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CYNTHIA WANG | PORTFOLIO Master of Architecture Candidate ‘19 Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation Duke University ‘15

clw2163@columbia.edu


CYNTHIA WANG clw2163@columbia.edu | 408.888.7618 212 W. 91st Street, New York, NY 10024 EDUCATION Columbia University | New York, NY Master of Architecture Candidate Expected May 2019 The Shape of Two Cities: New York/Paris Program May 2016 Duke University | Durham, NC May 2015 Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Biology, Minor in Environmental Science and Policy and Art History University College London | London, England Fall 2013 Study abroad coursework in London Architecture, Urban Planning Systems and Biology Harvard University | Cambridge, MA Summer 2012 Harvard Graduate School of Design: Career Discovery Program RELEVANT EXPERIENCE Peninsula Land & Capital | Palo Alto, CA May 2014 – Present Property Assistant and Design Consultant + Conducted quantitative and qualitative research through traditional online research and Excel to create an alphanumeric filing system to increase efficiency for managing all historic files + Compiled annually required Certificate of Insurance documentation for 125 tenants, input daily deposits and payments into QuickBooks, entered data for energy disclosure database and managed online commercial rent portfolio + Prepared plans and edit drawings for desired tenant modifications NO ARCHITECTURE | New York, NY May – Aug. 2017 Architectural Intern + Developed a design strategy from concept to completion for a housing competition in Rapperswil-Jona, Switzerland for 126 residential apartment units + Coordinated all aspects of the design process, including budget, project context and technical constraints The Shape of Two Cities: New York/Paris Program | Columbia University, NY Sept. 2015 – May 2016 Student in Architecture + Explored creative interpretations and design concepts through architectural theory and studio projects typical to those of first-year graduate school + Built models and hand-drew analytical and representational drawings (diagram, plan, section, axonometric) Friends of the Earth | Berkeley, CA May – Aug. 2013 Oceans and Vessels Program Intern + Updated and expanded the 2013 Cruise Ship Environmental Report Card, which allows passengers to choose greener cruises based on cruise lines’ environmental and health impacts + Performed media outreach, designed infographics and published blogs for the vessels campaign + Gained solid understanding of prevalent issues and policy efforts in water quality, oceans and marine biology through participation in environmental activism and campaign support LEADERSHIP/VOLUNTEER Duke Bite | Photographer Sept. 2014 – May 2015 + Contributed to the visual layout of the magazine through photography and content using Adobe InDesign WOODS | Co-Center Leader and Volunteer for After-School Program Jan. 2014 – May 2014 + Organized and headed weekly activities designed to increase environmental awareness and appreciation in Durham elementary school students for 2 hours per week SKILLS Language: Native Mandarin speaker, basic French and Spanish language proficiency Computer: Adobe Creative Suite (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator), Rhino, Revit, working knowledge of AutoCAD and V-Ray, basic HTML + CSS web coding and Javascript, MS Office Suite, QuickBooks, FileMaker Pro Other skills: Bookkeeping, Mental Arithmetic


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BRIDGELINE SCHOOL [CO]HOUSE LIBRARY AS URBAN TREEHOUSE MEDITATION PIER GREENPOINT TERRACE THEATER


BRIDGELINE SCHOOL | Bridgeport, Connecticut Semester: Spring 2018 Critic: Adam Frampton Studio: Columbia University GSAPP, Advanced Studio IV Partner: Kyungmin Cho This project seeks to develop a new educational model that bridges work and school. Situated along the waterfront, buildings are organized linearly on a 30ft by 30ft grid to form a non-hierarchical relationship between work and school, creating a series of programmatic parallel bands that are connected by a central spine. This grid system allows for future spatial flexibility, becoming a larger system that can expand or contract according to the future of education and the greater Bridgeport area. On a smaller scale, the ground floor is conceived as an open public landscape, where school and work spaces reflect a collaborative working 1

environment through open, non-hierarchical plans. Inversing these two architectural languages, the second floor is conceived as a more intimate and enclosed space, accommodating more individualized and smallscale learning through forced encounters. Thus, this new campus aims to rethink the school corridor as an urban street, reinterpreting the boundary between city and school, as well as creating new public spaces for the urban city.


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[CO]HOUSE | Bronx, New York Semester: Fall 2017 Critic: Adam Frampton Studio: Columbia University GSAPP, Core Studio III Partner: Elizabeth Daddazio [co]house seeks to develop new collectivity around family structure by forming non-traditional families and encouraging social mixing around shared spaces. Apartments navigate the potential living situations where grandparents play a major role as caregivers within the larger context of elderly care systems. The coexistence between generations creates an additional layer of care and observation while maintaining autonomy. Addressing these instances introduces a new model for co-living which facilitates new social relationships. Buildings are clustered together to form a field condition, creating a hierarchy of spaces while also allowing for 7

differing degrees of privacy. Each building grows from the site’s hardscape, where interior communal spaces become an extension of the exterior -- made entirely accessible for all generations. On a smaller scale, each apartment type seeks to accommodate the potential idiosyncrasies that exist within a non-traditional family. Units have been optimized to their most minimal dimensions while maintaining ADA accessibility, and are packed and aggregated in such a way that the residual square footage forms a central communal / circulatory space throughout the building.


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MICRO - APARTMENT [ 225 SF] CARETAKER

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MICRO - APARTMENT [ 150 SF] ELDERLY : SINGLE

1 - BEDROOM APARTMENT [ 675 SF] GRANDPARENT + CHILD

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STUDIO APARTMENT [ 450 SF] ELDERLY : COUPLE

2 - BEDROOM APARTMENT [ 900 SF] GRANDPARENT + PARENT + CHILD

2 - BEDROOM APARTMENT [ 900 SF] GRANDPARENT + PARENT + CHILD

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Ground floor plan

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Floor 03 plan

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LIBRARY AS URBAN TREEHOUSE | Brooklyn, New York Semester: Spring 2017 Critic: Mimi Hoang Studio: Columbia University GSAPP, Core Studio II Thoroughout history, the library has long been masquerading as a garden. This project aims to exaggerate this connection by transforming and elevating the experience of reading to one in the tree. “Library as an urban treehouse� can be defined as a place of tranquility and escape set within an urban context, a space that connects to nature and blurs the edge between indoor and outdoor. The path is elongated across suspended platforms of open and closed programs, skirting around different datums of tree trunks and canopies. In short, the library becomes a part of the forest, and the forest becomes a part of the city. 17


Diagram of structure and circulation in relation to the urban fabric

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BREAK

EXTENSION

Spatial relationships and experience shaped by degree of enclosure 18


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Floor 05 plan

Floor 03 plan

Ground floor plan 22


Series of conceptual drawing and section models 23


Above: Conceptual sectional layer model of the juxtaposition between what is suspending and what is emerging Below: Physical model using mat board, acrylic and basswood 24


MEDITATION PIER | East River Park, New York Semester: Fall 2016 Critic: Josh Uhl Studio: Columbia University GSAPP, Core Studio I This project aims to create a perceptual sense of isolation from the city. The design proposes a meditation and reflection center that serves as a spiritual extension of the physical activities of the site. Individual, floating meditation pods provide a strong visual connection to nature, while large, freestanding walls not only become a structural component that the user weaves and walks through, but also an operation that denies views of the city that is behind. Thus, the pier becomes a retreat, a place of both physical and spiritual detachment where people can come to escape. 25


Precedent analysis studying the reciprocity between landscaping, pathway and structured building. The sectional typologies of each moment were then subsequently translated into the pier.

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Floor 02 plan

Ground floor plan 30


GREENPOINT TERRACE THEATER | Brooklyn, New York Semester: Fall 2017 Critic: Sarrah Khan Studio: Columbia University GSAPP, Tech IV Team: Fiona Ho, Sunghoon Lee, Emily Po This studio seeks to integrate technical systems and design, with the intent of understanding basic principles and construction of the technical aspects of architecture. Our project is a flexible theater, sited along the Brooklyn waterfront, that uses terracing as a strategy to direct views and maximize connections between indoor and outdoor space. Divided into front- and back-of-house, the former is perceived as a bright, open public space and the latter as the backbone of the building. Understanding egress, environmental systems, materials and structural form were also crucial in the development of the project. 31


Floor 02 plan

Ground floor plan 32


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CYNTHIA WANG | PORTFOLIO Master of Architecture Candidate ‘19 Columbia University clw2163@columbia.edu 408.888.7618

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