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Student Organization:

Student Organization of the Year Kappa Delta Chi

Name:

Student Leader of the Year

E-mail:

Service Project of the Year

Bronc Cadet Club Mayela Ramirez

Health & Kinesiology Club

New Organization of the Year Minority Affairs Council

Dean’s Award Recipients Delta Xi Nu Sorority Delta Zeta Sorority Kappa Delta Chi Sorority Phi Kappa Theta Fraternity Society of Human Resource Management The National Society of Collegiate Scholars

Advisor of the Year

Minority Affairs Council Patricia Martin


Table of Contents Mission …………………………………………………….....………………………………..3 Message from Rebecca K. Gadson, Assistant Dean of Students...……...…………………..3 Contact Information ...………………………………………………………………………..4 Editor’s Note ...………………………………………………………………………………..4 Registering Student Organizations ...……………………………………………….…….....5 Privileges of Registration ……………………………………………………….….....6 Registration Goals...……………………………………………………………….......7 Student Organization Categorizations ………………………………………………...8 Department Sponsored Organizations ...……………………………………………....8 Registered Organizations ...…………………………………………………………...9 Temporary Organizations (New Organizations) ………………….………..................9 Fraternities/Sororities ...……………………………………………….…………..................10 Recognition Responsibilities ...……………………………….……………………….10 Academics …………………………………………………………………………….11 Anti-Hazing Policy ...………………………………………………………….............11 UTPA Code of Conduct ..……………………………………………………………………..11 Academic Achievement ...…………………………………………………………………..... 12 Recruiting and Working with Advisors ……………………………………………………..12 Hints on Recruiting an Advisor ………………………………………………………..12 How to Work with an Advisor ………………………………………………………...13 Self – Governance: Constitution* ……………………………………………………………13 What is a Constitution …………………………………………………………………13 Why Should I Have a Constitution ……………………………………………………13 What should I Include in My Constitution …………………………………………….13 Guidelines for Writing a Constitution ……………………………………………………….14 What are Bylaws? ……………………………………………………………………...15 Why should I have Bylaws? …………………………………………………………...15 What should I Include in My Bylaws? ………………………………………………...15 How can I use My Constitution & Bylaws? ………………………………………...…16 General Publicity and Posting Guidelines …………………………………………………...17 Posting Procedure ……………………………………………………………………...17 Acceptable Posting Locations …………………………………………………………17 Banners ………………………………………………………………………………...18 Sidewalk Chalking ……………………………………………………………..............18 Prohibited Posting ……………………………………………………………………...18 Removal ………………………………………………………………………..............19 T-Shirt Policy …………………………………………………………………………..19 Publications/Website …………………………………………………………………...19 Failure to Follow these Procedures …………………………………………………….20 Advertising and Publicity Tips ………………………………………………………....20 Choosing A Bank ………………………………………………………………………………22 Finding a Bank ………………………………………………………………………….22 Opening the Account ……………………………………………………………………22 Registration Letters ……………………………………………………………………..22 General Fundraising Guidelines ………………………………………………………………22 Space Restrictions ……………………………………………………………................23 Fundraising Areas ………………………………………………………………………23 Mobile Fundraisers ……………………………………………………………………..24 Selling for Others ……………………………………………………………………….24 Collecting Sales Tax ……………………………………………………………………………24 Tax Free Sales …………………………………………………………………………..24 Other Sales ……………………………………………………………………...............25 Raffles …………………………………………………………………………………………...25 Screening Films …………………………………………………………………………………26

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Contracts Overview*…………………………………………………………………………...27 Get your Contract in Writing and Signed ………………...…………………………….28 Are all your Contract Terms Agreed to by the Other Party? …………………...............28 Was your Contract Valid when you signed it? ………………………………................28 Is your Contract Fair to both Parties? …………………………………………………..29 Normal Parts of a Contract ……………………………………………………………..29 Risk Management ………………………………………………………………………………30 Risk Management Workshop …………………………………………………...............30 The Campus Safety & Security Report …………………………………………….................31 Statement on Date/Service Auctions …………………………………………………………..32 Gender Insensitivity ……………………………………………………………………..32 Personal Safety ……………………………………………………………….................32 Racial Insensitivity ……………………………………………………………………...32 Hazing & Discrimination ……………………………………………………………................33 Hazing Scenario: An Example of Hazing ………………………………………………33 Hazing the Law …………………………………………………………………………34 Alternatives to Hazing ………………………………………………………………….36 Myths and Facts about Hazing …………………………………………………………37 Discrimination ………………………………………………………………………….38 Event Planning ………………………………………………………………………................39 Campus Facility Reservations ………………………………………………………...............39 Use of University Property, Rooms, and Spaces ………………………………..……...39 Reservation of a Room or Space on University Property ………………………………39 Reservation Procedure …………………………………………………………………..40 Free Speech & Assembly ……………………………………………………………………….41 Prohibited Expression …………………………………………………………...............42 Student Organization Alcohol Rules …………………………………………………………..44 Food Handling & Safety ………………………………………………………………………..44 Temporary Food Booths: Food Safety Requirements….………………………………..45 Fire Safety Requirements ………………………………………………………………..45 Food Handler Safety Requirements ……………………………………………………. 47 Appendix A: Student Organization Advisor Handbook…………………………………..48-49 Recommendations and Responsibilities for Advisors………………………………....................50 Meetings……………………………………………………………………………...….50 Expectations……………………………………………………………………………...50 Club Finances…………………………………………………………...……………….51 Availability to Members……………………………………...………………………….51 Giving Advice……………………………...…………………………………………….51 Policies………………………………………………...…………………………………52 Roles of Advisor………………………………………………...……………………….52 Your Role in Student Activities ……………………………………………….……....................53 Potential Scenarios..……………………………………..………………………………………..54 Necessary Forms an Organization Needs………………………………………………………...55 Reminders……..………………………………………………………………….........................55 Campus Activity Registration Form: Instructions …………….…………………........................58 Temprary Food Booth: Form …………………………………………...………………………..62 Hazing ……………………………………………………………………………….…………...64 Anti-Hazing Compliance Form ……………………………………….…………………….……65

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Mission The Office for Student Involvement (OSI) enhances students’ academic and personal growth through co-curricular opportunities that foster the development of life management and leadership skills.

Message from Rebecca K. Gadson, Assistant Dean of Students: Welcome to the exciting world of student organizations! Becoming actively engaged in the campus community creates a number of invaluable opportunities for personal growth and development. Besides having fun and contributing to the spirit of campus life, your involvement in a student organization helps build valuable skills employers seek. For example, many employers prefer to seek students who can demonstrate such skills as teamwork, communication, effective time management, critical-thinking and the ability to work with others of diverse perspectives. The Office for Student Involvement team is here to assist you with recruiting members, officer transition, answer questions regarding program planning, finding an advisor, and explaining policies/procedures. We offer a number of programs/services throughout the year: • Fall Student Organization Conference • Skill Builders Workshop series For every OSI event you attend, you get extra points toward your Dean’s Award application. • • •

Involvement Fair each semester Food Handling Safety training Copies/faxes/laminating/supplies

Make the most of UTPA by getting involved and connected to all the opportunities available. You will truly experience the difference! Sincerely, Rebecca K. Gadson Assistant Dean of Students

Contact Information

Office for Student Involvement University Center, Room 205 1201 W. University Drive Edinburg, TX 78539-2999 Office: (956) 665-2660 Fax: (956) 665-2661 http://utpa.edu/involvement The website for the Office for Student Involvement is the primary repository of information for student organizations. It has all the forms you need, links to important resources, updates on policy, contact information, news, a list of all student organizations, an events calendar, and much more. Take a few minutes to familiarize yourself with the website. Professional Staff Rebecca Gadson, Assistant Dean of Students – gadsonr@utpa.edu Carina Alcantara, Coordinator of Student Development – alcantarac@utpa.edu Erika Lopez, Program Coordinator for Greek Life & Leadership – lopezen@utpa.edu Luz Ramos, Administrative Assistant I – lramos6@utpa.edu Daniela Venegas, Office Assistant II – venegasdk@utpa.edu

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The Editor’s Note: The Office for Student Involvement reserves the right to continue reviewing and revising current and future policies and procedures. The OSI will make its best efforts to educate and inform the student body of any changes. The purpose of this handbook is to provide assistance that will aid in developing a healthy and successful organizations and share information on policies and procedures that student organizations at The University of Texas-Pan American must follow to remain in good standing. It also serves as a guide for any student wishing to establish their own student organization. Much of the material published here is based on The University of Texas-Pan American Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP) and Regents’ Rules of the UT System. Where noted with an asterisk (*), material has been included and adapted from the Texas A&M University Handbook. Throughout this handbook, abbreviations will be used: OSI: Office for Student Involvement CSO: Committee on Student Organizations DOS: Dean of Students UTPA: University of Texas-Pan American (may also be referred to as “the University”) HOP: Handbook of Operating Procedures UC: University Center

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Registering Student Organizations Privileges of Registration Student organizations must register with The University of Texas-Pan American through OSI. There is no automatic guarantee that official recognition will be given. The University will not register any student organization whose actions or activities, in the opinion of the President are contrary to the educational purpose and work of the university. The registration process requires action by student organization leaders, their advisors and the University. The process creates a beneficial relationship between student organizations, their advisors and UTPA. Here are university resources available to you as a registered student organization at UTPA (unless otherwise specified): Facility Use: Student organizations are allowed to reserve rooms, areas, and other facilities on campus for recruiting, organizing, and hosting events. All facilities need to be requested with an Event Registration Form in the OSI at least 7 business days before the date of use. Mailbox: All organizations are assigned a mailbox that should be checked regularly by an officerof the organization to get important university information and the organization’s general mail. TIP: Check your mailbox at least once a week.

Mailboxes are located in the University Center, room 205. All mail for student organizations can be directed there. Organizations should use the following address: Organization Name Office for Student Involvement UC 205 University of Texas Pan American 1201 W. University Drive Edinburg, TX 78539 Posting Privileges: Organizations are allowed to distribute flyers, posters, and other publicity materials around campus. Skillbuilders Workshop Series: The OSI hosts the workshop series on topics to assist with organizational and member development. Examples of topics include planning and evaluating activities, creating an effective fundraiser, running a smooth organizational meeting, building teamwork in your organization or developing leadership skills. OSI Website: Registered student groups can have a link to their own website placed on the OSI website. Work/locker Space: Opportunity to apply for work or storage space on campus. 6


Insight: Educational handouts on a variety of organizational development topics to help your organization in its training and development. Also an OSI staff member can do the workshop with your organization if requested. Equipment: Student organization members have access to desktop computers, a laptop and digital projector, a fax machine (with a small charge for every use), a laminating machine (with six feet of free lamination each Fall and Spring semester), folding tables and chairs, extension cords, power strips, a ladder, plastic storage boxes, food safety equipment, and dollies to move equipment. The OSI also maintains a DVD library for check-out (to be used for private, not-for profit organizational viewings only), a resource library of books, and several different board games. Equipment can be reserved by submitting the Equiptment Request Form to UC205. Materials: Student organizations receive one(1) free 5ft banner every Fall and Spring semester, fifty (50) free black and white paper copies, ten (10) free color paper copies, and five (5) free poster boards each fall and spring semester. (There is a discounted price for these after the free quantity has run out.) The OSI also provides student organizations with markers, scissors, tape, glue, string, staples, pens, rulers, cutting boards, and butcher paper. Materials are available at UC 205. TIP: The free stuff is on a semester basis‌

Organizational Listservs: The OSI maintains three listservs for student organizations: Clublist (a general listserv for all members of student organizations), Greeklist (for sorority and fraternity members), and ADVISORSlist (for organizational advisors). These email listservs are used to send out information about upcoming events and activities. To subscribe, send a subscription request to the appropriate list from listserv.panam.edu or send an email to OSI@utpa.edu. Organization presidents are automatically added to the clublist and volunteer listserves each fall and spring semester. Special Events/: Special Events funds will continue to be available to fund up to 50% of the costs of approved requests. Each organization or individual may receive a maximum of $2,000 per academic year. On June 1, if Special Events funds are still available, organizations or individuals who have reached their $2,000 maximum may submit new requests for the summer. Guidelines and applications can be downloaded from the forms section of the OSI website: http://utpa.edu/involvement Fundraising: Registered student groups are allowed to hold fundraisers on campus. All fundraisers need to be requested with an Event Registration Form at the OSI at least 7 business days prior to the date of the event. Organization Awards: Each registered student organization has the opportunity to apply for student organization awards at the end of the year. Conferences: The OSI hosts leadership conferences each year to build organizational skills in different key areas. Water tower/bench/picnic table assignment: Each spring semester applications are available to request one of these items to paint and showcase your organization. 7


Bronc Notes: All organization advisors automatically have access to Broncnotes. Each fall and spring semester only the organization president is given access to post Broncnotes.

Registration Goals There are (4) main goals of the registration process: 1. To establish an on-going relationship with newly elected student leaders and newly appointed advisors. 2. To make student leaders aware of expectations, rules, responsibilities, and expectations of student leaders, student organizations, and their advisors. 3. To provide resource information to student leaders and advisors. 4. To gather information from student organizations. In order to reach these goals, be registered, and retain official recognition, student organizations must meet certain expectations. These expectations include but are not limited to: 

Apply for registration by completing and submitting the bi-annual on-line Bronc Link due each October 1 and February 15. The on-line packet can be found on the forms section of the OSI website: utpa.edu/involvement

Registration must be completed before the student organization may begin operating.

Adhere to all municipal, state, and federal laws, the UTPA Handbook of Operating Procedures (www.utpa.edu/hop), all UT System rules, and anti-hazing regulations.

Remain in good standing with UTPA, including full compliance with any conditions, stipulations, or restrictions placed upon organizational recognition.

Demonstrate respect for the UTPA community and other student organizations.

Operate in a manner consistent with the mission and goals of UTPA and the governing documents of the organization.

Consult with the appropriate university departments, offices, or representatives when planning large, unusual, or potentially complex events.

Ensure continuity in leadership from year to year by training newly selected leaders and maintaining good records.

Communicate and establish appropriate advisor expectations.

Social sororities and fraternities are required to abide by the same University regulations and policies as other registered student organizations (as outlined in this handbook). In addition, social sororities and fraternities are also responsible for abiding by the policies, regulations and procedures of their inter/national office.

Attendance by two officers is required to the Risk Management Workshop. 8


Student Organization Categorizations In an effort to more effectively understand and communicate the relationship that exists between the University and recognized student organizations, the Office for Student Involvement has defined the following categories of student organizations. It is important to note that these definitions are evolving and therefore subject to periodic revision. Each student organization given recognition by UTPA is categorized as either department sponsored, temporary, or registered. This categorization is determined by assessing the student organization’s relationship to the University. The privileges and responsibilities associated with each type of recognized student organization are outlined below.

Department Sponsored Organizations or Departmental Department sponsored organizations are those considered critical to the mission and culture of UTPA. These organizations are linked to the University because of their role in representing UTPA or in presenting events that are considered a necessary part of the university. Department-sponsored organizations usually have events for the campus and broader community, and typically have a close relationship with a university department or office. The activities and events of these organizations are considered to involve a higher level of complexity because of their scope and perceived association with UTPA. In addition to the university resources available to all recognized student organizations, department-sponsored organizations may have: A full-time professional staff member whose job designates them as the primary advisor to the department-sponsored organization. Designated office or workspace provided by the department. Access to funding from university department. Benefits for student leaders, such as opportunities for regular interaction with the Dean of Students and other key administrators, and possible appointment to university committees. May be required to carry liability insurance to cover membership and events as deemed appropriate by university review. Department-sponsored organizations that serve as governing bodies for temporary or registered organizations are responsible for providing appropriate levels of support and oversight for these organizations.

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Registered Organizations Registered organizations are those that are consistent with the mission and culture of the University and mainly host events limited to their membership. These organizations are mainly interest groups capable of functioning with minimal support from or interaction with the University. They may include Fraternities/Sororities, Honor Societies, Spiritual, Recreational, Hobby, Special Interest, Political, Cultural, or Academic/ Professional. In addition to the university resources available to all registered student organizations, the organizations may select their own advisor, who must be a full-time faculty or staff member of the University. Advisors must also be at least 21 years of age and not be enrolled in classes at UTPA. Organization leadership is required to attend the annual Risk Management Workshop.

Temporary Organizations (New Student Organizations) Temporary organizations are new groups that have submitted a Temporary Permission to Organize form to the OSI. They are not officially recognized by the University and do not have all privileges of a registered group. Temporary organizations cannot fundraise on campus. The OSI has put in place the following process in order to appropriately assess the request for registration and to allow the organization the opportunity to participate in the registration process. The following steps will need to be taken:  Complete a Temporary Permission to Organize form that you can find in the form section at our OSI website: utpa.edu/involvement. Then submit it to OSI in UC 205. Please note that according to HOP 5.6.1: A student organization shall not use the name of the University or the name of The University of Texas System as a part of the name of the organization. Example: WRONG: The University of Texas-Pan American Hockey Club. CORRECT: Hockey Club at the University of Texas-Pan American  It shall neither display the seal of either the University or The University of Texas System in connection with any activity of the organization nor use such seal or seals as a part of any letterhead, sign, banner, pamphlet, or other printed material that bears the name of the organization. These are some of the seals you may NOT use:

 Once approved by the Dean of Students, you will be declared a Temporary Organization. Upon gaining this temporary status your group will have advertising and posting privileges and will be able to reserve rooms and hold meetings on campus for a period of thirty (30) days. The review process will be completed when all documents 10


have been received. OSI staff may also meet with students or request additional written information when necessary to further discuss the organization during the recognition process. Your organization will be contacted via E-mail to notify you that it has been granted Temporary Permission to Organize.  Within thirty days of notification, your organization must complete the following: • Set up a New Student Organization Orientation meeting with one of the OSI employees. • Submit a constitution to the OSI in Rm 205 or email it to OSI@utpa.edu. • Complete your organization’s Bronc Link profile located at utpa.edu/bronclink. Guidelines for writing a constitution and sample constitutions are all available on the OSI website as well as a checklist. The constitution will lay out the governing rules for your organization. Your constitution will also be reviewed by the Committee on Student Organizations (CSO). Failure to submit the constitution within 30 days will result in immediate termination of access and privileges. The Update Packet lists the officers, members, and sources/amounts of expenditures and revenues for your organization. Your group will become a registered student organization once the CSO approves your constitution, OSI receives your Update Packet, and you complete your New Student Organization Orientation. If your constitution is not approved, you will have to resubmit your constitution to the CSO for review. The process of becoming a registered organization may take several weeks, depending on the number of organizations applying and the meeting schedule of the CSO. It is best to plan far in advance.

Fraternities/Sororities

Recognition Responsibilities

Social fraternities and sororities are self-supporting organizations. Most social fraternities and sororities are single sex organizations; while social sororities and fraternities may not discriminate on the basis of age, color, creed, disability, inter/national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation, University policy and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 do permit their selection of members on the basis of sex. For clarification regarding these federal regulations, see Title IX, Education Amendments of 1972 (Title 20 U.S.C. Sections 1681-1688). Please take special note of the following: 1. All social fraternities and sororities (as defined by Title IX) are exempt from taxation under section 501(a) of Title 26, the active membership of which consists primarily of students in attendance at an institution of higher education. Social fraternities and sororities at UTPA must be a member of the Greek Council and be recognized as a student organization by the Office for Student Involvement. 2. If an organization loses recognition by either entity (Greek Council or the Office of Student Development) for any reason, the organization will become inactive for the time period as decided by the OSI and/or Greek Council. Organizations losing their recognition will not be allowed any privileges awarded to recognized student organizations provided by UTPA. Once the specified time period has passed, an organization shall petition OSI and 11


the Greek Council for re-admission and recognition provided University requirements are met. 3. In the event an organization petitions OSI and the Greek Council and is turned down admission or recognition, the organization may appeal the decision in writing within five class days to the Dean of Students. The Dean of Students will have the final decision on the organization's admission or recognition and registration status. Interest groups will be granted a period of two years to gain affiliation with a national or international organization. If after two years the organization fails to gain colony status by an inter/national fraternity or sorority, the interest group will no longer be recognized by UTPA as a fraternity or sorority.

Academics Fraternity and sorority organizations were founded to support scholastic achievement, leadership development, service to the community and philanthropy. Inter/national fraternities and sorority organizations request that we provide academic data about their organizations. To that end, the Office for Student Involvement requires that all members grant permission to release their semester and cumulative grades to the current president/scholarship chair of their chapter for the purpose of gathering statistics, checking minimum standards and verifying eligibility. This remains effective until the individuals graduate, or are no longer affiliated with their chapter at UTPA, or until OSI is advised otherwise.

Anti-Hazing Policy Fraternity and sorority organizations are unique in that they require all those wishing to join their ranks to go through a formal New Member Education period of several weeks duration during which the prospective members must participate in an educational or developmental program. The procedures set forth in the Anti-Hazing policy (HOP 5.5.2 [C.21]) are meant to assure that the requirements made of prospective members during their pledging period contribute to the development of the individual and organization. Each fraternity and sorority organization must sign the appropriate compliance form and return to the OSI. If you have any questions regarding this process, do not hesitate to contact OSI or refer to HOP Section: 5.6.1: Recognition and Approval of Student Organizations.

UTPA Student Code of Conduct The decision by a student to apply for and to attend an institution of higher education is an individual choice. In making this choice the student is making the first of many life affecting decisions to participate in the greater world around them as a successful and responsible adult. It is within this context that UTPA addresses its working relationship with each individual student. A key expectation of all students is compliance with all UTPA regulations. UTPA regulations are based on state/federal law, as well as UT Rules & Regulations and should be familiar to all students. UTPA regulations specific to these issues can be found in the university’s Handbook of Operational Procedures (more commonly referred to as the HOP). 12


Students at the university attend with the vision of becoming members of a chosen profession. This vision coincides with the UTPA-student relationship encompassing academic and personal responsibility.

Academic Achievement

As part of an institution of higher learning, student organizations are called upon to coordinate their activities in a manner consistent with the mission of University of TexasPan American. Academic success is the foundation of the University’s purpose and as such should be an important part of the organization’s operations. Creating an environment that allows members to focus on academic success is important. One way that this can be done is by remembering to plan activities, meetings, and social opportunities with the academic calendar in mind. Developing relationships with faculty, both those serving as advisors and those serving students in the classroom, can also help the organization in maintaining an academic focus. Because academic success is the foundation of the University’s purpose and should be an integral part of a healthy organization, the OSI requires that groups maintain at least a 2.0 semester average GPA. If a group falls below a 2.0 average GPA, it will be notified in writing by the OSI. Groups who fall below a semester average GPA of 2.0 for two consecutive semesters will be suspended for one semester or until the semester GPA is above a 2.0. Faculty advisors often can provide insight and guidance to individual members or the group on issues related to academic success. Additionally, organizations may choose to offer academic developmental programs to their membership. The Learning Assistance Center (www.panam.edu/dept/lac) located in the Learning Assistance Center Building, provides professional support for students in need of academic assistance, and their staff are available to provide organizational programs as well as assist leadership in creating a supportive academic environment. The Center offers a variety of workshop and web-based resources on topics such as study skills for surviving college, procrastination and time management, test preparation and dealing with test anxiety, memory enhancement, and conquering finals.

Recruiting and Working With Advisors

Hints on Recruiting an Advisor

Before approaching a potential advisor, keep in mind the following:  Find someone who will have the time to spend working with your organization,  Find someone who will take the role willingly and seriously  Find someone who has knowledge or skills related to the mission/purpose of the organization. When approaching the person for the first time, make sure that he/she has a clear understanding of the organization’s purpose as well as what would be required of him/her, his/her duties, and the time commitment involved. Be open and honest with the potential advisor about the types of activities organization may participate in. Allow the person a reasonable length of time to consider his/her decision. If possible, choose someone who shares some of the same interests as the organization, and with whom the leadership of the organization has previously interacted. For example, when 13


starting an academic club or organization, staff within that department may be a good starting point in order to find an advisor. Each fall OSI asks interested University faculty/staff to contact us if they are willing to serve as an advisor to an organization. OSI may be able to give you suggestions if you are unsure as to where to begin. Keep in mind that staff of the OSI cannot serve as advisors, except for the fraternity/sorority governing boards (Greek Council, Multicultural Greek Council, Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Council) and the University Program Board.

How to Work With an Advisor It is best to meet with the advisor at least one day before organization meetings to go over the agenda and topics to be discussed. Be open to suggestions and criticisms he/she may provide. His/her knowledge and experience will help in exploring solutions and implementing organizational procedures. If an advisor cannot attend the meeting, be sure to meet with him/her after the meeting to brief him/her on what happened. Advisors can be a great resource; take advantage of their experience and insight.

Self-Governance: Constitution*

What is a Constitution?

A constitution contains the fundamental principles that outline the purpose, structure, and limits of an organization. Essentially, the constitution provides a foundation upon which an organization operates. Guidelines for writing a constitution and sample constitutions are all available on the OSI website: http://utpa.edu/involvement

Why should I have a Constitution? Every registered student organization at UTPA is required to have a current copy of their constitution and bylaws on file with the Office for Student Involvement. An updated copy should be filed promptly if the document changes during the year. Note: all changes must first be approved by the Committee on Student Organizations. Your constitution serves an important purpose for your organization. The process of writing a constitution should help to: Clarify your purpose Outline your basic structure Provide the cornerstone for building an effective group Allow members and potential members to have a better understanding of what the organization is all about and how it functions. If you keep in mind the value of having a written document that clearly describes the basic framework of your organization, the drafting of a constitution will be a much easier and more rewarding experience.

What should I include in my Constitution? A constitution should provide the structure for an organization, describe its purpose, and define the duties and responsibilities of the officers and members. The objective is to draft a document that covers these topics in a simple, clear, and concise manner. 14


Since your constitution should be tailored to the needs of your organization, you may wish to include additional articles or use a different organizational structure. However, the basic information outlined below must be included in the constitution you submit in order to gain recognition.

Guidelines for Writing a Constitution Article I Name State the name of the organization—for example, “The name of this organization shall be (insert name of organization here) at the University of Texas, Pan-American.” Article II Purpose & Goals Provide a general statement about the purpose and goals of the organization, as well as the type and scope of the organization’s activities. This is also an appropriate place to mention the organization’s affiliation with other groups, if any (for example, if the group is a chapter of a national organization). Article III Membership Provide a general statement about membership eligibility, standards, and requirements. Recognized student organizations at University of Texas - Pan American are required to be nondiscriminatory in membership unless otherwise permitted by applicable federal law (for example, Title IX). The language suggested is: “Membership is open to students, faculty, and staff of the University of Texas-Pan American regardless of race, national origin, political affiliation, sex, creed or religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, veteran’s status, or weight.” The membership selection process, types of membership, and procedures for disciplining and/or removing members should also be outlined here if not already appearing in the bylaws. Excerpt from HOP 5.6.1 No registered student organization or group may have any person as a member who is NOT either a student or a member of the faculty or staff of the University. Members MUST be students/faculty/ staff of UTPA Except pursuant to the provisions of Regents' Rules and Regulations regarding special use facilities, no organization or group, whether registered or not, may use any facility if it has as a member any person who is not either a student or a member of the faculty or staff of the University. The student organization membership shall consist of a minimum of three currently enrolled student members. Exceptions may be made for academic and honor societies. A majority of the total active membership of the student organization must be enrolled students. Only enrolled students may vote and hold office. Article IV Officers In sections under this article; list the titles of offices to be established, qualifications for each office, the method, time, and process of selection, and the term of office. The duties, powers, and responsibilities of each officer as well as procedures for removal from office and filling vacancies should also be outlined here if not already appearing in the bylaws. 15


At a minimum, each student organization is expected to select one officer as the chief student leader (usually titled “president”) and one officer authorized to deal with the organization’s finances (usually titled “treasurer”). The titles of these positions may vary according to the needs of the organization, but the two separate job functions must be provided for in this article. In addition, noting which officer has the responsibility of preparing and submitting the bi-annual Update Packet is strongly recommended. This article is also the appropriate place to outline the selection process, qualifications, responsibilities, and the term of office for the organization’s official university advisor(s). Article V Finances Provide a general statement about the way in which the finances of the organization should be handled, including what should happen to the organization’s funds if the organization is ended. Detailed financial procedures including the amount and collection procedures for dues, if any, should also be outlined here if not already appearing in the bylaws. Article VI. Amendments & Ratification This article should explain how constitutional amendments may be made, as well as the procedure for adopting this constitution and any future amendments. At a minimum, your constitution must be voted on and approved by the general membership of your organization. This article should also include a statement requiring prompt submission of an updated constitution and bylaws to the Office for Student Involvement for review by the Committee on Student Organizations should the document be changed following recognition. To be valid, the constitution must be signed by at least the organization’s chief student officer and primary advisor. You will want to provide a space for these individuals to sign and date the document.

What are Bylaws? Bylaws are secondary principles that govern the internal affairs of an organization. Bylaws are essentially an expansion of the articles or sections of the constitution. They describe in detail the procedures and steps the organization must follow in order to conduct business effectively and efficiently.

Why should I have Bylaws? Student organizations are not required to have bylaws, but may find them helpful to the organization’s operations. The constitution covers the fundamental principles but does not provide specific procedures for operating your organization. Bylaws should set forth in detail the procedures your group must follow to conduct business in an orderly manner. They provide further definition to the provisions contained in the constitution and can be changed more easily as the needs of the organization change.

What should I include in my Bylaws? Bylaws must not go against rules in the constitution. They generally contain, as needed, more specific information on the topics outlined below. If your organization has chosen not to develop bylaws, this information may be included in the appropriate sections of your constitution. The following are some standard articles that commonly appear in organization bylaws: 16


Membership - Sections under this article should discuss and detail the various aspects of membership that may be applicable: membership selection process, types of membership, and procedures for disciplining and/or removing members. Officers - Sections under this article should discuss the officer selection process, duties, powers, and responsibilities of each officer, and procedures for removal from office and filling empty officer positions. Committees - Sections under this article should discuss and detail standing and special committees (formation, selection, powers, and duties) and the executive committee (membership, powers, and duties), along with the roles and responsibilities of committee chairs. Meetings - Sections under this article should discuss types of meetings, how and when they are to occur, requirements for notice, attendance, and quorum (number of members needed present to transact business), meeting format, and parliamentary rules of order (usually Robert’s Rules of Order). Financial Procedures - Sections under this article should discuss and detail (if applicable) dues, initiation fees, and fines, collection procedures, and other financial procedures (budgets, expenditures, etc.). Amendment Procedures - Sections under this article should discuss the procedure for amending the bylaws (means of proposals, notice required, and voting requirements). Lastly, this is where you can include other specific policies and procedures unique to your organization that may be necessary for its operation.

How can I use my Constitution & Bylaws? Remember the reasons for having a constitution and bylaws. They articulate the purpose of your organization and spell out the procedures to be followed for its orderly functioning. Constitutions usually require a 2/3 vote of the membership for adoption. Bylaws only require a simple majority for passage. Once you have developed your constitution and bylaws, review them often. The needs of your group will change over time and it is important that the constitution and bylaws are kept up to date to show the current state of affairs. Make sure every new member of the organization has a copy of your governing documents. This will help to unify your members by informing them about the opportunities that exist for participation and the procedures they should follow to be an active, contributing member. A thorough study of the constitution and bylaws should be You can find more tips, a constitution a part of officer training and checklist and sample constitutions on the OSI transition. You should also website: www.utpa.edu/involvement. provide your advisor(s) with a copy of your constitution and bylaws.

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General Publicity and Posting Guidelines At UTPA, only the following are authorized to post materials:  Recognized/departmental student organizations  University offices  Faculty, staff and student organizations  Individual student, faculty, and staff advertising the sale of personally owned items.

Posting Procedure No advance permission is required to post signs. All posters, signs and fliers must include the following:  The event or activity being advertised is using a room that has already been reserved by the organization. (if applicable)  The material identifies the University person or organization sponsoring the posted sign. (required)  The material shows the date, time, and location. (if applicable)  The material has an ADA statement. This statement is required for events where special access may be required for people with disabilities. The ADA statement should say: “If special accommodations are needed, please contact X”, where X is the name and phone number of the organizational representative who will be responsible for setting up special accommodations for the person with Disability Services.  All postings must contain the date that it was posted.  No sign may be posted on top of another properly posted sign.  Signs in poor condition may be removed by the Dean of Students or designee. If your advertising material does not include the information above and is found on campus, it will be discarded immediately. Materials must be attached to bulletin boards so as not to destroy the surface. Signs, posters, or flyers will be attached to cork/bulletin boards with tacks, and kiosks with tacks or masking tape. No scotch tape or staples are to be used. Materials must not be attached to glass surfaces, vehicle windshields, indoor or outdoor walls/doors, vending machines, trashcans, trees, light posts, sidewalks, metal plates on columns or other similarly unauthorized locations. Persons or organizations that post materials are responsible for removal of materials within 30 days of posting or within 72 hours following the event.

Acceptable Posting Locations    

A University person or an organization may show a sign by holding or carrying it By displaying it on a table Posting it on a column along the covered walkway, bulletin board, kiosk, A-frame or other designated location. Posting inside buildings should be done only on the designated bulletin boards and elsewhere only with the permission of the building manager.

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Advertising materials should not be placed on any glass surface of any building,on trees nor staked into the ground. In addition, authorization to post materials in specific office spaces must come from the office manager. If needing to hang flyers/posters on the pillars, they are to be hung on the pillars of the covered walkway only, not the ones right outside buildings. Use the cables to tape your poster to the wire or fold the edges of your poster over the wire and staple in place. Do not tape posters directly to the column. You may still use string to post on columns that do not have cables. String is available to use for free to student organizations at OSI. Prior to posting, if any questions or concerns arise please come into our office located at UC 205 to discuss proper locations.

Banners: 

Banners are not allowed on campus. Please refer to HOP -----

Sidewalk Chalking 

Only members of the University community are eligible to chalk.

Chalking may not be done in areas where rain can’t reach such as the inside or outside walls of University buildings, vertical portions of stairs, columns, or under the covered MUST be in an area where the rain washes it out! walkway.

The message/artwork must be signed or otherwise identify the member of the University community or organization sponsoring it. Messages advertising events must include the ADA statement and should say: “If special accommodations are needed, please contact X”, where X is the name and phone number of the organizational representative who will be responsible for setting up special accommodations for the person with Disability Services.

Members of the University community and organizations are responsible for removing chalking when it falls into disrepair. Clean it up, 72 hours after your event!!!

Chalk is available for student organizations to check out from OSI for free.

Prohibited Postings Posting privileges are for on-campus purposes. Commercial ads from private businesses (For example: Clubs, printing agencies, restaurants, energy drinks) are not allowed anywhere on campus. If you have questions about a particular situation, contact the Office for Student Involvement in UC 205. 19


Personal postings are allowed. For example, students are allowed (and encouraged) to voice their opinions about academic topics, politics, etc. through pamphlets, brochures, and the like. They can also advertise their used books or other personal items for sale to the University community. However, personal postings that violate the solicitation provisions are not allowed. For example, students are not allowed to hand out flyers to advertise an outside business.

Removal Student organizations have the responsibility of removing their posters and signs from their locations and throwing them away. Removing postings keeps the University beautiful and lessens the work of custodial staff. It is also a mark of a responsible organization. Clean it up, 3 days after your event. Persons or organizations that post materials are responsible for removal of material within thirty days of posting or within 72 hours following the event. If you include this activity as part of your plans for after the event, you won’t have to worry about it.

Student Organizations that do not remove their posters within the time frame will receive a warning and might lose their posting privileges.

T-Shirt Policy If you decide to create a t-shirt for your organization, you need no advance permission from the University. Simply remember not to use official University logos or symbols or to in any way imply that you are sponsored by the University. Also, be sure to leave some physical distance between the name of your club and the name of our University. Placing the two next to each other could give the idea that your organization is a sponsored one. A way to clarify your organization’s affiliation with the university is to use the word “at” Example: Bronc Pride Organization at UTPA

Publications/Website “A registered student organization may state that its membership is composed of students, or of students, faculty, and/or staff, of the University, but it shall not suggest or imply that it is acting with the authority or as an agency of the University” (HOP 5.6.1). WRONG: UTPA_studentorg.com or UTPA_studentorg@something.com CORRECT: studentorg_UTPA@something.com or www.studentorg_utpa.com or studentorg@utpa.com Any website or E-mail address should not begin with UTPA or one its derivatives **Any group that is not currently following this policy must make changes immediately.

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If creating publications (brochures, reports, letters) or creating an organization website or blog, your organization must include the following statement: (INSERT ORGANIZATION NAME) is an independent organization composed of members from the University of Texas, Pan-American community; however, the opinions and views expressed do not necessarily represent those of The University of Texas-Pan American."

Failure to follow these procedures All postings not adhering to these or other applicable University guidelines and regulations will be removed, and any sponsoring campus organization may be subject to, but not limited to, the following:  Recommendation to the Dean of Students that the student organization face the loss of university recognition for a specified period of time. 

Recommendation to the Assistant Dean of Students that possible university disciplinary action be taken.

All advertising, including table tents in Food Services locations, is limited to recognized campus organizations and university related events with prior approval of authorized Food Services personnel.

Advertising and Publicity Tips Publicity is communication intended to get the interest and participation of individuals in a specific event, activity, or action. As a process, it informs, sells, educates, clarifies, exposes, excites, and involves. It serves as the vital link between a planned program and program response. Depending on the program, publicity can be one of the major causes of the success or failure of the program. "Getting the word out" is a major part of the program planning process. Quickly prepared, ill-timed publicity can be as ineffective as a program planned in the same manner. On occasion, an event may have so much potential appeal that enough publicity may be merely of word of mouth. Other times, the program may be so new and unheard of that it is necessary to organize a full-scale publicity campaign to generate interest and enthusiasm for the event, giving the potential audience at least some ideas of the nature of the program. However, People need to know about most of the time there is existing and plenty of interest your event! on the campus for just about any type of program and Spread the word through the task lies in getting that interest through captivating mediums that students tap and high quality publicity methods. into, whether it’s Facebook, Twitter, posters, word-ofmouth or a guy in a gorilla suit passing out flyers in the Student Union. Think outside the box!!!

Promotional techniques, whether in the form of posters, banners, flyers, ads, etc. will evoke a psychological response before the reactor even thinks about the message being communicated. The best publicity is that which is colorful, but the purpose may be lost if one cannot tell quickly what the program is. A flyer or poster that is scruffy-looking, 21


unpleasing to the eye, poorly designed, or badly printed may hurt the program rather than help. The character of the publicity — whatever it may be — reflects the quality of the upcoming program in the eyes of the person reading or hearing the publicity.

Target Your Audience Who are you trying to attract? What do you know about these individuals? Tailor Your Information The language, design, and media of your materials should be tailored to your audience. Be sure to share with audience the who, what, where, and when of your event. If the name of the event does not portray the whole story, consider including a short description or the purpose of the event. Timing When should publicity be released? Should it all go out at once, or should certain kinds be used at special times (e.g. teasers)? Which days are the best for campus newspaper ads? What are the time considerations for ad deadlines, poster designing, and printing? Effectively Distribute Your Materials Where are the traffic patterns? Are any areas being left uncovered? For example, target the rush hours when classes let out, utilize the corners of the walkways to distribute materials, carry a poster on a sandwich board, ask professors to distribute flyers or take time prior to class to make an announcement, hand out treats as you pass out flyers, and be creative. Types of Publicity Will flyers alone work? Ads? Is the program of sufficient expense and importance to warrant radio time? Try to do as many different things as you can to attract attention to your event. Task Coordination Who will be responsible for doing what and when? How have you involved your membership in assisting with implementing and advertising the event? Budget Will the response be worth the amount of money spent? Is a sufficient amount of money being spent? Is the total publicity budget a realistic one? The most effective approach to publicizing a program is through a variety of methods that will complement each other. These methods can include very straight, readable forms; interesting, eye catching forms; a possible audiovisual experience; and a fresh, new, creative approach. These may exist as graphics, displays, live exhibitions, and objects not usually used for publicity but related in some way to the program. It should be noted that because of the vast differences in constituency, size, location, and level of student involvement, there is no one sure way to publicize an event that would 22


work for every group. Each group should carefully investigate and evaluate those methods currently being used, in addition to possible methods, to develop a clear understanding of the best approach in which to evoke the highest level of response. Enthusiasm and interest are much more easily generated if a creative approach to publicity is used. Unique, fresh, and clever methods of promotion are usually more fun, will rally more support in terms of manpower, and if done in a sophisticated manner will sell almost any program.

Finding a Bank

Choosing a Bank

Your organization’s money should be kept at a bank. Which bank you choose is up to you. But before choosing, think about what is important to you in a bank. Some things to consider are:  Cost for the type of account you will have (monthly fees for checking accounts, transaction costs for savings accounts, penalties)  Service quality  Convenience  Location, sometimes a bank that has no monthly fee may be too inconvenient to use (e.g., it may be located too far from campus) or a bank that has a relatively high fee might be very convenient. Research several banks, create a list and compare to help you choose your organization’s bank. You might also want to consider talking to an account manager at the bank. Your group, by virtue of its standing as a registered organization, may be able to receive a discount or some other perk.

Opening the Account Before you open an account at any bank, you will need two key pieces of information:  An authorization form (e.g., a signature card)  An Employee Identification Number (EIN) The EIN is a nine-digit federal ID number for the organization that allows you to engage in financial transactions just like a social security number would do for an individual. It’s quick and easy to get one by filling out IRS Form SS-4, and you can even get the number over the phone. For more information, see the SS-4 instructions at www.irs.gov/pub/irspdf/iss4.pdf and the form itself at www.irs.gov/pub/irs-fill/fss4.pdf. The authorization form or signature card will be provided by your bank and is simply a way that the bank records signatures of those people who are authorized to sign checks and withdraw funds from the bank. It is good practice to require two signatures on checks (e.g. treasurer and president) You may also call the IRS at 1-877-829-5500 for more information.

Registration Letters If your bank requires a letter from the University in order to open an account in the organization’s name, come to UC Rm 205 and speak to one of our staff. We will print a 23


letter stating that your organization is officially registered with the University and list the officers. NOTE: Make sure your Bronc Link is complete before requesting the letter.

General Fundraising Guidelines All registered student organizations are allowed to raise funds on campus by selling food, merchandise, tickets, and other items. Like any other kind of event, fundraisers must be registered through an Event Registration Form- General Outdoor (Blue) at least ten (10) business days before their scheduled date.

Space Restrictions Certain areas of campus are off limits to fundraising. Generally, no fundraising is allowed inside buildings and food sales are not allowed where food is already provided by an official University source (for example, in the Student Union).

Fundraising Areas The following areas are specifically dedicated to student organization fundraising activities. Organizations can reserve most of them with a Green Form. (The number in parentheses represents the number of organizations that can be in that area at a given time.) Ballroom (may vary) **Note: You must sell what you signed up to sell. For example if you signed up to sell pizza you must sell pizza not nachos or any other item. Ballroom Walkway (1) BUSA Walkway (1) BUSA Lobby (1) Chapel Lawn (1) COAS Lobby (1) Education Circle (1) Engineering Building Lobby (1) Fine Arts Building Outside (1) (needs the special permission of the college’s Dean) General Classroom Building – MAGC Front Lawn (1) General Classroom Building – MAGC Lobby (1) HSHE Walkway (1) HSHW Breezeway Hall (1) HSHW Courtyard (1)

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HSHW Gazebo (1)

Checklist for reservations:  Registration form has completely been filled out completely including a second option/ rain plan.  Layout has been attached to the Reservation Form. (If the layout is not attached the Reservation Form will NOT be processed). **Note: Barbeque pits are available on a first come, first serve basis. If more than 5 tables are needed, Physical Plant will need to be notified for delivery.

Library BBQ Area (1) Library North/Courtyards (2) Library South Lawn (1) Library Media Courtyard (1) Quad North (1) Quad South (1) SBSC Courtyard (1) SBSC Lobby (1) Science Building Lobby (1) Science Quad (1) Student Union East Patio (1) Student Union West Patio (1) UC Circle (1) UC Downstairs Lobby (1) For each cluster of spaces in or near a given building, items sold there at the same time must be different from organizations in adjacent areas. For example, if an organization is already selling pizza in the SBSC Lobby, then another organization who wishes to sell pizza cannot do so in the SBSC Courtyard at the same time (although it will be able to sell pizza in some other building, or in the SBSC Lobby at another time). Organizations can fundraise in more than one location at one time. If you have any doubts about whether you can hold a fundraiser in a given location, submit your Yellow Form with your preferences written in and the OSI will work in getting you the best possible space.

Mobile Fundraisers Some clubs may want to hold mobile fundraisers – for example, they may want to sell food from a mobile cart or knickknacks from a box. Fundraisers of this type are allowed, but in all such cases, the club MUST submit an Event Registration Form for the activity. No fundraiser will be approved that defeats the purpose of limiting the kinds of items that can be sold in specific spaces.

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See page 45 for more information on food handling & safety.

Selling for Others You cannot solicit on behalf of organizations that themselves cannot solicit on campus. This means that you cannot sell anything for outside for-profit businesses: no portion of the funds you raise on campus can be distributed to an outside organization. You can receive donations from businesses and thank them for their help, but you cannot sell items which will in any way monetarily benefit that outside business, or that are received on consignment. A good rule of thumb is this: 100% of the funds you raise on campus MUST go directly to your organization. This restriction does not apply to 501(c)(3) organizations whose authorized agents are allowed to solicit funds for a maximum of fourteen (14) days per fiscal year on campus. If you raise funds for this kind of organization, you must be capable of producing proof that the organization is indeed a 501(c)(3) and that your club is authorized to solicit funds for it.

Tax Free Sales

Collecting Sales Tax

Student organizations can have a one-day, tax-free sale every month if the main purpose of that sale is to raise funds for the organization and the organization’s purpose is not to make a profit (which should include most, if not all, of UTPA’s student organizations). “Tax-free” means that you do not have to collect sales tax on the taxable items you sell for that one day (unless you sell an item that is priced at $5,000 or more that has not been donated or manufactured by you or which you sell to the donor). Taxable items are tangible personal property and taxable services, whether in physical or electronic form. Tangible personal property is property that can be seen, weighed, measured, felt, or touched or that is perceptible to the senses in any other manner. This includes computer programs and prepaid telephone calling cards. Taxable services are amusement services, personal services, maintenance services, and other kinds of services as described in the Texas Tax Code. You do not have to collect sales tax even if you have sales on more than one day each month if your total receipts for the calendar year are no more than $5,000. As a general rule of thumb, you should issue receipts for any sale you make on campus. However, for your tax-free sales, you can place a sign at your sale location indicating that the sale is a tax free sale to benefit your organization.

Other Sales If you sell taxable items for more than one day in a month and you sell more than $5,000 in a calendar year, you must obtain a sales tax permit and collect sales tax from your customers. To obtain an application for a tax permit, see www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/taxforms/ap201.pdf. Once you obtain your permit, you must display it at your sale. Be sure to give out 26


receipts showing the sale amount and tax amount. For more information on calculating tax and related matters, see www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/sales/index.html. Your organization should issue resale certificates to its suppliers when buying taxable items for resale. The organization must collect and remit tax and file sales tax returns from the sale of taxable items just the same as any other seller. Records must be maintained for auditing purposes on these transactions as well. Downloadable resale certificates can be found here: www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/taxforms/01-3391.pdf (front) and www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/taxforms/01-3392.pdf (back). For more information on collecting sales tax, see the Texas Tax Code, §151: www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/tx.toc.htm. See also Texas Administrative Code, Title 34, Part 1, Chapter 2, Subchapter O, §3.316: www.sos.state.tx.us/tac/index.shtml. If you are still confused, see the Comptroller of Public Account’s webpage at www.window.state.tx.us/m23taxes.html. You can contact them directly if you have any questions.

Raffles Raffles are events where prizes are awarded by chance at a single occasion among a single pool or group of persons who have paid or promised a thing of value for a ticket that represents a chance to win a prize. Games of skill and lotteries where no money is exchanged for a chance to win a prize are not considered raffles under this definition. • • • •

In Texas, only the following kinds of organizations may conduct raffles: An association organized mainly for religious purposes that have been in existence in Texas for at least 10 years A volunteer emergency medical service that does not pay its members other than nominal compensation; A volunteer fire department that operates firefighting equipment and does not pay its members other than nominal compensation A nonprofit organization that: has existed for at least three preceding years, during which it has had a governing body duly elected by its members and is exempt from federal income tax under Section 501(c), Internal Revenue Code; does not distribute any of its income to its members, officers or governing body; does not devote a substantial part of its activities to attempting to influence legislation; and does not participate in any political campaign.

Student organizations are not allowed to conduct raffles for their benefit unless they are one of the organizations mentioned above. Student organizations may, however, sell raffle tickets on behalf of organizations that are eligible to conduct raffles. Example: Student Organization may legitimately sell raffle tickets for the MakeA-Wish Foundation (a nonprofit, tax-exempt charity) or if Student Organization itself is an approved 501(c) organization, it may sell raffle tickets on its own behalf. Any raffle-related activity on campus must be registered with a Yellow Form with OSI. In addition, the following guidelines must be observed: 27


      

The prize for the raffle can be anything except money. The value of the prize cannot exceed $50,000. The organization must have each raffle prize in its possession or must post a bond for the full amount of the value of the prize with the county clerk of the county where the raffle is being held. The organization may hold only 2 raffles per year and only 1 raffle at a time. Raffle tickets may not be advertised state-wide or through paid advertisements. The raffle ticket must state the name or address of the organization holding the raffle, the name of an officer of the organization, the price of the ticket, and a general description of each prize to be awarded that has a value of over $10. No one may be compensated directly or indirectly for organizing or conducting a raffle or for selling raffle tickets. An organization may not permit a non-member or other unauthorized person to sell or offer to sell raffle tickets.

For more information about raffles in Texas, see the Charitable Raffle Enabling Act at: www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/OC/content/htm/oc.013.00.002002.00.htm. If you have questions after reading the law, you should consult an attorney.

Screening Films Student organizations may not publicly screen unlicensed films that are protected under copyright law. Protected films include rentals from video stores and movies that can be purchased from retailers. Purchase or rental of films from these sources, whether they are DVDs or VHS tapes, does not give license to show them in public. If a student organization wants to screen a film in public, it must secure a license to do so. There are various companies that license films to student groups. They will charge a fee depending on the film title, the number of people expected, and the amount of the admission fee. For more information about copyright law, see U.S. Code Title 17 at www.copyright.gov/title17. Organizations may be able to screen films without a license in cases where the following requirements are met:  The subject of the film is related to the mission of the organization  The showing is endorsed in class by faculty, (e.g., Professor Gomez recommends that all his students in Media Studies 101 go to see “Meeting People is Easy”),  The showing includes an intellectual or educational discussion related to the film,  The organization does not solicit donations, sell refreshment or merchandise, or in any other way benefit financially from the showing,  The showing does not duplicate showings that are already being made on campus and for which a licensing fee was paid.

Contracts Overview* Contracts are a binding agreement between two parties in which each gives something in return for something else. If you are involved in a student group, then you may deal with contracts if you sell things like t-shirts, have speakers or performers come to campus, rent a bus, or rent a room or a hall. 28


As a registered student organization, your group is entitled to all of the rights and privileges accompanying such recognition. With this privilege also comes responsibility. There is a fine balance within the relationship between your group and the University you must keep in mind. On the one hand, your conduct and decisions reflect on the University so it is important that you conduct yourselves and your affairs in an appropriate manner. On the other hand, you should not be representing to third parties in contract formations or other business dealings that you are representing UTPA. You are a recognized student group but you are not an employee or a designated representative to enter into binding agreements on behalf of UTPA. So, when you are involved with third parties and vendors, the recommendation to avoid this possible misperception as to your group's authority to act in a contract setting (either with direct or apparent authority) is to say: (Organization Name) is a registered student organization at The University of Texas-Pan American and does not represent the university. The organization cannot contractually obligate The University of Texas-Pan American. As a (member/officer) of (Organization Name), I enter into this (Contract/Agreement) on behalf of the organization in my role as Pres/Treasurer/etc. Including language like this, both orally and in writing, helps avoid any possible links between your activity and the University. Again, your registration with the University does not make you a representative of UTPA. It merely allows you to use some of the privileges of being a recognized student group at The University of Texas-Pan American. Although you may be reading this and thinking that disclaimer language such as this is unnecessary, you would be surprised at the misperceptions of outside businesses when you mention that you are a student group at The University of Texas-Pan American. If you leave it at that or add on things that make it seem that the university is behind you in making your agreement or contract, then the vendor or third party might believe that the university will take responsibility if the student group fails in its obligation. This is something that should not and cannot happen. Given the autonomy of student leadership, you must be willing to take responsibility for your decisions as they apply to yourself and your group. This is how you grow and develop as a student leader. Therefore, make sure you include language in your contract as mentioned above so that it is clear to others that your ability to enter into the agreement or contract is a function of your role as a leader in your group and not as a representative of The University of Texas-Pan American.

Get Your Contract in Writing and Signed The most important concept to contract law is having your agreement in writing and signed by the parties involved. The courts, as well as society, tend to believe things more when we see them in writing. Also, if a person's signature is attached to the writing, then surely it must be true. That is also the case with contracts. Courts will generally look at a written contract signed by both parties treating it as a final written expression of the parties. When that happens and both parties fulfill the agreement, then all is well with the world. However, problems often arise in the formation and execution of contracts. Here are some examples of problems that might arise when dealing with contracts. 

Are all Your Contract Terms agreed to by the other party? First, what happens when you are contracting with a printing company to have your programs for your big event printed up and you are still going back and forth on the 29


terms of the agreement? You think you are still getting the kinks worked out in your agreement when the printer decides to go ahead and print your programs according to their last specifications. Meanwhile, you had already given them an updated version of the specifications in which you ask for the glossy paper instead of the standard paper and ask for a three-color format instead of standard black and white. As you can see, this is a problem for you because you are now getting programs that are not what you wanted. 

Was Your Contract Valid When You Signed it? Second, what happens if you are the president of a group and you are not quite eighteen (18) years old and you make an agreement with a band promoter to have his band play for an event your group is putting on in two weeks? Is the contract enforceable? What if you turn eighteen (18) after the contract was signed, but before the concert is performed? The general rule is that a minor is allowed to renounce a contract as a minor but also within a reasonable time after reaching the age of majority (18 in Texas). Under the law, the contract you made with the band promoter may not be enforceable. So, if you decided not to have the band play for your group (breach of contract), you most likely could do it because you are a minor. Courts do not like it, however, when commerce is inhibited, which is exactly what happens when minors are allowed to avoid contract responsibilities with third parties. You are best advised not to try to breach your contract and use age as an excuse. Other factors that may affect your capacity to contract with another person include being under duress, intoxicated, or coerced. Also, your contract will not be valid if it involves breaking the law or is otherwise illegal. Along these lines, what happens if a member of your group signs a contract on behalf of your group but had no authority to do so by your group? Is your group liable for the consequences of this contract? This answer is going to depend on the role this group member plays in your organization. Usually, your group would have to indicate to the other party in the contract that it has given authority or permission to this person to enter into a contract. On the other hand, if this person has been making contracts for the group on previous occasions and it has always been understood that s/he is acting on behalf of the group, then the group may be responsible for the consequences of the contract. This is an area your group needs to watch. Make it clear to your participants what your group's policy is on entering into contracts. Without articulating your policy or creating a policy in this area, you may end up with members getting your organization involved in things that you do not wish to be involved. Play it safe and let your members know ahead of time so you can avoid unpleasant surprises later.

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Is Your Contract Fair to Both Parties? Finally, what happens if you sign a contract that is just so one-sided that your organization is responsible for everything and the other party guarantees nothing? The term court's use in this case is called "unconscionability" which basically means that something is unfair. This public policy argument often works when a contract is so one-sided that the other party is really in a bad position.

Normal Parts of a Contract Here are some things you will see in most standard contracts: • Description- indicates what the contract covers, such as "Contract for T-Shirts" 30


Caption- indicates who the parties are to the contract and when the contract was made.

Background- indicates what each party's business or purpose is, like "Rick's Tee Shirts is located on 101 Old College Main and is in the retail business of selling tee shirts".

Contract Duration- indicates how long contract is valid (often found early in document).

Definitions- indicates what the meaning of commonly used words in the contract are like "they" means "Y Club" or "late" means "any promise fulfilled after the expiration of the time limit agreed to by both parties." It is important to define terms that have subtle differences in their meaning like "must" (absolute), "shall" (contingent upon), and "may" (permissive). Party Obligations- indicates what each party is responsible for in the contract like "Rick's Tee Shirts shall supply Y Club with 500 tee shirts on September 30 at $5.00 a shirt. Y Club must pay Rick's Tee Shirts $2,500 plus tax on the date of delivery."

Operative Provisions- indicates what other things make up the contract like if any warranties or exclusions apply. Often, this is the place you will see disclaimer and limiting language designed to give the party who wrote the contract advantage over the party that signs the contract.

Enforcement Provisions- indicates the part of the contract that deals with "What happens if..." (Someone does not fulfill their end of the agreement, something not in the contract is causing problems, where to go if there is a dispute, what happens if the other party said we agreed verbally but it is not in the written contract)

Closing- indicates that both parties agree to the contract and then they sign it. This section has provided a basic overview to the contracting process for a recognized student organization. In sum, it is in your best interest to read the contract carefully and discuss with other members of your group, your advisor, and when applicable, legal counsel, any questions or problems you have with provisions of a contract BEFORE YOU SIGN IT. Once you sign a contract it becomes very difficult to change provisions of the contract.

Risk Management The purpose of risk management is to assist student organization leaders, members, and advisors in learning to identify the potential and perceived risks involved in their activities as well as in development of prudent judgment skills used to eliminate, limit or accept these risks. The Office for Student Involvement encourages student leaders as well as faculty and staff advisors to collaborate on the creation of student organization environments that help members and leaders make intelligent, fair and reasonable choices within the boundaries established by state, federal or local laws, UTPA HOP, UT Regents’ 31


Rules & Regulations, and the educational mission of The University of Texas-Pan American. It is important for Advisors to work with your student organization in many ways: preevent planning, analyzing potential risks and explaining liability issues, promoting the use of liability waivers, making recommendations before organization’s enter into contractual agreements, helping with travel plans, assisting in the creation of organization risk management standards, and more. The OSI team is always willing to meet with students and/or advisors individually or as groups to provide support and guidance when questions arise.

Risk Management Workshop House Bill 2639 amends the Education Code to require each public, private, or independent college and university, including a junior college, to provide a risk management program at least once during each academic year to address possession and use of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs, hazing, sexual abuse and harassment, and behavior at parties and other events held by a student organization, as well as other issues deemed appropriate. It sets out attendance requirements for members and advisors of student organizations and requires sanctions to address absences from compulsory meetings. The bill also requires the Texas Department of Insurance to study various issues involving the levels and types of insurance coverage required of and available to college and university fraternities ALL student organizations MUST attend a Risk Management Workshop at the start of every academic year. Any 2 OSI approved officers need to attend. Failure to attend will result in immediate suspension of the organization. At the start of every academic year, at least two officers need to attend the annual Risk Management Workshop. Any two (2) of the following officers (President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, Risk Management Chair, Recruitment Chair, and Sergeant at arms) that are indicated in the update packet will be required to attend as their organization's representatives. All other positions not mentioned will need prior approval by the Office for Student Involvement. Attendance will be verified by the Office for Student Involvement (OSI). Failure to attend will result in immediate suspension and revocation of all organization privileges. The student organization will have 10 calendar days from the date noted on the notification to appeal their suspension. Appeal must be presented in writing to the Office for Student Involvement. Upon approval of appeal, all affected individuals will be mandated to attend the Risk Management Workshop series make up sessions on the individual topics originally covered during the Risk Management workshop. Each topic will be offered once. The same officer(s) must attend all sessions in their entirety, failure to so will result in immediate suspension of the organization until the requirement is met the following semester. Suspended organizations lose recognition and all privileges associated thereof. Student organization privileges revoked but not limited to: Recognition by the university, on campus activity or involvement as a group, reservations for the use of on campus facilities

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(previous reservations made through the OSI will be cancelled), & use of services specifically for student organizations (e.g. free copies, lamination, fundraising, etc.) However, we will continue to keep your mailbox active at the Office for Student Involvement, located in UC 205 as many of you receive bank records and other official mail at this address.

Suspended organizations, newly recognized student organizations, and new officers elected in late fall or early spring will have an opportunity to attend a Risk Management seminar in February. The February Risk Management seminar will be the only one offered in the Spring semester. Approved new student organizations are required to attend the Spring workshop. **Note: Regardless of attendance in the Spring semester at the Risk Management Workshop, organizations are required to attend the Risk Management Workshop at the start of every academic year. Texas House Bill 2639 requires that all advisors attend once during their tenure as an advisor to a student organization. All advisors must be older than 21 years of age, be a full time faculty or staff member of the University, and should attend the Risk Management workshop within their first year as an advisor. ALL student organization Advisors are encouraged to attend so as to advisors MUST attend a Risk prevent any consequences that may be placed Management Workshop once upon the student organization. during their tenure.

The Campus Safety & Security Report Each year the University Police Department and the Office of the Dean of Students work together to release the Campus Safety and Security Report which is part of the requirements for the Clery Act. The purpose of this Act is to inform students and their parents about campus crime prevention programs, procedures for reporting crimes on campus, and information about the number and frequency of crimes reported on our campus to campus security authorities. Campus security authorities are those persons on a campus who have significant interactions with students. This includes student organization advisors. For purposes of the Clery Act, a crime is reported when a victim or witness brings it to the attention of a campus security authority. These crimes include homicide, forcible and nonforcible sex offenses, robbery, simple and aggravated assaults, burglary, theft, motor vehicle theft, arson, weapons, drug abuse, and liquor law violations. It is not required that the crime be investigated by the University Police Department or by the Office of the Dean of Students to be counted in the statistics and third party reporting is allowed. If you are in doubt on whether or not something classifies as a crime, please contact the University Police Criminal Investigations Division at 316-7151, the Assistant Chief of Police at 3845076, or the Office of the Dean of Students at 665-2262 for clarification. Undercounting a crime on our campus can result in a Department of Education fine of $27,500 and removal of all federal financial aid. So please take this seriously and allow the University Police Department and Office of the Dean of Students to determine whether or not something should or should not be counted as a crime. 33


Students will often trust student organization advisors enough to come forward when unfortunate things happen to them. The Office of the Dean of Students will do everything it can to protect that relationship and comply with the Clery Act. Please do not hesitate to ask any one of our professional staff for assistance.

Statement on Date/Service Auctions* Various opinions have been expressed regarding whether or not date auctions are appropriate activities for student organizations at The University of Texas-Pan American. Clearly, everyone is entitled to his/her own opinion. The purpose of this statement is to discuss briefly three aspects of date auctions that make them inappropriate in the opinion of the Dean of Students, Office for Student Involvement, the Department of Residence Life, and the Office of Student Life & Transition Services. It is not our intent to propose that the organizations that have sponsored date auctions in the past had any intentions of promoting or endorsing these issues. Rather, it is our intent to promote awareness of these concerns and point out potential problems and liabilities for future consideration.

Gender insensitivity: An extension of the issues above is the need for us all to respect the rights of others and to know that a person cannot be bought. One of the dangerous attitudes that continue to exist between men and women is the concept of "whoever pays is entitled." Many date rapes result from the assumption on the part of the man or the woman or both that whoever pays for the "date" is entitled to more than the other person wanted. Date auctions can tend to create an environment where those expectations may be used to the disadvantage of one or the other participants.

Personal safety: A date auction often involves a "well known" person spending time with a stranger on a "date" that he or she otherwise might not have chosen to spend time with at all. The organization sponsoring the auction has no way of knowing the motivations of the persons doing the bidding. A "fatal attraction" circumstance is possible, where the date auction becomes a convenient means by which a person has the opportunity to "buy" some time with the person to whom he or she is attracted. Although the possibility of this scenario may seem extremely remote, it has considerable liability implications for the organization sponsoring the event.

Racial insensitivity: Date auctions tend to have the appearance of and the "trappings" of slave auctions. Slave auctions were a very real and tragic part of the history of this country. They devalued the dignity of human beings to the level of merchandise. Regardless of the intent of a date auction, it still involves one person "bidding" for the services of another person. Whether the services consist of work or time or something else, an auction of this type consists of one person paying a second person (or organization) for the services of a third person. The bidding process invariably involves a comparison of the relative "value" of each person being auctioned. On a campus where equality, openness, and sensitivity are valued, any activity that suggests the auctioning of one human being's services to another is inappropriate. Date auctions are usually held to raise money for good causes. The organizations have good intentions in sponsoring the activity. Given the above concerns, which expose the potential for persons and/or groups to be offended or hurt, date auctions may be perceived 34


to be a bad way to raise money. If an organization should want to hold an auction, we would encourage the auctioning of items, such as tickets to an event or dinners at a particular restaurant, rather than auctioning individuals. With the many positive and imaginative alternatives that organizations have for raising funds, we feel date auctions should be avoided.

Hazing & Discrimination * One of the many keys to success for student organizations is the acceptance of new members. Often organizations have a formal process under which they bring new members into their group. Whether using a formal or informal process it is important to recognize that The University of Texas - Pan American and the State of Texas as well many inter/national organizations have strict guidelines governing components of new member programs, initiations, or sustaining membership procedures that may be outside of the boundaries of good decision-making. In an effort to assist organizations with the development and coordination of safe, successful practices we offer the following: A student organization can suffer great consequences if hazing and discrimination are a part of its activities. Hazing and discrimination are against state law and both are actions UTPA will not tolerate.

Hazing Scenario: An Example of Hazing Some members of Group A+, a prestigious academic honor society, decided to conduct an initiation of new members. After all, they were Snub Nu and they wanted nothing but the best in their organization. This idea to have an initiation was a new idea so the members of the group thought of ways they could initiate their new members. On initiation night, new members were required to paint each others' faces, glue their hair together, and do as many push ups as they could do. During the course of the evening, one of the Hazing refers to any activity new members, while being chased around the expected of someone joining a room, slipped and fell on a table edge hitting her group that humiliates, degrades or cheek. As a result, she developed facial bruises risks emotional and /or physical which caused her pain and embarrassment. She harm regardless of the person’s called her parents to let them know what willingness to participate. happened. Her father became very irate and called For more information visit: the university. Is this hazing? What if all the new www.stophazing.com initiates consented to these activities? What if the injured new initiate did not mind the fact that she was hurt? Regardless of how the victim thought or whether or not she agreed to the activities, this event is HAZING. This next section is designed to help answer questions you may have on hazing and its consequences. Hazing is against the law in the State of Texas and is a violation of UT Board of Regents Rules and Regulations. The Dean of Students, the Office for Student Involvement, and UTPA will enforce to the best of their abilities all legislation, laws, and regulations pertaining to this issue. Read the following information carefully before planning activities.

Hazing: The Law On August 31, 1987, a law went into effect in the State of Texas regarding hazing. Below is an abbreviated summary, in question and answer format, of the contents of that law and 35


the applicability and implications for students, faculty, and staff at UTPA. For the entire text of the law, please see go to www.utpa.edu/hop/files/pdf/C6141857.pdf or http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/ED/content/htm/ed.003.00.000051.00.htm 1. What is the definition of hazing? "Hazing" means any intentional, knowing, or reckless act, occurring on or off campus of The University of Texas-Pan American, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in any organization whose members are or include students at The University of Texas-Pan American.

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Victims of Hazing often: Show physical signs of exhaustion, hangovers increased illness, scars, or bruising Feel anger, confusion, embarrassment, helplessness, anxiety and even sometimes depression due to being hazed by peers. Feel that there is no way out. They started the process and they have to finish it. Feel a sense of loyalty to the group and avoid sharing their concerns or fears with anyone for fear the group might get in trouble. Feel like they are weak and should toughen up, just like those did before them. See a decrease in performance in school, sports, or work.

The term includes but is not limited to:

Any type of physical brutality, such as whipping, beating, striking, branding, electronic shocking, placing of a harmful substance on the body, or similar activity. Any type of physical activity, such as sleep deprivation, exposure to the elements, confinement in a small space, calisthenics, or other activity that subjects the student to an unreasonable risk or harm or that adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student. Any activity involving consumption of a food, liquid, alcoholic beverage, liquor, drug, or other substance which subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or which adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student. Any activity that intimidates or threatens the student with ostracism, that subjects the student to extreme mental stress, shame, or humiliation, or that adversely affects the mental health or dignity of the student or discourages the student from entering or remaining 36


registered in an educational institution, or that may reasonably be expected to cause a student to leave the organization or the institution rather than submit to acts described in this subsection. Any activity that induces, causes, or requires the student to perform a duty or task that involves a violation of the Penal Code. 2. How do I commit a hazing offense? According to state law, a person commits a hazing offense: by engaging in a hazing activity, by soliciting, directing, encouraging, aiding or attempting to aid another in hazing; by intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly allowing hazing to occur; by failing to report to the Dean of Students, or other appropriate university official of firsthand knowledge that a hazing incident is planned or has occurred. Refer to Education Code, chapter 37 found at: http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/cgi-bin/cqcgi for more information. 3. Does it matter if I did not intend to harm anybody? No. The State of Texas makes clear that if one of the above occurs, it is hazing regardless of the intent. 4. Does it matter if the person being hazed agrees to the activity? No! Hazing with or without the consent of a student is prohibited by the University and by the UT System. Regardless of the fact that a person consented to or acquiesced in a hazing activity is not a defense to prosecution for hazing under the law. 5. What is the penalty if I am found in violation of hazing? The law does not affect or in any way restrict the right of the university to enforce its own rules against hazing. The student may be subjected to university disciplinary action, up to and including removal from the university; in addition to or regardless of any penalty imposed by the state. 6. Can I get into any trouble for reporting hazing? No. In an effort to encourage reporting of hazing incidents, the law grants immunity from civil or criminal liability to any person who reports a specific hazing event to the Dean of Students or other appropriate official of the University and immunizes that person from participating in any judicial proceedings resulting from that report. A person who reports in bad faith or with malice, however, is not protected by this section. 7. Where do I report hazing? Student Judicial Services (UC 322A) 665-2659 Office of the Dean of Students (UC 104) 665-2260 UTPA Police Department (ASF 1.201) 665-2737 8. Are there State penalties for hazing? Yes, they are listed below: The offense of failing to report is a Class B misdemeanor. Any other offense under this section that does not cause serious bodily injury to another is a Class B misdemeanor. Any other offense under this section that causes serious bodily injury to another is a Class A misdemeanor. Any other offense under this section that causes the death of another is a state jail felony. 37


If an offense causes the death of a student, in sentencing a person convicted of an offense under this section, the court may require the person to perform community service, subject to the same conditions imposed on a person placed on community supervision under Section 11, Article 42.12, Code of Criminal Procedure, for an appropriate period of time in lieu of confinement in county jail or in lieu of a part of the time the person is sentenced to confinement in county jail.(An offense under this section is a misdemeanor punishable by: a fine of not less than $5,000 nor more than $10,000; or if the court finds that the offense caused personal injury, property damage, or other loss, a fine of not less than $5,000 nor more than double the amount lost or expenses incurred because of the injury, damage, or loss. 9. Can an organization be found guilty of hazing? Yes. An organization commits an offense if the organization condones or encourages hazing or if an officer or any combination of members, pledges, or alumni of the organization commits or assists in the commission of hazing.

Alternatives to Hazing Sometimes, organizations that haze new members are confused about how to change these practices. There are many creative ways to change from a hazing to a non-hazing organization. The following are some specific examples of ways to eliminate hazing and make membership a challenging but positive experience: Note: In Greek-letter organizations, the term "pledge" is often equated with hazing practices. Many national organizations have sought to eliminate this term in order to foster more positive attitudes toward the new members. Some substitute terms include "associate members" and "new members." When organizations are challenged to eliminate hazing practices, some members are often resistant to this change. In many cases, those who are most vocal against eliminating hazing are those who are bitter and angry about the hazing that they themselves endured (but don't admit this publicly) and expect that others should be abused in order to gain "true" membership in the group. You will also find that some of these folks are likely to be bullies of the group—people who enjoy a "power trip" at the expense of someone else. Of course, if you try to eliminate hazing in your organization, you will likely encounter many elaborate reasons for why this will be devastating for your group. While there will be some who don’t want changes, there will be many who can be convinced of the negative effects and potential risks of hazing. Believers in the supposed "benefits" of hazing may be more likely to change their opinion if they can envision some alternatives. The supposed "benefits" of hazing follow in bold with non-hazing alternatives to accomplish the same goal listed alongside.  Foster Unity: Have the members of your group/organization work together on a community service project. Visit a ropes course to work on group cohesiveness, communication and leadership skills. In fraternities and sororities with chapter houses, the group might work together on a chapter room improvement project. Another option for fostering unity without hazing is for the members to work together to plan a social or athletic event with another group.  Develop Problem-Solving Abilities: Have new/associate members discuss chapter/organization challenges and plan solutions that the active members might then adopt. 38


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Develop Leadership Skills: Encourage participation in school/campus activities outside of the organization. Encourage new members to get involved in organizational committees and/or leadership roles. Develop a peer mentor program within your group for leadership roles. Invite school/community/business leaders into the organization to share their experiences. Instill a Sense of Membership: Plan special events when the entire organization gets together to attend a movie, play, or church service. Plan a "membership circle" when actives and new members participate in a candlelight service in which each person has a chance to express what membership means to them. Promote Scholarship: Take advantage of UTPA’s academic and tutoring services. Designate study hours for members of your organization. Invite university or community experts to discuss test taking skills, study methods, time management etc. Build Awareness of Organization History: Invite an older member to talk about the organization’s early days, its founding, special traditions, and prominent former members. For Fraternities and Sororities increase knowledge of the Greek System: Invite leaders of Greek or Multicultural Greek Councils, Panhellenic, Inetrfraternity and/or Advisors to speak on Greek governance including their goals and expectations of the Greek system. Career Goals: Use college resources for seminars on resume writing, job interview skills; various careers. Involve New Members in the Community: Get involved with campus and community service projects. Plan fund-raisers for local charitable organizations. Improve Relations with Other Organizations: Encourage new members to plan social or service projects with new members and other organizations; work together to plan joint social or service activities.

Myths and Facts about Hazing* Myth #1: Hazing is a problem for fraternities and sororities primarily. Fact #1: Hazing is a societal problem. Hazing incidents have been frequently documented in the military, athletic teams, marching bands, religious cults, professional schools and other types of clubs and/or, organizations. Reports of hazing activities in high schools are on the rise. Myth #2: Hazing is no more than foolish pranks that sometimes go awry. Fact #2: Hazing is an act of power and control over others, it is victimization. Hazing is premeditated and NOT accidental. Hazing may be abusive, degrading and often lifethreatening. Myth #3: As long as there is no malicious intent, a little hazing should be O.K. Fact #3: Even if there is no malicious "intent" safety may still be a factor in traditional hazing activities that are considered "all in good fun." For example, serious accidents have occurred during scavenger hunts and kidnapping trips. Besides, what purpose do such activities serve in promoting the growth and development of group team members? Myth #4: Hazing is an effective way to teach respect and develop discipline. Fact #4: First, respect must be EARNED—not taught. Victims of hazing rarely report having respect for those who have hazed them. Just like other forms of victimization, hazing breeds mistrust, apathy and alienation. 39


Myth #5: If someone agrees to participate in an activity, it cannot be considered hazing. Fact #5: In states that have lawsuits against hazing, consent of the victim cannot be used as a defense in a civil suit. This is because even if someone agrees to participate in a potentially hazardous action it may not be true consent when considering the peer pressure and desire to belong to the group.

Discrimination Although the federal and state laws concerning racial, gender, and disability discrimination have little direct influence on individual student groups, it is important to remember that the university has policies governing these matters as well. The University’s Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Policy published in UTPA HOP states: The University of Texas-Pan American is committed to providing equal opportunity to all persons seeking employment, or access to its programs, facilities, or services without regard to race, religion, color, gender, disability, age, veteran status, national origin, sexual orientation, citizenship or gender identity and expression. In order to abide by this policy, here are some things UTPA student organizations my want to consider: To the best of the group's abilities, try to be reasonable in the accommodation of potential members, members, and guests who may be different from you and your group in terms of gender, race, disability, etc. These accommodations include but are not limited to: Rearranging physical space to accommodate people in wheel chairs Rearranging new member events for the late afternoon hours so non-traditional students can also participate in your club and organization Strive to work with groups that are different from yours to gain exposure to new ideas and people instead of isolating yourselves which could possibly lead to harassment because of your group's lack of diversity 10 Ways to Celebrate Diversity Together 1. Talk with others about their background 2. Inform people if something they say is offensive and why. 3. Volunteer to help with an event devoted to support a diverse group. 4. Learn a cultural dance. 5. Watch a controversial or educational movie and discuss it afterwards. 6. Go to a museum to see a cultural exhibit. 7. Meet with some multicultural student organizations on campus to fund out how you can better meet students’ needs through programs and events. 8. Make plans to attend a local march, rally, or protest in support of another group’s rights. 9. Put together an educational or social program that highlights diversity. 10.De aware of one another’s needs. 40


Use educational opportunities as methods for improving your understanding of those not like you physically, cognitively, etc. In keeping with the Bronc Spirit, try to take the time to think about how you can accommodate those different from you before those who are different show up to join your club or attend your events Be sensitive to the "isms" and phobias such as sexism, racism, heterosexism, etc. If bigotry of any kind appears in your organization, work with your advisor to have a plan in place where those members' ideas can be challenged through education and exposure, either through university sponsored events or within the organization itself. "Isms" left unchecked become possible harassment situations. UTPA cannot and will not tolerate harassment of any kind. Confront it early. Do yourself and your group a favor and report harassment of any kind to the University. Students should contact the Dean of Students at 665-2262. Not reporting this information could hurt your organization if anything were to happen and you or your group knew about it. If you know something and a reasonable person would act on that knowledge and you do not, then you will be liable for the harm that occurs from your inaction.

Event Planning One of the most important parts of an organization’s activities or events is the planning process. Adequate planning can play a major part in the success of your event. The Office for Student Involvement provides resources that will be helpful in planning events ranging from group meetings to campus or community-wide activities. As members of the campus community, student organizations are expected to plan activities, operations, and services offered within the boundaries established by (University’s Rules & Regent’s as well as operating guidelines established by The Office for Student Involvement, organization governing documents, and other campus entities the organization is associated with. Due to the “Little Things” complexity of many organization activities, it  Be prepared to turn off the lights is always in the best interest of the student if your presenter has a leadership to focus on issues of personal safety, PowerPoint to share financial security, and public image. The  Make sure your programming Office for Student Involvement is committed to space is accessible assisting all student organizations plan  Have water available for activities that promote leadership development, presenters/performers advance the mission of the organization,  Don’t put perishable enhance the educational mission of the refreshments out too early – University, and are safe. food can go bad and make folks sick  Have thank you cards ready to fill out as soon as the event is over! Some student organizations have been around for many years and have established annual programs or events. While the information for event planning will help to improve these activities, it is important that all organizations use the event planning information and form to plan events new to the organization. Always feel free to come by or contact Office for Student Involvement with any questions you have concerning event planning. 41


Effective pre-event planning can enhance participant safety, provide better fiscal planning, increase student development, reduce legal liability, and is simply a good thing to do.

Campus Facility Reservations Use of University Property, Rooms, and Spaces The University permits the orderly use of rooms and spaces on its property, as provided in this subsection, to further the educational process. The University does not allow any person or organization to use a University facility for any purpose other than in the course of the regular mission of the University or the U. T. System

Reservation of a Room or Space on University Property Academic and administrative units, and registered student, faculty, and staff organizations, may reserve the use of a room or space on University property for purposes permitted by the Regents' Rules and HOP Section 8.4.3. Reservations are not required but are strongly encouraged. A person or organization planning to use a room or space without a reservation may find the facility locked or in use by another person or organization. The University Police rely on a list of scheduled events, and a large group without a reservation is likely to attract their courteous but inquiring attention. An organization with a reservation has the right to the reserved space listed on the reservation for the time covered by the reservation. Any person or organization using or occupying the space without a reservation must give up control of the space to allow any organization with a reservation to begin using the space promptly at the beginning of its reserved time. Remember to leave the space you use in as good condition as you found it. Clean the area and equipment. The Office for Student Involvement or Dean of Students can help student organizations structure events in ways that both comply with the University's rules and achieve the organization's goals for the event. OSI can help identify appropriate space and potentially conflicting events and help the planners avoid unintended disruption. Important Reminder: Make sure to add time to your reservation for set up and breakdown. Example: If you plan your event to be from 7:00 – 9:00p.m., make your reservation from 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. that way you have 30 minutes before and after your event to set up and clean up.

Persons or organizations planning a public assembly are strongly encouraged to meet with an OSI staff if there is uncertainty about applicable University rules, the appropriateness of the planned location, or possible conflict with any other event.

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Reservation Procedure

BTW: Business days does NOT include Saturday. **Note: If the officer making the reservation is NOT listed on your organization’s BroncLink. They will NOT be allowed to turn in a registration form. Make sure you’ve updated your BroncLink!

All organizations wishing to reserve a space should complete the Event Registration Form, seven (7)business days before the event takes place. Officers must complete the Reservation Form. There are 3 Types of Reservation forms: 1. General Outdoor (Blue) 2. Student Union/University Center (Pink) 3. General Classroom (Yellow) OSI can assist student organizations in properly completing the appropriate form and making these requests. Some spaces are controlled by academic or administrative units other than the scheduling office (Uschedule) and those units shall make the rules and procedures for reserving spaces, and a list of the spaces that may be reserved is readily available on the Dean of Students website and on a flyer or pamphlet conveniently available at the unit's office. The reservation of a space will be honored unless: the proposed use of the room or space would violate one or more of the general rules in Subsections D.2. and D.3. of HOP 5.6.2; another event or exhibit has been scheduled for the proposed time and location, or so near that there is a practical conflict; the room or space requested is inadequate to accommodate the proposed use; the proposed use of the room or space would violate reasonable and nondiscriminatory fire, health, or safety standards; the proposed use of the room or space would constitute an immediate and actual danger to students, faculty members, or staff members, or to the peace or security of the University that available law enforcement officials could not control with reasonable effort; the applicant is under a disciplinary penalty prohibiting reserving the use of a University room or space, or prohibiting the proposed use of the room or space; or the applicant owes a monetary debt to the University and the debt is considered delinquent. If an application is denied, upon request, the OSI or Dean of Students shall provide the applicant a written statement of the grounds for denial within five business days.

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Reservation Steps 1. Once the Reservation Form is complete, bring it to UC 205, 7business days before the event, meeting, fundraiser, etc. **Note: floor plan / diagram must be submitted with form to be processed. 2. The organization officer that submits the form MUST be indicated on the organization’s BroncLink and authorized by the organization to sign it. In case we have any questions or a room is not available, we will contact that person. Be sure to give an accurate phone number and email address. 3. Once the form is received at UC 205, we will make the room request for you throughUschedule. If there are any problems (e.g., missing information, or none of the requested rooms is available), we will contact you. 4. Once the room request is made throughUschedule, we must wait for confirmation from the Uschedule scheduler. (OSI is not responsible for the such timeframe) 5. When the room is confirmed, it will appear on the Uschedule website. In addition, a copy of the Event Registration Form along with the Confirmation number will be placed in your Student Organization Mailbox located at the University Center, Room 205. There is no need to call OSI.

Free Speech & Assembly The freedoms of speech, expression, and assembly are fundamental rights of all persons and are central to the mission of the University. Students, faculty, and staff have the right to assemble, speak, and attempt to attract the attention of others, and corresponding rights to hear the speech of others when they choose to listen, and ignore the speech of others when they choose not to listen. Students, faculty, and staff are free to express their views, individually or in organized groups, orally or in writing or by other symbols, on any topic, in all parts of the campus, subject only to rules necessary to preserve the equal rights of others and the other functions of the University. (See HOP 5.6.2 for greater detail) **Note: UTPA items such as tables, chairs, etc may not be checked out without a facility/space reservation. Except as expressly authorized by Subsection D.2. on Prohibited Expression of HOP 5.6.2 (see below), the University shall not discriminate on the basis of the political, religious, philosophical, ideological, or academic viewpoint expressed by any person, either in the enforcement and administration of these rules or otherwise.

Prohibited Expression Obscenity 44


No person or organization shall distribute or display on the campus any writing or visual image, or engage in any public performance, that is obscene. A writing, image, or performance is "obscene" if it is obscene as defined in Texas Penal Code, Section 21.08 or successor provisions, and is within the constitutional definition of obscenity as set forth in the United States Code and decisions of the United States Supreme Court. Defamation No person shall make, distribute, or display on the campus any statement that unlawfully defames any other person. A statement unlawfully defames another person if it is false, if the false portion of the statement injures the reputation of the other person, and if the speaker has the constitutionally required state of mind as set forth in decisions of the United States Supreme Court. Defamation is further defined in Texas Penal Code, Section 73.001 or successor provisions. Incitement to Imminent Violations of Law No person shall make, distribute, or display on the campus any statements directed at inciting or producing imminent violations of law under circumstances such that the statements are likely to actually and imminently incite or produce violations of law, including but not limited to Texas Penal Code, Section 42.01 or successor provisions. Harassment Persons shall not make, distribute, or display on the campus any statement that constitutes verbal harassment of any other person. This subsection applies to all speech on the campus, including speech that is part of teaching, research, or other official functions of the University. Verbal Harassment "Verbal harassment" means hostile or offensive speech, oral, written, or symbolic, that personally describes or is personally directed to one or more specific individuals; and is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent to create an objectively hostile environment that interferes with or diminishes the victim's ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or privileges provided by the University. To make an argument for or against the substance of any political, religious, philosophical, ideological, or academic idea is not verbal harassment, even if some listeners are offended by the argument or idea. The categories of sexually harassing speech set forth in HOP Section 2.2.4 are rarely, if ever, necessary to argue for or against the substance of any political, religious, philosophical, ideological, or academic idea. Verbal harassment may consist of threats, insults, epithets, ridicule, personal attacks, or the categories of harassing sexual speech set forth in HOP Section 2.2.4, and is often based on the victim's appearance, personal characteristics, or group membership, including but not limited to race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, citizenship, veteran status, sexual orientation, ideology, political views, or political affiliation. Harassment can also consist of nonverbal conduct, such as hazing, practical jokes, damage to property, and physical assault. In the case of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct, sexual conduct is often central to the offense. These forms of harassment are prohibited in HOP Section 2.2.4, and in the Regents’ Rules, Series 30105. 45


The harassment that this subsection prohibits does not exhaust the category of speech that is unnecessary and inappropriate to vigorous debate in a diverse community of educated people. An essential part of higher education is to learn to separate substantive argument from personal offense, and to express even the deepest disagreements within standards of civility that reflect mutual respect, understanding, and sensitivity among the diverse population within the University and in the larger society. These are community norms, even though they cannot be enforced by disciplinary rules. For greater detail or to learn how to report an incident, review HOP 5.6.2 Policy on Free Speech & Assembly section, D.2.d.6 on pg. 9. Disruption The term "disruption" and its variants, as used in this rule, are distinct from and broader than the phrase "disruptive activities," as used in the Regents' Rules, Series 30103, Section 2. This rule is concerned not only with deliberate disruption, but also with scheduling and coordination of events to manage or minimize the inevitable conflicts between legitimate events conducted in close proximity. Speech, expression, or assembly may not be conducted in a way that disrupts or interferes with any: teaching, research, administration, or other authorized activities on the campus; free and unimpeded flow of pedestrian and vehicular traffic on the campus; or signs, tables, exhibits, public assemblies, distribution of literature, or guest speakers acting under the rules in this section. Except in the most extreme cases, interference and disruption are unavoidably contextual. Intentional physical interference with other persons is nearly always disruptive in any context. Interfering with traffic depends on the relation between the volume of traffic and the size of the passageway left open. Disruptive noise is the most contextual of all, because it depends on the activity disrupted. Any distracting sound may disrupt a memorial service. Any sound sufficiently loud or persistent to make concentration difficult may disrupt a class or library. Occasional heckling in the speaker's pauses may not disrupt a political speech, but persistent heckling that prevents listeners from hearing the speaker does disrupt a political speech. These illustrations may be helpful, but none of them includes enough context to be taken as a rule. We cannot escape relying on the judgment and fairness of University authorities in particular cases. In this context where difficult enforcement judgments are unavoidable, it is especially important to remind administrators and law enforcement officials that their judgments should not be influenced by the viewpoint of those claiming disruption or of those allegedly disrupting. Potentially disruptive events can often proceed without disruption if participants, administrators, and law enforcement officials cooperate to avoid disruption without stopping the event. In cases of minimal or unintentional disruption, administrators and law enforcement officials should clearly state what they consider disruptive and seek voluntary compliance before stopping the event or resorting to disciplinary charges or arrest.

Student Organization Alcohol Rules The University of Texas - Pan American is an educational institution dedicated to the pursuit of excellence, the promotion of academic achievement and the advancement of knowledge. Because of the university’s interest in the intellectual, physical and psychological well-being of the campus community, it is important that the university take 46


steps to curtail the abusive or illegal use of alcoholic beverages. Thus, the education of students about the effects of misuse and use of alcohol will help accomplish these interests and goals. It is the university’s expectation that student leaders be responsible event planners and considers all of the applicable rules, policies, and or foreseeable issues before putting those event plans into action. Alcohol Awareness Workshop At least two (2) officer from each student organization must attend an alcohol awareness workshop each fall semester. Dates and times of these annual workshops will be announced each fall through the University's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program.

Food Handling & Safety There are extensive guidelines associated with events that include food. This is due to the need to follow certain food handling steps to assure safe preparation and service of food items. The goal of the UTPA Food Safety program is to ensure that food provided on campus by temporary food vendors are safe for human consumption. The Department of Environmental Health & Safety (DEHS) staff is responsible for conducting food safety inspections of the permitted food vendors. Food Safety requirements are applicable to those foods that if handled improperly can result in a food borne illness. The Office for Student Involvement along with Department of Environmental Health and Safety Services are working together to ensure that student organizations take every precaution to prevent any illness associated with food handling. The OSI offers multiple opportunities throughout the academic year for student organizations to meet the requirement of food handling certification. Workshops for Food handling & Safety certification are presented by the UTPA Environmental Health and Safety Department. No outside food handling certifications may be substituted for UTPA certification. Checklist for Food Handling  At least 3 of my organization members have been certified by UTPA.  At least 1 of my certified members will be present at the site where we’ll be handling food throughout the entire event.  I have reviewed what I have learned at the Food Handling Workshop with ALL my members.  The Food Handling Certificate is on display where I’m handling food. All student organizations are required to attend a food handling & safety workshop on an annual basis, if they are planning to sell or giveaway food on campus. Those organizations that attended last year’s workshops have until October 1st to renew. At least three (3) members of each organization must attend. Furthermore, certified members, at least one (1), must remain at the food site through-out the duration of the food event. The Food Handling Certificate badges must be displayed during the food event. If student organizations are not certified in food handling and cited by DEHS, all privileges for 47


serving food on campus can be revoked. Organizations that do not have at least one certified member at the site are not permitted to sell or give food away on campus at any time. If a student is to lose their certificate badge they can be replaced at a cost of $3.00. Food Handling Workshops presented by the OSI and DEHS are scheduled on various dates and times at the beginning of every long academic semester. Please contact the Office for Student Involvement to get more information on dates, times and locations. Faculty or staff that would like to get certified in food handling safety must contact the Department of Environmental Health and Safety Department directly at 665-3690.

Hosting a Safe, Healthy Event with Food This section provides guidelines necessary for a student organization to host a temporary event where food will be prepared and distributed. These steps must be taken to ensure people attending the event will have a safe and healthy experience.

Procedure for Temporary Events A temporary event is described as an event that lasts no more than 72 hours at a fixed location. All temporary events must comply with the Texas Department of Health guidelines concerning food preparation. Those guidelines are called the “Texas Food Establishment Rules” (TFER).

Temporary Food Booth: Food Safety Requirements (01/01/05) The goal of the UTPA Food Safety program is to ensure that the foods provided on campus by temporary food vendors are safe for human consumption. The Environmental Health & Safety (EHS) staff is responsible for conducting food safety inspections of the permitted food vendors. Food Safety requirements are applicable to those foods that if handled improperly can result in a food borne illness. These foods include, but are not limited to: Beef or chicken fajitas, hot dogs, chicken salad, grilled hamburgers, submarine sandwiches, chef salads, sausage wraps

Fire Safety Requirements    

Liquid combustibles (e.g. propane grills) are not allowed on campus. Food booths that have open flames are required to have a fire extinguisher. All persons are to be trained in the proper use of the fire extinguisher. Food booths that have open flames are not allowed to be placed within 10 ft of combustible walls or roofs. Barbecue pits etc. cannot be placed next to air intakes.

Food Handler Safety Requirements  

Food handling Certificate and certified members of the organization must be present during every food fundraiser. No person shall work in a food booth while infected with a communicable disease that can be transmitted by or while afflicted with a boil, infected wound, or acute respiratory infection. 48


Personnel that handle food must wash their hands as frequently as needed. At a minimum, food handlers shall wash their hands thoroughly: • Before starting • After visiting the toilet • After coughing or sneezing into the hands or handkerchiefs

If hand washing facilities are not readily available, a sturdy plastic or stainless steel bucket or tub with soap, water and 1 tablespoon of liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of water shall be provided for hand washing.

Food handlers are required to wear hair nets and disposable gloves when preparing food.

If food is to be manipulated by hand, food handlers are required to wear disposable gloves.

Personnel shall not eat or drink or chew tobacco in the food preparation or service areas.

All foods must be prepared on site or at approved food service facilities (Pizza hut etc.) NO food prepared in the home kitchen is allowed in the food booth.

All potentially hazardous food products must be stored at 45°F or colder at 140°F or hotter. A metal stem products thermometer must be available at the stands that sell potentially hazardous foods.

All foods, food containers, utensils, napkins, beverage cups and straws, and other single service materials must be stored at least six (6) inches above the floor and protected from splash, dust, insects, weather or other contamination.

Open, unprotected displays of food or beverages are not permitted. All food including condiments must be covered at all times when not in use.

Food handlers shall use, whenever possible, separate cutting boards, blocks, tables and utensils for raw and cooked food. If the same equipment and utensils must be used, food handlers shall thoroughly clean and sanitize equipment for raw food after each use.

If utensil cleansing is required and hot and cold running water is not available, food booths must provide the following: •

Three (3) sturdy plastic or stainless steel buckets or tubs of adequate size to be used for utensil cleansing and sanitizing. Set up to be: 1 2 3 Wash - Rinse - Sanitize One bucket or tub shall be used to wash (soapy water): One bucket or tub shall be used to rinse (clean, clear water): (3) One bucket or tub shall be used to sanitize (liquid chlorine bleach/water solution with 2 tablespoons of bleach per gallon water). 49


Ice for human consumption must be stored separately from ice used to chill other foods or beverages. Foods and beverages chilled in ice must not be submerged in water. The ice storage unit must have open drains and covers, Styrofoam ice chests are NOT acceptable for storage of ice or other food products.

All condiments, including onions, relish, ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc., should be available for customers in self-service packets or be dispensed from sanitary automatic dispensers.

Adequate facilities for disposal of solid waste (garbage can) must be provided.

All waste water generated from the temporary food establishment (from beverage dispensers, sinks, steam tables, ice melt, etc.) must be drained and disposed of into the sanitary sewer system or approved septic system.

Animals are prohibited.

Other

All food booths are to be situated in a manner which will minimize the trampling of plants, grass, shrubs or trees.

All food booths are to be placed in a manner which will minimize the interruption of pedestrian traffic on the walkways.

All food booths are to be placed in a manner which will minimize the introduction of any contaminants (smoke, etc.) into any university building.

Before leaving the specific location, all garbage is to be picked up and the general area cleaned. If a table has been used to store food, it is to be wiped and disinfected prior to leaving the location.

To ensure that a temporary event will meet the TFER guidelines, a checklist has been created (Refer to page 48). All items will have to be addressed before a permit will be issued.

Student Organization Travel Student organizations often need to travel to conferences, tournaments, field trips, etc. It is important to take precautions and carefully plan your trip. You can find the university policy on Student Travel at utpa.edu/hop

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Appendix A: Student Organization Advisor’s Handbook

The Student Organization Advisor Handbook This handbook is intended to help advisors. It is a collection of suggestions, recommendations, expectations, and tips which have been assembled after having worked with student organizations for several years. They are the by-products of experience. They are not rendered with guarantees that, if faithfully observed, they will yield success. They should enhance the effectiveness, quality or rapport, and acquisition of personal enjoyment and satisfaction for the advisor. Perhaps, most importantly, they may be helpful. A handbook such as this cannot be all-inclusive. The handbook is intended to be a document of practical application. Hopefully, it will make you more comfortable and confident and will add to the enjoyment of being an advisor to a student organization.

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Table of Contents: Recommendations and Responsibilities for Advisors ......…………………….…..52 Meetings……………………………………………………………………52 Expectations………………………………………………………………..52 Club Finances…………………………………………………………...….52 Availability to Members……………………………………...…………….53 Giving Advice……………………………...……………………………….53 Policies………………………………………………...…………………….54 Roles of Advisor………………………………………………...…………...54 Your Role in Student Activities ……………………………………………….……54 Potential Scenarios..……………………………………..…………………………..56 Forms for Organization …….……………………………………………………….57 Reminders……..…………………………………………………………………......57

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Responsibilities and Recommendations Meetings Advisors should be available for regularly scheduled and special meetings of their respective organizations. Advisors should meet with executive officers of their organizations to assist with the development of organizational programs and/or project development. Advisors should meet with members to discuss the financial status of the organization, including identification of problems and their potential solutions, and identification of financial strengths and means of perpetuating such.

Expectations Advisors should be familiar with the constitution and by-laws of their organizations and be prepared to render assistance with their interpretation. The appropriate role of the advisor is not to become “one of the gang,� nor is it to remain conspicuously aloof from the group. The effective advisor is one who will render advice when it is requested and offer counsel, even though it may not have been sought. The advisor can expect to be asked to provide quick solutions to problems that he or she will be unable to render as rapidly as the group usually would like. An individual should not accept an invitation to serve as an advisor or to continue to serve if he or she is not prepared to fulfill the expectations of such. An advisor should attempt to learn the names of organization members as quickly as possible. An advisor should assist membership in improving leadership skills. An advisor should be prepared to serve as a liaison between the organization and the University when asked. An advisor should make every effort to be informed of all organizational activities, meeting times, locations of activities and agendas.

Club Finances 53


Advisors should make sure that adequate financial accounting procedures are established and maintained upon change of officers. Advisors have access to the University-maintained financial records of their respective organizations. Periodically, these records should be reviewed.

Availability to Members Advisors should be available to members to discuss internal organizational difficulties, such as communications, delegation of responsibilities, etc., and to assist the officers with their responsibilities. Advisors are encouraged to attend the various functions of their organizations (other than meetings, such as fundraisers, special projects and programs, etc.); however, usually such attendance is not mandated. Advisors should be available to meet with organization officers and/or members when they request help. An advisor should not feel offended if he or she is not asked to be involved in all of the organizations activities.

Giving Advice Advisors should advise and counsel the organization as it develops and works towards the achievement of its goals and objectives. The advisor should not hesitate to provide constructive criticism when it is deemed necessary; likewise, positive organizational accomplishment should be appropriately acknowledged. The advisor should be aware of the fact that at times that he or she will be called upon to serve as a personal confidant in organization-related matters. This is a particularly sensitive role. The advisor will want to provide assistance to the person seeking advice, usually in regard to a problematic situation. However, the advisor cannot compromise the relationship with the group by showing favoritism to one or a small group of individuals. At times the advisor must be willing and prepared to tell their organization what it is doing or planning to do is wrong or inappropriate. When feasible, alternative suggestions should be offered. The advisor can expect to be asked to serve as a counselor by group members with personal problems unrelated to their organizational affiliation. An advisor should not hesitate to engage in the general discussion of organizational matters at meetings; however, he or she normally should not dominate discussion or become the focus of attention.

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An advisor should realize that students often might not accept his or her advice as “gospel.” The advisor should expect to be challenged; however, this should not be interpreted as an indication that his or her services are no longer desired.

Policies Advisors should be familiar with the institution’s policies and rules that govern registered student organizations. For further information please refer to the Student Organization Handbook and the Hand Book of Operating Procedures. Advisors should strongly encourage their respective organizations to adhere to the policies and rules of the University as well to obey local statutes and the laws of the State and Nations. An advisor should be a currently employed, full-time member of the University’s faculty or staff and must retain that status to continue to serve as an official advisor. Further the advisor must be at least twenty one years of age and must not be enrolled in any classes.

Roles of the Advisor An individual assumes an advisor’s role voluntarily; however, even though serving as a volunteer, he or she is expected to uphold the best interest of the University. The voluntary association between the advisor and the group would continue as long as the relationship is productive and mutually satisfactory. When such a relationship no longer exists, the advisor should resign. It is important for an advisor to get the “pulse” of the group by developing a sense of the group’s personality. This should elevate the level of advising effectiveness. Advisors should not hesitate to contact the Office for Student Involvement, Assistant Dean of Students and Coordinators of Student Development to discuss problems, plans or changes in organizational status that may be of interest or importance to the University. It would be advantageous to accept a position as advisor to a group whose interest parallel those of the advisor.

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Your Role in Student Activities You play an integral part in student activities. This involvement is of importance to the students as well as to the faculty and institution, in that it provides a needed sense of direction for the student organization, as well as enables students and faculty to interact in and out-of-classroom milieu. As an advisor of a student group, you will be confronted by the question of what type of role should be undertaken. While there is no answer that will suffice for every situation, there are some basic concepts that may be of help.

Why Advise? As an advisor you provide the opportunity to contribute to the growth and development of students and the organization. You should strive to ensure that the experiences that occur within the organization are meaningful and provide an atmosphere for the members to learn. A student organization advisor also has the opportunity to make a difference in students’ lives, to learn from students, to know what is going on in their world, and to help students implement what has been learned in the classroom. The utmost satisfaction is seeing an organization build character, trust, and dependability in its members. The advisor is able to observe, firsthand, the successes of the organization and students developing self-confidence. Advising also creates an opportunity to share knowledge and expertise on relevant topics.

What are the needs of the group? The faculty member involved in advising a student group is frequently confronted by the question of what type of role should be assumed. While there is no answer which will suffice for every situation, there are some basic concepts that may be of help. The nature of an advisor’s interaction with a student group will be determined largely by the type of needs the group has. If the group has new and inexperienced leadership, you may find a more directive role is best. This role is also determined by two other factors; your personality and the expectations of the group. Some advisors will have very dominant personalities and in these instances, it is difficult for them to play a passive role. In other circumstances, a group may expect their advisor to play a very specific role for the group. If these aspects of advisement are not addressed, there may be conflicts between you and the members. A very simple process, which can be utilized to alleviate any potential difficulties, is to have a prospective faculty advisor meet with a group on several occasions before accepting the position. The students can get to know the faculty member and he or she can make observations about the appropriate style of advisement that should be used. After several meetings, the faculty member and student organization’s executives can 56


meet and discuss the observations of the faculty member and the expectations of the group for their advisor. The faculty member should recognize that he or she can be a valuable resource for the group. He or she should not ignore the basic consideration that a student group is just that—a student group. A faculty member loses effectiveness in the advisory position.

What is my level of Involvement? Your involvement as an advisor depends on the organization and its leaders. Attending the meetings on a regular basis is the best way to stay informed of all activities and projects. However, time may not permit attendance at every organizational meeting. In this case, a solution would be to schedule an informal meeting with the officers. You should clarify, between you and the organization, what you role as an advisor will involve. Be prepared for your role to change each year with the new officers and members.

What about legal responsibilities? Due to increased legalism of the society, anxiety can arise about the possibilities of lawsuits from student activities, which might name an advisor as a party in a suit. This matter has been manifested through some groups being unable to find an advisor. These groups may be recreational or sports clubs, which undertake activities deemed hazardous. Political and international groups have also had difficulties finding sponsors due to the nature of their activities. There is no easy answer to these issues; however, an advisor to a student organization will generally not be held responsible for the group’s activities unless they are negligent. It is encouraged, that to become aware of negligent, or risky events and activities, that advisors attend the Risk Management Workshops. See Risk Management under Reminders section in this handbook.

Potential Situations Your organization is planning a questionable event: As an advisor, you may request the group to obtain the opinion of a Coordinator of Student Development. A meeting may be set with the Student Development staff to clarify any questions. You are no longer comfortable being the

advisor: Explain to the executive officers you are no longer able to serve as their advisor. Give the group reasonable amount of time to find a new advisor. And when changes are made, the Office for Student Involvement must be informed.

There are major problems with the organization: As an advisor, you should meet with the officers to discuss your observations. Brainstorm with the officers to get a plan of action to solve the situation. Additionally, the staff at the Office for Student Involvement is willing to help mediate and seek solutions. 57


Your organization has violated University policies, federal and/or state laws: Advisors have the responsibilities to bring violations to the attention of the proper offices, such as the Office for Student Involvement, the Assistant Dean of Students, or the Dean of Students.

The organization lacks financial management: Ask that a treasurer’s report be given each week at the meeting so that the report will be included in the organization’s minutes. Assist in establishing an operational budget for the entire year and plan fundraisers. The Office for Student Involvement recommends this be done at the beginning of each semester.

Necessary Forms an Organization Needs Bronc Link(online) Each semester, every student organization needs to obtain the Student Organization Handbook. In it is important information that needs to be submitted by a certain deadline. This being the organization Bronc Link . Bronc Linkis one of two major requirements that are mandated by the Office for Student Involvement. The other requirement is being in attendance at the Risk Management Workshop. Deadlines for the Bronc Linkto be thoroughly and completely updated are by October 1 and February 15 of each academic year. Failure to update information will result in an immediate suspension.

Event Registration Forms (on-campus events) In order for a student organization to register for a campus activity/ event, it must complete and submit an Event Registration Form(s). These forms are for general and special meetings, fundraisers, lectures, special events and anything else that the organization does on campus. Multiple dates for meetings and other repetitive activities can be listed on one form, as long as the times and location is the same.

Our Web Page All these forms, including Awards and Recognition forms, Special Events Fund forms, Student Travel forms, Organization Operations forms, Update Packet Forms.

Reminders Memos to Advisors You will receive copies of the memos the Office for Student Involvement mails to student Organizations. This serves a two-fold purpose: first, it helps to keep the advisors informed of what is going on and, second, it gives us some assurances that someone might “nag” the student group about action that must be taken (particularly if 58


deadlines are involved). The Office for Student Involvement cannot personally follow up with every group on campus, but we hope the advisors will. We appreciate all the help the advisors give us.

Mail Many of the delays in communication between the Office for Student Involvement and organizations can be avoided if students checked their mail on a weekly basis. Please encourage your group to do this. It might help if one member of each organization was assigned this task. We have created an email listserv as well, and we encourage clubs to open their own student organization account.

Reserving Facilities Don’t forget to tell the organization to reserve a room for your meetings. You need to do this to register the activity.

Resources Available The Advisor Listserv is an email list for student organization advisors from the Office for Student Involvement which notifies them about events, deadlines, and other information concerning their organization. The Advisor Orientation is a great resource for student organization advisors to become informed. In this luncheon information is given over new policies, service updates the Office for Student Involvement provides, and dates of events the organization and advisors should be aware of. The OSI Website is an easy way to stay informed about event information or services the Office for Student Involvement offers. There you can find a several handouts of relevant information called Insight about all aspects of organization from budgeting to time management. Further, the website also contains the dates of Skill Builders Workshop, which is a series of workshops designed to assist student organizations.

RISK MANAGEMENT The purpose of risk management is to assist student organization leaders, members, and advisors in learning to identify the potential and perceived risks involved in their activities as well as in development of prudent judgment skills used to eliminate, limit or accept these risks. The Office for Student Involvement encourages student leaders as well as faculty and staff advisors to collaborate on the creation of student organization environments that help members and leaders make intelligent, fair and reasonable choices within the boundaries established by state, federal or local laws, UTPA HOP, UT Regents’ Rules & Regulations, and the educational mission of The University of Texas-Pan American. It is important for Advisors to work with your student organization in many ways: preevent planning, analyzing potential risks and explaining liability issues, promoting the use of liability waivers, making recommendations before organization’s enter into contractual agreements, helping with travel plans, assisting in the creation of organization risk management standards, and more. The OSI team is always willing to meet with students 59


and/or advisors individually or as groups to provide support and guidance when questions arise.

RISK MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP House Bill 2639 amends the Education Code to require each public, private, or independent college and university, including a junior college, to provide a risk management program at least once during each academic year to address possession and use of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs, hazing, sexual abuse and harassment, and behavior at parties and other events held by a student organization, as well as other issues deemed appropriate. It sets out attendance requirements for members and advisors of student organizations and requires sanctions to address absences from compulsory meetings. The bill also requires the Texas Department of Insurance to study various issues involving the levels and types of insurance coverage required of and available to college and university fraternities At the start of every academic year, at least two officers need to attend the annual Risk Management Workshop. Any two (2) of the following officers (President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, Risk Management Chair, Recruitment Chair, and Sergeant at arms) that are indicated in the update packet will be required to attend as their organization's representatives. Attendance will be verified by the Office for Student Involvement (OSI). Failure to attend will result in immediate suspension and revocation of all organization privileges. The student organization will have 10 calendar days from the date noted on the notification to appeal their suspension. Appeal must be presented in writing to the Office for Student Involvement. Upon approval of appeal, all affected individuals will be mandated to attend the Skill Builder Workshop series sessions on the individual topics originally covered during the Risk Management workshop. Each topic will be offered once. The same officer(s) must attend all sessions in their entirety, failure to so will result in immediate suspension of the organization until the requirement is met. Suspended organizations lose recognition and all privileges associated thereof. Suspended organizations and new officers elected in late fall or early spring will have an opportunity to attend a Risk Management seminar in February. The February Risk Management seminar will be the only one offered in the Spring semester. Approved new student organizations are required to attend the Spring workshop. Note: Regardless of Spring attendance at the Risk Management Workshop, organizations are required to attend the Risk Management Workshop at the start of every academic year. Texas House Bill 2639 requires that all advisors attend once during their tenure as an advisor to a student organization. All advisors must be older than 21 years of age, be a full time faculty or staff member of the University, and should attend the Risk Management workshop within their first year as an advisor. Advisors are encouraged to attend so as to prevent any consequences that may be placed upon the student organization.

This Handbook is adapted, and has excerpts from, the Association of College Unions International Resource Notebook; A Guide for Student Organization Advisors, Mel S. Klein, Director, Office of Student Activities, Pennsylvania State University; The Faculty Role in Student Activities, Jan M. Carlson, Coordinator of Student Activities, Oklahoma State

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University; Advisor’s Handbook, Student Organizations Services, West Texas A&M University; Advisor’s Handbook for Student Organizations/Agencies, Western Michigan University; and from a report of a National Survey conducted by the Division of Student Affairs and Services, Department of Student Activities and Union Programs at the University of Connecticut.

II. Campus Activity Registration Form: Instructions Event Registration Form- All Locations Instructions The Event Registration Form should be used to reserve rooms and other spaces on campus for student organization activities; use this form for meetings, fundraisers, special events, speakers, films, and other organizational events. Make sure you are using the most updated version (2009). Please follow the instructions below to quickly reserve your space. 1. You should first check to see if the room or location you want to reserve is available for the day and time that you want it. Go to utpa.edu/uschedule and follow the on-screen menus to see if your room is available. 2. If you find a room or location you’d like to reserve and it is available, fill out an Event Registration Form. Give us as much information as you can about the event or activity you are hosting. Form must be completed in its entirety. 3. We require that you turn in the form a minimum of ten (10) business days before the activity will take place. If you are requesting after hours or weekend access, tables, chairs, or other equipment, you should give us three (3) additional days to process the request, since we will need to make arrangements. Furthermore, we require that all Ballroom reservations be submitted at least fifteen (15) business days prior to the event. 4. When the form is complete, bring it to UC 205. Floor plan / diagram must be submitted with form to be processed. The organizational officer who submits the form should be indicated on the update packet and authorized by the organization to sign it. In case we have any questions or a room is not available, we will contact that person. Be sure to give an accurate phone number and email address. 5. Once the form is received at UC 205, we will make the room request for you throughUschedule. If there are any problems (e.g., missing information, or none of the requested rooms is available), we will contact you. 6. Once the room request is made through Uschedule, we must still wait for confirmation from the R25 scheduler. 7. When the room is confirmed, it will appear on the Uschedulewebsite. In addition, a copy of the Event Registration Form along with the Confirmation number will be placed in your Student Organization Mailbox located at the University Center, Room 205. There is no need to call. 8. Remember to leave the space you use in as good a condition as you found it. Clean up the area and make sure any equipment you borrowed is also clean.

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Event Registration Form- General Classroom All student organizations must conform to the university’s general policies pertaining to student activities and/or events. Please submit this completed form with a minimum of 7 business days before the activity or event to the Office of Student Development, UC 205. Ballroom reservations require at least 15 business days in advance. Evening and weekend events will require 3 additional days for processing. Charges may apply for these requests. Reservations are considered tentative until final confirmation from OSD. Student organizations must check their student organization mailbox to receive confirmation. ORGANIZATION INFORMATION

EVENT LOCATION – Must be indicated General Classroom

Organization Name: ________________________

st

1 Choice: _________________________________________

Contact Name: ____________________________ Officer Position: ___________________________ Contact Phone Number: _____________________ Contact Email: ____________________________ Advisor Name: ____________________________ Advisor Phone Number: ____________________ Fundraising:  Yes  No Food Handling Certification:  Yes

For a list of classrooms please visit the OSD website for availability or speak to an OSD staff member.

If reservation is for general meetings please indicate all dates here: ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

 No 2

nd

Choice: (Required) ___________________________________

EVENT INFORMATION Event Type- Please choose all applicable  Audition

 Cultural

 Film/Video/Movie

 Meeting

 Rally

 Retreat

 Speaker

 Concert

 Dance

 Fundraiser

 Performance

 Recruitment

 Service

 Workshop

 Conference

 Educational

 Informational

 Political

 Religious

 Social

 Other ____________

Event Description- Must be complete

(NOTE: Furniture are not to be moved or removed from classroom.)

Event Name: ________________________Proposed Date(s): ________________________ # Exp. Attend: ______ Admiss. Charge: ________ Set up Time: ___________am / pm Guest Speaker:

 Yes  No,

Start Time: ___________am / pm

End Time: ___________ am / pm

If yes, whom: ____________________________________Topic: ________________________________

Item to be sold/given: _________________________ Cost/ Item: ______________ If food item, what is it? ____________________________ Detailed Event Description:

__________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ Special Services- Equipment needed for event: ( Check all that apply)  8ft Tables  6ft Tables

Qty ____  Rnd. Tables Qty ____  4x8 Stage

Qty ____ Qty ____

 Folding Chairs Qty ____  Trash Cans Qty ____

 Audio / Visual ____________

Physical Plant will only deliver more than 5 tables.

 Police Services – Services may be required if more than 50 are expected in attendance. $30/hr. per officer ****Floor Plan / Diagram MUST be submitted with form. Forms will be considered incomplete and will not be processed.****

Signature: ______________________________________________

Date_________________

Questions about planning your event? Stop by or call 381-2660

63

For Office Use Only: R25 Confirmed: ___________________ Police Request: ___________________ Physical Plant: _________________ OSD 2009


Event Registration Form- Student Union / University Center All student organizations must conform to the university’s general policies pertaining to student activities and/or events. Please submit this completed form with a minimum of 7 business days before the activity or event to the Office of Student Development, UC 205. Ballroom reservations require at least 15 business days in advance. Evening and weekend events will require 3 additional days for processing. Charges may apply for these requests. Reservations are considered tentative until final confirmation from OSD. Student organizations must check their student organization mailbox to receive confirmation. ORGANIZATION INFORMATION

EVENT LOCATION – Check one (1) only Student Union

Organization Name: ________________________ Contact Name: ____________________________ Officer Position: ___________________________ Contact Phone Number: _____________________

University Center

2.320 Mesquite (10)

UC 307 (50)

2.330 Oleander (10)

UC 306A (24)

2.406 Sage (16)

UC Ballroom Walkway (50)

2.418 Palmetto (16)

UC Downstairs Lobby (20)

1.102 Theater (494)

UC Ballroom Lobby (10)

Contact Email: ____________________________

Commons (100)

UC Ballroom (North) (150)

Advisor Name: ____________________________

East Patio (100)

UC Ballroom (South) (150)

South Patio (100)

UC –Cenizo Room (20) Setup # _____

Game Room (100)

UC – Bronc Room (20) Setup # _____

Advisor Phone Number: ____________________ Fundraising:

 Yes

 No

Food Handling Certification:

Café (100)

 Yes

 No

nd

2

Choice: (Required) ___________________________________

EVENT INFORMATION Event Type- Please choose all applicable  Audition

 Cultural

 Film/Video/Movie

 Meeting

 Rally

 Retreat

 Speaker

 Concert

 Dance

 Fundraiser

 Performance

 Recruitment

 Service

 Workshop

 Conference

 Educational

 Informational

 Political

 Religious

 Social

 Other ____________

Event Description- Must be complete Event Name: ________________________Proposed Date(s): ________________________ # Exp. Attend: ______ Admiss. Charge: ________ Set up Time: ___________am / pm Guest Speaker:

 Yes  No,

Start Time: ___________am / pm

End Time: ___________ am / pm

If yes, whom: ____________________________________Topic: ________________________________

Item to be sold/given: _________________________ Cost/ Item: ______________ If food item, what is it? ____________________________ (Please Note: Food to be served at Student Union MUST be catered by Sodexo) Detailed Event Description: (if reserving for a meeting please indicate all dates here.)

__________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ Special Services- Equipment needed for event:  6ft Tables Qty ____  Folding Chairs Qty ____  BBQ Pit - (Charge may apply)  4ft Tables (SU) Qty ____  Trash Cans Qty ____  Stage  Round Tables Qty ____  Audio/ Visual Specify __________________  Other ________________________

 Police Services – Services may be required if more than 50 are expected in attendance.

Physical Plant will only deliver more than 5 tables.

$30/hr. per officer

****Floor Plan / Diagram MUST be submitted with form. Forms will be considered incomplete and will not be processed.****

Signature: ______________________________________________

Date_________________

Questions about planning your event? Stop by or call 381-2660 For Office Use Only: R25 Confirmed: ___________________ Police Request: ___________________ Physical Plant: _________________ OSD 2009

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Event Registration Form- General Outdoor All student organizations must conform to the university’s general policies pertaining to student activities and/or events. Please submit this completed form with a minimum of 7 business days before the activity or event to the Office of Student Development, UC 205. Ballroom reservations require at least 15 business days in advance. Evening and weekend events will require 3 additional days for processing. Charges may apply for these requests. Reservations are considered tentative until final confirmation from OSD. Student organizations must check their student organization mailbox to receive confirmation. ORGANIZATION INFORMATION

EVENT LOCATION – Check one (1) only General Campus

Organization Name: ________________________ Contact Name: ____________________________ Officer Position: ___________________________ Contact Phone Number: _____________________ Contact Email: ____________________________

 BUSA Walkway  HPE1 TenCt  Bronc Lawn  HPE1 T & F  Chapel Lawn  HSHW Gazebo  EC  LIB BBQ area  Field Ctyd  LIBR Cty A  Field Front Mall  LIBR Cty B  Flagpole  LIBR Lawn  LIBR Media Cty

 MAGC Front Lawn  Quad North  Quad South  SCIE Cty  SCIE Promenade  SCIE Quad  SCIE Sundial  UC Circle

Advisor Name: ____________________________ 2

Advisor Phone Number: ____________________ Fundraising:  Yes  No Food Handling Certification:  Yes

nd

Choice: (Required) ___________________________________

Rain Plan: (Required) _____________________________________

 No

EVENT INFORMATION Event Type- Please choose all applicable  Audition

 Cultural

 Film/Video/Movie

 Meeting

 Rally

 Retreat

 Speaker

 Concert

 Dance

 Fundraiser

 Performance

 Recruitment

 Service

 Workshop

 Conference

 Educational

 Informational

 Political

 Religious

 Social

 Other ____________

Event Description- Must be complete Event Name: ________________________Proposed Date(s): ________________________ # Exp. Attend: ______ Admiss. Charge: ________ Set up Time: ___________am / pm Guest Speaker:

 Yes  No,

Start Time: ___________am / pm

End Time: ___________ am / pm

If yes, whom: ____________________________________Topic: ________________________________

Item to be sold/given: _________________________ Cost/ Item: ______________ If food item, what is it? ____________________________ Detailed Event Description:

__________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ Special Services- Equipment needed for event: (Check  8ft Tables Qty ____  Folding Chairs Qty ____  6ft Tables Qty ____  Trash Cans Qty ____  Rnd. Tables Qty ____  Flood Lights Qty ____

all that apply)  Canopy 20x20 Qty ____  Canopy 40x40  4x8 Stage Qty ____

 BBQ Pit - (Charge may apply)  Electric/ Water- Specify _____  Other____________________

 Police Services – Services may be required if more than 50 are expected in attendance.

Physical Plant will only deliver more than 5 tables.

$30/hr. per officer

****Floor Plan / Diagram MUST be submitted with form. Forms will be considered incomplete and will not be processed.****

Signature: ______________________________________________

Date_________________

Questions about planning your event? Stop by or call 381-2660 For Office Use Only: R25 Confirmed: ___________________ Police Request: ___________________ Physical Plant: _________________

65 OSD 2009


V. Temporary Food Booth: Form

Temporary Food Booth Food Safety Audit Checklist (01/01/05) DESCRIPTION 1. Food booths that have open flames (barbecue pits etc.) have a fire extinguisher.

Y

N

NA

2. Food booths that have open flames are not placed within 10 ft of combustible walls or roofs. 3. All potentially hazardous foods must be prepared on site or at approved food service facilities (Pizza hut etc.). 4. Personnel that handle food must wash their hands as frequently as necessary to maintain cleanliness. 5. Food handlers are wearing hair nets and disposable gloves when preparing food. 6. Food handlers are wearing disposable gloves when serving food. 7. Personnel are not eating, drinking or chewing tobacco in the food booth area. 8. All potentially hazardous food products are stored at 45ËšF or colder or at 140ËšF or hotter. Reheated food should be reheated to 165 deg. F or higher. 9. All foods, food containers, utensils, napkins, beverage cups and straws, etc. s are stored at least six (6) inches above the floor and protected from external contamination. 10. All food including condiments are covered at all times when not in use. 11. Food handlers shall use, whenever possible, separate cutting boards, blocks, tables and utensils for raw and cooked food. If the same equipment and utensils must be used, food handlers shall thoroughly clean and sanitize equipment for raw food after each use. 12. Ice for human consumption must be stored separately from ice used to chill other foods or beverages.

13. All condiments, including onions, relish, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc., are in self-service packets or dispensed from sanitary automatic dispensers. 14. A garbage can is available. 15. Animals are not present. 16. All food booths are situated in a manner which minimizes the trampling of plants, grass, shrubs or trees. 17. All food booths are placed in a manner which minimizes the interruption of pedestrian traffic on the walkways. 18. All food booths are to be placed in a manner which minimizes the introduction of any contaminants (smoke etc.) into any university building.

66


19. All garbage is to be picked up and the general area cleaned. If a table has been used to store food, it is to be wiped and disinfected prior to leaving the location .

VI. Hazing 51.936. Hazing (a) Subchapter F, Chapter 37, applies to hazing at an educational institution under this section. (b) For purposes of this section, in Subchapter F, Chapter 37, "educational institution" means an institution of higher education. (c) Each postsecondary educational institution shall distribute to each student during the first three weeks of each semester: (1) a summary of the provisions of Subchapter F, Chapter 37; and (2) a list of organizations that have been disciplined for hazing or convicted for hazing on or off the campus of the institution during the preceding three years. (d) If the institution publishes a general catalogue, student handbook, or similar publication, it shall publish a summary of the provisions of Subchapter F, Chapter 37, in each edition of the publication. Added by Acts 1995, 74th Leg., ch. 260, ยง 18, eff. May 30, 1995.

67


VII. Anti-Hazing Compliance Form Office for Student Involvement New Member Education Program Please submit to the Office for Student Involvement, Rm 205 University Center, no later than 7 days of formal initiation. All portions must be complete. Any changes must be made immediately and submitted to the OSI.

Fraternity/Sorority:________________________________________________________________ __ New Member Educator: _________________________ Email:_________________________________ Phone #: (home) _______________________ (cell or other)____________________________ New Member Education Begins: ____________ New Member Education Ends: ______________ Total Number of Weeks: ___________

68


Initiation Date: __________________________ New Member Educator: _______________________________________________ Phone #: ______________________ E-mail: _______________________________________ Location of initiation: ( ) On Campus ( ) Off Campus This program was devised by your: ( ) International ( ) National Office ( ) Local Chapter We, the undersigned, certify that we have read and agree to abide by the University’s policies and regulations concerning new member/pledge/associate education and hazing. This form will be for office use only and will remain property of the Office for Student Involvement. Attached to this form you will find an anti-hazing statement and a new member education roster. Please read and clearly fill out all areas of the roster and return it to OSI with this page. New Member Educator (print)

__________________________ E-mail

_____________ Date

_____________________________ Chapter President (print)

__________________________ E-mail

_______________ Date

Advisor (print)

__________________________ E-mail

_______________ Date

Office for Student Involvement New Member Education Program ANTI-HAZING STATEMENT In addition to the statutory definition of hazing, hazing is also defined at the University as any intentional, knowing, or reckless act, occurring on or off the campus of an educational institution, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in an organization. Hazing includes, but is not limited to: 1.

any type of physical brutality, such as whipping, beating, striking, branding, electronic shocking, placing of a harmful substance on the body, or similar activity;

2.

any type of physical activity, such as sleep deprivation, exposure to the elements, confinement in a small space, calisthenics, or other activity that subject the student to unreasonable risk of harm or that adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student;

3.

any activity involving the consumption of a food, liquid, alcoholic beverage, liquor, drug or other substance that

69


subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or that adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student; 4.

any activity that intimidates or threatens the student with ostracism, that subjects the student to extreme mental stress, shame or humiliation, that adversely affects the mental health or dignity of the student or discourage the student from entering or remaining registered in an educational institution, or that may reasonably be expected to cause a student to leave the organization or the institution rather than submit to acts described in this subdivision; and

5.

any activity that induces, causes, or requires the student to perform a duty or task that involves a violation of the Penal Code. The fact that a person consented to or acquiesced in a hazing activity is not a defense to prosecution.

Office for Student Involvement New Member Education Program This document is for OSI office use only Please type or print clearly the first and last name of each new or associate member along with his or her studen i.d. number and classsification (e.g. Freshmen) Name

Student ID

Class

1. _________________________________________________________________ 2. _________________________________________________________________ 3. _________________________________________________________________ 4. _________________________________________________________________ 5. _________________________________________________________________ 6. _________________________________________________________________ 7. _________________________________________________________________ 70


8. _________________________________________________________________ 9. _________________________________________________________________ 10. _________________________________________________________________ 11. _________________________________________________________________ 12. _________________________________________________________________ 13. _________________________________________________________________ 14. _________________________________________________________________ 15. _________________________________________________________________ 16. _________________________________________________________________ 17. _________________________________________________________________ 18.

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Student Organization Handbook