problem of public interest the needle of design actions is inserted to ease the pain and solve the problem. the next presentation was delivered by tina thompson, project developer of the project “design City Kolding”, who used design thinking in the context of creating a central urban district representing sustain-

last, but not least, the earlier presentations were followed up by two more presentations of hPi d-school alumni. second to last, a team of the collective “What would Harry do?” consisting of thuy Chinh duong, Florian strenge, Hanna Martus and Axel Menning, presented their award-winning concept for future mobility in Vientiane, laos. the concept, which won the urban Planning award of the Bombardier youCity Contest, consists of a colour-coding scheme which finds application in the transport sector of Vientaine. since public transport is poorly established in this emerging market, alternative concepts had to be developed in order to use the large offer of private transportation. in this case each district has an assigned colour, which then

can be displayed on transportation devices in order to indicate routes. Mariana Gutheil, who represented Perestroika Brasil, gave the last presentation on a collective known as the school of Creativity. Perestroika combines the offers of a wide range of courses. one of the projects dealt with the challenge to make Porto alegre a better city for people who cannot see. in order to gain empathy, participants showed a great extent of commitment and actually experienced everyday life blind-folded for two days. overall, the festivals Global Challenge: “Redesign your City” demonstrated that design thinking is found applied in a wide variety of solution creation around the world. after a full day of interesting presentations and input from a wide-range of projects, everybody agreed that reshaping the future of urban areas is a universal matter in which each and every one can learn from each other. Written by Jonas Rehmet


CREDITS


198

CREDITS

D.CONFESTIVAL STEERING TEAM

prof. Dr. Bernard Roth Director of d.school, Stanford University katharina Berger Head of Design Thinking department, Deutsche Bank

prof. Dr. Hasso plattner Co-Founder of the SAP AG, Head of the SAP Advisory Borad

prof. ulrich Weinberg Director HPI School of Design Thinking

prof. Dr. larry leifer Director of the Center for Design Research, Stanford University

Prof. David Kelley Co-Founder and chairman of IDEO, Co-Founder and director od d.school Stanford

arne van oosterom Founder of the Design Thinking Network, Amsterdam

Dr. Claudia nicolai Program Manager HPI School of Design Thinking prof. patrick Whitney Director Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology

Julia leihener Creation Center Deutsche Telekom prof. Dr. Terry Winograd Director of the human computer interaction program, Stanford University

prof. Dr. Christoph meinel CEO of the HPI Potsdam prof. Dr. Erik Spiekermann CEO EdenSpiekermann

In memory of Bill moggridge (1943–2012) Co-Founder IDEO, Director of the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum

prof. Dr. kees Dorst University of Technology, Sydney Dr. véronique Hillen Director at the department Génie Industriel, Ecole de Ponts Paris Tech

prof. Bruce nussbaum Director of Parsons The New School for Design george kembel Co-founder and executive director of the d.school, Stanford University

Dr. Raimund Schmolze Creation Center Deutsche Telekom


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DESIgn THInkIng aT HpI

Innovate!

!

Professional Track

CREDITS ConTaCT

Open Courses & Company Workshops

Want to gain true confidence in applying Design Thinking to your company areas? Book the new program coming up in May 2014.

Want to book professional training for your company team or join an open course? Please get in contact with the HPI Academy.

www.hpi.de/ d-school

Project Partners Want to have students help you solve complex problems in 6 or 12 weeks? Please get in contact with us! www.hpi.de/ d-school/partner

www.hpi-academy.de

Hasso-Plattner-Institut f端r Softwaresystemtechnik GmbH School of Design Thinking Prof. Ulrich Weinberg Postfach 900460 D-14440 Potsdam/Germany Tel: Web: E-Mail:

+49 (0)331 5509 - 123 www.hpi.de/d-school office-d-school@hpi.de

Hasso-Plattner-Institut f端r Softwaresystemtechnik GmbH Academy GmbH Dr. Timm Krohn August-Bebel-Str. 88 D-14482 Potsdam/Germany Tel: Web: E-Mail:

+49 (0)331 5509 - 553 www.hpi-academy.de info@hpi-academy.de


202

CREDITS

D.CONFESTIVAL SPEAKER LIST

Surname

Name

Company

Surname

Name

Company

Acar

Ahmet Emre

HIIG

Gumienny

Raja

Hasso-Plattner-Institut

Barrasch

Elias

creative confidence

Gutheil

Mariana

Perestroika Brazil

Bedö

Viktor

Invisible Playground

Gutsmann

Michael

Bigpoint

Berger

Katharina

Deutsche Bank

Hagemann Snabe

Jim

SAP

Berger

Katharina

Deutsche Bank

Hawthorne

Grace

d.school Stanford University

Beyhl

Thomas

Hasso-Plattner-Institut

Heidemanns

Henning

Ministry for economic and European affairs

Bickert

Svenja

University of London

Hillen

Véronique

Ecole de table conte Paris Tech

Bleuel

Flavia

Horlitz

Archibald

GRAVIS

Borlinghaus

Kristin

Deople Network

Hufnagel

Judith

gravity

Borovikov

Tatjana

SAP

Ichikawa

Fumiko

University of Tokyo

Borsch

Ann-Cathrin

B.A.U.M. e.V.

Isselburg

Anna

Both

Thomas

HPI School of Design Thinking

Jordan

Roberta

d.collective

Brenner

Walter

University of St. Gallen

Kelley

David

d.school Stanford University

Bruder

Bettina

University of New South Wales

Kembel

George

d.school Stanford University

Dissen

Gerald

Deople Network

Kim

Yong Se

Sungkyunkwan University

Dorst

Kees

University of Technology Sydney

Koslowsky

Jörg

d.collective

Dreissigacker

Hanswerner

SAP

Krohn

Timm

HPI Academy

Duda

George

Charité

Krüger

Andreas

MODULOR

Duong

Thuy Chinh

Lampelzammer

Tobias

Kammerakademie Potsdam

Eisenberg

Marco

Lange

Bettina

Kammerakademie Potsdam

Emelina

Galina

Langkafel

Peter

SAP

Engelke

Lutz

TRIAD

Larasati

Dwinta

ITB Bandung

Erbe

Andreas

Swisscom

Leihener

Julia

Deutsche Telekom Innovation Laboratories

Gericke

Lutz

Hasso-Plattner-Institut

Licht

Lucas

Deople Network

Gonçalve

Inês

Lietsch

Fritz

ALTOP

Groeben

Sabine

Ling

Brian

Global Education Team

DB Mobility Logistics AG


204

CREDITS

D.CONFESTIVAL SPEAKER LIST

Surname

Name

Company

Surname

Name

Company

Luebbe

Alexander

Hasso-Plattner-Institut

Pottag

Hedi

Mamo

Eskinder

Make Sense

Prib

Anne

Manhães

Maurício

Rafat

Shamim

Impact Solutions

Martus

Hanna

Rasfeld

Margret

Evangelische Schule Berlin Zentrum

Mehra

Robin

Tiefenschärfe

Regenbrecht

Christian

Charité

Meinel

Christoph

Hasso-Plattner-Institut

Rehme

Frank

Metro

Menning

Axel

Reinhard

Ulrike

we school Khajuraho

Meyer

Michael

Siemens

Rhinow

Holger

Hasso-Plattner-Institut

Michl

Bettina

Tiefenschärfe

Riddle

Ben

Furman University

Mros

Julia

Point Blank International

Rosa

Marcos

Alfred-Herrhausen-Stiftung

Mühl

Gordon

SAP

Roth

Bernard

d.school Stanford University

Müller

Andreas

Deople Network

Royalty

Adam

d.school Stanford University

Müller

Katharina

Rubinstein

Rhonda

California Academy of Sciences

Münzing

Tell

Impact Solutions

Schanz

Anne

Deople Network

Nada

Nader

Fatih University

Scheer

Andrea

creative confidence

Neugebauer

Rainer

John-Cage-Orgelstiftung Halberstadt

Scheffer

Cornie

Ney

Steven

Jacobs University

Schliephake

Peter

Zürcher Kantonalbank

Nicolai

Claudia

HPI School of Design Thinking

Schmieder

Marie

d.collective

Nogueira

Nathalia

d.collective

Schmolze

Raimund

Deutsche Telekom Innovation Laboratories

Omar

Zaki

Braunschweig University of Art

Schnaithmann

Christine

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Pachineela

Lakshman

SAP TIGF India

Schuhmann

Rick

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Peschel

Christoph

Deople Network

Seibel

Johannes

d.collective

Peters

Chris

SAP

Skutela

Ariane

SAP

Plattner

Hasso

SAP

Smith

Stuart

National University of Singapore

Plaum

Marcel

Fraport

Sonder

Frank

foresee

Ploskonos

Anna

Design Thinking Lab Moscow

Spiegel

Peter

Genisis


206

CREDITS

D.CONFESTIVAL SPEAKER LIST

Surname

Name

Company

Surname

Name

Company

Spiekermann

Erik

Edenspiekermann

Wand

Eku

Braunschweig University of Art

Stalling

Lars

Innovating Services and Digital Experiences

Warnke

Daniel

Deople Network

Stannieder

Linda

MetaDesign

Watson

Rodger

University of Technology Sydney

Steinert

Bastian

Hasso-Plattner-Institut

Weckesser

Volkmar

DekaBank

Stern

André

SAP

Wegner

Martin

DHL

Strenge

Florian

Weiland

Ute

Alfred-Herrhausen-Stiftung

Stüber

Ralf

PostFinance

Weinberg

Ulrich

HPI School of Design Thinking

Stüttgen

Marcus

Janssen-Cilag

Wenker

Tobias

Point Blank International

Sztandera

Les

Werzlau

Friedemann

Kammerakademie Potsdam

Thies

Anna

Stockholm University

Whitney

Patrick

Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology

Thomson

Tina

Design City Kolding

Widyowijatnoko

Andry

Institut Teknologi Bandung

Tornow

Alexander

gruppenbing!

Wolff

Sascha

Dark Horse

Toscani

Oliviero

Studio Toscani

Xinyuan

Huang

School of Animation and Digital Arts

Tosun

Cafer

SAP Innovation Center

Zupan

Blaz

University of Ljubljana

Tschimmel

Katja

ESAD

van Oosterom

Arne

Design Thinking Network

van Wulfen

Gijs

FORTH Innovation Method

Vermaas

Pieter

Delft University of Technology

Vetterli

Christophe

University of St. Gallen

Vignoli

Matteo

University of Modena

Viswanthan

Satya

SAP

Voget

Lea

d.collective

von Kortzfleisch

Harald

University of Koblenz-Landau

von Mutius

Bernhard

Denkbank

von Stamm

Bettina

Innovation Leadership Forum

von Thienen

Julia

Hasso-Plattner-Institut


208

CREDITS

D.CONFESTIVAL List of PARTICIPATING companies

Alfred-Herrhausen-Stiftung

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Swisscom

ALTOP

Impact Solutions

Tiefenschärfe

B.A.U.M. e.V.

Innovating Services and Digital Experiences

TRIAD

Bigpoint

Innovation Leadership Forum

University of Modena

Braunschweig University of Art

Institut Teknologi Bandung

University of Koblenz-Landau

California Academy of Sciences

Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology

University of Ljubljana

Charité

Invisible Playground

University of London

creative confidence

ITB Bandung

University of New South Wales

d.collective

Jacobs University

University of St. Gallen

d.school Stanford University

Janssen-Cilag

University of Technology Sydney

Dark Horse

John-Cage-Orgelstiftung Halberstadt

University of Tokyo

DB Mobility Logistics AG

Kammerakademie Potsdam

we school Khajuraho

DekaBank

Make Sense

Zürcher Kantonalbank

Delft University of Technology

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Deople Network

MetaDesign

Evangelische Schule Berlin Zentrum

Metro

Fatih University

Ministry for economic affairs and European affairs

foresee

MODULOR

FORTH Innovation Method

National University of Singapore

Fraport

Perestroika Brazil

Furman University

Point Blank International

Genisis

PostFinance

Global Education Team

SAP

GRAVIS

SAP Innovation Center

gravity

SAP TIGF India

gruppenbing!

School of Animation and Digital Arts

Hasso-Plattner-Institut

Siemens

HIIG

Stockholm University

HPI Academy

Studio Toscani

HPI School of Design Thinking

Sungkyunkwan University


210

CREDITS CREDITS

D.Confestival PRODUCTION CREDITS

HPI School of Design Thinking d.confestival production team Ulrich Weinberg – Conference Chair Heike Balluneit Nina Buschle Ulla Egelhof Katy Kavanaugh Isabel Spicker Verena Völkel HPI d.confestival BOOK Production & Graphic Design Team Harald Goegl Glória Matos da Costa Joe Murphy HPI d.confestival Booklet Authors Eva Katharina Barbosa Pfannes Moritz Gekeler Theo Gerstenmaier Svenja Kersken Claire Luzia Leifert Juliane Loeffler Glória Matos da Costa Christop Meinel Nurith Moersberger Sirje Mueller-Viise Joe Murphy Jonas Rehmet Cleo Schmid Jan Schmiedgen Johannes Seibel Elisabeth Voigt Ulrich Weinberg

HPI d.confestival Booklet Photographers Yannick Baeumer Stefan Berg Anna Bickenbach Harald Goegl Dirk Laessig Joe Murphy Ulrich Weinberg HPI School of Design Thinking Anna Bickenbach Thomas Both Anni Dirzus-Naß Moritz Gekeler Harald Goegl Katharina Grascha Mario Heber Nurith Mörsberger Claudia Nicolai Caroline Szymanski Elisabeth Voigt Kristin Wagler Hasso-Plattner-Institut Hans-Joachim Allgaier Katrin Augustin Stefan Blankenburg Silke Braune Michael Dirska Rosina Geiger Thomas Hertzer Sebastian Ihrke Steffen Körner Klaus Knebel Marcel Mellack Steffen Zierl

Triad Anne Ahrens Anette Baier Elena Baumgartner Robert Eysoldt Michael Hajduk Lilian Harms Jeanina Hoeft Stella Hombach Sabine Kahlenberg Stefan Klessmann Harald Lipken Elena Macari Tom Mueller Ansgar Petters Stefan Richter Maria Slowinska Hasso-Plattner-Institut iDeveloper Timo Djürken Tim Specht d.confestival Hosts Nicole Adelt Sebastian Blinn Kathrin Bort Florian Bremer Susan Buckow Johannes Busch Alev Coban Tina Dreisicke Ariane Ecker Ayax Fernandez Paula Fischer Robert Fischer James Fish Laura Gabrysiak

Jochen Gürtler Stefan Hampel Elisabeth Helldorf Carien de Heus Katrin Hoppe Richard Hylerstedt Andrzej Karel Michael Karsch Wolfgang Lauterbach Katrin Lütkemöller Trechelle Lyn Ras Christoph Matthies Axel Menning Joe Murphy Klaus Oberbauer Lucas Paes de Melo Mebuba Perveen Alexander Prokop Johannes Puschmann Lukas Pirl Giulia Radtke Mauro Rego Anton Reinig Alina Schauf Johannes Seibel Lukas Stadelmann Celine Staigies Mana Taheri Carla Tanaka Hemma Thaler Michael Wessel Nushin Yazdani D-School Potsdam Spin-Offs D.collective Roberta Jordan Jörg Koslowsky

Nathalia Nogueira Marie Schmieder Johannes Seidel Lea Voget Deople Network e.V. Kristin Borlinghaus Lucas Licht Andreas Müller Christoph Peschel Anne Schanz Daniel Warnke What Would Harry Do? Laura Andrea Fabian Behnke Philipp Breil Claudia Brückner Nadja Büttner Chinh Duong Christian Forbig

Mariana Gutheil Sebastian Krapp Anna Laesser Ines Lauber Carol Lopez Sebastian Mairline Axel Menning, Hanna Mosca Vanessa Pedroso Ana Pessanha Johannes Puschmann Rui Quinta Wibke Sandau Birte Schaper Mia-Alina Schauf Jan Felix Schwarz Florian Strenge Ronja Wickert And all those others who were there when we needed them


212

D.CONFESTIVAL SUPPORTED BY

CREDITS CREDITS


214

CREDITS CREDITS


216

Design: Ulla Egelhof Gl贸ria Matos da Costa Joe Murphy Project Management: Harald Goegl Photos: Yannick Baeumer Stefan Berg Anna Bickenbach Harald Goegl Dirk Laessig Joe Murphy Ulrich Weinberg

CREDITS CREDITS

IMPRINT D.BOOK

Editors: Eva Katharina Barbosa Pfannes Moritz Gekeler Theo Gerstenmaier Svenja Kersken Claire Luzia Leifert Juliane Loeffler Gl贸ria Matos da Costa Nurith Moersberger Sirje Mueller-Viise Joe Murphy Jonas Rehmet Cleo Schmid Jan Schmiedgen Johannes Seibel Isabel Spicker Elisabeth Voigt Ulrich Weinberg

Copyright by Hasso-Plattner-Institut School of Design Thinking Prof. Ulrich Weinberg Telefon: +49 (0)331 5509 - 123 Web:

www.hpi.de/d-school

E-Mail:

office-d-school@hpi.de

Address: Prof.-Dr.-Helmert-Str. 2 - 3

14482 Potsdam, Germany

Amtsgericht Potsdam, HRB 12184 Gesch盲ftsf眉hrung: Prof. Dr. Christoph Meinel All rights reserved. Potsdam, 2014


d.confestival 2012 - the book  

The first event of its kind for Design Thinking worldwide, the “d.confestival“ 2012 was the destination for multidisciplinary thinkers to co...

d.confestival 2012 - the book  

The first event of its kind for Design Thinking worldwide, the “d.confestival“ 2012 was the destination for multidisciplinary thinkers to co...

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