Page 1

Urban Nutrition Program,  Pune 1st November 2012 Jaskeerat Bedi

© Design Impact 2012


Many NGO’s , crèches, balewadi’s and anaganwadi’s are dedicated to curb the problem of  malnutrition. Amongst such organizations, Deep Griha Society ( DGS ) has been working  since 1975 in welfare development activities, serving the impoverished communities of  Tadiwala Road, Ramtekdi, and Bibvewadi.

Run by Dr. Neela Onawale, DGS is a church funded organization that is catering to welfare  development activities in – Child care, child empowerment, women empowerment, medical  & healthcare, Disha ( HIV / AIDS awareness ) and rural empowerment.

DGS believes in “Empowerment of the marginalised through capacity building and  sustainable urban and rural development programmes”

Malnutrition, a malignant problem

© Design Impact 2012


Every year 45,000 children die of malnutrition in Maharashtra alone, according to ‘A report  on nutritional crisis in Maharashtra’ by the Pune ‐ based SATHI (Support for Advocacy and  Training to Health Initiatives). 

More children die of mild or moderate malnutrition (33,000) than of severe malnutrition  (12,000)

Though the state government has introduced schemes for children meant to prevent such  deaths (The Mid‐day Meal Scheme and The Integrated Child Development Scheme). But the  state government spends just 0.8% of its gross domestic product on these schemes. To make  matters worse, poor administration and governance often leaves such initiatives in the state  of utter neglect. 

Malnutrition, a malignant problem

© Design Impact 2012


Deep Griha and Design Impact believe that the solution – better nutrition for children – can  also have a positive impact on local women. 

What if a nutritious snack program implemented over a 6‐month period shows higher  weights, heights, and haemoglobin counts for the 300+ children at Deep Griha’s day‐care  centres? These positive health impacts could catalyse a new livelihood option – manufacture  and sale of these snacks ‐ for local women’s self‐help groups while children in the community  would have increased access to nutritious foods.

DESIGN IMPACT INTERVENTION

© Design Impact 2012


The main centre of DGS is based out of  Tadiwala Road, an area that houses slum  community of around 35,000 people, many  of whom are enrolled in DGS programmes.

Deep Griha Society, Tadiwala Road, Pune

© Design Impact 2012


Child Care at DGS Child care welfare activities run  across all three centers of DGS. Deep Griha crèches and  balwadis provide early education for  children, preparing them for starting  school at the age of five.

Child Care at DGS

© Design Impact 2012


Children between the ages of 6 months to 5 years are looked after by the teachers at the crèche's at DGC. Children spend 9AM to 5PM in the centre from  Monday to Saturday. •

With children cared for safely during the day, both parents can go out to work and older siblings are able  to attend school. The children receive fully‐rounded care, and emphasis is placed on working with parents  and building positive relationships with the community. Parents are also invited to monthly meetings with their child's teachers, to monitor progress and address  any problems.

© Design Impact 2012


DI Fellow: Anisha Shankar About Anisha: Graduate in Communication and  Energy and Environmental Policy from the University  of Delaware, Anisha had been spent the last  six  years working  in the U.S.  Dec 2011‐ May 2012: As a DI Fellow, Anisha spent  her time observing food given at the crèches,  researching and creating nutritious snack options for  children, collecting feedback on health snacks from  children and DGS Staff and conducting pre‐nutrition  analysis.

DI Fellow: Anisha Shankar

© Design Impact 2012


1. She observed that DGS was  supplementing  food as best it could  within its limited budget. But plainly  there were opportunities to make  any new nutritional efforts count for  the children. Meals at DGS

2. Based on her research, Anisha created four different health snacks,  two sweet and two spicy.

3. Engaged the DGS Community in  tasting the snacks and getting  feedback.

© Design Impact 2012


Pre Nutrition Analysis In order to measure the true impact  of nutrition supplement given to the  children, Anisha meticulously noted  down their heights and weights.  Lack of proper machines and trained  staff made this procedure confusing  and time‐consuming, but with  continuous trials and great efforts,  Anisha finally succeeded in getting  correct measurements of the  children. This measurement will be used in the  future to further asses the impact of  nutrition supplements .

Pre Nutrition Analysis

© Design Impact 2012


Weight‐for‐height is a measure of current nutritional status. Low  weight for height  indicates moderate to severe malnutrition. The results plotted from the first round of  heights and weights using WHO’s Anthro program which compares the population to  the standard were‐ The red line curve shows that approximately half of the 235 children measured are  more than two negative standard deviations away from the mean (moderate  malnutrition, http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/moderate_malnutrition/en/index.html ) and about  one quarter are more than three negative standard deviations away from the mean  (severe malnutrition, http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/severe_malnutrition/en/index.html).  

Comparing DGS children to the WHO standard.


While this is a dramatic plot, it is  hard to lose sight of the many  factors that confound the story:  high turnover in class  composition meaning that new  malnourished children could  skew the curve to the left; our  lack of knowledge about what  and how much the children eat  at home; and whether the  children have been unwell  recently. 

Comparing DGS children to the WHO standard


DI Fellow: Jaskeerat Bedi About Jaskeerat: Jaskeerat comes from a design  background, with masters in strategic design  management and work experience in exhibition  design. She brings with her knowledge of developing  business models using user centric design and brand  development. Aug 2012‐ May 2013: As a DI Fellow, Jaskeerat’s objective is to test different business models which  can help in scaling the nutritious snacks such that it  reaches the right audience, as well as, creates a  sustainable business model for women’s self help  group. She is also responsible for measuring the  impact of nutrition supplement program by  conducting periodic post nutrition analysis.

DI Fellow: Jaskeerat Bedi

© Design Impact 2012


As soon as I joined DGS, I immersed myself in the ladoo making process, using it as an ice‐ breaker to interact with the “mausis” as well as understand what it takes to make these  nutritious yummy snacks.

I couldn’t help but notice how the DGS kitchen, every alternate day in the afternoon, would  change into a ladoo making unit, wherein 5‐6 mausi’s got together to prepare up to 100  ladoos, all in a time spam of 1.5 hours.

This process also enabled me to gauge the levels of hierarchy existing within team leaders,  DGS staff and the mausis. 

DI Fellow: Jaskeerat Bedi

© Design Impact 2012


Preparing the ladoo’s

© Design Impact 2012


Preparing the ladoo’s

© Design Impact 2012


Next, I took a walk into all the crèches, to see how the  ladoos are distributed to the children.

Preparing the ladoos

© Design Impact 2012


Click here to see the video: http://youtu.be/UrkdXlMWoUQ Video: Distributing ladoos at the crèches

© Design Impact 2012


The entire ladoo making and distribution process was extremely organized. 1. 2. 3.

The team leader Mrs. Ranjana, had an yearly estimate of production cost of  the ladoos. Each batch of laddos prepared are counted for and noted down in a register  maintained by the team leaders across all centers. Each crèche is given ladoos based on the number of children present on that day, so  as to reduce any wastage. This number  is noted down, along with signature of the  supervising teacher of the crèche and the distributor.

Distributing laddos at the crèches

© Design Impact 2012


Meals distributed at the crèches   I made a note on the type of meals being distributed at the crèches.

Monday               Milk (with coconut) + Eggs           Lentils + Cauliflower + Rice Tuesday               Milk (with semolina) + Laddo Lentils + Fenugreek + Rice Wednesday        Milk ( with vermicelli) + Eggs        Lentils + Bottle Gourd + Rice Thursday             Milk ( with semolina) + Laddo Lentils + Spinach + Rice Friday                   Milk ( with vermicelli) + Laddo Lentils + Potatoes + Rice Saturday             Milk (with coconut)                          Lentils + Cauliflower + Rice

One‐ time meal

© Design Impact 2012


Next, I observed how health measurements of children were taken. •

All the teachers at the creches are asked to maintain WHO health card, and plot the weight  to age ratio of the children on it. However, due to a new template released by WHO, many  teachers were confused about plotting and reading the card. I often found myself answering  questions related to the new templates.

Despite, Anisha’s organized documentation, I faced initial problems in getting up to date  height‐weight measurements of the children that I could use as reference point. This was  primarily because till now all height‐weight measurements were overlooked by volunteers  and the same information was not transferred to the DGS staff.

Post nutrition analysis

© Design Impact 2012


Post nutrition analysis

title

title

title

title


Training Program for Teachers Each teacher takes care of  up to 30 children and spends more than six hours with them. If they  can be trained to take proper measurements and file it in a systemic manner, dependency on the  volunteers will reduce drastically and the process might become cyclic( or perhaps embed ) in the  calendar of DGS! Training Program for Teachers

© Design Impact 2012


I developed forms in Marathi, for filling health indicators and distributed amongst all teachers, such that hence forth, all measurements could be taken in a homogenous fashion.

Training Program for Teachers

We also discussed the new WHO  template and what the plotting  indicates. This exercise helped  clear a lot of doubts amongst the  teachers © Design Impact 2012


Measuring Heights After handing out the forms and giving a  demonstration of measuring height and weight, I  asked each teacher to take the measurements of 5  other teachers. This created quite a flutter of  activities as the ladies busied themselves, excited to  get themselves measured! They often forgot to write down the name of the  crèche & the date of measurement. Some even tried  copying the measurements of others! While measuring weights was fairly simple, it was  difficult to get the right height measurements. It took  some time for the teachers to understand the  reading and the metric system, while keeping in  mind the protocols of getting the accurate height.  They also got confused in reading the English  numerical. After many attempts, I think they have  finally figured how to read the markings!

Training Program for Teachers

© Design Impact 2012


The presentation was a great way to interact with all the school teachers, as well as team  leaders. Optimistically, we set our dates to collect the health indicators by 15th September,  however, lack of equipment and the festival period hindered our process. Never the less, we were successful in completing our 1st round of Post Nutrition  Assessment and maintaining a systematic record in homogenous data entry fashion by the  end of September.

Post nutrition analysis

© Design Impact 2012


The red line indicates that‐ 1/5th ( 46 of 213 ) children are  severely malnourished as they  fall below three median. 1/3rd ( 66 of 213) children are  moderately malnourished as  they fall between ‐2 & ‐3 median

Post nutrition analysis

© Design Impact 2012


After having completed our 1st Post Nutrition Analysis, we decided to conduct our 2nd  Analysis in the 1st week of December. Meanwhile, I decided to sketch some probable business models as to circulate ladoo’s to a  wider audience. 

Sketching business models

© Design Impact 2012


Sketching Business Models

© Design Impact 2012


MULTIPLE ENTRY LEVELS: Government + DGS

1. 2. 3. 4.

integrated child  development services municipal corporations government schools anganwadi’s

Sketching Business Models

APPROACH STRATEGY: 1.INDIVIDUAL APPROACH DGS has networks with different Anganwadi’s &  nearby government schools that can be explored. 2. VIA ICDS ICDS is a government run body that controls all  nutrition related activity for children. Approach via  ICDS will have maximum impact over a large number  of schools & crèches.

© Design Impact 2012


MULTIPLE ENTRY LEVELS: NGO’S + DGS

1. Connect with NGO’s that  focus on child care, health, nutrition  based initiatives

APPROACH STRATEGY: 1. DGS AS SERVICE PROVIDER DGS will provide healthy ladoo’s to the children at  these NGO’s and as well as measure nutrition  assessment. 2. DGS AS TRAINER DGS will provide training service to NGO’s on how to  make ladoo’s as well as measure health indicators 3. DGS AS CONSULTANT Provides training & supervision services for certain  time period till the NGO has developed its own  resources to manage the project.

Sketching Business Models

© Design Impact 2012


MULTIPLE ENTRY LEVELS: SELF HELP GROUPS + DGS

1. Connect with self help group’s for new start‐up initiative 2. Connect with existing groups for  launching a new food product

Sketching Business Models

APPROACH STRATEGY: 1. DEEP GRIHA INITIATIVE  PRODUCT DGS will provide employment opportunities to run  its own SHG, under which women will make, package  & sell healthy products as Deep Griha Initiative.

© Design Impact 2012


MULTIPLE ENTRY LEVELS: RETAIL + DGS

1. Connect with corporate that  cater to children ( food,  entertainment, education, etc ) 

Sketching Business Models

APPROACH STRATEGY: 1. CSR INITIATIVE OF CORPORATE DGS can approach a corporate to fund The Ladoo Project on a large scale using existing resources of  the Corporate

© Design Impact 2012


image

Keeping the business models in mind, I thought of hitting the ground zero,! I began going for events and exhibitions, where different NGO’s would get together and started talking about‐ THE LADOO PROJECT

Laddo talks

© Design Impact 2012


Participating in Yellow Ribbon NGO Fair Due to oncoming Diwali season, we got the opportunity to participate in another NGO Fair at  Ishanaya Mall, Pune. This time we decided to take a step further than just talking about the project. We decided to  make people taste our healthy ladoos and get some market feedback! Yellow Ribbon NGO Fair

© Design Impact 2012


image

image

image

Some quick sketches and rough prototypes later, we created our 1st set of Samples of ladoo’s ( peanut & millet )  ready for sale. 

Yellow Ribbon NGO Fair


Rs 50 per packet Each Ladoo package contained 5  ladoo’s each and was priced at Rs 50/ packet. We prepared 60 such packets to  be sold in a span of 4 days event,  starting from 26th October to 29th October.

Yellow Ribbon NGO Fair

© Design Impact 2012


Key Learning's +People were inquisitive about our project and came  forward to support the cause. +We had some children too, whose facial expressions  gave us an honest feedback on the rather  unattractive colours of our ladoos +We also gathered a lot of feedback on how to make  the branding of the project more visual and  empathetic. +Met some organizations that showed interest in  learning the recipes of these ladoos, while others  were interested in offering retail space for them. +Some people also suggested to reduce the size of  the ladoos as they seemed really heavy to consume +Some enquired if the ladoos could benefit cancer,  diabetic patients, or old people. Yellow Ribbon NGO Fair

© Design Impact 2012


PROFIT EARNED: Of the 60 packets made, we were able to sell 30  packets in a span of four days. We realized that in  order to sell these ladoos, we needed to persuade  people to taste the ladoos first, talk about the cause  and then they would buy the packets. So, we were  constantly on our feet, and adopted aggressive  marketing to get our laados going. We were able to make 100 % profit, even though we  sold only half the number of packets. Of all the products displayed at the Deep Griha Stall,  the laados were the hottest selling products.  This experience gave confidence to the DGS Staff on  how effective story telling about the product via  design thinking can earn good returns.

Training Program for Teachers

© Design Impact 2012


Thanks for your time. Would love to hear your feedback.  Contact: Jaskeerat Bedi Jaskeerat.bedi@d‐impact.org www.d‐impact.org

© Design Impact 2012

Urban Nutrition Project: October 2012 Update  

Process journal on the laddo project by DI Fellow Jaskeerat Bedi.