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WHERE ARE ALL THE JOBS? HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction .............................................................................................................................................................. 2 2. Methodology ............................................................................................................................................................ 2 3. Employment by Industry: Top 10 Sectors of Employment ..................................................................................... 3 I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X.

Retail and Wholesale Trade ................................................................................................................................ 4 Manufacturing ..................................................................................................................................................... 6 Health Care and Social Assistance ....................................................................................................................... 8 Educational Services .......................................................................................................................................... 10 Finance, Insurance, Real Estate and Leasing .................................................................................................... 12 Construction ...................................................................................................................................................... 14 Professional, Scientific and Technical Services ................................................................................................. 16 Accommodation and Food Services .................................................................................................................. 18 Transportation and Warehousing ..................................................................................................................... 20 Business, Building and Other Support Services ................................................................................................ 22

4. What Does All This Tell Us? .................................................................................................................................... 24

Updated September 2012


1. INTRODUCTION This report outlines the most prominent occupations in Hamilton’s top 10 industries, as classified by the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). It provides information regarding the required skill level, median income and outlook for future employment for each occupation. The occupations are organized according to the National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2006 of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The following scale was used to classify the NOC skill levels: A- Occupations usually require university education B- Occupations usually require college or vocational education or apprenticeship training C- Occupations usually require secondary school and/or occupation-specific training D- On-the-job training is usually provided for occupations

2. METHODOLOGY Information from the 2006 census provided the basis for much of the report, as it provides the most comprehensive data. To identify more recent employment trends, Local Labour Market Indicators derived from Canadian Business Patterns (June 2011), Labour Force Survey (2010) and other Statistics Canada sources were also included, whenever possible.

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3. EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Table 1: Top 10 Sectors of Employment (Hamilton CMA) NAICS

41, 44-45 31-33 62 61 52-53 23 54 72 48-49 55-56

Industry

% of Jobs in all Industries (2011)

% Growth of Jobs in Industry (2001 to 2011)

17.3% 13.3% 12.7% 6.8% 6.8%

17.3% -30.8% 32.1% 10.3% 11.3%

# of Employers (2011) (Hamilton Census Division) 3,938 1,029 1,867 333 4,294

6.7% 6.3%

38.4% 34.1%

3,740 3,262

6.1% 5.3% 4.4%

25.3% 27.0% 35.8%

1,220 1,678 2,427

Retail and Wholesale Trade Manufacturing Health Care and Social Assistance Educational Services Finance, Insurance, Real Estate and Leasing Construction Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Accommodation and Food Services Transportation and Warehousing Business, Building and Other Support Services

(Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey & Canadian Business Patterns)

Table 2: Top 10 Subsectors (Hamilton Census Division) NAICS

Industry

# Employed (2006)

# of Employers (2011)

611

Educational Services

18,660

333

722

Food Services and Drinking Places

13,795

1,147

622

Hospitals

11,540

13

541

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

10,985

3,262

331

Primary Metal Manufacturing

9,350

28

561

Administrative and Support Services

7,510

1,284

445

Food and Beverage Stores

6,890

493

621

Ambulatory Health Care Services

6,420

1,458

623

Nursing and Residential Care Facilities

5,695

184

336

Transportation Equipment Manufacturing

5,625

41

(Statistics Canada- 2006 Census & Canadian Business Patterns)

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I.

RETAIL AND WHOLESALE TRADE (NAICS 41, 44-45)

HIGHLIGHTS   

Accounted for 17.3% of jobs across all industries (Hamilton CMA 2011) Industry employed 41,615 workers (Hamilton Census Division 2006) 3,938 employers (Hamilton Census Division June 2011) (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey; Canadian Business Patterns)

EMPLOYMENT TRENDS BY INDUSTRY Employment Trends Employment Percentage Change, 2006-2010 Hamilton CMA 15.00% 10.00% 5.00%

Retail and Wholesale Trade

0.00%

All industries

-5.00%

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

-10.00% (Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey)

HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS

Top Occupations in Retail and Wholesale Trade 6421 Retail salespersons and sales clerks Hamilton, 2006 0621 Retail trade managers 22.8% 6611 Cashiers 48.6% 10.4% 9.4% 3.4%

6622 Grocery clerks and store shelf stockers 6411 Sales representatives, wholesale trade (non-technical) Other

5.4%

(Statistics Canada- 2006 Census)

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HAMILTON CENSUS DIVISION: SKILL REQUIREMENTS, MEDIAN INCOME AND OUTLOOK FOR TOP OCCUPATIONS Total Employment (2006): 41,615

Occupational Title

# Employed (2006)

Skill Level

Median Annual Income (2006)

Outlook 2006-2016 New Workers Required

9,475

C

$29,194

2,450

4,340

A

$37,988

1,205

3,920 2,250

D D

$17,999 $27,348

991 387

1,405

C

$52,001

295

1,100

C

$39,798

235

945

B

$33,102

169

920

C

$36,689

97

880

A

$80,470

307

685

C

$30,020

339

(Across All Industries)

6421

0621 6611 6622

6411

7452 6211 1471 0611

3414

Retail Salespersons and Sales Clerks Retail Trade Managers Cashiers Grocery Clerks and Store Shelf Stockers Sales Representatives, Wholesale Trade (nontechnical) Material Handlers Retail Trade Supervisors Shippers and Receivers Sales, Marketing and Advertising Managers Other Assisting Occupations in Support of Health Services

With 9,475 workers in Hamilton, Retail Salespersons and Sales Clerks are the most common occupations in this industry. Job opportunities are usually available year-round, with higher demand during peak shopping seasons. This occupation is usually part-time or temporary with a young age profile and low skill requirements. There are ongoing replacement needs as workers leave for other opportunities.

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II. MANUFACTURING (NAICS 31-33) HIGHLIGHTS   

Accounted for 13.3% of jobs across all industries (Hamilton CMA 2011) Industry employed 42,525 workers (Hamilton Census Division 2006) 1,029 employers (Hamilton Census Division June 2011) (Statistics Canada, 2006 Census, Labour Force Survey & Canadian Business Patterns)

EMPLOYMENT TRENDS BY INDUSTRY

Employment Growth by Industry Employment Percentage Change, 2006-2010 Hamilton CMA 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% -5.0%

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Manufacturing All Industries

-10.0% -15.0% -20.0%

(Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey)

HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS

Top Occupations in Manufacturing Hamilton, 2006 4.1% 4.0% 3.8% 3.1% 3.1%

7265 Welders and related machine operators 9482 Motor vehicle assemblers, inspectors and testers 9617 Labourers in food, beverage and tobacco processing 7311 Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics (except textile) 0911 Manufacturing managers Other

81.9%

(Statistics Canada- 2006 Census)

6


HAMILTON CENSUS DIVISION: SKILL REQUIREMENTS, MEDIAN INCOME AND OUTLOOK FOR TOP OCCUPATIONS Total Employment (2006): 42,525 Top Occupations

# Employed (2006)

Skill Level

Welders And Related Machine Operators Motor Vehicle Assemblers, Inspectors And Testers Labourers in Food, Beverage and Tobacco Processing

1,740

B

$47,323

-94

1700

C

$50,458

-40

1,630

D

$28,382

34

7311

Construction Millwrights and Industrial Mechanics (Except Textile)

1,315

B

$64,615

-142

0911

1,310

A

$76,010

-17

7231

Manufacturing Managers Machinists and Machining and Tooling Inspectors

1,170

B

$54,804

-19

7452

Material Handlers

1,070

C

$39,798

235

9611

Labourers In Mineral and Metal Processing Structural Metal and Platework Fabricators and Fitters Shippers and Receivers

1,070

D

56,552

-295

950

B

$62,583

-154

875

C

$36,689

97

Median Annual Income (2006)

Outlook 2006-2016 New Workers Required

(Across All Industries)

7265

9482

9617

7263

1471

(Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Custom Tabulation- Workforce Planning Hamilton and Centre for Spatial Economics)

Many of the top occupations in the manufacturing sector are expected to decline during the period 2006-2016. The sector has declined overall by over 30% in the 10 year period 2001-2011. 7


III. HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE (NAICS 62) HIGHLIGHTS   

Accounted for 12.7% of jobs across all industries (Hamilton CMA 2011) Industry employed 30,290 workers (Hamilton Census Division 2006) 1,867 employers (Hamilton Census Division June 2011) (Statistics Canada,-2006 Census, Labour Force Survey & Canadian Business Patterns)

EMPLOYMENT TRENDS BY INDUSTRY

Employment Growth by Industry Employment Percentage Change, 2006-2010 Hamilton CMA 15.0% 10.0% Health care and social assistance

5.0% 0.0% -5.0%

All Industries 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

-10.0% (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey)

HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS

Top Occupations in Health Care and Social Assistance3152 Registered nurses Hamilton, 2006 3413 Nurse aides, orderlies and patient service associates

15.3% 10.5%

58.6%

6.7% 4.8% 4.0%

4214 Early childhood educators and assistants 4212 Community and social service workers 1414 Receptionists and switchboard operators Other (Statistics Canada-2006 Census)

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HAMILTON CENSUS DIVISION: SKILL REQUIREMENTS, MEDIAN INCOME AND OUTLOOK FOR TOP OCCUPATIONS Total Employment (2006): 30,290

Top Occupations

# Employed (2006)

Skill Level

Median Annual Income (2006)

4,645

A

$66,327

3,195

C

$33,584

Outlook 2006-2016 New Workers Required

(Across All Industries)

3152 3413

4214

4212

1414

6471

3112

6661 4152 3111

Registered Nurses Nurse Aides, Orderlies and Patient Service Associates Early Childhood Educators and Assistants Community and Social Service Workers Receptionists and Switchboard Operators Visiting homemakers, housekeepers and related occupations General Practitioners and Family Physicians Light Duty Cleaners Social Workers Specialist Physicians

2,814

1,454 2,030

B

$24,211

861

1,445

B

$38,205

600

1,225

C

$30,690

869

985

C

$24,238

352

875

A

$136,011

553

815

D

$21,006

778

715

A

$56,190

424

700

A

$225,721

481

(Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Custom Tabulation- Workforce Planning Hamilton and Centre for Spatial Economics)

Registered nurses and nurse aides have the highest concentration of employment in the health care sector. According to Statistics Canada, employment prospects for these occupations are expected to be good in the Hamilton-NiagaraPeninsula in 2012-2013. The age profile of registered and registered practical nurses in the region is older than most economic regions in Ontario, with 40% of registered nurses fifty years of age and over, according to the 2006 census. Employment prospects for nurse aides, orderlies and patient associates are also good for upcoming years, as this occupation experiences a high rate of turnover (partly due to the relatively low share of full-time positions available). 9


IV. EDUCATIONAL SERVICES (NAICS 61) HIGHLIGHTS   

Accounted for 6.8% of jobs across all industries (Hamilton CMA 2011) Industry employed 20,340 workers (Hamilton Census Division 2006) 333 employers (Hamilton Census Division June 2011) (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Canadian Business Patterns)

EMPLOYMENT TREND BY INDUSTRY

Employment Growth by Industry Employment Percentage Change, 2006-2010 Hamilton CMA 20.0% 10.0% Educational services

0.0% -10.0%

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

All Industries

-20.0% (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey)

HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS

Top Occupations in Educational Services Hamilton, 2006

4142 Elementary school and kindergarten teachers 4141 Secondary school teachers

21.5% 42.0%

13.4%

9.8% 5.4%

4122 Post-secondary teaching and research assistants 6472 Elementary and secondary school teacher assistants 4121 University professors Other Educational Services Occupations

7.8%

(Statistics Canada-2006 Census)

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HAMILTON CENSUS DIVISION: SKILL REQUIREMENTS, MEDIAN INCOME AND OUTLOOK FOR TOP OCCUPATIONS Total Employment (2006): 20,340

Occupational Title

# Employed (2006)

Skill Level

Median Annual Income (2006)

Outlook 2006-2016 New Workers Required

4,365

A

$60,217

1,007

2,725

A

$67,334

502

2,000

A

$32,189

441

1,595

C

$27,362

387

1,105

A

$90,025

445

1,050

D

$34,964

937

875

A

$65,603

341

505

C

$36,658

1,129

490

B

$34,913

989

380

A

$24,135

107

(Across All Industries)

4142

4141 4122

6472

4121 6663

4131

1411 1241

5133

Elementary School and Kindergarten Teachers Secondary School Teachers Post-Secondary Teaching and Research Assistants Elementary and Secondary School Teacher Assistants University Professors Janitors, Caretakers and Building Superintendents College and Other Vocational Instructors General Office Clerks Secretaries (Except Legal And Medical) Musicians And Singers

(Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Custom Tabulation- Workforce Planning Hamilton and Centre for Spatial Economics)

The educational services industry is mainly composed of teachers and professors at the elementary, secondary and postsecondary level; however, there are supporting occupations that do not require university education.

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V. FINANCE, INSURANCE, REAL ESTATE AND LEASING (NAICS 52-53) HIGHLIGHTS   

Accounted for 6.8% of jobs across all industries (Hamilton CMA 2011) Industry employed 40,645 workers (Hamilton Census Division 2006) 4,294 employers (Hamilton Census Division June 2011) (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey & Canadian Business Patterns)

EMPLOYMENT TREND BY INDUSTRY

Employment Growth by Industry Employment Percentage Change, 2006-2010 Hamilton CMA 20.0% 10.0%

Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing

0.0% -10.0%

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

All Industries

-20.0% (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey)

HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS

Top Occupations in Finance, Insurance, Real Estate and 1433 Customer service Leasing representatives - financial services 6232 Real estate agents and Hamilton, 2006

salespersons 6231 Insurance agents and brokers

11% 7% 6%

65%

1114 Other financial officers 0122 Banking, credit and other investment managers Other

6% 5%

(Statistics Canada-2006 Census)

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HAMILTON CENSUS DIVISION: SKILL REQUIREMENTS, MEDIAN INCOME AND OUTLOOK FOR TOP OCCUPATIONS Total Employment (2006): 40,645

Occupational Title

# Employed (2006)

Skill Level

Median Annual Income (2006)

Outlook 2006-2016 New Workers Required

1,545

C

$30,606

334

1,025

B

$52476

356

895

B

$42,005

223

785

A

$53,283

222

695

A

$59,362

133

580

B

$40,010

302

515

B

$38,782

93

475

C

$36,658

1,129

470

A

$66,760

168

465

C

$35,485

80

(Across All Industries)

1433

6232 6231 1114 0122

1224 1232 1411 0121

1434

Customer Service RepresentativesFinancial Real Estate Agents and Salespersons Insurance Agents and Brokers Other Financial Officers Banking, Credit and Other Investment Managers Property Administrators Loan Officers General Office Clerks Insurance, Real Estate and Financial Brokerage Managers Banking, Insurance and Other Financial Clerks

(Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Custom Tabulation- Workforce Planning Hamilton and Centre for Spatial Economics)

The most prominent occupations in this sector are customer service representatives in financial services. A significant number of job openings arise from high turnover, as this is mostly an entry-level position; however, employment growth in this occupation will be limited as duties are adapted and consolidated due to technological advancement. Many of the projected job openings in this sector will require completion of secondary school, college or vocational education.

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VI. CONSTRUCTION (NAICS 23) HIGHLIGHTS   

Accounted for 6.7% of jobs across all industries (Hamilton CMA 2011) Industry employed 17,485 workers (Hamilton Census Division 2006) 3,740 employers (Hamilton Census Division June 2011) (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey & Canadian Business Patterns)

EMPLOYMENT TREND BY INDUSTRY

Employment Growth by Industry Employment Percentage Change, 2006-2010 Hamilton CMA 40.0% 20.0%

Construction All Industries

0.0% 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

-20.0% (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey)

HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS

Top Occupations in Construction Hamilton, 2006 13%

7611 Construction trades helpers and labourers 7271 Carpenters

9% 6%

7241 Electricians (except industrial and power system) 0711 Construction managers

4% 64%

4%

7294 Painters and decorators Other Occupations in Construction (Statistics Canada-2006 Census)

14


HAMILTON CENSUS DIVISION: SKILL REQUIREMENTS, MEDIAN INCOME AND OUTLOOK FOR TOP OCCUPATIONS Total Employment (2006): 17,485

Occupational Title

# Employed (2006)

Skill Level

Median Annual Income (2006)

Outlook 2006-2016 New Workers Required

(Across All Industries)

7611

7271 7241

0711 7294 0712

7291 7284

7251 7219

Construction Trades Helpers and Labourers Carpenters

2,195

D

$40,034

209

1,550

B

$35,295

119

Electricians (Except Industrial and Power System) Construction Managers Painters and Decorators Residential Home Builders and Renovators

1,035

B

$51,174

98

740

A

$62,516

123

715

B

$24,649

68

625

A

$31,936

71

Roofers and Shinglers Plasterers, Drywall Installers and Finishers, and Lathers Plumbers

550

B

$36,609

50

540

B

$38,014

18

525

B

$46,085

77

Contractors and Supervisors, Other Construction Trades, Installers, Repairers and Servicers

465

B

$49,847

69

(Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Custom Tabulation- Workforce Planning Hamilton and Centre for Spatial Economics)

The most common construction occupations, construction trades helpers and labourers, have a younger age profile when compared to all occupations in the province, with over 80% of people in this occupation under the age of 50 at the time of the 2006 census. As this is an entry level position, there tends to be high turnover as workers leave for other opportunities.

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VII. PROFESSIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL SERVICES (NAICS 54) HIGHLIGHTS   

Accounted for 6.3% of jobs across all industries (Hamilton CMA 2011) Industry employed 12,735 workers (Hamilton Census Division 2006) 3,262 employers (Hamilton Census Division June 2011) (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey & Canadian Business Patterns)

EMPLOYMENT TREND BY INDUSTRY

Employment Growth by Industry Employment Percentage Change, 2006-2010 Hamilton CMA 30.0% 20.0%

Professional, scientific and technical services

10.0%

All Industries

0.0% -10.0%

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010 (Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey)

HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS

Top Occupations in Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

1111 Financial auditors and accountants 4112 Lawyers and Québec notaries

Hamilton, 2006

5.5% 4.8% 4.2% 3.7% 3.4%

1231 Bookkeepers 2171 Information systems analysts and consultants 1242 Legal secretaries Other Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Occupations

78.5%

(Statistics Canada-2006 Census)

16


HAMILTON CENSUS DIVISION: SKILL REQUIREMENTS, MEDIAN INCOME AND OUTLOOK FOR TOP OCCUPATIONS Total Employment (2006): 12, 735

Occupational Title

# Employed (2006)

Skill Level

Median Annual Income (2006)

Outlook 2006-2016 New Workers Required

Financial Auditors and Accountants Lawyers and Quebec Notaries Bookkeepers

695

A

$59,270

533

605

A

$109,695

368

540

B

$34,034

460

Information Systems Analysts and Consultants Legal Secretaries

465

A

$64,953

121

435

B

$34,198

170

Paralegal and Related Occupations Computer Programmers and Interactive Media Developers Accounting and Related Clerks Graphic Designers and Illustrators Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management

415

B

$36,994

186

360

A

$58,113

134

345

C

$36,880

525

330

B

$35,335

99

290

A

$47,566

117

(Across All Industries)

1111 4112 1231 2171

1242 4211 2174

1431 5241 1122

(Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Custom Tabulation- Workforce Planning Hamilton and Centre for Spatial Economics)

Most of the top occupations in this sector require either college or university education. Even supporting roles in this industry, such as accounting and related clerks, tend to work in computerized environments, making computer skills an essential requirement for employment.

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VIII. ACCOMODATION AND FOOD SERVICES (NAICS 72) HIGHLIGHTS   

Accounted for 6.1% of jobs across all industries (Hamilton CMA 2011) Industry employed 16,430 workers (Hamilton Census Division 2006) 1,220 employers (Hamilton Census Division June 2011) (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey, Canadian Business Patterns)

EMPLOYMENT TREND BY INDUSTRY

Employment Growth by Industry Employment Percentage Change, 2006-2010 Hamilton CMA 60.0% 40.0% 20.0%

All Industries

0.0% -20.0%

Accommodation and food services 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

-40.0% (Statistics Canada–Labour Force Survey)

HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS

Top Occupations in Accommodation and Food Services 6641 Food counter attendants, Hamilton, 2006 kitchen helpers and related occupations 24.4%

31.1%

6453 Food and beverage servers 6242 Cooks

6.2%

0631 Restaurant and food service managers 6611 Cashiers

9.5% 15.5% 13.3%

Other Occupations in Accommodation and Food Services (Statistics Canada-2006 Census)

18


HAMILTON CENSUS DIVISION: SKILL REQUIREMENTS, MEDIAN INCOME AND OUTLOOK FOR TOP OCCUPATIONS Total Employment (2006): 16,430

Occupational Title

# Employed (2006)

Skill Level

Median Annual Income (2006)

Outlook 2006-2016 New Workers Required

Food Counter Attendants, Kitchen Helpers and Related Occupations Food and Beverage Servers Cooks

5,105

D

$16,583

1,444

2,550

C

$14,712

581

2,185

B

$19,982

636

1,560

A

$28,126

427

6611

Restaurant and Food Service Managers Cashiers

1,015

D

$17,999

991

6452

Bartenders

600

C

$11,946

140

6212

Food Service Supervisors Chefs

530

B

$20,231

127

420

B

$32,210

136

Ma卯tres D'H么tel and Hosts Light Duty Cleaners

355

C

$4,047

69

315

D

$21,006

778

(Across All Industries)

6641

6453 6242 0631

6241 6451 6661

(Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Custom Tabulation- Workforce Planning Hamilton and Centre for Spatial Economics)

The accommodation and food services industry is predominately driven by consumer spending and tourism. Most of the top occupations in this industry are entry-level requiring little formal education, resulting in a relatively younger workforce.

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IX. TRANSPORTATION AND WAREHOUSING (NAICS 48-49) HIGHLIGHTS   

Accounted for 5.3% of jobs across all industries (Hamilton CMA 2011) Industry employed 11,740 workers (Hamilton Census Division 2006) 1,678 employers (Hamilton Census Division June 2011) (Statistics Canada- Labour Force Survey &, Canadian Business Patterns)

EMPLOYMENT TREND BY INDUSTRY

Employment Growth by Industry Employment Percentage Change, 2006-2010 Hamilton CMA 30.0% 20.0% 10.0%

Transportation and warehousing

0.0% -10.0%

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

All Industries

-20.0% -30.0% (Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey)

HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS

Top Occupations in Transportation and Warehousing Hamilton, 2006 24.4%

51.2%

7411 Truck drivers 7412 Bus drivers and subway and other transit operators 7413 Taxi and limousine drivers and chauffeurs

8.3%

7414 Delivery and courier service drivers 1462 Letter carriers

5.5% 5.2%

Other Occuaptions in Transportation and Warehousing

5.5%

(Statistics Canada-2006 Census)

20


HAMILTON CENSUS DIVISION: SKILL REQUIREMENTS, MEDIAN INCOME AND OUTLOOK FOR TOP OCCUPATIONS Total Employment (2006): 11,740

Occupational Title

# Employed (2006)

Skill Level

Median Annual Income (2006)

Outlook 2006-2016 New Workers Required

(Across All Industries)

7411

Truck Drivers

2860

C

$42,728

827

7412

970

C

$50,351

329

650

C

$18,812

215

640

C

$33,929

301

1462

Bus Drivers, Subway and Other Transit Operators Taxi and Limousine Drivers and Chauffeurs Delivery and Courier Service Drivers Letter Carriers

605

C

$47,673

135

7452

Material Handlers

585

C

$39,798

235

1461

Mail, Postal and Related Clerks Dispatchers and Radio Operators Transportation Managers Automotive Service Technicians, Truck and Bus Mechanics and Mechanical Repairers

455

C

$43,300

213

355

C

$39,741

178

295

A

$63,617

105

280

B

$44,498

587

7413

7414

1475 0713 7321

(Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Custom Tabulation- Workforce Planning Hamilton and Centre for Spatial Economics)

Almost 25% jobs in this industry are truck drivers. This occupation has a relatively older workforce and working conditions, such as long hours and being away from home, have been cited as reasons for a high turnover rate. Employment growth has moderated over the past few years due to economic uncertainty in both Ontario and the United States1.

1

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada 21


X. BUSINESS, BUILDING AND OTHER SUPPORT SERVICES (NAICS 55-56) HIGHLIGHTS   

Accounted for 4.4% of jobs across all industries (Hamilton CMA 2011) Industry employed 12,635 workers (Hamilton Census Division 2006) 2,427 employers (Hamilton Census Division June 2011) (Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Canadian Business Patterns)

EMPLOYMENT TREND BY INDUSTRY

Employment Growth by Industry Employment Percentage Change, 2006-2010 Hamilton CMA 20.0% Business, building and other support services All Industries

10.0% 0.0% -10.0%

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

-20.0% (Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey)

HAMILTON’S TOP OCCUPATIONS

Top Occupations in Business, Building and Other Support Services Hamilton, 2006 12.7% 11.5%

58.2%

7.9% 5.5% 4.2%

6661 Light duty cleaners

8612 Landscaping and grounds maintenance labourers 6651 Security guards and related occupations 6663 Janitors, caretakers and building superintendents 6623 Other elemental sales occupations Other Occupations in Business, Building and Other Support Services (Statistics Canada- 2006 Census)

22


HAMILTON CENSUS DIVISION: SKILL REQUIREMENTS, MEDIAN INCOME AND OUTLOOK FOR TOP OCCUPATIONS Total Employment: 12,635

Occupational Title

# Employed

Skill Level

Median Annual Income (2006)

Outlook 2006-2016 New Workers Required

(Across All Industries)

6661

Light Duty Cleaners

1,610

D

$21,006

778

8612

Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance labourers Security Guards and Related Occupations Janitors, Caretakers and Building Superintendents Other Elemental Sales Occupations Travel Counsellors

1,450

D

$29,184

370

995

D

$27,298

417

695

D

$34,964

937

530

D

$27,570

260

415

C

$30,639

117

Customer Service, Information and Related Clerks Material Handlers

395

C

$36,622

411

305

C

$39,798

235

General Office Clerks Other Labourers in Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities

275

C

$36,658

1,129

270

D

$29,593

73

6651

6663

6623 6431 1453

7452 1411 9619

(Statistics Canada-Labour Force Survey, 2006 Census & Custom Tabulation- Workforce Planning Hamilton and Centre for Spatial Economics)

The majority of occupations in this industry do not require formal education above secondary school training. Many occupations are entry-level and thus experience high turnover rates as workers move on to other opportunities.

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4. WHAT DOES ALL THIS TELL US? Many of the top occupations are found across several industries, indicating that working in a specific occupation does not limit a worker to a particular industry. For example, light duty cleaners are the top occupation in the Business, Building and Other Support Services sector employing 1,610 workers, while also employing 815 workers in the Health Care and Social Assistance sector. Similarly, material handlers work in Retail and Wholesale Trade, Manufacturing, Transportation and Warehousing, and Business, Building and Other Support Services. It is generally the C- or D-level occupations that are found across industries, as these occupations tend to be less specialized and do not have specific education requirements. Furthermore, it is projected that there will be increased demand for many of these low-skill occupations that are found across multiple sectors during the period 2006-2016.

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Where are all the jobs?