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r o f n a m t s e b e Th y a m a job ! n e m o w be a UARY 25, 2014 http://techandtrades.org/ https://twitter.com/TechHam2014

FEBR , Y A D llege o TUES C k Mohaw eek Campus Stoney

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THANK YOU A G E N D A A special thanks to the members of the TECH 2014 Advisory Group: Paul Cheeseman, Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board Susan Clarke, Industry Education Council Cyndi Ingle, Workforce Planning Hamilton Reece Morgan, Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board Leo Paone, Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board Marilyn Presutti, Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board Judy Travis, Workforce Planning Hamilton

And thank you to…

Sarah Zamin, our Master of Ceremonies Rosita Hall of Motivated Minds & Laura Side, Mohawk College Thanks to the TECH 2014 Coordinator: Patti Stirling, Stirling & Associates And to our funder: Employment Ontario

WHY WE USE ROSIE THE RIVETER AS OUR ICON

TECH 2014 AGENDA 9:00 – 9:30

Registration

9:30 – 9:40

Welcome by Master of Ceremonies

Sarah Zamin

9:40 – 10:15

Team Leader Roundtable Discussions

This is your opportunity to talk to the women who are working in trades careers. Ask questions about salary, education, training, working conditions, etc.

10:15 – 10:45

Keynote Speaker

Rosita Hall, Professional Speaker, Trainer, Author

10:45 - 12:00

HANDS-ON WORKSHOP # 1

You will participate in trades activities, supervised by Mohawk College staff in trades such as:

Rosie the Riveter is a cultural icon, representing the six million women who entered the workforce for the first time during World War II, many of whom worked in the manufacturing plants that produced munitions for the war. These women took the places of the male workers who were absent fighting in the Pacific and Europe.

• AutoCAD • Building & Renovations • Electrical / Electronics

The character is now considered a feminist icon in the US, and a herald of women’s economic power to come. Rosie and her slogan “We Can Do It!” were featured on posters, magazines and more. Rosie the Riveter was most closely associated with a real woman, Rose Will Monroe, who was born in Kentucky in 1920 and moved to Michigan during World War II.

TECHNOLOGY & TRADES FOR WOMEN What is a Rivet? A metal fastener with a large head on one end, used to connect multiple metal plates by passing the shank through aligned holes in the plates and hammering the plain end to form a second head. What is a Riveter? A worker who inserts and hammers rivets using a riveting machine.

She worked as a riveter at the Willow Run Aircraft Factory, building B29 and B24 bombers for the U.S. Army. Monroe was asked to star in a promotional film about the war effort at home, and was featured in a poster campaign. Rosie went on to become perhaps the most widely recognized icon of that era. The films and posters she appeared in were used by the U.S. government to encourage women to go to work in support of the war effort. According to the Encyclopedia of American Economic History, the “Rosie the Riveter” movement increased the number of working American women to 20 million by 1944, a 57% increase from 1940. Conditions were sometimes very poor and pay was not always equal—the average man working in a wartime plant was paid $54.65 per week, while women were paid $31.21 per week – still considerably more than they were making in fields predominated by women such as secretarial positions and domestic jobs. Nonetheless, women quickly responded to Rosie the Riveter, who convinced them they had a patriotic duty to enter the workforce. Some claim that she forever opened up the work force for women. After the war, the “Rosies” and the generations that followed them knew that working alongside men in the factories was in fact a possibility for women.

• Pneumatics • Welding 12:00- 12:30

LUNCH

View the information displays in lobby

12:30 – 1:45

HANDS-ON WORKSHOP #2

You will participate in trades activities, supervised by Mohawk College staff in trades such as: • AutoCAD • Building & Renovations • Electrical / Electronics • Pneumatics • Welding

1:45 – 2:00

Evaluation & Wrap Up


WELCOME Welcome to TECH 2014! Workforce Planning Hamilton, the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board and the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board are pleased to welcome you to TECH 2014: Women at Work. Have you heard the phrase “The best man for a job may be a woman?” In the case of skilled trades careers, many of which have previously been male dominated, this may certainly be the case. As you will discover today through hands-on activities and meeting women who work in skilled trades, the skilled trades are a well paid and growing field that will need many new workers in the coming years. You’ll have the opportunity to talk to women who are eager to share the realities of their occupations with you. Ask them questions about their personal journeys to success, and what they learned along the way. Please make use of the expertise in the room and don’t be afraid to ask them the questions that YOU want answered. Keep an open mind today and be flexible to get the most out of the experience! Today you’ll participate in two hands-on activities and will experience trades that you may be totally unfamiliar with, which will serve to give a view of some of the career options available to you in the future. Make sure you visit the displays by OYAP, Apprenticesearch.com and others to find out more about the trades. Why are we hosting TECH 2014 and why are we encouraging young women to enter the skilled trades? As you will discover, skilled trades are well paid career options and it is believed by many that there is a skills shortage looming, as older people retire. Who better to fill the gap than young women like yourself? If you like a challenge and want a career that will allow you to support yourself skilled trades may be just the “ticket.” Our best wishes for an enjoyable day and feel free to tweet about your experiences at @TechHam2014.

Shami

ABDULAHAD

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • I work as a Mechanical Engineering Designer at Toshiba Industrial Products Canada (TIPCA) What education was needed for your job? • This job needs a post-secondary engineering education such as Mechanical Engineering technology, mechanical engineering technician • Also you need to know 2D and 3D drafting software such as AutoCAD and Solid Works ...etc. Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • I was trained as an electrical engineer before I moved to Canada so with my background in engineering the skill trades were a good choice of careers! What makes you “passionate” about your job? • It is a challenging and meaningful job. It gives me a feeling of accomplishment after finishing a design and seeing it manufactured. What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • I don’t see why mechanical design should be a man’s job only. I can design a motor as good as the next colleague despite his or her gender. What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Do not be intimidated by the name of the job. • Men and women can be equally professional and capable of doing mechanical, electrical or any type of design!  

Shaima

ANAM

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Quality Assurance Manager at Toshiba Industrial Products Canada (TIPCA) What education was needed for your job? • Electrical Engineering Diploma

Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • My dad encouraged me to be an engineer! What makes you “passionate” about your job? • I consider my job to be very innovative work and it also allows me to me to meet new people. What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • You must work hard to change people’s perspectives about women working in these jobs.... women can do the work too! What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • If you are passionate about something, go for it!!  

Lori

BAGLIOLID

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Mechanical Engineer Designer at Toshiba Industrial Products Canada (TIPCA) What education was needed for your job? • Mechanical Engineering Technology Diploma Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • I had good math skills and problem solving skills and I was always interested in the manufacturing industry What makes you “passionate” about your job? • I enjoy designing and watching the final product being manufactured and completed and working at final assembly • From start to finish ....from designing it to completing it and then seeing it at work! What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • Sometimes some men prefer to work with only males and you have to find a way to work with them to get the job done! What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Don’t let other people’s opinions affect what you want to do with your future • You can do anything you want to do. • You just have to work hard!  

TEAM LEADERS


Marguerite

BOWERMAN

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Functional Expert Admissions at Mohawk College What education was needed for your job? • Computer Science & Engineering (Software Engineering) Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • It was a career change for me. What makes you “passionate” about your job? • Every day there is a new challenge • I like the constant change in technology and continuous changing environment. What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • This is still a male dominated field. • The general population expects a male to do my job as they are always surprised to see a woman. • As a woman in this field I have to continue to prove myself daily. • I find myself learning and understanding every detail so that I am valued. What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Be confident • Don’t let anyone change your mind about your future!  

Stephanie

BRASSEUR, C.E.T. CMM

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Traffic Project Co-ordinator for the City of Kitchener What education was needed for your job? • Mohawk College - Transportation Engineering Technology Diploma Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • I was told there would be good paying jobs and great work experience and challenging opportunities

What makes you “passionate” about your job? • I love the daily challenges and coordinating safety on job sites as well as seeing projects from start to completion What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • It can be a challenge always being questioned about job title / position you have; there are also “knowledge challenges” from male peers. What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Develop your organizational skills and your people skills; these are the two main points. If you don’t have these skills you are off to a poor start in a trades or technology career.  

Karen

BREITNER

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Master Electrician at Lumination FX Ltd • Mohawk College/Professor What education was needed for your job? • Trades college apprenticeship Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • Needed a good paying and steady job What makes you “passionate” about your job? • I like to see the results from my own handiwork. “I did that” What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • Always having to prove yourself! What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Trades are a good way to earn and learn

BROUSSEAU

• Not being able to find proper work clothes and safety gear, or at the very least having much fewer options • You come to a point where you don’t even care if they are pink, in two weeks of paint/ oil/ mud everything looks the same colour anyways!

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Winter: General Manager - Holiday Lights Canada Inc. (Main job, 8 years) • Year Round: Handyman (maintenance) - Moksha Yoga Hamilton • Summer: Director - Unicamp of Ontario Inc. • Previous jobs include: ŠŠ Owning a painting and renovations company ŠŠ Production line worker at factory ŠŠ Junior Project Coordinator with construction and engineering at the University of Guelph

What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Have faith in yourself. • Your gender does not limit what you are capable of learning or doing. • Understand your personal strengths and weakness and how to use them both to your advantage. • No matter what industry you decide to work in there will always be someone (boss, co-worker, staff, client etc) who will think you can’t be as good at your job as someone older, taller, stronger or of the dominate gender. • Take pride in your work, and let your work speak for itself.

Crystal Sue

What education was needed for your job? • Both of my jobs required experience running and managing companies but they only required a high school education and experience. • My education at Ryerson in Architectural Science specializing in Project Management helped me obtain the previous jobs needed for the experience necessary for my current work. Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • always loved working with my hands • love understanding how things work • being able to physically see my hard work at the end of the day/week – • being able to roll out of bed and throw on your gear and not worry about being ‘presentable’ in your workplace (you’re only going to get covered in dirt anyways • work flexibility, being able to work long days and sometimes 7 days a week and then take a month off and travel during the down time • I thrive in physically active environments What makes you “passionate” about your job? • I love what I do and I’m good at it • Having to problem solve daily based on jobs, equipment, staff, weather and clients • Seeing the results of my hard work on a daily basis • Having my clients ecstatic about the new design I implemented that year What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • Older male staff (who have to report to me) questioning my authority and going above my head to my male boss • Clients wanting to know who will be doing the ‘heavy’ lifting/ ladder moving/ actual work (hint: it’s me!)

Corina

CHANG

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Engineer, Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada What education was needed for your job? • University degree is preferred for my job Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • Constant change keeps me engaged • Confidence in job security • High level of compensation What makes you “passionate” about your job? • Having fun with people • Learning and achieving together What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • You often have to prove or demonstrate competency first to gain opportunities, whereas the guys are given opportunities to develop their competency • Promotions are always tinged with the suspicion of tokenism. What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • It won’t be as bad as you think • The guys have mothers/wives/sisters - they won’t be beastly to you! • True freedom is financial independence.  

TEAM LEADERS TEAM LEADERS


Carla Christina

CHEUNG

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • System Specialist and Training Development at Burkert Fluid Control Systems What education was needed for your job? • College, University, Trade School, Apprenticeship Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • The desire to pursue an occupation that was interesting and challenging as well unconventional for women. • The ability to do something different each day that I could be proud of and feel fulfilled. • The want for a career that I look forward to each day, rather than a job that I need to work to survive. What makes you “passionate” about your job? • Being able to do different things each day that pull from my own knowledge and experience as well as collaborating and learning from others. • Working physically and mentally to achieve a goal that we (as a company) are proud of What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • Proving to men- and women, that there is no such thing as a man’s job. • Breaking down barriers, stereotypes and pre-conceived notions What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” ― Confucius • “And never be afraid to do it- no matter what the job is and who says you shouldn’t” - Carla Cheung  

Nadine

CURRIE

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Administrator @ Advanced Welding Techniques Inc. in Hamilton • Boilermaker

What education was needed for your job? • I served my apprenticeship through the Boilermakers Union, Local 128. • I went through welding school to get my welding tickets before entering into my apprenticeship. • My knowledge of the industry, welding, along with knowledge of the career options in the welding industry. Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • Skilled Trades are in demand! • Knowing that a large percentage of skilled trades workers were heading for retirement and there would be a future, rather than a career that may become less in demand • Always liked working with my hands • Getting my education paid for through the union • Good paying job! What makes you “passionate” about your job? • Physically demanding • Constantly learning • Always something you can learn to upgrade your skill set • The people • Feeling like you are stepping out of the usual gender roles and changing things in the industry for women. What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • Being small, I got tools taken off me by a man thinking I could not do my job. • An assumption that I was there as some quota filler • Being called “sweetheart” or “honey” • Asked a lot “are you sure you want to do this?” as I was training What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Research the job and what it entails • Don’t let anyone else tell you what you want to do • Don’t expect to be treated differently and eventually you won’t be.  

Peggy

FORREST

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Construction Project Manager Corporation of the City of Kitchener What education was needed for your job? • Knowledge of construction components/processes • Construction project management courses • Technical knowledge and cost estimating

• Design knowledge • Municipal budgeting / financing systems Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • I enjoyed construction at a young age (my father was a contractor) • I wanted non-traditional career • I wanted constant challenge! What makes you “passionate” about your job? • I enjoy serving the public • I enjoy constant challenge construction industry provides • I enjoy challenges of project administration • I enjoy seeing a project at its inception and following it through to the end - sense of accomplishment What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • Credibility ...being taken seriously as a highly skilled woman What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Be strong, confident - you can do it! • Ignore those who think “a woman can’t do a man’s job” • Determine your path and keep on it  

Lisa

MACPHERSON

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Glazier Superintendent and I am working at the new Pan Am games site in Toronto What education was needed for your job? • I took glazier metal mechanics which is provided by the union. • You go to school 3 times for two months at a time and it takes roughly 4 years to complete your apprenticeship. • After your apprenticeship is complete you are able to write your CFQ which is recognized around the world. • When you are not in school you are on the tools learning how to be a glazier. Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • I enjoy working outside • I love to build things and learn how it all goes together • You get a lot of self pride when working in construction as a women • The money is very good • The trade tests your physical limits and your mind

What makes you “passionate” about your job? • Seeing the finished building and knowing I had something to do with it. • As a glazier your work is always visible, we wrap buildings with glass and finish exterior and interior areas of the buildings. • Almost all entrances are done by glaziers from the glass to the finished flashings. • There are not a lot of women in this industry and knowing that I am of the few that are able to do it and excel at it is very rewarding. What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • Every job site I have been on, I’ve found that as a woman you always seem to have to out- work the men, just to get respect. • You need to be able to take a joke ‘cause men are men and they are not always politically right • Getting your body in shape and learning the different techniques • Getting use to all the different elements and working in them • Choosing your battles is important • You may have to travel depending on the trade you pick What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • If you like being outside and being physical then do it! • If you like challenges then do it! • It’s very rewarding to know how to fix things on the job and off • You learn how to use so many different tools that can be very helpful at home and elsewhere • Try to learn how to do things properly, listen to your foreman and do not hesitate to ask questions. • It’s better to do it right the first time • Nobody knows everything in construction because it is constantly evolving and everyone is always learning.  

Shanta

NATHWANI

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Instructor, Web Design at Sheridan College What education was needed for your job? • Bachelor of Commerce Degree in Information Technology Management • Diploma in Network Administration and Web Mastering

TEAM LEADERS TEAM LEADERS


Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • Love of computers as a child • Found myself fixing the internet problems at my real estate job and decided to switch to technology What makes you “passionate” about your job? • That “a-ha” moment that I see on students faces when they have a breakthrough in their learning What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • Everyone thinks you’re the “assistant”. • Sometimes, co-workers/supervisors think that all we do is HR and we don’t like to get our hands dirty What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Get your hands dirty! • Don’t back down  

Cathy

PHILLIPS

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • I was an electrician and worked at Dofasco • I was their first female trades person! What education was needed for your job? • Community College is required. • Technician courses Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • I preferred to work with my hands and fix things rather than sit behind a desk

Courtney

RUPP

What is your current occupation and where do you work? • Precast pre-stressed concrete & weld/fabrication inspector (quality control & assurance) What education was needed for your job? • Various welding certifications from welding training centres • Precast pre-stressed concrete certifications Why did you decide to enter the skill trades and/or apprenticeship training? • Art has always been my passion and I found working with my hands rewarding as well as challenging. • It also does not hurt to bring home a nice pay cheque weekly! What makes you “passionate” about your job? • I take a lot of pride in a job done well. • I’m always up for a challenge • It helps me learn new things as well as pushing myself to do things that I didn’t think I could do! What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • Sometimes it’s difficult to convince people that I know what I’m talking about but I ALWAYS know that my work speaks for itself! What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Nothing too big or small is out of reach; limitations are labels we put on ourselves. • Nothing can stop someone who is determined to succeed.

What makes you “passionate” about your job? • At the end of the day I could see what I accomplished and it made a difference! What are some of the challenges of being a woman working in what some people think is a “man’s job”? • Finding a bathroom!! • Proving to the men that I was their equal What advice would you give to young women making career choices today? • Do something that you really enjoy doing and that you can make a career at. • Jobs.... these are not for life!

TEAM LEADERS


P R O G R A M S APPRENTICESHIP What is an OYAP “Accelerated” program?

Through several partnerships with colleges and local unions, programs have been created that give you an enriching experience in a skilled trade profession. Through any of the “Accelerated” programs, you can: • Complete part or all of your Level One apprenticeship schooling in a specific trade • Earn hours towards your apprenticeship training

What is an Apprentice?

An apprentice is someone learning a trade while employed in that trade. Not just anyone can pursue a skilled trade; it takes interest, specific aptitude, skills and pride in your work if you are expecting a good career with a great future.

• Earn high school and dual credits • Register as an apprentice • In some cases, earn money while registered as an OYAP student participating in an “Accelerated” program

How do students apply for any of the OYAP “Accelerated” programs? The application process for any one of the “Accelerated” programs is as follows: • Students, parents, and teachers are invited to attend an information session • pertaining to the specific program of their choice. Details on information sessions, application due dates, and interview dates can be provided by speaking to a Guidance Counsellor or Cooperative Education teacher. Or you can log onto www.oyaphwcdsb.com for details pertaining to all of the “Accelerated” programs. • Together with a Guidance Counsellor or Cooperative education teacher, complete the OYAP Accelerated program application and submit the application with all of the following: a completed application , and current resume. A recent copy of a Credit Counselling Form which must be obtained from a school’s Guidance Counsellor. • During the interview process, students will be assessed on the following: Personal presentation, communication skills, attitude and motivation. Join the thousands of high school students throughout Ontario who have chosen to take control of their future. Earn high school credits while exploring the world of skilled trade professions. Discover the educational opportunities that can set you on a pathway to success. Be a leader. Take control of your future...Today!

Accelerated Program of your choice:

Automotive Service Technician; Child and Youth Worker; Cook (Level 1); Construction Craft Worker; Child Development Practitioner ; General Carpenter ; Hairstyling; Horticulture For more information contact your OYAP Coordinator: HWDSB- Reece Morgan (Reece.morgan@hwdsb.on.ca) HWCDSB- Leo Paone (paonel@hwcdsb.ca)

What is an Apprenticeship? Apprenticeship is a combination of paid on-the-job training, work experience and technical training in a trade. Apprentices spend about 80% of their time learning on-the-job from a qualified tradesperson. The remaining 20% is spent at a college or an approved training organization. The entire program can last from 2 to 5 years, depending on the trade.

What can I expect to gain by taking an Apprenticeship? Once you have successfully completed your apprenticeship you will receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification, issued by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. This is commonly called your “Ticket”. A “Ticket” means that you are a certified Tradesperson who is highly skilled, and this puts you in an exceptional position for employment and top-notch wages!


SCRAMBLE TECH 2014 Word Scramble TECH 2014 Word Scramble

Find andcircle circle the the following Trades: Find and followingApprenticeship Apprenticeship Trades: (Words run left –right / up-down/on angles) (Words run left –right / up-down/on angles) ARCHITECT ARCHITECT BOILERMAKER BOILERMAKER CARPENTER CARPENTER DRYWALLER DRYWALLER

L N S N W Z T T V U T R E B S

P N B F A Q H M C C D E N O Y

X L Q Z F M E C E R L T G I E

ELECTRICIAN ELECTRICIAN ENGINEER ENGINEER MECHANIC MECHANIC PAINTER PAINTER

Q Z U F T C N T J E I N I L U

J E M M H E I H C E M E N E G

G J T A B H C T W E C P E R R

M J N H C E R H I X R R E M Z

I I N R A I R S N B L A R A R

 

PLUMBER PLUMBER TECHNICIAN TECHNICIAN TECHNOLOGIST TECHNOLOGIST WEBMASTER WEBMASTER WELDER WELDER

C L A L C H H P I I I C X K R

R T S I G O L O N H C E T E H

L D A Q R U D V R K G I D R U

O N W E B M A S T E R L A D D

P A I N T E R U G T E W M N U

G W V I G P W Q S W K N V T D

R E L L A W Y R D T Z E G I Y

Step into the future with

Skilled Trades Jobs in the skilled trades offer wages above the average salary, while providing an opportunity to “earn while you learn” through apprenticeship programs. Interested in becoming a woman in skilled trades and have questions? Give us a call at 905-575-1212 ext 5000 and we will help you get started.

Learn more at mohawkcollege.ca/women-in-trades



Tech 2014: Women at Work