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2016 JANUARY– JUNE

FAMILY EMPOWERMENT REPORT


Cape York Partnership is the engine room for innovative policy and programs designed to end passive welfare and empower Cape York Indigenous people and families to improve their own lives. We want to ensure that Indigenous rights and responsibility exist in proper balance, and Indigenous people are truly enabled to be the masters of their own exciting destinies.

Š2016 Not to be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission of Cape York Partnership. Cape York Partnership takes all care to ensure the accuracy and quality of the information in this report. Cape York Partnerships cannot guarantee complete accuracy and all materials are provided without warranty.


contents 4

Welcome

5

Our Vision

6

EDUCATION

8

O-Hub – Student Education Trust

12 16 18 21

Cape York Leaders Program – Academic Leaders Cape York Academy Djarragun College Cape York Girl Acedemy

26

EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

28

Cape York Employment

30

Cape York Enterprises

32

Bama Services

34

Cape York Timber

35

O-Hub – MPower

37

Cape York Leaders Program – Aurukun Youth Orbiting Program

39

Cape York Institute – Land Reform and Home Ownership

42

INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT

44

O-Hub – Strong Families

46

O-Hub – Pride of Place

48

LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND LEADERSHIP

50

Pama Language Centre

54

Cape York Leaders Program – Youth, Skilling and Excelling Leaders

58

RECONCILIATION AND RECOGNITION

60

Cape York Institute – Constitional Reform

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are warned that photos in this publication may contain images of deceased persons which may cause sadness or distress. We pay tribute and honour their memory by sharing their stories.


CO-EDITORS

welcome Welcome to the Family Empowerment Report (FER) for January–June 2016. As you will see throughout this report, our work at Cape York Partnership is ambitious. Our determination is driven through our core purpose—to ensure that Cape York people have the capabilities to choose a life that they have reason to value. To reach that goal, we embrace and champion reforms across a wide landscape. Each is seen as a ‘cog’ in a larger machine of reform. Each cog influences the others and movement in one will inspire movement in others. Of course, for our reform machine to be highly effective, we need to know how we are progressing with each individual cog. Without that, we cannot gauge our overall progress. That is what the FER does. It is a rigorous report card on progress that we use to chart our next steps and drive continuous innovation. The FER is also a very important way we report back to our many supporters and stakeholders. Governments, corporate donors, and individuals that support our work expect that we are delivering real results. This FER shows that our work is delivering results. Importantly, it reveals that we are having great success in many areas, making good progress in other areas, and falling short with some important ‘cogs’. The changes we are striving to bring about in partnership with the people of Cape York are complex and highly interconnected. There is no doubt that success is happening and progress is being made. There is also no doubt that there is much work to do. The Family Empowerment Report ensures that we are able to track progress on the work to be done and adjust approaches through innovation which, in turn, is measured through the Family Empowerment Report.

FIONA JOSE

CAPE YORK PARTNERSHIP

ADAM DUNN

BAMA SERVICES

OUR EDITORIAL COMMITEE

IRIS UNDERWOOD CY PEOPLE

KIA YEATMAN

AUDREY DEEMAL O-HUB

LIZZIE FULLER

CAPE YORK EMPLOYMENT

DJARRAGUN COLLEGE

KAYLA MALLIE

TROYSON BASSANI

BAMA SERVICES

MELISSA BROWNE

CAPE YORK LEADERS PROGRAM

COMMUNICATIONS

SHANEEN CANNON

CAPE YORK INSTITUTE


our vision

The people of Cape York have the capabilities to choose a life they have reason to value.

A FAMILY CENTRED APPROACH Cape York Partnership pursues Indigenous empowerment. The long hand of government intervention in the lives of Indigenous people has too often smothered Indigenous initiative, leadership and responsibility. Cape York Partnership is an Indigenous organisation that has stood up to lead a comprehensive reform agenda to turn this on its head. We want to ensure that Indigenous rights and responsibility exist in proper balance, and Indigenous people are truly enabled to be the masters of their own destinies.

OUR COGS OF CHANGE Innovative policy, research and on-the-ground reforms are the lifeblood elements of Cape York Partnership. Each policy and operational area of the Cape York Partnership is like a cog in an engine—each plays an important role in the functioning of the machine that drives development and in turn our reform agenda. Cape York Partnership and its collective of entities aim to get all of the cogs moving.

Recognition & Reconciliation Language & Culture

Cape York

Welfare Reform Education

Families Employment & Land Reform & Economic Home Ownership Opportunity

Individual & Leadership Family Development

5


6


education Education of our children is the most important key to the future. Through

education,

we

can

radically improve the life prospects of Indigenous children. The

unequivocal

purpose

of

education for Cape York’s young people is to provide them with the opportunities for a fully bi-cultural education, to enable them to move between their home worlds and the wide Australian and global worlds, and enjoy the best of both. Cape York Partnership pursues a world where Cape York children have opportunities available to them to achieve the same educational outcomes as any family would want for their children in any part of Australia.

7


student education trust The Student Education Trust (SET) promotes the value and importance of education by: • enabling and encouraging parents, carers, kin and others to regularly set aside money to pay for their children’s educational needs

JOURNEY

• assisting SET donors to purchase educational items for their children.

Up to three donors contribute money to children’s SET accounts on a fortnightly basis

Parents, carers, and kin open SET accounts for their children (0–26 years) and commit themselves as donors

Donors use SET savings to purchase educational goods and services for their children

Students have what they need to succeed at school

SET is a Cape York Welfare Reform initiative and operates out of the O-Hubs in the four communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge.

MEMBERSHIP SET ACCOUNTS

SET DONORS

TOTAL DONORS

DONOR ACTIVITY

SET donors overall by the end of June.

of SET accounts were considered ‘active’ from January to June, meaning donors made at least one purchase from and/ or contribution to these accounts during this period.

TOTAL ACCOUNTS

OPEN ACCOUNTS

SET accounts had been opened by the end of June.

(87%) of the total 985 accounts remained open at the end of June.

575

48%

27%

985

853

61%

of the total combined population of 0–26 year olds in the four Welfare Reform communities have now benefitted from SET.1

of these open accounts are for primaryschool aged children.

57%

of the total combined population of 15+ year olds in the four Welfare Reform communities have now donated to SET.3

TOTAL SET ACCOUNTS EVER OPENED 2013 TO 2016

51% of donors are contributing to two or more SET accounts: donors are seeing the benefit of SET and signing up multiple children to help the whole family.

400 300

TOTAL SET DONORS 2013 TO 2016

200

200

100 0

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2013

Aurukun

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2014

Coen

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2015

Hope Vale

150

JAN–JUN

100

2016

50

Mossman Gorge

0

412

500 400 200 100 0

(0–4)

Aurukun

(5–11)

Coen

SECONDARY FURTHER SCHOOL EDUCATION (12–17)

Hope Vale

JUL–DEC

2014

Coen

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2015

Hope Vale

JAN–JUN

2016

Mossman Gorge

(18–25)

50%

70

4 PRIMARY SCHOOL

JAN–JUN

NUMBER OF SET ACCOUNTS DONORS ARE CONTRIBUTING TO (% OF TOTAL DONORS) 30 JUNE 2016

111 EARLY CHILDHOOD

JUL–DEC

Aurukun

215

300

JAN–JUN

2013

OPEN SET ACCOUNTS BY LEVEL OF SCHOOLING2 30 JUNE 2016

40% 30%

FINISHED/ LEFT SCHOOL

20%

47%

10%

(18–25)

0%

Mossman Gorge

1 ACCOUNT

29% 2 ACCOUNTS

13%

10%

3 ACCOUNTS

4+ ACCOUNTS

1 Based on the percentage population growth across the four Welfare Reform communities between 2006–11 (as per Census data), and applying it as an annual rate, we estimate that the population of community members aged 0–25 years has reached 1,627 in 2016. 2 The total accounts in this figure do not add to 853 because the schooling status of 41 SET students is unknown. These students are aged between 14 and 17 years and have a total combined balance of $59,089.35. 3 Based on the percentage population growth across the four Welfare Reform communities between 2006–11 (as per Census data), and applying it as an annual rate, we estimate that the population of community members aged 15+ years has reached 2,153 in 2016.

8


HOW DOES SET HELP MEMBERS TO SUPPORT THEIR CHILDREN’S EDUCATIONAL NEEDS? Aurukun

SAVING SUPPORT TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS

$2,563,693 contributed over the life of SET so far.

$141,398

contributed across the four Welfare Reform communities between January– June 2016.

SET BALANCES

Coen

Hope Vale

Mossman Gorge

TOTAL VALUE OF CONTRIBUTIONS 2014 TO 2016 $200,000 $150,000

$154,394

$149,604

$138,296

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

sitting in SET accounts at the end of June, ready to be turned into educational opportunities for Cape York children.

$141,398

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

$1,061,033

$1,086,736

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

$100,000 $50,000 $0

JAN–JUN

2014

2015

BALANCE OF SET ACCOUNTS 2014 TO 2016

$1,086,736

$142,114

$1,200,000

$978,735

$918,006

$986,551

2016

$800,000 $400,000 $0

JAN–JUN

2014

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2015

2016

PURCHASING EDUCATIONAL ITEMS TOTAL PURCHASES

$1,719,014

spent on educational goods over the life of SET so far.

$121,158 spent across the four Welfare Reform communities between January–June 2016.

TOTAL NUMBER OF ITEMS PURCHASED USING SET1 2014 TO 2016

$5,101 was spent at the six SET Fairs held

5143 3873

4000 2000

SET FAIRS

5708

6000

0

1534 JAN–JUN

in Aurukun, Coen and Hope Vale between January–June 2016.

999 2014

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2015

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

2016

TOP SIX ITEMS PURCHASED THROUGH SET BETWEEN JANUARY-JUNE 2016 1

2

Stationery

3

School uniforms

Anjanette Costello enjoyed browsing through books with her children.

4

Boarding school packs

Lunchboxes and drink bottles

SET beneficiaries, Francis Kerr and Nancee-Rae Bowen, enjoying their new stationery.

5

6

School bags

Extra-curricular activity

(fees and equipment)

Weiba Donahue and Edijon Cobus, showing off their new SET purchases.

1 It is likely that the total number of purchases reported in this section underestimates the total actual number of items purchased through SET, since our records are heavily dependent on the level of detail contained in the purchase orders we receive (e.g. ‘uniforms’ versus an exact number of uniform items purchased). These figures are, however, the closest approximation to the total number of items purchased that we have available.

9


POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF SET HOW DOES SET CAUSE POSITIVE CHANGE?

FOR KIDS…

SET=

school readiness

FOR PARENTS…

CHILDREN HAVE ACCESS TO HIGHQUALITY EDUCATIONAL GOODS

57% of SET accounts were considered ‘active’ between January–June 2016.

Donors are regularly contributing to and purchasing from SET accounts, meaning children are reaping the benefits.

“It provides educational item[s] for my children.” ANJANETTE COSTELLO, SET DONOR SINCE 2008

“[SET gives] easy access to educational needs [including a] variety of books.” IRIS UNDERWOOD, SET DONOR SINCE 2014

school participation

engagement in education

PARENTS DON’T HAVE TO STRESS With SET, the money is already put aside, so parents don’t have to stress when school fees are due.

“It saves me worrying about where I’m going to get the money to buy school books and uniforms: the money is always there, right through to grade 12.” VANESSA DONAHUE, SET DONOR SINCE 2009

educational outcomes

less financial stress PARENTS ARE SUPPORTED TO GET THEIR CHILDREN READY FOR SCHOOL SET assists and encourages parents and carers to get their children ready for school.

“[SET] is good for when you get your kids ready for day care or school. It’s got everything for little kids.” SHENICE ROSENDALE, SET DONOR SINCE

“Easy access to educational things.” LAUREN DEEMAL, SET DONOR SINCE 2014

2014 (PICTURED BELOW WITH HER SON, KYSONN)

(PICTURED BELOW LEFT WITH HER SON, DEVON, AND MOTHER, FRANCINE)

“SET is great for “Getting school items for your kids, it comes in handy.” DANIELLE GORDON, SET DONOR SINCE 2011 (DONOR FOR CIARA MCKINLEY, PICTURED

BELOW

WITH

HER

NEW

SCHOOLBAG, PURCHASED THROUGH SET)

WHAT ARE OTHER MEMBERS SAYING ABOUT SET? “It’s good; I can get what my little fella needs.” — LETISHA SPRATT, SET DONOR SINCE 2012

“It’s good for the kids to buy things when you need it… Everything, it’s all good.” — NATALIA BARU, SET DONOR SINCE 2011

“Very convenient, good stuff, don’t need money to shop… [The SET Fair was] spacious, nicely set out and friendly services.”

“It was good, SET had lunchboxes and bag[s] because I couldn’t find any that I liked [elsewhere].”

—SELINA BOWEN, SET DONOR SINCE 2008

—DANIELLE GORDON, SET DONOR SINCE 2011

10


STEPPING ONTO A NEW PATHWAY AFTER SCHOOL

“Having SET around was very helpful…” Shaunica Leecheu’s mother and grandmother set up a SET account for her when she was in grade seven at school. Shaunica was supported throughout her schooling by the funds her family put away and ended up graduating Year 12 at Blackheath and Thornburgh College in Charters Towers in 2014. After finishing school, Shaunica used her SET funds to navigate new learning pathways, including horsemanship training with the Northern Territory Cattlemen’s Association in Townsville, where she obtained a Certificate II in both Agriculture and Rural Operations. Shaunica says, “Having SET around was very helpful as it allowed me to fly down to Townsville to participate in the training courses and I also done some turtle researching, where we went out and tagged them, measured them…” Although Shaunica has been turtle tagging in her home of Hope Vale since she was 13-years-old, in Townsville she also had the opportunity to see some flatback sea turtles nesting and learned how to use the GPS along the beach. “I can now say that I have seen four species of sea turtles and I think there is another two more that I need to see, which will make me happy…” As for future plans, Shaunica is keenly interested in pursuing further studies in land care and conservation. “I am going to start TAFE in Townsville soon to study horticulture, which will help me with my career pathway… — land conservation management. I love to have discussions about environmental issues and I am very passionate about what is happening within the land and sea. If we don’t look after our environment, there may not be enough good sea grass around to feed the turtles.” Shaunica’s future pathway is secure with SET funds available to support her studies.

11


academic leaders The Cape York Leaders Program (CYLP) supports the development of current and future leaders through four phases of leadership: 1) Academic Leaders; 2) Youth Leaders; 3) Skilling Leaders; 4) Excelling Leaders. This section concerns Phase One, Academic Leaders.

men

torship

academic

Academic Leaders are offered scholarships to attend secondary schools and tertiary institutions across Queensland while receiving intensive support from dedicated CYLP staff. CYLP is supported by an Indigenous Steering Committee, populated by current and alumni members. The Steering Committee plays a central role in assisting CYLP staff to ensure the program remains relevant and continues to provide high-quality support to Leaders.

youth

LEADERS

LEADERS

excelling

skilling

LEADERS

LEADERS

MEMBERSHIP

115

Academic Leaders were current members of CYLP by the end of June. Each year, CYLP recruits new leaders through a competitive application process. TOTAL CYLP ACADEMIC LEADERS 2012 TO 2016

70%

Our Leaders have cultural connections across Cape York, Palm Island and Yarrabah. They orbit from these areas to board at high-quality secondary and tertiary institutions throughout Queensland. By orbiting across the State, these Leaders are learning to walk, with confidence, in two worlds.

of our 115 Academic Secondary and Tertiary Leaders have been with the Program for at least two years. Secondary

ACADEMIC LEADERS’ HOME COMMUNITIES 2016

Tertiary

30

100 80

20

60

18 13 12 12

40

10

20 2012

2013

2014

2015

0

2016

5 4

4

3

3

3 2

2

1

In June 2016, 60% (n=69) of our Leaders were from the Cape York Welfare Reform communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge.

Our Program retention rates are consistently high. At the end of June, retention rates1 are:

7

Hop e Va le Mos sma n/M G Aur uku n Yarr aba h Coe n Bam aga Map oon Palm Islan d Por mp uraa w Nap ranu m We ipa Wu jal W ujal Loc kha rt R iver Coo ktow n Injin oo

0

26

100% for Academic Secondary

Leaders and 100% for Academic Tertiary Leaders.

Since 2005, CYLP has supported 306 Academic Leaders to attend and achieve at high-quality boarding schools and universities across Queensland.

St Theresa’s Catholic College students, Sammy Bowenda (Aurukun), Timothy Yoren (Hope Vale) and Kaanju Bamboo (Mossman) with CYLP Student Support Officer, Sharon Phineasa.

Secondary student at The Cathedral School of St Anne and St James, Katherine Weston-Rosendale (Hope Vale/Wujal Wujal), studying hard in the school library.

1 Retention rates for Academic Leaders are for the period 1 January–30 June 2016.

12

Brisbane-based Tertiary students, Kemuel Tamwoy (Aurukun), Crystal Thomas (Yarrabah/Innisfail), Silas Tamwoy (Weipa/ Aurukun/Injinoo), Valerie Tamwoy (Bamaga), Marley AhMat (Weipa/ Napranum), Koby Frazer (Old Mapoon) and Shannen Castors (Palm Island), pictured with Mentoring and Transition Support Officer, Bernard Sabadi, and Donagh Worner (Jawun Secondee).


HOW DOES CYLP HELP ACADEMIC LEADERS ACHIEVE SUCCESS AT SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY? SETTING EXPECTATIONS

PARENTING CONFERENCES

We demand the best from students and their parents and thus, require that both parties sign a binding agreement upon entry to the Program, holding them to a high standard of behaviour and commitment to education.

Student Support Officers give continuous support to parents and carers, assisting them to work with schools so their children achieve educational outcomes. Biennial parenting conferences bring together parents, students and school staff so that all parties can work together in supporting students to achieve.

“It’s about being bi-cultural; it’s about being multi-lingual, and having the facility to do that successfully.” NOEL PEARSON, FOUNDER OF CAPE YORK PARTNERSHIP

LEADERSHIP CAMPS AND WORKSHOPS

EMOTIONAL AND PRACTICAL SUPPORT

Academic Leaders are encouraged to attend CYLP camps and workshops, which offer them a chance to network with other students on the Program so that they can learn and achieve together. These events also assist participants to improve their study skills, career planning, motivation and leadership skills.

Academic Leaders receive constant and ongoing support from a team of dedicated Student Support Officers who assist by: providing emotional and practical support to students and their families; liaising with academic institutions, including around opportunities for tutoring and academic assistance; identifying employment opportunities and assisting students to enter the workforce.

In January, Leaders participated in the annual CYLP camp, held at Tunnel Ridge (Sunshine Coast, Queensland). Students participated in a range of confidence- and team-building activities, and got to know each other and the CYLP team better. OUR ACADEMIC STUDENTS (N=61) TOLD US THAT THE CYLP CAMP HELPED THEM TO: 100%

87%

80%

77%

70%

60%

64%

62%

62%

61%

40% 20% 0%

Meet new people

Make new friends

Relax and have fun

Feel proud of their culture

Improve their Feel ready leadership for the skills school year

Improve their confidence

“[The camp] helped me gain more confidence in myself and my leadership skills and I thank CYLP for helping me become the leader I am today.” — ACADEMIC LEADER “The camp helped me by [emphasising the importance of] believing in yourself and being proud and also staying proud.” — ACADEMIC LEADER

Our Support Officers also continue to build contacts with prospective future employers so that students can be assisted to transition into apprenticeships and employment when they finish school.

Congratulations to Michael Dingo (Hope Vale) and Gauai Wallace (Hope Vale/Cooktown), who were recognised as the ‘Most Improved Players’ in their school’s volleyball competition. Bobby Bowie (Coen) is enjoying his first year at The Cathedral School of St Anne and St James in Townsville.

Our Academic Leaders enjoyed their annual camp at Tunnel Ridge (Sunshine Coast, Queensland) in January.

Our staff has continued to provide a high level of care and support to students and their families between January–June. In particular, Student Support Officers have: helped new students to transition into highschool and settle into their new boarding accommodation, including getting used to school routines; connected students with Indigenous support staff within their schools; arranged meetings with school support staff and external organisations (e.g. Headspace) to seek professional guidance where needed.

Rockhampton Grammar School student, Xavian Pitt (Mossman), playing a club game for Brothers.

13

INVOLVEMENT IN SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY LIFE As a means of ensuring they have ‘skin in the game’, parents are required to contribute funds so that students can participate in extra-curricular activities that enrich their learning. Between January– June, students have participated in a range of extra-curricular activities, including a range of sports (e.g. cricket, football, netball, basketball, athletics), Anzac Day events, school musicals, and volunteering for charities (e.g. Red Shield Appeal).


POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF CYLP

Cape York students apply for and are accepted into the Cape York Leaders Program; they actively engage and take up the support and opportunities on offer. STUDENTS HAVE STRONG SCHOOL ATTENDANCE1

94%

average school attendance was achieved by our Academic Secondary Leaders in Semester 1, 2016. This is an excellent attendance rate.

Increased School attendance and confidence take-up of extra-curricular orbiting for school activities increases

Educational outcomes improve

STUDENTS ARE ACHIEVING GREAT THINGS With the support of CYLP, our Academic Leaders continue to achieve outstanding success in both their personal and professional lives. Between January–June, our Secondary and Tertiary Academic Leaders have: -- ­been selected for leadership roles in their schools, including as Boarding Captain, Senior Residential Leader and Prefects -- ­travelled to New Zealand for the Youth Environmental Leaders Forum -- ­commenced participation in a Business traineeship with MAXIMA, hosted out to major companies like Bupa and QANTAS -- ­continued to work towards the completion of vocational qualifications, including Cert III’s in Sports and Rec and Fitness -- ­been selected to travel to Rockhampton for the Confraternity Shield Rugby League Carnival -- ­been selected for the Singers Competition (Junior Rugby League).

WHAT ARE MEMBERS AND GRADUATES SAYING? “For me it’s just leading by example… making sure that I’m doing the right thing. I know that there are younger kids watching me.” — CATHERINE NOAH, PORMPURAAW (2015 ACADEMIC

“I realise now how important leadership is because when I was younger my older brother, he kind of set an example for me, and when I looked I was like ‘oh, I want to be like him, I want to grow up and do the things he does.’ So I realise now that leadership is really important — I’ve got to set an example for the younger students and my younger brother and cousins and things like that.” — PHILLIP YEATMAN, YARRABAH (2015 ACADEMIC

SECONDARY GRADUATE)

SECONDARY GRADUATE AND CURRENT ACADEMIC TERTIARY LEADER)

“…I want to go back to the communities and help Indigenous people.” — GERAEUH BOWEN, HOPE

“The Cape York Leaders Program has given me an awesome opportunity to study; that’s something that I would not have got the opportunity to do if I was still at home… I think it’s a great way for Indigenous students to better their education.”

VALE (2014 ACADEMIC SECONDARY

— LORRAINE JAFFER, COEN (2015 ACADEMIC SECONDARY GRADUATE AND CURRENT

GRADUATE AND CURRENT ACADEMIC

ACADEMIC TERTIARY LEADER)

TERTIARY LEADER)

“Give it a go, don’t be ashamed, no one around is going to make fun of you—you’re all one people.” — SHIQUEA

CREEK,

COEN

(CURRENT

ACADEMIC SECONDARY LEADER)

“…Just finishing my degree I felt really privileged that I could… stand up and talk the talk…” — MARGARET BLACKMAN, MAPOON (ACADEMIC TERTIARY GRADUATE) “Lead your brothers and sisters, especially your younger ones… Give them knowledge to lead the way as well, so they can take after you.” — MARSHALL WINKLE, WUJAL WUJAL (2015 ACADEMIC SECONDARY GRADUATE)

WHERE ARE OUR PAST LEADERS NOW? ACHIEVING GREAT HEIGHTS TANAY ROPEYARN’S JOURNEY Tanay Ropeyarn first joined CYLP in 2009 as an Academic Secondary Leader, attending Cathedral School in Townsville. Upon graduating, she went on to study a Bachelor of Laws at James Cook University from 2010 and continued with CYLP as an Academic Tertiary Leader. After graduating from her Bachelor Degree and completing her further required studies, Tanay was officially admitted into the legal profession at the Cairns Supreme Court in late June. Tanay now works as a Solicitor at the Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Service and, as far as she is aware, is the first person from her home community of Injinoo to become a solicitor. Tanay has achieved wonderful things already; we look forward to seeing her continue to achieve great heights into the future as well.

1 This is based on a sample of 35 of our students' semester one attendance rates.

14


WHERE ARE OUR PAST LEADERS NOW? PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS KELAM’S JOURNEY FROM CYLP TO THE ROYAL AUSTRALIAN NAVY Kelam Nona, originally from Bamaga, graduated from the Academic Leaders Secondary Program in 2013, after attending Columba Catholic College in Charters Towers. Since graduating, Kelam has joined the Royal Australian Navy. “I’m in the Royal Australian Navy. I’ve been in for two years [and] joined as a Communicator. I’m currently based at the Australian Federation Guard (AFG, Canberra). The AFG provides a tri-service ceremonial capability in order to promote the standards, values, traditions and ethos of the Australian Defence Force…” We asked Kelam how CYLP helped him in his journey. “The Program has helped me a lot. I am very thankful to have been a part of it. It had given me the opportunity to fulfil my dream to become a sailor of the Royal Australian Navy. It helped build my confidence and skills, which required me to become a role model to my people and my community.” We also asked Kelam what advice he would give to the current Academic Leaders. “Keep doing what they’re doing. If anything goes wrong in their paths, just ask questions. Don’t be afraid to ask. There is no such thing as a dumb question. A little question will help you to push forward. Go hard in life. It’ll all be worth it in the end. Don’t rush at things, it takes time… patience and time do more than strength or passion.” We are proud to see past Academic Leaders like Kelam achieving such amazing things. Keep up the great work and thank you for your service.

MAKING HIS MARK:

TERTIARY LEADER, PHILLIP YEATMAN Phillip Yeatman from Yarrabah graduated from our Academic Secondary Leaders Phase in 2015 after completing his Year 12 studies at Brisbane Boys’ College. He has now become an Academic Tertiary Leader and is currently at Queensland University of Technology studying a Bachelor of Engineering, specialising in Mechanical Engineering. Phillip is also a keen artist and recently launched his design for the Queensland Reds Indigenous jersey.

STEPPING INTO WORK: SECONDARY GRADUATE, ELISHA TAMWOY Elisha Tamwoy—a Secondary Leaders graduate from 2015—has made a great start to the year, obtaining work at the local supermarket in his home community of Aurukun. Elisha has also completed short-term contracts with Rio Tinto, working out on country. He’s done such a great job that the company has asked him to do more work for them in the near future. Other than working hard, Elisha has also been keeping busy playing Rugby League with the Kang Kang Men’s and Under 18s teams.

15

WORKING HARD AND PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE: SECONDARY GRADUATE, TESSA FRIDAY-BULSEY Tessa Friday-Bulsey (Palm Island) graduated from the Academic Secondary Leaders Phase in 2015 after completing her Year 12 studies at Stuartholme School in Brisbane. Tessa is now living in Townsville and working as a Receptionist at Dreamtime Training. Tessa plans to keep working throughout 2016 to get some hands-on experience and save some money before moving back to Brisbane in 2017 to study at the Queensland University of Technology.


cape york academy get ready, work hard, be good

Cape York Academy (CYA) was originally established in January 2010 as part of the Cape York Welfare Reform initiative, and seeks to turn around historically low school attendance and performance. CYA is currently managed by Good to Great Schools Australia (GGSA) through a unique partnership with the Department of Education and Training (DET) and operates three primary schools in Aurukun, Coen, and Hope Vale. CYA also provides case management around school readiness and attendance for eight Mossman Gorge students who attend Mossman State Primary School. An overwhelming majority of CYA’s students are socioeconomically disadvantaged and live in communities where violence, drugs and alcohol risk undermining their school attendance and performance. The use of Positive Behaviour Interventions and Supports (PBIS) mean that CYA schools are ‘safe havens’ where students come to learn, despite community disruptions. CYA employs a full-service 5C framework—Childhood, Class, Club, Culture and Community—across an extended school day to ensure students are school ready, attend regularly and succeed in their education. CYA uses the Direct Instruction (DI) and Explicit Direct Instruction (EDI) frameworks to accelerate students, even if they’re starting from behind. CYA is determined to ensure that our younger generations achieve their full potential, talent and creativity, and have the confidence and capacity for hard work so that they can orbit between two worlds and enjoy the best of both.

ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE ENROLMENT

ATTENDANCE

372

73%

students were enrolled across all three CYA campuses at the end of June.

99% of CYA’s students are Indigenous.

average attendance rate across the three CYA campuses during the January–June period. The percentage of students attending 90 per cent of the time has increased gradually across all campuses from 2012–2016, though Aurukun has experienced a slight fall in this group during January–June, likely due to periods of significant community unrest and subsequent closure of the school during Term 2.

AVERAGE SCHOOL ATTENDANCE (%) TERM 1 2015 TO TERM 2 2016 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0

TERM 1

TERM 2

Aurukun

TERM 3

2015

TERM 4

Coen

TERM 1

TERM 2

2016

Hope Vale

HOW DOES CYA SUPPORT STUDENTS TO SUCCEED?

CYA delivers an innovative 5C program over an extended school day (for Pre-Prep students, 8:30am–12noon; for Prep to Year 6 students, 8.30am–4:00pm). The 5Cs are: 1) Childhood, 2) Class, 3) Club, 4) Culture, and 5) Community. CHILDHOOD This domain concerns early childhood social, emotional, intellectual and physical development and seeks to reduce—through a targeted Pre-Prep program—the number of students who are developmentally at risk or vulnerable when they enter Prep. The Pre-Prep literacy program, for instance, helps students learn English before they start formal schooling.

CLASS The Class domain focuses on mastery of literacy and numeracy using DI have resulted in amazing gains for our students, including those who otherwise start from behind.

CLUB AND CULTURE The Club Curriculum encourages moral development, higher-order skills and creative expression, including through participation in sports, music and health subjects. The Culture Curriculum promotes individual identity, culture and language to help students prepare for their futures and walk in two worlds. Australian and global non-Indigenous and Indigenous perspectives are embedded within lessons, while community members are also engaged in delivering cultural content in ‘free’ lessons. New EDI units from the re-written Club and Culture Curriculum were also implemented between January–June. An ancestral language programme has successfully run in Hope Vale (teaching Guugu Yimidhirr), while a similar programme is currently being developed in Aurukun (to teach Wik).

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COMMUNITY The Community domain focuses on attendance and school readiness, including health, wellbeing, special and material needs. CYA case manages its students—especially those most in need, including severe nonattenders—and is also developing a comprehensive special education support program.


POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF CYA ON CHILDREN AND FAMILIES DI IN PRE-PREP HAS ACCELERATED STUDENTS’ LITERACY GAINS Since 2013, the CYA Pre-Prep program has resulted in considerable improvements to students’ literacy, setting them up for success in their formal schooling. When the Academy began, only four per cent of Prep students were on track to read independently by Year 2; in 2016 so far, 85 per cent of the Academy’s Prep students are on track to read independently by Year 2. Our Coen Prep students commenced their storybook reading exercises half a term ahead of schedule in Semester 1 2016—a fantastic achievement. Overall, our students now no longer begin school as non-English speakers and minimise academic disadvantage for having English as a second language. YEARS OF LITERACY GAINED IN PREP: AURUKUN STUDENTS1 YEARS

1.5

1.19

1.0

0.72

0.80

0.5

0.22 0.28

0

0.41

0.26

NO DI (2013 Preps)

0.40

0.41

DI (2014–15 Preps)

1 day/wk or less of Pre-Prep

Pre-Prep students are making great gains as a result of CYA’s targeted literacy program, and are starting their formal schooling better off.

DI (2016 Preps)

2 days/wk of Pre-Prep

3–5 days/wk of Pre-Prep

STUDENT 3

STUDENT 2

STUDENT 1

CASE MANAGEMENT AND GREAT TEACHING IMPROVE STUDENTS’ ATTENDANCE • Teacher providing consistent and inclusive classroom environment

2015

2016

54% attendance rate

95% attendance rate, so far

2015

2016

58% attendance rate

83% attendance rate, so far

2015

2016

61% attendance rate

90% attendance rate, so far

• Student feels secure and valued so he can attend his learning • Student has developed a rapport with his teacher and case managers • Students’ improvements were celebrated in front of the school with his parents at parade

• Case managers developed an Individual Behaviour Support Plan • Student feels safer and has improved rapport with his teacher • Student now aware of his behaviour triggers and can self-regulate • Developing positive relationships with other teachers and staff

• Student placement tested into a bridging program • Became more confident and tested up into a higher class • Attends five days a week to keep up with his peers • Has only had positive behaviour reports recorded this year

MORE STUDENTS ARE NOW AT GRADE LEVEL IN READING AND MATH THAN EVER BEFORE Despite ongoing challenges, CYA students are demonstrating considerable progress in key literacy and numeracy indicators. STUDENTS AT GRADE LEVEL FOR READING2

STUDENTS AT GRADE LEVEL FOR MATHEMATICS3 100

38

6 2011

40

12

2013

2014

2015

2016

0

55

31

20

2 2012

52

60

23 10

80

3

1

2011

2012

16 2013

1 2016 results are projected, based on Term 2 progress. 2 2016 results are projected, based on results achieved at the end of Term 2. 3 2016 results are projected, based on results achieved at the end of Term 2.

17

2014

2015

2016

CYA celebrates strong school attendance and strives to improve when attendance dips.


POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF CYA ON CHILDREN AND FAMILIES CONTINUED STUDENTS’ NAPLAN RESULTS ARE IMPROVING OVER TIME

“For Years 3-5, there has been greater than the Australian average growth: 181% greater in Reading, 98% greater in Writing, and 181% greater in Numeracy.”

CYA’s Coen and Hope Vale students sat NAPLAN tests in the middle of Term 2.1 Their results demonstrate that students’ key outcomes are improving over time. • Mean scale scores for reading, writing, spelling, grammar and punctuation have improved for Coen’s Year 3 cohort. Coen’s Year 5 cohort has also improved dramatically since being tested as Year 3s in 2014, more than doubling Australian average growth in reading, writing and numeracy. • There is now a larger proportion of Year 3 Hope Vale students at national minimum standard for reading, writing, spelling, grammar, punctuation and numeracy than ever before.

— PROFESSOR JOHN HATTIE, JACK KEATING LECTURE AT THE MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, JUNE 2016

• Since NAPLAN testing began, we have seen our Year 3 students’ mean scale scores for reading and numeracy gradually improve across all campuses. AURUKUN YEAR 3 READING MEAN SCALE SCORES 2008 TO 20152

AURUKUN YEAR 3 NUMERACY MEAN SCALE SCORES 2008 TO 20153

500

500

400

400

300

300

200

200

100

100

0

2008

2009

2010

Aurukun

2011

2012

2013

Linear (Aurukun)

2014

0

2015

National average

2008

2009

2010

Aurukun

2011

2012

Linear (Aurukun)

2013

2014

National average

COEN YEAR 3 READING MEAN SCALE SCORES 2008 TO 2016

COEN YEAR 3 NUMERACY MEAN SCALE SCORES 2008 TO 2016

500

500

400

400

300

300

200

200

100

100

0

2008

2009

2010

Coen

2011

2012

2013

Linear (Coen)

2014

2015

0

2016

National average

2008

2009

2010

Coen

2011

2012

2013

Linear (Coen)

2014

2015

HOPE VALE YEAR 3 NUMERACY MEAN SCALE SCORES 2008 TO 2016

500

500

400

400

300

300

200

200

100

100 2008

2009

Hope Vale

2010

2011

2012

2013

Linear (Hope Vale)

2014

2015

0

2016

National average

2008

2009

Hope Vale

2010

2011

2013

Linear (Hope Vale)

1 Aurukun students did not sit the NAPLAN in Term 2 2016 due to a forced school closure. 2 2016 results are not available for Aurukun, as a forced school closure meant that students could not sit the NAPLAN test during Term 2. 3 2016 results are not available for Aurukun, as a forced school closure meant that students could not sit the NAPLAN test during Term 2.

18

2012

2016

National average

HOPE VALE YEAR 3 READING MEAN SCALE SCORES 2008 T0 2016

0

2015

2014

2015

2016

National average


Lead teachers of the Academy practicing how to coach at a Coaching Academy workshop

Class groups accelerating their learning with Direct Instruction

Teachers attend Partner Practice twice a week to develop their skills

All the classes in Coen and Hope Vale were adopted by community sponsors. Shown here; CYE sponsors Coen’s Preps, Well-Being Centre sponsors Coen’s Year 1/2’s

Coen Preps began reading storybook half a term ahead of schedule

Hope Vale staff nominate an engaged family each week to receive a meat tray and be featured in their next newsletter

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djarragun college learn, connect, succeed

Djarragun College is a lighthouse Indigenous school, with a vision of being the leading Indigenous College in Australia for its co-educational cohort of Prep to Year 12 students, including roughly one fifth boarders. The School caters to students from remote communities across Cape York, the Torres Strait Islands, Yarrabah, Cairns and surrounds. As part of the Cape York Partnership, the College is driven by the Cape York Agenda. Djarragun supports the Agenda by ensuring that every student achieves their full potential and has the confidence and capacity for hard work, so that they can orbit between their home communities and mainstream society, enjoying the best of both. The College’s mantra of ‘no student left behind, no student held back’ combines with a high expectation that every student will graduate with entry to university, further education or employment. At Djarragun, students always come first: their learning, safety and wellbeing are our core focus.

ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE ENROLMENT

363 students were enrolled at Djarragun at the end of June, 99 per cent of whom identify as Indigenous. Our enrolments have increased dramatically since the end of 2015 (where enrolments were 207), due to our new Principal’s sustained commitment to recruiting new students.

22%

of our student cohort are boarders and come from a range of locations across Cape York, the Torres Strait Islands, Yarrabah, Cairns and surrounds. The nature of our student cohort is transitional. For example, in 2015 almost 68 per cent of the school’s student population had been enrolled for one year or less.

ATTENDANCE

59%

average attendance rate during the January– June period. This is lower than the average attendance for July–December 2015 (69%), but is the result of the School’s increased efforts to reach out to and enrol Cape York students who have experienced difficult backgrounds, including significant disengagement from school.

BREAKDOWN OF STUDENTS’ HOME RESIDENCY BY LOCALITY

3%

45% 30% 13%

9%

Regional communities

Cairns suburbs

Local communities

Other

Torres Strait Islands

HOW DOES DJARRAGUN COLLEGE SUPPORT STUDENTS TO SUCCEED? HIGH-QUALITY EDUCATION

HEALTH AND WELLBEING

Djarragun College caters to three cohorts of students: 1) those who plan to move into further studies (e.g. university); 2) those who are not academically bound, but wish to obtain a Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) and a trade qualification; 3) those who face significant challenges in terms of their literacy and numeracy but who, with strong support, can move into meaningful employment. Djarragun provides a holistic, high-quality educational experience to all students, which places them, their families, their culture and their futures at the forefront.

Djarragun students are supported by a growing Health and Wellbeing Centre. At Djarragun, we aim to know each of our students in terms of their academic ability, physical health and wellbeing, so that we can support each of them holistically on their life pathways.

Students celebrated their cultural roots by dancing at the School’s Presentation Day.

Our Year 10 Careers Class visited CQ University ‘Experience Uni a Day’ event in May. They attended information sessions for nursing, paramedical science, engineering and education.

20

Students celebrated their mothers this Mother’s Day by making them morning tea and inviting them into their classrooms.


POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS FOR DJARRAGUN COLLEGE STUDENTS PARENTS COMMEND DJARRAGUN’S TEACHERS AND PASTORAL CARE In late 2015, we asked a small cohort (N=17) of our students’ parents what they thought Djarragun College did well. Their top three answers were: provide good teachers (n=16, 94%); provide excellent pastoral care (n=15, 94%); offers good subject choices (n=15, 88%).

STUDENTS ENJOY BEING AT DJARRAGUN In late 2015, we asked a cohort (N=49) of our students what they enjoyed most about being at Djarragun College. Their answers are outlined below. WHAT STUDENTS LIKE MOST ABOUT BEING AT DJARRAGUN (N=49) 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

Friends

Sports

OUR STUDENTS SEE VAST IMPROVEMENTS IN LEARNING OUTCOMES One of our students came to Djarragun College in late 2013. She was in Grade 1 and was, at that stage, a non-reader. She placed at lesson 11 of kindergarten reading and lesson 31 of the kindergarten oral language/comprehension programme. She was, at this point, well behind in her reading skills, with a reading level of less than five years of age—more than two years less than her actual age.

Subjects

My teacher

Boarding

Feeling safe

Culture – School dance, art grounds and music

In just 2.5 years, this student went from being essentially a non-reader to reading at grade level—an amazing accomplishment.

During Semester 1 of that year, she started to show some improvement, but was still placed at a kindergarten reading level. However, by February 2015 (when the student had reached Grade 3), and after participating in ongoing intensive Direct Instruction lessons, the student began to advance more quickly. Her reading level was now that of a Grade 1 student and by May that year, she had jumped over 100 reading lessons to being half way through the Grade 2 reading curriculum. In 2016 (while starting Grade 4), the student began in a remedial program so that she could focus particularly on her decoding and fluency, but by May she was already blitzing the program and had advanced to the top of her class. She is now placed into Grade 4 reading. In just 2.5 years, this student has gone from being essentially a non-reader to reading at grade level; her PROBE score (derived from a test that assesses students’ reading and comprehension) doubled over this time, from a decoding age of below 5 to a decoding age of 10. This is an amazing accomplishment and a testament to the impact that the Direct Instruction approach can have on our students. Amazingly, this student has also made similar gains in maths.

Years 10, 11 and 12 students visited HMAS Cairns Navy Base in April and took a tour aboard the HMAS Leeuwin with Captain Adam Muckalt.

For Anzac Day, our students, along with Payton Harper Sailor (Yr7), Woody Patterson (Yr10) and Wayne Stewart (Yr10) from the 134 Army Cadet Unit, participated in a College assembly and laid a wreath as a tribute to the fallen Australian and New Zealand soldiers. Our Boarders also attended a memorial service in Gordonvale.

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

PAMELA AMBER’S MILITARY CAREER

Pamela Amber graduated from her Year 12 studies at Djarragun College in 2012. She enjoyed and excelled at sports during her time at school, going on to complete a Certificate II in Community Activities at TAFE. However, Pamela always had an interest in joining the Army. “I’ve always wanted to join the Army, since small, to challenge myself. I thought: ‘I have to finish school first then I could apply’.” Eventually, Pamela moved from Cairns to Wagga Wagga (NSW) and participated in multiple training and pre-selection courses. “It was challenging and all about the determination but I just took it day by day,” Pamela recalls. “I thought: ‘I really want to be one day in that uniform’.” After completing her training successfully, Pamela officially became a Private with the ADF in May this year and is now the first person in her family to have earned a military rank. Pamela likens some of the challenges she faced in becoming a Private to starting school at Djarragun College in Year 8. “When I first went there in Year 8 there were so many people and I only knew a few. Then I met new friends and they helped me through,” she said. The humble 20-year old hopes that other young students find the courage to push through challenges to achieve their goals too. “My advice, especially to young Indigenous people, is whatever opportunity comes your way just take it… you never know, it may only come once in a lifetime.”

ELIZABETH KEBISU HAS JOINED THE DJARRAGUN TEAM AND IS A FANTASTIC ROLE MODEL FOR OUR STUDENTS “Djarragun College is such a great school.”

Elizabeth Kebisu graduated her Year 12 studies at Djarragun College in 2015 and thoroughly enjoyed her time at the School. “I’ve been coming here [to] Djarragun for five years. [The] five years I’ve been schooling here was fantastic. The staff… here at Djarragun is just incredible…”, said Elizabeth. In fact, Elizabeth enjoyed her time here so much that she chose to return to the School to do volunteer work in 2016. Volunteering quickly led her to pursue further opportunities at Djarragun. “I came back to Djarragun to do… volunteering work for a couple of months and now I’m working as [an] employee.” Elizabeth is now employed with the School’s Student Services Team and is already doing a fantastic job in her new role. “Djarragun College is such a great school. It gives you so much opportunity… For the last two years, DC gave me an opportunity to go down to [the] Gold Coast [and] Griffith University for university experience to see what… university [is] like…” While plans for university might still be in Elizabeth’s future, for now she is shining in her new role and has become a valued member of the School’s staff. We’re thrilled to have her back at Djarragun for a little longer to act as such a fantastic role model for our students.

22


cape york girl academy

growing up strong in body, mind, culture and spirit Teenage pregnancy is one of the most common reasons for Cape York girls dropping out of school. Through yarning circles and community consultations, Cape York women asked for a place for girls to finish their schooling, to gain work skills and qualifications, and to grow themselves and their children as our future Indigenous leaders. The Cape York Girl Academy ensures every Indigenous girl can complete their education. It is Australia’s first boarding school designed for young mothers and their babies. Mothers and babies live together and learn together, supported by caring staff and surrounded by friends and visiting family. The Girl Academy’s mission is to nurture and support effective and confident mothers, happy and confident children, and provide young Indigenous women with opportunities for growth and success in every aspect of their lives.

ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE TOTAL STUDENTS

21 students have enrolled at the Girl Academy at some point between January–June.

At the end of Term 2, 9 students were enrolled. Girl Academy students come from a range of locations, including Hope Vale, Atherton, Napranum, Weipa, Yarrabah, Tiwi Islands, Cairns, the Northern Arnhem land community of Ramingining and North Stradbroke Island.

ATTENDANCE HISTORIES

85%

of our students did not attend school during the 12 months prior to coming to the Girl Academy. 10% of our students attended school either ‘rarely’ or ‘not often’ (that is, 2–4 days per week).1

CURRENT ATTENDANCE Over Terms 1 and 2, our students

have achieved an average 80% attendance rate.2 For most of our students, this is a significant move towards re-engaging with school after prolonged periods of chronic disengagement.

Healthy mind, healthy culture, healthy body, healthy spirit, healthy relationships HOW DOES THE GIRL ACADEMY SUPPORT STUDENTS AND THEIR CHILDREN TO LEARN AND GROW? INTENSIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT Students are engaged in a Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority (QCAA) curriculum, divided into Year 9 and Year 11 levels. This includes subjects in Literacy, Numeracy, Art and vocational certificates in Hospitality, Childcare and Technology. Subjects are delivered by a teacher in the classroom and online through the Cairns School of Distance Education. By the end of Year 12, all girls have the opportunity to graduate with a Queensland Certificate of Education.

MULTIDISCIPLINARY HEALTH AND WELLBEING SUPPORT FOR MUMS AND BABIES Students and their babies participate in a multidisciplinary health and wellbeing support programme to ensure they are happy, healthy and ready to learn. Between January–June, students and bubs participated in: Circle of Security Training; a Diabetes Awareness workshop; a Quit Smoking workshop; Conflict Resolution training; and a series of Behavioural Expectations workshops, focusing on core themes of respect, responsibility, reliability and resilience.

SAFE AND SECURE BOARDING Students and their children live on campus in safe and secure boarding accommodation, supported 24 hours-a-day by our Boarding Coordinator and staff. Our Boarding staff organise activities for the girls outside of class time. Between January–June, students enjoyed fishing, bushwalking, trips to nearby waterholes (e.g. Josephine Falls and Mossman Gorge), cooking courses and other cultural and fun activities.

Students spend time with their babies throughout the school day and on weekends, which helps in building secure attachment.

Students attend daily classes to improve their educational outcomes and set the foundation for bright futures.

1 The final 5% of students were unable to provide these details. 2 Some of our students take leave for short periods of time in order to attend cultural events in their home communities.

23


POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF THE GIRL ACADEMY ON STUDENTS AND THEIR CHILDREN GIRL ACADEMY STUDENTS HAVE STRONG ASPIRATIONS “When I finish school I want to go off to university and study the things I’m interested in. I am very thankful for being a part of the Girl Academy because I got to meet such outstanding people and become a part of another amazing family.” “I came to the Girl Academy because I would like to get a better education. My future goal is to be a cleaner or housekeeper. I love being here because it’s a great school and it just feels like my own home.” “When I finish school I want to do nursing school to become a midwife. I love being here because I always get supported and getting encouraged for the things I don’t want to do.”

“The reason I came to Girl Academy was to finish off my education and to make lifelong friends. My goal for my future is to become a successful Indigenous woman with a good job being a midwife. I’m so thankful to be a part of this school because my son gets to grow and learn with me.” “Wanting to make a good name for myself and making Hope Vale a bigger and better place for my people…” “My goal for my future is to become a veterinarian after I graduate school. I love that we are all Indigenous girls and I’m grateful to have this opportunity to study here at Girl Academy.” “One thing I love is the people here at the Girl Academy and I’m thankful for staying here and calling it my second home.”

OUR STUDENTS’ CHILDREN ARE THRIVING IN A SAFE, NURTURING ENVIRONMENT

“Through predictability, this little girl was able to feel secure and has now learnt to wave goodbye to her mum… Practicing these social exchanges helps with her social skills development.” One of our 13-month-old girls, who has attended for just over one month, had separation anxiety and would sob for her mother when left with staff. Her mother only spoke to her in her ancestral language, which is encouraged to ensure that her cultural identity and connection to her own country and people can be maintained. However, we know that bilingualism also improves problem solving and the child’s ability to learn new words. To help the child with her anxiety, the Girl Academy’s Early Learning Coordinator encouraged mum to say goodbye to her with a kiss and tell her she would be back.

watches butterflies daily and will point to them and call out to get staff to join her attention. She points to birds and makes a “b” sound. Literacy development contributes to closing the gap in lifelong outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Through daily exposure to literature, this child has demonstrated early reading behaviours. She often chooses books and hands them to the Early Learning Coordinator as if to gesture for staff to read to her. This demonstrates that she is beginning to enjoy books—an incredible step towards a life-long love for learning. Although she still sometimes holds books upside down when handling them independently, she demonstrates an understanding of some concepts of print. For instance, she points to the book and moves her finger along, making rhythmical utterances. She pauses and then turns pages, continuing with her rhythmical utterances. She has shown an understanding of using a reading voice; recently, she pointed to a picture of a dog in a book that staff members were reading with her in an effort to explore the sounds that animals make. She uttered “Du Du” (woof woof).

Through predictability, this little girl was able to feel secure and has now learnt to wave goodbye to her mum, as well as other students and staff, upon leaving. Practicing these social exchanges helps with her social skills development. She will also now pick up a mobile phone or landline and put the receiver up to her ear and utter “alo”. She has grown in confidence and is able to move away from an adult for several minutes at a time without seeking emotional support. This child has now learned routines and uses her new knowledge to communicate what she wants, using non-verbal cues. For example, she puts on her hat when she wants to go outside because she has learnt that a hat is worn when going outdoors. She will also lay back in the Early Learning Coordinator’s arms and begin to hum to self-soothe when she is tired, because she is used to the Coordinator and others singing Twinkle Twinkle to her to soothe her to sleep. She is also beginning to use some verbal communication. She

The progress that this child and her mother have made since coming to the Girl Academy has been remarkable. The impact of a safe, nurturing and stable environment on them both has been profound and we know that they will continue to learn, grow and flourish over the coming months and years.

24


Our students’ successes were celebrated during a small awards ceremony at the close of Term 2. Congratulations to all of our students who have worked hard and, although it was not easy for them to be away from home and in a new environment, have achieved so much already. Well done.

Compass Group in NSW generously donated a coffee machine to the School so that students can practice their Barista skills.

Our students participated in Circle of Security training with Wuchopperen in March, learning key parenting skills so they can nurture and support their children.

Students enjoyed participating in Wuchopperen’s Healthy Tucker workshop. The School was officially blessed by Bishop Malcolm in June, while Bernie Singleton did a traditional welcome to country.

Students visited Hartley’s Crocodile Farm to celebrate the end of Term 2.

Students practiced putting up their tents at School before going on a one-night camping trip to Kuranda.

Students visited TAFE Beauty Clinic to hear about the educational opportunities available there.

25


26


employment and economic development The right of Indigenous people to build a real economy is central to our work: true empowerment fosters confident economic development. We believe Indigenous Australia must become integrated into the national and global economies. Culture, language and connection to country should not be traded off. Indigenous communities on Cape York can have a viable future as small towns and cultural hearths. Success economic

in

employment development

and must

involve increasing our success in land reform, education and orbiting.

27


cape york employment Cape York Employment (CYE) is the Community Development Programme (CDP) contractor in Aurukun and Coen (Region 60). We seek to move people from welfare dependency to employment by providing meaningful training and wellbeing support for jobseekers. We build strong links with local and distant employers in order to identify job opportunities for our jobseekers and work closely with employers to transition jobseekers into employment. CYE recognises the limited opportunities currently within the Cape York economy and also seeks work readiness and employment in areas beyond Cape York by encouraging jobseekers to orbit into employment beyond their communities.

OUR JOBSEEKERS AND STAFF Community members who receive welfare are required, as a condition of their welfare payments, to build their work skills and readiness by visiting CYE. Men and women who engage with CYE are supported to build the capabilities they need to move away from passive welfare dependency and take hold of their futures.

TOTAL JOBSEEKERS

TOTAL CYE STAFF

496

22 staff members were employed with CYE at the end of June, 94 per cent of

jobseekers made up CYE’s caseload at the end of June. Of these, 457 (92%) were ‘commenced’, 22 (4%) ‘suspended’ and 17 (3%) ‘pending’. Cape York Employment’s jobseekers are from Aurukun, Coen, Port Stewart and other immediately surrounding remote communities.

whom were Indigenous.

As a matter of principal, CYE attempts to employ as many local staff as possible. At the end of June, nine (60%) of the 15 staff who were based in either Aurukun or Coen were local.

HOW DOES CYE HELP JOBSEEKERS TO BUILD WORK CAPABILITIES AND FIND JOBS? JOBSEEKER CAPABILITY BUILDING THROUGH WORK-FOR-THE-DOLE ACTIVITIES

EMPLOYER PARTNERSHIPS AND JOB PLACEMENTS

Of the 496 jobseekers on CYE’s caseload, 208 (42%) are required to participate in work-for-the-dole activities.

331

By the end of June, 83 per cent of these individuals were placed in an activity to build their work capabilities. CYE is committed to providing jobseekers with meaningful work-for-the-dole activities that enable them to build useful and transferrable work skills. CYE’s approach is not about keeping jobseekers ‘busy’—it is about up-skilling and building jobseekers’ capabilities so they can move away from welfare dependency and into employment. CYE’s work-for-the-dole activities include, for example: training qualifications, which are linked to real-life job opportunities (not just ‘training for training’s sake) (e.g. Licencing and Small Motor Maintenance and The Block activities); work experience placements, which build jobseekers’ familiarity with work routines and provide on-the-job experience and training (e.g. the Our Community and Aurukun Community Care activities); community projects and job-ready workshops that build jobseekers’ confidence, wellbeing, job-specific skills and routines (e.g. the Good Day Every Day, Active Communities, Better Gardens, Busy Hands and Our Kitchen Rules activities). Numeracy and literacy skills development is embedded in all of our jobseeker activities.

jobseekers had been placed into employment by the end of June. These jobseekers were placed with a range of CYE’s partner employers. CYE’s efforts have resulted in jobseekers finding and staying in employment—some for the first time in their lives. However, like other CDP providers, many of CYE’s jobseekers also frequently move in and out of employment as they adjust to working life. To date, 65 (20%) of these 331 jobseekers have remained in their positions for 26 weeks or more.

Aurukun jobseekers undertaking numeracy and literacy training, which is embedded into CYE’s Busy Hands jobseeker activity. These jobseekers undertook a goal-setting activity, while others used computers to work on their resumes. Some of our Aurukun jobseekers started their health checks with Apunipima during the January–June period. They also completed additional activities, including White Card training, learning about work habits and expectations, and fitness activities.

ONGOING JOBSEEKER SUPPORT Jobseekers receive ongoing support and advice from the CYE team, including through regular appointments. On average, 59 per cent of jobseekers attended their appointments during June.

28

Coen jobseekers worked on upgrading the gardens at the local Community Hub (above). This helped participants to build landscaping skills, which are transferrable to future employment.


POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF CYE

CYE=

wellbeing and confidence

work-related skills and readiness

ability to obtain and remain in employment

JOBSEEKERS ARE BUILDING THEIR WELLBEING AND CONFIDENCE, AND GETTING WORK-READY YARNS AT THE SHADY PLACE FOR MEN CYE has a hosting arrangement with the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) to run the Shady Place for Men in Aurukun. The Shady Place provides an opportunity for male jobseekers to work with CYE and RFDS staff in overcoming social and other barriers to work. Every day, a CYE staff member visits the jobseekers to talk with them about potential employment opportunities within Aurukun. CYE staff also mentor jobseekers with a view to improving their overall wellbeing and confidence, and provide materials to support work-readiness activities, which assists in preparing jobseekers for future employment.

BUILDING SKILLS AND PRIDE A group of jobseekers who have regular attendance were chosen to participate in a more structured activity, which involved constructing arbours in Aurukun’s parks. The jobseekers worked alongside a builder to plan and build the arbours and, in the process of doing so, gained real work skills. The men were proud of their work and pleased that the arbours they had constructed would provide shade for local children to play in. They worked longer hours just to finish some of the work and locals who live around the park came to ask what they were doing and watch them work. This activity helped to build these jobseekers’ work skills and confidence, preparing them for future employment opportunities.

LEARNING THROUGH HANDS-ON WORK Jobseekers have been working on landscaping projects around the community, giving them the opportunity to utilise different machinery and learn different construction techniques. This has boosted these jobseekers’ confidence and built their capacity to take up potential employment opportunities in the future. JOBSEEKERS ARE BUILDING THEIR WELLBEING AND CONFIDENCE, AND GETTING WORK-READY

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jobseekers placed so far

BUILDING SKILLS AND WORK ETHIC, ON THE JOB Jobseekers, Warren Bell and Abraham Kerindun, were placed with Sebenico during the January–June period to assist with building internal fencing for Ergon Energy’s accommodation quarters. Both jobseekers have learnt to work alongside experienced tradesmen and have already built a strong rapport with the existing Sebenico team. We hope that this may lead to further employment opportunities with Sebenico in the future.

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remained in their jobs 13 weeks later

65

have remained in their jobs for over 26 weeks

MOVING INTO WORK

• Jobseeker, Sally Yunkaporta, is currently employed with Apunipima as a domestic cleaner. She is enjoying working with the Apunipima team and has transitioned into full-time employment very well. We wish Sally all the best. • Jobseeker, Tracy Wolmby, was recently placed in part-time work with the Aurukun Home and Community Care centre. She is currently assisting with activities for the elders at the Centre and is so far enjoying the work. • Jobseeker, Janet Landis, recently secured employment with the Koolkan Child Care Centre in Aurukun. She is employed as a Childcare Assistant and is enjoying the position already— particularly being able to work with children. • Aurukun Jobseeker, Blanche Kowearpta, commenced employment as a Cleaner with Goodline in Weipa during the January–June period.

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cape york enterprises Cape York Enterprises creates Indigenous-owned and controlled enterprises of scale in order to deliver economic development and employment outcomes for Cape York people. We undertake three primary activities: 1. Originate, develop and grow portfolio businesses that are at least initially wholly owned by Cape York Partnership and that pursue our economic objectives, namely: i) 100% Indigenous ownership; ii) minimum 75% Indigenous employment; iii) achieve an acceptable return on capital; iv) establish commercial relationships with Traditional Owners. 2. Incubate Indigenous businesses owned by third parties. 3. Provide corporate advisory services to other Indigenous organisations.

OUR PEOPLE Cape York Enterprises employs two non-Indigenous staff who work to support and nurture Indigenous-owned and led businesses. We also receive support from long-term secondees through Jawun’s secondment programme. This provides an average of two additional full-time equivalent resources. Cape York Enterprises’ strategy is to provide the support needed to help Indigenous businesses grow opportunities for Indigenous employment and economic participation. Across all of its services, Cape York Enterprises has so far supported the maintenance or creation of approximately 50 Indigenous jobs.

Across all of its services, Cape York Enterprises has so far supported the maintenance or creation of approximately 50 Indigenous jobs.

HOW DOES CAPE YORK ENTERPRISES BUILD ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES ON CAPE YORK? INDIGENOUS PORTFOLIO BUSINESSES To date, Cape York Enterprises has established and operates three Indigenous portfolio businesses: Cape York Timber, Cape York Employment and Bama Services (these businesses are reported against separately in other sections of this Report.) Cape York Enterprises also continues to consider opportunities for additional portfolio businesses that can generate further economic opportunities for Cape York’s Indigenous peoples including in the primary- and secondary-production, tourism, environmental, privateinfrastructure and contracting industries. Cape York Enterprises’ portfolio businesses pursue our enterprise objectives of: -----

100% Indigenous ownership minimum 75% Indigenous employment achieving acceptable returns on capital establishing commercial relationships with Traditional Owners.

CORPORATE ADVICE TO INDIGENOUS BUSINESSES Cape York Enterprises provides corporate advisory services to Indigenous organisations in an effort to assist them to function and operate with strong internal processes and governance.

Cape York Enterprises incubatory business, Yindilli Camping Ground, has now established a strong online presence.

Cape York Enterprises’ portfolio business, Cape York Timber, continues to increase its production, thereby enabling it to create more Indigenous employment.

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INDIGENOUS INCUBATORY BUSINESSES Cape York Enterprises provides practical business support to start-up businesses. We draw on our professional services network, internal corporate functions and also assist new Indigenous businesses to source various forms of capital. Cape York Enterprises has, so far, provided support to 11 Indigenous businesses. These include: ------

­ ynz Coffee and Food Bar, L ­Yindilli Camping Ground ­Iron Gate Films ­Wild Barra swimwear ­Maaramaka Walkabout Tours and Campgrounds, and more.

Lynesse Ludwick’s business, Lynz Coffee and Food Bar in Hope Vale, continues to grow with support from Cape York Enterprises.


OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF CAPE YORK ENTERPRISES’ WORK INCREASING INDIGENOUS EMPLOYMENT

50 Indigenous people are employed

across all of Cape York Enterprises portfolio businesses, as well as the businesses to which it provides incubatory and advisory support. Through improved employment opportunities, individuals and whole communities experience economic and social multiplier effects.

INDIGENOUS BUSINESSES ARE GETTING NOTICED Kuku Yalanji Elder and Buru Traditional Owner, CJ Fisher, sought advice from Cape York Enterprises to help establish a marketing strategy for his business, Yindilli Camping Ground, located west of Wujal Wujal. Yindilli also offers rainforest and cultural site tours, which both provide unique insight into CJ’s traditional lands, dreamtime stories, bush tucker and sites of cultural significance. As a result of Cape York Enterprises’ support, Yindilli now has a strong online presence and is listed in a number of leading tourist guides and brochures for the local area. Cape York Enterprises also assisted in designing and creating a series of brochures for Yindilli, which will help to spread the word about this great business even further.

INDIGENOUS-LED ECONOMIC SUCCESS: LEADING THE WAY FOR CULTURAL TOURISM Cape York Enterprises incubatory business, Maaramaka Walkabout Tours and Campgrounds, is run by Gerald and Irene Hammett of Hope Vale. The couple launched their business in 2010, naming it after a significant local landmark. “Maaramaka is the Indigenous name for the curtain fig tree,” said Irene. “There are significant stories around that tree—all Bama people have this story...” Through their business, Gerald and Irene have an opportunity to share their intimate knowledge of the local culture, history and land. Gerald and Irene also have an intimate knowledge of the local rainforest. As Gerald explained, “I worked with the botanist, Bernie Highland, and picked up how to identify plants… I had a really good working life in forestry and met lots of different characters. I taught a lot of university students—we had an exchange of learning. Aboriginal Elders working in the rainforest helped out. We used to sit around at night talking about trees. I knew all the botanical names.” Recently, Maaramaka has focused on organising tours for large groups of cruise liner passengers from Cooktown. Overall, business is going well; Gerald and Irene continue to work hard. SECURING THE HOPE VALE ARTS AND CULTURAL CENTRE’S FUTURE The Hope Vale Art and Cultural Centre is a well-established community hub for local artists, promoting local art, dance and culture. Although the Centre has operated for some seven years now, its funding model was recently disrupted and thus, Cape York Enterprises has been involved in supporting it to identify new funding sources and enhance internal management processes. These efforts seek to ensure the Centre has a secure and stable future as a key economic hub and can continue to provide an avenue for sustainable income for local artists.

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YARRABAH’S NEWEST INDIGENOUS-OWNED AND LED CAFÉ Suzanne Andrews of Yarrabah recently received support from Cape York Enterprises to get her Yarrabah café, YarriCino, up and running. She has now been operating for around three months and has already employed three local staff members. We wish Suzanne all the best with her business into the future.


bama services Bama Services is a leading Indigenous building and landscaping business, successfully delivering projects across Queensland. Our mission is to give Indigenous people the capability to participate in the real economy, thereby empowering them to be active agents in their own development. At Bama Services, we: • employ motivated, fit young Indigenous people with an interest in attaining or completing a trade qualification in landscaping, building, or civil construction • support and assist employees to complete their relevant trade qualifications • employ an administration and support team, comprising mainly of Indigenous men and women from Cape York • offer a multidisciplinary Support and Wellbeing Programme for our employees as a means of assisting them to reach their personal and professional goals.

OUR PEOPLE

26 permanent staff are currently employed by Bama Services, of which 21 (81%)

identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander. We employ a further 18 casual staff, of which 15 (83%) identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander. Two non-Indigenous and three Indigenous staff ceased employment during the reporting period. All of these employees have obtained employment with other companies.

18 (69%) of our permanent Indigenous staff had been employed with us for more than 12 months by the end of June; 21 (81%) have been employed with us for over six months.

Since it was established in 2010, Bama Services has employed and supported over 140 Indigenous employees.

HOW DOES BAMA SERVICES ASSIST EMPLOYEES TO BUILD BRIGHT FUTURES? BUILDING GREAT PROJECTS Bama Services has completed hundreds of large- and smallscale projects. Our capacity includes landscaping, facilities maintenance, construction, civil works, and specialised jobs. Between January–June, Bama Services has continued to increase its competitiveness in the local and greater Queensland markets. For example, we have completed a number of significant projects, including: Julatten Child Care, Munro Martin Park, newly built houses on Mabuiag Island, the Chinese Gardens, and a portion of the Peninsular Development Road. By ensuring our commercial success, we can continue to employ and support an increasing number of Indigenous men and women, as well as give them top-quality work experience to assist them in their future careers.

EMPLOYEE CAREER DEVELOPMENT, EDUCATION AND TRAINING Certificate III apprenticeships and Certificate IV qualifications are offered through our Career Development, Education and Training Programme to individuals who are committed to building a career with Bama Services. We assist employees to develop career plans and identify learning and development opportunities. Of our 26 permanent employees, four (15%) have successfully obtained qualifications since the start of 2016. By the end of June, a further 13 (50%) of Bama's employees were working towards at least one qualification. In 2016 so far, four staff are undertaking a Certificate III in Parks and Gardens, four are undertaking a Certificate III in Carpentry, two are undertaking a Certificate III in Landscape Construction, and three are undertaking a Certificate IV in either Project Management, Horticulture or Community Services. REWARD AND RECOGNTION As a way of acknowledging excellence at Bama Services, we host quarterly Pride Awards. To win, employees must display excellence in areas of Pride of Person, Pride of Plant and Pride of Place. The winners for the January–March Pride Awards were Kyle Schuh, Luke Woibo and James Crawford. In the April–June quarter the winners were Peter Romano, James Crawford and Gerald Bindoraho. Congratulations to these high-achieving staff. We also give two annual awards, which will be presented later in the year.

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TOP: Proud Bama employees, Justin Banu, Gerald Bindoraho and John Nicholson MIDDLE & BOTTOM: James Crawford and Luke Woibo accepting their Pride awards. Congratulations to all of our Pride Award winners.


MULTIDISCIPLINARY HEALTH AND WELLBEING SUPPORT Some of our employees have grown up in circumstances of disadvantage and, as a result, experience barriers to successful employment. Bama Services provides a comprehensive support system to help all staff to thrive and realise their personal and professional potential. The Support and Wellbeing Programme (SWP) is led by the SWP team. All staff members who participate are offered individual case management in areas of health, wellbeing, housing, financial management, legal issues, family relationships, employment issues, career development, education and training. When issues are identified, participants are offered access to external multidisciplinary service providers. In addition, group education sessions are offered on a weekly basis. Some of our standout activities during the January–June period have included sessions regarding Cultural Awareness and Leadership, Health (such as education on sugar content in food and diabetes), Deadly Runners Program and injury prevention. We also hosted the film crew from Black Fella Films. In addition, we are up-skilling our internal mentors by partnering with the Cape York Leaders Program. This partnership has been instrumental in providing leadership and mentoring training to select members of our staff. These mentors will be providing workplace support to new staff as part of a Workplace Buddy Programme.

Our employees come together weekly as a group to participate in education sessions. These sessions seek to promote the overall health, wellbeing and happiness of our staff; they’re also a lot of fun.

POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF BAMA SERVICES HOW DOES BAMA SERVICES CAUSE POSITIVE CHANGE?

All Bama employees are offered access to our multidisciplinary health and wellbeing model and undertake training to gain qualifications

Improved health and wellbeing

Improved workrelated skills and experience

Improved ability to enjoy continued employment and long-term careers

OUR STAFF ARE IMPROVING THEIR WORK SKILLS AND GAINING PROMOTIONS Over the past six months we are pleased to report that several staff have been promoted, provided with career development opportunities and nominated for awards. LUKE’S STORY Luke Woibo commenced with Bama Services just over two years ago. He travelled from Hope Vale and commenced as an Apprentice enrolled in Landscape Construction, Certificate III. Generally, an Apprenticeship of this nature takes three years to complete. Luke applied himself and completed it in two years. He received accolades from his Manager and TAFE Trainer, such that he was nominated for the Queensland Training Awards as Apprentice of the Year 2016. He made it into the final five for the Region. Recently, Luke has been promoted to Leading Hand and is in charge of a small team. He is soon to enrol in Landscape Construction, Certificate IV. It is expected that he will be promoted to Supervisor upon completion of this qualification. He has a strong work ethic and is an excellent mentor to our younger staff. JONO’S STORY Jono Coker has been with Bama Services since its inception in 2010. He has worked tirelessly for the organisation and has mentored many young Indigenous employees, transitioning them from unskilled and inexperienced to qualified and productive. Many of our employees come from backgrounds of extreme disadvantage, thus mentoring and support are essential to their success. Jono is an excellent role model and was recently promoted to General Manager of Landscaping. He is the first Indigenous person to be appointed to the Executive Leadership Team (ELT). We have another two Indigenous staff that will join him in the next few months. Once this occurs, we will have achieved 60 per cent Indigenous representation in the ELT.

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cape york timber Established in 2013, Cape York Timber (CYT) is an Indigenous business that produces high-quality sustainable Australian hardwood and provides Indigenous employment and training. CYT’s key goals are to build: • a sustainable and profitable Indigenous-owned and controlled business • a workforce that comprises at least 75 per cent Indigenous people • a new Indigenous-led and controlled industry on Cape York that enables Traditional Owners to productively utilise the natural forestry assets on their land. CYT sustainably and selectively harvests hardwood from Indigenous-owned land across Cape York and operates a commercial timber mill in Cooktown. CYT is the only commercial-scale hardwood sawmill in Far North Queensland and is the only Indigenous-owned timber business in the whole of Queensland. We operate under a sustainable harvesting methodology, guided by best practice. CYT sells finished, high-quality timber products into the Queensland building market, primarily architectural timber for residential construction.

OUR EMPLOYEES

8 staff are currently employed by CYT of which 6 (75%) identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander. Most (67%) of our Indigenous employees are from the Cape York Welfare Reform communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale or Mossman Gorge; the rest come from other parts of Cape York.

HOW DOES CYT BUILD ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR CAPE YORK? SOURCING HIGH-QUALITY TIMBER CYT works with Traditional Owners to reach harvesting agreements that are mutually beneficial. In this regard, CYT creates economic development opportunities for Cape York’s Aboriginal people. Since it began its operations, CYT has paid substantial timber royalties to Aboriginal Land Trusts for access to high-quality, sustainable timber, thereby generating a new income stream for land trusts, some of which have very few other income streams. Where possible, CYT also encourages and promotes timber-harvesting opportunities for Traditional Owners. Cape York is home to a vast quantity of durable, aesthetic and merchantable timber species. The uniqueness of these timber species is an opportunity to develop a Cape York specific timber brand. However to do this, CYT needs to first develop awareness and make these species available to the timber market.

EMPLOYEE CAREER DEVELOPMENT, EDUCATION AND TRAINING Many of CYT’s staff members have had difficult backgrounds, including long periods of unemployment and/or other life challenges. To this end, CYT provides multidisciplinary support for its staff in order to improve employee wellbeing, performance and retention. Although none of CYT's staff had previous experience in the timber industry, many now hold key operational positions and have gained work experience at some of the industry’s leading facilities.

HOW DOES CYT BUILD ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR CAPE YORK? SOURCING HIGH-QUALITY TIMBER CYT is one of very few Indigenous-owned production businesses in Cape York that also provides employment opportunities for Indigenous workers. At the end of June, CYT boasted six Indigenous employees from Cape York. Our average retention rate for these staff is 13 months. Our longest serving member has been with us now for 31 months, while our newest member has been with us since May 2016—one month, so far.

Cape York Timber staff, Jaydon (Timber Stacker), Quinton (Breakdown Operator), Lyle (Leading Hand). , Ashley (Timber Stacker), and Graham (Mill and Log Yard).

LAND COMMERCIALISATION OPPORTUNITIES FOR TRADITIONAL OWNERS Although the natural assets of Traditional Owners’ land hold significant potential value, industries need to be created in order to provide opportunities for Cape York’s Aboriginal peoples to tap into that value. In this regard, CYT assists Traditional Owners with the commercialisation of their land (via timber royalties) and seeks to create a culture of active forestry management. To date, CYT has consulted and negotiated with five Indigenous Traditional Owners about active forestry management. So far, three (60%) of these negotiations have resulted in the creation of commercial opportunities for Traditional Owners. In addition to timber harvesting, CYT also has a long-term vision to assist Traditional Owners and others to identify further opportunities to benefit from other soft commodities and local production industries.

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aurukun youth orbiting project Youth disengagement from education and employment is an ongoing issue in Aurukun, and is often identified by community members as being a key contributor to community unrest. This is a legacy of poor primary-school attendance, limited literacy and numeracy skills, entrenched social disadvantage and few opportunities for local employment. The Aurukun Youth Orbiting Project assists Aurukun’s disengaged youth to build their capabilities to choose lives they have reason to value. It targets youth who have not and will not otherwise take up alternative opportunities for engagement through existing secondary education and employment opportunities. It does so by facilitating their engagement in full-time employment through the following process: 1. A two-week induction, including meetings with the prospective participant, their parents, other family and/or carers to ensure all are aware of the details of the Project (e.g. that it involves time away from home and a strong commitment). 2. Participants and their parents, family and/or carers choose whether or not to commit to the Project; commitment requires them to sign a formal contract, indicating their agreement to participate and abide by the Project rules. 3. When ready, youth orbit into supported training (e.g. horsemanship, rural operations) and employment in meatworks and/ or fruit picking for periods of up to two years. Throughout the process, youth are supported through intensive case management. They are also given practical assistance with transportation, accommodation and work equipment.

MEMBERSHIP TOTAL MEMBERS

MEMBERS’ HISTORIES OF DISENGAGEMENT

Orbiting Project by the end of June. Most (88%) were from Aurukun, while one (12%) was from Coen. They are aged between 15 and 17 years.

with other training or employment, when they joined the Project.

8 individuals had participated in the Aurukun Youth

100% of our members were not attending school, nor were engaged 88% of our members had been disengaged from school, training and work for three to four years prior to joining the Project.

HOW DOES THE AURUKUN YOUTH ORBITING PROJECT SUPPORT YOUTH TO RE-ENGAGE? INTENSIVE SUPPORT

ORBITING OPPORTUNITIES TO BUILD WORK AND LIFE SKILLS

Throughout their time with the Project, each member is supported by live-in mentors. These mentors build supportive relationships with participants and act as positive role models throughout the participants’ work placements.

When they are ready, participants are supported to orbit into paid work placements across Australia, including the Peterborough Abattoir in South Australia. Participants are placed for a period of at least six months and up to two years, where they board together in supported accommodation with live-in mentors. During their placements, participants learn critical life skills such as personal care, anger management and work routines. They also earn money while on the job and get a taste of what it’s like to participate in the real economy.

PREPARATORY ACTIVITIES Participants are coached and supported by Cape York Partnership staff, including mentors, for two weeks to prepare them for orbiting. This preparation phase enables our staff to set clear expectations of participants and establish initial routines, which make transition to orbiting easier.

Jarrod Ornyengaia, hard at work.

Wilson Marbendinar, printing off labels for boxes of meat.

While all participants’ parents have been incredibly supportive, Donovan Wolmby, Phyllis Yunkaporta, Maree Kalkeeyorta and Eldridge Walmbeng in particular are amongst those who have provided constant support to their boys while they have undertaken their placements.

Zantack Walmbeng and his family, seeing him off before he makes the trek to Peterborough for his work placement.

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Participants being treated during Birthdays and Christmas celebrations. Thanks to Christine (Peterborough Supervisor), who provided Christmas presents and a feast for the boys.


POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF THE AURUKUN YOUTH ORBITING PROJECT

AYOP=

confidence and sense of self worth

independence and life skills

work skills and capacity

engagement with positive life trajectories

PARTICIPANTS BUILD THEIR CONFIDENCE, WORK SKILLS AND LEARN TO WALK IN TWO WORLDS During his stay at Peterborough, Djina Jaffer boarded with existing Peterborough employee, Bridget Woods, and her family. He quickly became part of the family and went from strength to strength. “Djina lived with us for some months and became a much loved family member in that time… all activities we took part in he was included in”, said Bridget. Djina built his confidence and ended up becoming a trusted listening ear for other Project participants. “He… was a big help with the boys when we went to the farm or other outings as he would help supervise them. If any of the boys were struggling at work I would ask Djina to talk to them, as they would often express themselves to him before gaining the trust with myself to open up to me.” While employed at Peterborough, Djina put in the hard yards and developed a strong work ethic. This led to him being nominated by Bridget for a Meat Industry Training Advisory Council (MINTRAC) award—a Victorian scheme recognising outstanding performance by meat industry apprentices. Djina ended up coming Runner Up for the award and attended the awards ceremony in Melbourne in early April. This was a fantastic achievement and one that was well deserved. During his time with the Project, Djina made considerable progress in both his personal and professional life. It has been amazing to watch this young man’s confidence and skills grow and we wish him all the best for whatever the future holds. PARTICIPANTS, MENTORS AND EMPLOYEES MAKE CROSS-CULTURAL CONNECTIONS “I probably took as much if not more away from my time with the boys than they did. I learned so much about their culture and also had my eyes opened to the unfair treatment these kids have dealt with throughout their lives, with racial taunts and situations from their life in communities. I spent hours researching their community so I could gain an understanding of what they were dealing with. I am so grateful they came into my life and know now that this is an area I would like to concentrate more in.”

“We’ll spend a year with them trying to instill values and trying to help them, to bring them up… to be more independent so they… look after themselves in the future and also helping them out in other ways of life… so that they can be successful in their futures and be an influence to their peers and to their communities. And also, at the same time, [we are] learning from them as we are here on a Visa that is cross-cultural as well; it is both ways—it is give and take.”

— BRIDGET WOODS, PETERBOROUGH EMPLOYEE

—TODUADUA RATACINAOVALASI, PROJECT MENTOR

Wilson Marbendinar, Jarrod Ornyengaia, Zantack Walmbeng, Jack Wolmby and Rayden Kalkeeyorta participate in Army cadet training each Monday evening, after work.

Rayden Kalkeeyorta cleaning up at Peterborough.

Jarrod Ornyengaia from Archer River practices his archery skills during a weekend away.

Jack, showing off his tidy room at the Peterborough dormitory.

Fijian Supervisors, Seme Cagilaba and Toduadua Ratacinaovalasi, often take participants to a weekend campsite, roughly 40km outside of Peterborough. There, participants wind down from the week’s work and have time for some fun—like making music and sharing good meals.

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Part of a day’s work.


land reform and home ownership As part of its broader agenda, the Cape York Welfare Reform initiative is working to support Cape York communities to reduce their complete dependence on the Indigenous social housing welfare model, which advertently promotes and supports passivity, and into real economic engagement and home ownership. Currently, no individual or family owns their home on Indigenous land on Cape York or elsewhere on Indigenous land in Queensland in a form and with the rights and responsibilities that both Indigenous and non-Indigenous Queenslanders living on non-Indigenous land have long taken for granted. The Cape York Institute seeks to support Indigenous people to have choice for their housing and the opportunity to use their land as an asset. It does so by advocating for land reform and for investment in land administration systems and also by building the capacity of Indigenous trustees and beneficiaries to develop their own planning tools and engage with property markets and individual ownership. It is the Institute’s aspiration that, in the long term, social housing will only be needed to support a minority of families, as people choose to move out of welfare housing into home ownership. Our work seeks to achieve this by: • supporting local aspirations for home ownership and building the capacity of community members and leaders so that they can collaboratively address land tenure, native title and planning issues to achieve home ownership on their land • working closely with Traditional Owners, trustees, mainstream banks, valuers and all levels of government to recognise and overcome deeply-entrenched structural barriers and policies affecting Indigenous land and the strong aspirations that local people have for home ownership and economic development. There is some good progress now emerging through the Welfare Reform initiative and through our partnership with the Queensland Government, but there is still a long journey and investment required in land reform to catch up to the mainstream home ownership benchmarks of the 70 per cent home ownership rate enjoyed by non-Indigenous Australians, or even the 29 per cent home ownership rate enjoyed by Indigenous Australians on non-Indigenous land.

SCOPE OF OUR WORK COMMUNITIES WE WORK WITH We work predominantly with the four Cape York Welfare Reform communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge. During 2015–16, our efforts have been focused primarily on overcoming land tenure barriers in Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge to enable home ownership within these very different, in terms of land tenure, communities. The Institute has also given support to the Empowered Communities initiative by supporting families in Kowanyama and Lockhart River to settle their historical Katter lease interests. The Institute is working closely with Traditional Owners, Trustees, mainstream banks and government at all levels to settle and purse collective objectives for enabling local aspirations for home ownership and other economic development opportunities.

HOW DOES THE INSTITUTE SUPPORT LAND REFORM AND HOME OWNERSHIP OUTCOMES? SUPPORTING TRADITIONAL OWNERS AND TRUSTEES During January–June, the Institute has worked closely with the Congress of Clans in Hope Vale to support its work to offer home ownership choices to 38 families living on rural residential blocks around Hope Vale and creating the option for new builds on the blocks. In Mossman Gorge, the Institute is supporting Bamanga Bubu Ngadimunku Inc. (BBN) to develop home ownership options for families in Mossman Gorge. We have also worked with both Jabalbina and BBN to settle long-outstanding land transfer issues. Finally, the Institute has provided advice and support, upon request, to other trustees, including in Lockhart River, the Northern Peninsula Area and Torres Strait.

INFLUENCING GOVERNMENT POLICY AND ENAGAGEMENT WITH THE REAL ECONOMY The Institute works closely with all tiers of government to seek land reform and home ownership outcomes for Cape York. Between January–June, the Institute has been working in partnership with the Queensland Government to progress its Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge pilot projects (see right) and has also been involved in State-wide policy discussions about investment in land reform and land administration. The Institute has also supported Congress to engage with St. George Bank and Herron Todd White valuers to help Congress gauge the potential market value of its land under different leasing scenarios.

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HOPE VALE AND MOSSMAN GORGE PILOT PROJECTS In January 2016, the Institute began a pilot project to support local trustees to address land reform and home ownership in Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge. The Institute has engaged with trustees, community members, mainstream banks and government and has made significant progress on laying the foundations for designing and implementing home ownership outcomes in the months and years to come. In Hope Vale, it is likely that there will be multiple successful and viable home ownership outcomes by early 2017.


OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF THE INSTITUTE’S WORK The Institute has been leading Queensland- and Australia-wide thinking on land reform and Indigenous home ownership for many years through the Welfare Reform initiative. Our ongoing relationships and engagement with community members, trustees, Traditional Owners and governments at all levels have strengthened during this time. Many elements of reform on Cape York and for State-wide policy in the past nine years have been led by the Cape York Institute and Cape York Indigenous leaders. Key outcomes from this work during the period January–June 2016 are outlined below. LED THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN MOU FOR LAND REFORM AND HOME OWNERSHIP

CREATED HOME OWNERSHIP CHOICES IN MOSSMAN GORGE

The Institute led the development and signing of an MOU for land reform and home ownership between the Hope Vale Congress of Clans and the Queensland Department of Housing and Public Works. The MOU was signed in March and multiple streams of work are now progressing, with Institute staff providing intensive support to Congress and Government to achieve the objectives of the MOU. This includes addressing native title, resolving planning scheme issues and building a viable and sustainable continuum from welfare housing to home ownership, including the option for private rentals for existing houses. This work will have many spill overs for creating a model approach and is already influencing approaches in other communities.

The Institute worked closely with BBN in Mossman Gorge to adapt a Community Land Trust model to create home ownership choices for local people living in Mossman Gorge. This model will be able to be implemented as soon as land transfer issues are resolved for the Indigenous Reserve (lot 152). The Institute is providing ongoing support to BBN, Jabalbina and the Queensland Government to settle this transfer issue to the mutual benefit of all parties.

SUPPORTED KOWANYAMA AND LOCKHART RIVER TRUSTEES AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS TO SETTLE ISSUES AROUND EXISTING KATTER LEASES The Institute provided support to trustees and community members in Kowanyama and Lockhart River, upon request through the Empowered Communities initiative, to settle issues surrounding existing Katter lease interests. The Institute also worked with leaseholders to build their capacity to take on home ownership responsibilities.

SUPPORTED TRADITIONAL OWNERS TO IMPROVE THE SCOPE AND EFFECTIVENESS OF INDIGENOUS LAND-USE AGREEMENTS The Institute worked with Traditional Owners, through the Cape York Land Council, to improve the scope, effectiveness and efficiency of Indigenous Land Use Agreements (ILUAs), which are necessary to enable and support the ability of trustees to create viable and sustainable home ownership and economic development opportunities for individuals and families. The current ILUA being developed with the Hope Vale Congress of Clans will, for the first time, help to create opportunities for the establishment of fully tradable interests for existing houses, as well as create lots for new houses to support home ownership.

SUPPORTED CAPE YORK FAMILIES TO IMPROVE THEIR READINESS FOR HOME OWNERSHIP The Institute worked with a senior Lending Manager from Westpac from January to May (through the Jawun network) to support Cape York families to assess and improve their financial capacity to take up mortgages and apply mainstream bank valuations for home ownership leases in Hope Vale. This has led to an ongoing working partnership between the Congress of Clans, the Institute and St. George Bank. This work has been critical in guiding current land-reform work and building the capacity of Congress and local families to have real choice and become homeowners in the near future.

Many people at Hope Vale take real pride in their house. Congress wants to give people an opportunity for home ownership which creates wealth for them.

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39


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individual and family development It is individuals and families, not communities, who are the key agents of change in the move from passive welfare to self-reliance and economic freedom. Families and children are at the heart of our work. Our touchstone is our partnership with

individuals,

families

and

communities as they strive for lives of value, freedom and prosperity. We believe in the potential of all people. We place our children’s rights to a better future at the forefront. We recognise that we can’t make change happen for people; but we can support, inspire, and assist people to learn and grow so they can do it themselves.

41


mpower MPower supports individuals and families to manage their money by:

JOURNEY

• • • •

enabling access to internet and phone banking facilities, with or without support from staff helping members to overcome everyday financial struggles through ongoing family support equipping members with knowledge and skills around budgeting, debt reduction, banking, wealth creation and bill payments providing support and advice around smart purchasing options, as well as understanding terms and conditions of purchase.

Those aged 15+ years sign up to MPower; they come to the O-Hub to receive support and training

Members attend MPower sessions and use the selfservice area to learn financial literacy skills and improve their financial behaviours

Members improve their financial literacy…

…which translates into improved financial behaviours; members become stronger money managers.

MPower is a Cape York Welfare Reform initiative and operates out of the O-Hubs in the four communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge.

MEMBERSHIP

TOTAL MPOWER MEMBERS 2013 TO 2016

TOTAL MEMBERS

1000

1,916 people had become MPower members at some point by the end of June, which represents about 89% of all adults

800

34% of members who have joined since July 2013 have

0

600 400

(15+ years) living in the four Welfare Reform communities.1

200 JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

2013

been self- or family/friend-referred: people are spreading the good word about the help that MPower can give.

Aurukun

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

2014

Coen

JUL–DEC

2015

Hope Vale

JAN–JUN

2016

Mossman Gorge

HOW DOES MPOWER HELP MEMBERS TO IMPROVE THEIR FINANCIAL LITERACY? INTERNET AND PHONE BANKING, SELF-SERVICE AREA Members can come to the O-Hub at any time to use the selfservice area for internet and phone banking. O-Hub staff members are always available to assist and encourage members to build their internet and phone banking skills.

724 members used the self-service area 5,534

times between January–June. This is only slightly fewer than the average 5,806 sessions per six-monthly period between January 2014 and December 2015.

ONGOING FINANCIAL LITERACY SUPPORT Members can build their financial literacy through a range of ongoing support sessions:

TOTAL MPOWER SESSIONS2 JAN - JUN 2016

General Support sessions assist members with general advice around basic financial matters. Little ‘a’ sessions assist members to overcome specific and minor financial problems (e.g. paying a bill) to prevent them from growing into larger issues. Simple Budget sessions teach members the importance of budgeting, and take them through the basics of drafting a budget for themselves. Money Management Tools (MMTs) teach members about banking, budgeting, debt reduction, internet and phone banking, loans, payments and wealth creation.

300

[Avg:318]

106 [Avg:1 35

83

8] [Avg:31

6 15vg:113] [A

[Avg:1103]

403

[Avg:336]

Wise Buys supports members to get value for money when purchasing household goods and services. Coaching consists of a series of structured sessions covering all aspects of money management and linking people with other opportunities (e.g. SET, POP etc.) to help them build strong financial literacy and improve other outcomes.

664

]

General Support

MMT

Little ‘a’

Wise Buys

Simple Budget

Coaching

1 Based on the percentage population growth across the four Welfare Reform communities between 2006–11 (as per Census data), and applying it as an annual rate, we estimate that the population of community members aged 15+ years has reached 2,153 in 2016. 2 Avg=Average number of sessions per six-monthly period between January 2014–December 2015.

42


POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF MPOWER ON COMMUNITY MEMBERS

MPOWER=

financial literacy

financial behaviours

responsible money management; economic participation

MPOWER IMPROVES FINANCIAL LITERACY We asked our staff to objectively rate a sample of our MPower members against financial literacy and behaviour criteria. These individuals had been members of MPower for an average of 3.6 years. Some of their results are illustrated below.

86%

of MPower members we surveyed (n=107) know how much they get paid; 95% understand where their money comes from

(n=119); 62% understood the concept of a budget either well, very well or extremely well (n=72).

Q. Does the partner know how much they get paid? (n=124) 100 80 60 40 20 0

Q. Rate the partner’s understanding of where their money comes from (n=125) 100 80 60 40 20 0

67 40

17 No

Sometimes

Yes

6

0

Very limited

Somewhat limited

50

37

32

Very good

Good

Extremely good

IMPROVED FINANCIAL LITERACY TRANSLATES INTO BETTER FINANCIAL BEHAVIOURS, BUT THIS TAKES TIME…

68%

(n=79) of MPower members we surveyed were either good, very good or extremely good at paying their bills on time over the past month; 51% (n=62) were aware of what they had spent over the past month.

Q. During the past month, how good has the partner been at paying their bills on time? (n=116)

54

60

27

40 20 0

20

10 Very limited

Somewhat limited

Good

Very good

5 Extremely good

Q. How good is the partner’s awareness about what they have spent over the last month? (n=122) 50 40 30 20 10 0

47

45

15

13

Very limited

Somewhat limited

Good

2

Very good

Extremely good

MPOWER = INDEPENDENT MONEY MANAGEMENT

36% of all MPower self-service

sessions during January–June were unassisted: these members were able to independently manage their money using MPower.

Unassisted

UNASSISTED AND ASSISTED SESSIONS AS A PROPORTION (%) OF TOTAL SESSIONS, 2011 TO 2016

Assisted

100% 80%

64%

60% 40%

36%

20% 0%

JUL–DEC

2011

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2012

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2013

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2014

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2015

JAN–JUN

2016

MPOWER SUPPORTS MEMBERS TO DREAM BIG AND SET GOALS

“I am proud that I have money in the bank for my new house.”

Thanks to MPower, Loretta Spratt can now afford to dream big, and turn those dreams into reality. Loretta, who works at the Mossman Gorge nursery, is on the verge of achieving her biggest dream—buying a house. “My dream is to get a[n] IBA loan for my new house,” she said. “I have the money saved, now I just have to sit with you [MPower] guys and complete the IBA paperwork.” Before she signed up for MPower in 2011, Loretta would never have dreamed that she could one day buy her own home. “I was always stressed and in debt,” she said. “When bills came, I never had the money to pay them.” MPower assisted Loretta by “teaching me how to save better”. Now her financial situation is firmly under control.

Loretta Spratt was stressed and in debt; now she’s on top of her bills and dreaming of home ownership.

“Money is there all the time when I need it,” she said. “Rent and electricity and car and pet… [bills] are all sorted now. I can pay them.” And what’s more … “I learned that now I have money in the bank I can save for other things.” Loretta, who is also a member of POP, Wise Buys, SET and Strong Families, is full of praise for the staff at the O-Hub. “You guys have been helping me along the way,” she said. “Thanks for getting me this far.”

43


strong families Strong Families encourages and promotes positive parenting by: • creating opportunities for families to positively engage with each other and other community members • equipping parents and carers with the knowledge and skills they need to effectively care for their children through positive parenting sessions • supporting families in everyday parenting struggles through ongoing family support

JOURNEY

• assisting families to create happy and healthy homes for their children.

Parents, carers and kin become Strong Families members

They attend Strong Families sessions and learn positive parenting skills

They consistently apply these skills in their homes and create nurturing environments for their children

Children thrive in happy, healthy family homes

More broadly, Strong Families seeks to lift entrenched dysfunction that results in the over-representation of Cape children in the Child Welfare system by restoring social norms around healthy, nurturing and loving homes. Strong Families is a Cape York Welfare Reform initiative and operates out of the O-Hubs in the four communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge.

MEMBERSHIP

TOTAL STRONG FAMILIES MEMBERS 2013 TO 2016

TOTAL MEMBERS

200

424 people had become Strong Families members at some point by the end of June, which represents about 20% of all

150 100

adults (15+ years) living in the Welfare Reform communities.1

50

PARTICIPATION

0

236 unique people accessed Strong Families between January–

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

2013

June, Because members and non-members can participate, Strong Families also touches those who are not formally signed up.

Aurukun

JUL–DEC

2014

Coen

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2015

Hope Vale

JAN–JUN

2016

Mossman Gorge

HOW DOES STRONG FAMILIES HELP PARENTS AND CARERS? ENGAGEMENT

FAMILY SUPPORT

encourage members and non-members to engage with the Program, have discussions about positive parenting in the community, and restore social norms around happy, healthy families.

activities during January–June to provide members with emotional and practical support around daily parenting and family matters, including referrals to other services, and support in dealing with other services (e.g. Child Safety).

386 activities between January–June to

POSITIVE PARENTING SESSIONS

57

Triple P sessions between January– June to teach positive parenting skills and assist members to implement these skills in their homes. This includes supporting members to address specific behavioural and other problems.

HOME PRIDE

318

33

activities between January– June to support families to create happy and healthy homes for children, including healthy cooking, home hygiene, and DIY home improvement projects.

TOTAL STRONG FAMILIES ACTIVITIES 2013 TO 2016 500 400 300 200 100 0

JAN–JUN

2013

Aurukun

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

Coen

2014

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

Hope Vale

2015

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

2016

Mossman Gorge

1 Based on the percentage population growth across the four Welfare Reform communities from 2006–11 (as per Census data), and applying it as an annual rate, we estimate that the population of community members aged 15+ years has reached 2,153 in 2016.

44


POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF STRONG FAMILIES

STRONG FAMILIES

=

positive parenting knowledge

positive parenting skills and techniques

use of positive parenting at home

happy and healthy children and families

PARENTS AND CARERS ARE BUILDING THEIR SKILLS AND CONFIDENCE1 Members who actively engage with Strong Families consistently tell us that they take away the tools they need to be more confident in managing their children’s problem behaviours. The outcomes listed below show how these members are beginning to learn the skills they need to become the best parents they can be. These stories also demonstrate that many of our members who are achieving positive outcomes do so despite facing many serious challenges and obstacles. KIDS ARE GOING TO SCHOOL One member, who struggles with substance abuse issues, has had trouble getting their child to attend school. They came to Strong Families seeking assistance with this ongoing concern.

The member has attended Strong Families and learned how to communicate more effectively with their children. They are also working on establishing boundaries, including defining appropriate and inappropriate behaviours. The partner is now addressing their own substance abuse, having recognised the impact it is having on their children. As a result, they are better able to get their children off to school in the mornings.

CHILDREN’S BEHAVIOUR IS IMPROVING One member was referred to Strong Families by the Family Responsibilities Commission: their children were not attending school.

The partner has learned a variety of strategies through Strong Families, including instigating a household planner to chart responsibilities for different household members. The partner’s children have reacted well to the chart and the partner is already happy with the results. The partner has also learned the importance of role modelling good behaviour to their children and is working hard to encourage other members of their family to do the same.

PARENTS/CARERS ARE LESS STRESSED One member is a full-time carer for their grandchildren and came to Strong Families to learn methods of dealing with problematic behaviours. The carer was very stressed and needed assistance.

The partner has attended a number of Strong Families sessions and spoken to staff about the types of problematic behaviours displayed by their grandchildren. They learned about giving clear instructions, handling situations in a calm manner, and giving positive reinforcement for good behaviour. The partner still has some concerns about their grandchildren teasing one another, but things have already improved dramatically for the family.

STRONG FAMILIES HELPS ALL GENERATIONS TO ‘PULL ONE WAY AND ALL TOGETHER’ HOW TO LET GO “I want to be a good grandparent” Sometimes, being strong means stepping back. For Rosie Bulmer, whose home is brimming with children and grandchildren—with another two new arrivals welcomed last December and in early January—being strong means allowing her children to take responsibility for raising their own children. It is easy for family roles to become blurred when several generations live together. Rosie and her husband, Bernard, share their home with daughter, Charlene, 27, and her two children, Isiah, seven and Ataya, five, as well as their elder son, Bernard and his partner, Kahran, both 22, who have a one-year-old son (also named Bernard). Younger son, Darby, 19, and nephew, Lance, complete the household. (The couple also has a younger daughter, Molly, 24, who lives in Laura.) When Charlene, a single mum with three children, signed up with Strong Families last September, she invited both her parents to attend sessions with her. Since then, Rosie has also signed up as a Strong Families member. “For myself, personally, I now understand my role as a grandmother: to take my hands off and let my daughter take responsibility for raising her children,” said Rosie. “I have learned the different roles between being a grandmother to my grandchildren, and a mother to my daughter.” “I am a strong woman,” added Rosie, who works for Home and Community Care (HACC) Services, delivering meals to Elders in Coen. “Working one-on-one with [Strong Families consultant] Carol, I have learned to support my daughter and different ways to build a strong family.” For Rosie, the challenge is “getting our family to pull one way and all together”. She now appreciates that communication will play a key role in helping her family achieve this goal. 1 The member stories contained in this section have been slightly altered to ensure these individuals cannot be identified.

45


pride of place Pride of Place (POP) helps families to create healthier outdoor living spaces where they can spend quality time together. POP assists by: • supporting members to undertake Backyard Blitzes (backyard renovation projects), for which members contribute money and ‘sweat equity’ labour • providing members with information about caring for their gardens and outdoor living spaces through Garden Clubs and Pop-up Visits

JOURNEY

• support wit DIY home improvement projects.

Community members sign up to POP

They increase their knowledge and skills around home maintenance

Healthier outdoor living spaces contribute to families’ wellbeing

They maintain their homes and yards; create beautiful outdoor living areas

POP is a Cape York Welfare Reform initiative and operates out of the O-Hubs in the four communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge.

MEMBERSHIP

TOTAL POP MEMBERS 2013 TO 2016

TOTAL MEMBERS

200

376 people had become POP members by the end of June, which represents about 17% of all adults (15+ years) living in

150 100

the four Welfare Reform communities.

1

50

PARTICIPATION

0

267 unique people participated in one or more POP activities

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2013

between January–June.

Aurukun

JAN–JUN

JUL–DEC

2014

Coen

JAN–JUN

Hope Vale

JUL–DEC

2015

JAN–JUN

2016

Mossman Gorge

HOW DOES POP HELP MEMBERS TO CREATE HEALTHIER OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES? ENGAGEMENT AND SKILL-BUILDING

BACKYARD RENOVATIONS

402 activities between January–June, including Garden Clubs and

38

TOTAL POP-UP VISITS 2014 TO 2016

27

Pop-up Visits, to encourage members and non-members to engage with the Programme and learn gardening skills in an interactive setting.

392

500 400 300 200

307

13 Backyard Blitzes were completed during the period. These members can now enjoy their new outdoor living spaces.

134

100 0

members and non-members worked on their Blitz projects between January–June, contributing 391.3 hours of sweat equity.

392

141 JAN–JUN

2014

JUL–DEC

JAN–JUN

2015

JUL–DEC

members are currently signed up to a complete a Backyard Blitz and have so far contributed $29,417 towards their combined target contribution of $38,000.

130 Backyard Blitzes have now been completed across

JAN–JUN

the four Welfare Reform communities, to date.

2016

POP led a Community Voluntary Project in Aurukun in May, during which POP members and staff worked together to build a garden around the existing ‘Welcome to Aurukun’ sign at the community’s road entrance. Cape York Employment also got involved and supported the completion of this project. 1 Based on the percentage population growth across the four Welfare Reform communities from 2006–11 (as per Census data), and applying it as an annual rate, we estimate that the population of community members aged 15+ years has reached 2,153 in 2016.

46


HAVE A GROW AT IT

“I want to keep my place looking nice for the future.” When Colin Peemuggina and his mother, Delma, combined their green thumbs, the results received a big “thumbs up” from the judges of the Best Garden in The Village competition. It was a pretty impressive outcome for the dynamic duo, who had no garden on their property prior to Delma joining POP in May, 2014. Twenty-eight-yearold Colin got stuck in straight away. “The [POP] enabler showed me how to do gardens and I learnt from him,” said Colin. Within the space of a year, their efforts were bearing fruit and they decided to compete in the 2015 Best Garden in The Village competition. “Because our place is looking really good,” said Colin proudly. That doesn’t mean they didn’t have to put in some extra spadework, before the competition judging. There were still lawns to be mowed, gardens to be weeded, and rubbish to be cleared. “We stayed at home for a couple of weeks to make the place nice,” said Colin. Winning the BGITV competition was a surprise, but Colin doesn’t plan to rest on his laurels now, even though soaring summer temperatures can cause even the most dedicated gardener to wilt. “Looking after gardens and mowing grass all the time—it’s hot at this time of year,” he agreed. Colin is determined to “grow the distance”. “I have learned to take pride in my place, not let it get out of control and keep on top of the maintenance,” he said. Besides, he needs to start planning for the 2016 Best Garden in The Village competition.

Coen’s annual POP Best Garden in the Village Competition was held in June and all eight entrants put in a great effort. A big congratulations to our winners, Dion Creek and Leisha Murgha, as well as our Runner Up, Rose Johnson. Congratulations also to the gardeners who took out our other categories: Most Interesting Garden— Jimmy Bero and Nikisha Missionary (and Tahnee Creek, who was Runner Up); Best Edible Garden—Kirsten Kulka (and Anita Platt, who was Runner Up).

47


48


language, culture and leadership Cape York Peninsula is widely recognised as a linguistic treasury. Our many languages are keys to some of the oldest continuous living traditions on the planet. These

languages

are

now,

however, fragile and immediately threatened. Language and culture need support to flourish within and outside of our schools. It is also critical that, while ensuring Cape York children grow up learning their language and culture, we also ensure Cape York adults do the same and build the other necessary skills they need to be strong cultural, professional, spiritual leaders.

49


pama language centre Pama Language Centre (PLC) aims to ensure the viability of the ancestral languages of Cape York Peninsula by: • working with speakers to record the linguistic and cultural detail of their ancestral languages • working with speakers to increase literacy and potential for literacy in ancestral languages through development of contemporary literature and language learning materials • working with speakers to revive the intergenerational transmission of ancestral languages • raising awareness of and support for the ancestral languages of Cape York Peninsula in the wider community.

THE ROAD TO ANCESTRAL LANGUAGE VIABILITY

Recording of languages and active corpus development with speakers begins

Linguists work with speakers to create opportunities for language transmission and promotion

Speakers engage in authorship at many levels, taking control of the future of their ancestral languages

Viability of language is assured by completion of recording and ongoing corpus development. Intergenerational transmission continues to increase.

PLC is an initiative of the Cape York Institute, established to pursue the right of all children of Indigenous nations to be fluent and literate in their ancestral languages so that they will be able to walk in two worlds with confidence, as the inheritors of their rich, living cultural heritage. PLC currently supports recording, revitalisation, revival and maintenance activities with Injinoo Ikya and Mpakwithi language nations at Bamaga, with Wik-Mungkan, Wik-Alken, Wik-Ngatharr and Wik-Ngathan language nations at Aurukun and with the Guugu Yimidhirr language nation at Hope Vale. PLC is seeking funding to enable the progressive extension of its reach to all language nations of Cape York Peninsula.

PARTICIPATION AND REACH ESTIMATED MEMBERSHIP OF LANGUAGE NATIONS CURRENTLY SERVED BY PLC

NUMBERS OF SPEAKERS AND NON-SPEAKERS DIRECTLY REACHED BY OR INVOLVED IN PLC ACTIVITIES

750 Injinoo Ikya

50 Wik-Ngatharr

20 Mpakwithi

80 Wik-Ngathan

106

1,200+ Wik-Mungkan

1,200 Guugu Yimidhirr

40+

adult

community members benefitted from the Guugu Yimidhirr literacy program, the Guugu Yimidhirr song writing and choir project, recording initiatives and the availability of language materials

50 Wik-Alken

during January–June.

3,000 Northern Peninsula Area people benefitted from the

NUMBERS OF SPEAKERS INVOLVED IN PLC ANCESTRAL LANGUAGE ACTION TEAMS

39

children at Hope Vale Primary School and

availability of the first recording of Injinoo Ikya language hymns during January–June.

speakers participating in recording, revitalisation, revival

60+ people at Aurukun benefitted from the Painted Stories

and maintenance work between January–June, including:

Workshop in April 2016 and ongoing Art Centre activities, art

12 Injinoo Ikya

and recording activities with the Women’s Centre and Men’s

15 Wik-Alken, Wik-Ngatharr, Wik Ngathan

Centre, and Home and Community Care centre-based social

12 Guugu Yimidhirr

and documentation activities with Elders.

HOW DOES THE PLC SUPPORT LANGUAGE REVITALISATION? LANGUAGE RECORDING

CORPUS EXPANSION

The PLC salvages existing language information, including

The PLC helps ancestral languages to conquer domains

linguistic detail and oral literature, so that it can be preserved

previously dominated by English via the development of new

into the future. A huge amount of linguistic detail and oral

genres, such as children’s literature, children’s songs, poetry

traditions remain to be recorded in Cape York Peninsula but

and theatre. This keeps speakers thinking and talking about

this work needs to be done quickly to keep our languages and

new ways to say things and new ways to use their beautiful

cultures rich and viable.

ancestral languages.

50


INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION AND LANGUAGE PROMOTION Intergenerational transmission is the internationally-recognised measure of language strength and language endangerment. For many Cape York Peninsula languages, parents are no longer able to speak their language fluently and confidently with their children. The PLC works to create opportunities to revive the flow of ancestral language transmission to younger generations. EXTENSION OF PLC’S SCOPE AND REACH OVER TIME JAN 2015

Guugu Yimidhirr school literacy programme (ongoing since 2012)

JAN 2016

Injinoo Ikya project in Bamaga begins

FEB 2016

FEB 2016

MAR 2016

APR 2016

MAY 2016

Wik languages projects at Aurukun begin

Painted Stories Workshop at Aurukun

Guugu Yimidhirr song-writing and choir projects begin

Development of enhanced e-book begins, expanding on primary-school based language work at Hope Vale

CD of Injinoo Ikya Hymns recorded Gudaa Bula Dyugi-dyugi Guugu Yimidhirr picture book published by PLC

JUN 2016

Mpakwithi project at Bamaga begins

POSITIVE OUTCOMES AND IMPACTS OF PLC

PLC=

increased engagement with ancestral languages (speakers are excited to have the opportunity to work with their languages)

increased accessibility of ancestral languages

increased viability of ancestral languages

an increased sense of anticipation and investment in the future

THE PLC WORKS TO CREATE A HEALTHY SPIRAL OF LANGUAGE REVITALISATION

DOCUMENTING ANCESTRAL LANGUAGES

Thorough language documentation is critical to the viability of languages. The

document

process of language documentation also has many positive ‘spin-offs’ that feed

song: a Guugu Yimidhirr Children’s Songbook

back into increased viability of the language and speech community, into individual

and a Songbook developed by Ruby Hunter

wellbeing, identity belonging, improved educational

and Archie Roach. These two projects are

aspirations and outcomes.

developing

The PLC has supported two projects to Aboriginal

languages

urgently-needed

through

materials

to

support language learning and transmission, as

well

as

providing

opportunities

Indigenous translators and writers.

2022

and beyond…

• Awareness • Expectation • Engagement with language • Engagement with other spheres • Collaborative action and responsibility • Planning for the future • Working with language inspires innovative thinking and cooperative action.

2016

51

for


INCREASING THE ACCESSIBILITY OF ANCESTRAL LANGUAGE MATERIALS TO SUPPORT INTERGENERATIONAL LANGUAGE TRANSMISSION A Guugu Yimidhirr picture book for

transmission of Guugu Yimidhirr, has also

“It’s really good with this e-book that kids can hear the story at the same time as reading the words and then can jump back to click on a word if they want to hear it again, as many times as they want. It’s great. I want to do all my books this way too. This makes it really easy to learn the language when you can see the word and hear how it sounds at the same time.”

now been developed into a read-aloud

— IRENE HAMMETT, GUUGU YIMIDHIRR AUTHOR

children was recently written by ancestrallanguage speaker and Primary Yimidhirr Language Teacher, Lillian Bowen, and published by the PLC in February 2016. This book, which is being used at Hope Vale to support the intergenerational

e-book by the author.

The new Guugu Yimidhirr picture book has already proven to be popular with students at the local Cape York Academy Primary School. Here, Lillian Bowen, reads it with one of the Cape York Academy students.

INCREASING ENGAGEMENT WITH ANCESTRAL LANGUAGES The Injinoo Ikya Ancestral Language

are now talking about recording their own

“Our CD has been played on the radio so everyone across NPA has heard our songs. Now the other language nations want to make CDs too, which is great. We are going to be pretty busy.”

songs and beginning their own ancestral

—XAVIER BARKER, AURUKUN LINGUIST

Action Team recorded a CD of Injinoo Ikya hymns in time for the Easter Service at St Michael’s Church at Bamaga. The Project has created a lot of interest in the Injinoo Ikya speech community and amongst other language groups, who

language revival projects.

PHOTO BY Gina Allain and Louise Ashmore

Adelaide and Lois Toikalkin watch their recordings about their country site, depicted in Lois’s painting My Country (hanging behind).

PHOTO BY Gina Allain and Louise Ashmore

Recording the CD at Bamaga.

PHOTO BY Gina Allain and Louise Ashmore

Younger family members assisted with documenting the painted stories.

Recording commentary and stories told by Vera Koomeeta to develop into the Painted Stories Language Books.

52


CREATING REFLECTIVE, QUIET SPACES TO SUPPORT THE RECORDING OF THE WIK-ALKEN, WIK-NGATHARR AND WIK-NGATHAN LANGUAGES The Painted Stories: Language and Art Workshop was held by the PLC, with support from the Home and Community Care centre and Wik Arts Centre in Aurukun from 22–29 April. The Workshop was held in response to ancestral language speakers’ requests for an opportunity to create a reflective and quiet space that would allow them to record stories in local ancestral languages, Wik-Alken and Wik-Ngathan, so that these could be passed on to younger generations through oral and written recordings. The Workshop enabled Elders to work with younger generations in painting aspects of their country sites, autobiographical narratives and cultural history. These

PHOTO BY Gina Allain and Louise Ashmore

paintings and stories will form the basis of language books that will include images of the artworks, the text, and learning guides for each painting, which highlights specific vocabulary. The resulting materials will be

Senior Artist, Jean Walmbeng, talks about the story place she is painting for the language books.

designed to be multi-functional, being able to be read by children to each other, used as learning materials for young children, and also kept as a record of the history of the individual families and ancestral-language-speaking Elders. They will also be able to be used in the compilation of a topical picture dictionary, and be adapted to digital

“It’s been great with plenty of people there from 7.30am–4.30pm and lots of relatives popping in to look at their work and talk about the project.” — LOUISE ASHMORE, LINGUIST, WORKSHOP FACILITATOR

media formats, such as read-aloud e-books. During the Workshop, young people also received training in the documentation of languages, including assisting with photography, operating audio-visual recording equipment and using linguistic analysis software to transcribe materials and assist with design and layout. The Workshop has already led to a number of significant outcomes for participants, and the broader community, including the following: • Creation of original paintings and stories that will form the basis of future storybooks and learning resources in Wik-Alken and Wik-Ngathan, thereby promoting the accessibility of ancestral language materials • Creation of a domain for the inter-generational transmission of language and culture materials

PHOTO BY Gina Allain and Louise Ashmore

• Recordings and documentation of language in use as people discussed their work and collaborated on narratives

Vera Koomeeta works on her large-scale painting.

• Participants developed and refined their skills in painting and documenting ancestral languages • Promotion of the artistic and cultural practices and linguistic knowledge of the diverse community of Aurukun. The Workshop has also led to further discussions

PHOTO BY Gina Allain and Louise Ashmore

around opportunities for training young people in language documentation and creating employment

Family members visited the workshop to look at the work and discuss the project.

opportunities in this area.

53


youth, skilling, excelling leaders The Cape York Leaders Program (CYLP) supports the development of current and future leaders through four phases of leadership: 1) Academic Leaders; 2) Youth Leaders; 3) Skilling Leaders; 4) Excelling Leaders. This section concerns Phases Two, Three and Four.

men

torship

academic

• Youth Leaders, aged 18–24, are assisted over 2–4 years to build the capabilities and skills necessary to gain employment, or progress within their current jobs. • Skilling Leaders, aged 25+, are supported over 2–4 years to undertake training in management, governance and personal development, allowing them to become role models and achieve their personal and professional goals.

youth

LEADERS

LEADERS

excelling

skilling

LEADERS

LEADERS

• Excelling Leaders, aged 25+, who are currently in—or aspiring to be in—leadership roles, and who are supported over 2–4 years to build or extend their leadership skills and become strong and resilient leaders ins their families, communities, and/or in a professional capacity. CYLP is supported by an Indigenous Steering Committee, populated by current and alumni members. The Steering Committee plays a central role in assisting CYLP staff to ensure the Program remains relevant and continues to provide high-quality support to Leaders.

MEMBERSHIP

27

TOTAL CYLP YOUTH, SKILLING AND EXCELLING LEADERS 2013 TO 20161

Youth, Skilling and Excelling Leaders were current members of CYLP by the end of June.

50

Each year, CYLP recruits new leaders through a competitive application process. We are currently finalising the recruitment of our new cohort of Leaders for 2016. Of this new cohort

30

(59%) Leaders are new to the Program, while

the remaining 11 (41%) were either already enrolled in their current phase, or have progressed through from other phases of the Program.

20 10

The 11 Leaders who were previously already enrolled in either their current or different phases of the Program have been

0

2013

with CYLP for 4.3 years, on average (minimum=3 years; maximum=11 years).

2014

Youth

Our Leaders have cultural connections across Cape York and Yarrabah. They orbit from these areas to attend training and support workshops in Cairns. By orbiting across the State, these Leaders are learning to walk, with confidence, in two worlds.

2015

2016

Skilling

Excelling

LEADERS’ HOME COMMUNITIES 2016 8 6

In June 2016, 44% of our Leaders were from the Cape York Welfare Reform communities of Aurukun, Coen, Hope Vale and Mossman Gorge.

6

6

5

4

1 Seis ia

1 Loc kha rt R iver

2

Old Map oon

2

Yarr aba h

Coe n

0

2

Kow any ama

Since 2005, CYLP has supported and nurtured 399 Youth, Skilling and Excelling Leaders.

Bam aga

2

2

New Map oon

16

Hop e Va le

of 27,

40

1 As recruitment for 2016 is only just winding up, we still have some applicants whose positions on the Program have not yet been finalised. As a result, we expect that these numbers will continue to fluctuate and, most likely, rise over the coming weeks and months. We also only have one Skilling Leaders group enrolled for 2016, whereas in previous years we enrolled two groups. However, our slight decline in numbers during 2016 so far may be due slight changes in the way that we deliver our Program. In particular, it is now delivered under a fee-for-service model for the first time and workshops and training are focused purely on building our participants’ leadership capabilities, rather than also putting them through accredited Certificate and other courses.

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HOW DOES CYLP HELP YOUTH, SKILLING & EXCELLING LEADERS ACHIEVE SUCCESS? EMOTIONAL AND PRACTICAL SUPPORT Leaders receive constant and ongoing support throughout their journey on the Program. Below are examples of the types of support provided to Leaders during 2016 so far:

LEADERSHIP WORKSHOPS, BUSINESS AND GOVERNANCE TRAINING

MENTORING SUPPORT Leaders are partnered with mentors from other phases of the Program so that they can receive advice and support, and build strong networks amongst their peers.

• support and advice around working with others.

Youth, Skilling and Excelling Leaders regularly come together for workshops in Cairns. These workshops usually involve mentoring, business and governance training. Because we have only just recruited our new cohort of Leaders, we have not yet had the opportunity to begin our leadership workshops for the year. However, we look forward to undertaking this training with our new Leaders in the coming weeks and months.

TRANSITIONS INTO FURTHER EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT

CYLP ALSO BUILDS CAPACITY THROUGH CULTURAL AWARENESS TRAINING AND INFORMATION SESSIONS

Leaders are supported to transition into further education and/or employment if they are unemployed, or if they already have employment, progress within their current jobs. Of the 27

CYLP conducted eight cultural awareness workshops and three information sessions between January–June. The workshops were held with staff at Bama Services, Cape York Partnership and Jawun secondees, and sought to increase participants’ knowledge of Cape York Indigenous peoples and

• coping with loss and grief • relationships • health concerns • workplace communication • religious or spiritual needs

Leaders who are currently enrolled, 18 (67%) are employed—many within Cape York regional organisations like Cape York Partnership, Cape York Land Council, Cape York Employment and Bama Services.

their history. Overall, 87 people attended these workshops. The three information sessions were held with Djarragun College and Bama Services staff, as well as a group of Jawun secondees. Two were cultural information sessions, while an overview of CYLP was presented in the third session.

HOW DOES CYLP HELP YOUTH, SKILLING & EXCELLING LEADERS ACHIEVE SUCCESS?

Community members apply for and are accepted into the Cape York Leaders Program; they actively engage, attending skill-building workshops and taking up work opportunities.

Increased confidence and work skills

Improved leadership ability and work readiness

Increased fulfilment of leadership roles

WHAT ARE OUR GRADUATE LEADERS SAYING? “[The Program has] done amazing things for me as an individual. First and foremost, it’s helped me to build my self-esteem; helped me to get the confidence and practical skills to be able to become a leader in my family… within my community and also how I can effect change beyond that as well.” — SHARON PHINEASA, BAMAGA (LEADERSHIP ACADEMY

“[The Program] gave me a great opportunity… It’s not just about myself, but it’s about my role and how you can see a great challenge, but it’s about the responsibility of how you can address these issues as a strong leader.” — JONATHAN KORKATAIN,

2009–11; 2013 SKILLING LEADERS GRADUATE)

“After [the] Leadership Program I came to the Ministry, and that Leadership Program helped me in my Ministry role as a leader—to lead the church for a bit, and outside of the church… And again… the Leadership Program helped me to work beyond my own community and it just opened the doors for me that I would never have thought possible. So it was a great Program, and I will continually give my support to the Program.”

AURUKUN (LEADERSHIP ACADEMY 2008–2010)

“…to have the position that I have now… you have to be confident in yourself, you have to trust the work that you do, so it’s helped me to grow as a person as well — both personally and professionally.” — SHANEEN CANNON, HOPE VALE (LEADERSHIP

— HERBERT YUNKAPORTA, AURUKUN (LEADERSHIP ACADEMY

ACADEMY 2011; 2015 EXCELLING LEADERS GRADUATE)

2008, 2011)

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HOW HAS THE PROGRAM HELPED? GROWING CONFIDENCE AND GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY: LENORE CASEY Lenore Casey graduated from the Excelling Leaders Phase of the Program in 2015 and, since then, has continued to give back to the community through her work at the Cape York Partnership O-Hubs. Although she was originally from Hope Vale, Lenore lived in Normanton for most of her adult life before moving back to Hope Vale in the last few years. At that point, she decided to join the Leaders Program. “…the reason I applied was because I needed to reconnect with what was happening back home on the Cape and with my family, and also just to make those connections. I had a cousin who was doing it and she encouraged me to apply… and yeah, I’ve really enjoyed it.” “The parts of the Program that were most challenging for me was I guess building those networks again. Since applying to do the course… well, I applied when I was based in Hope Vale with Cape York Partnership, then from there I went to be based in Aurukun for a few months, and then from Aurukun to Coen… and I’m really enjoying going back into community and really working with the families in community as well.” Lenore says the Program has helped her in a number of ways. “The Program has helped me by giving me my confidence back. I worked in management for years, but like I was saying, I was on another country, I didn’t work in management [at home] before I left—I was just young—so it helped me step up in my family.” Lenore is now the Leader of the Cape York Partnership O-Hub in Coen and is going from strength to strength. “I guess my future goals are just to be able to do my work satisfactorily. I’m a perfectionist and I like to make sure that everything is in order, so this has helped me a lot to put everything together, to where I want to be.”

CYLP Training and Development Coordinator Melissa Browne (far right) delivered leadership training to Bama Services Crew. Bama Services staff Kayla Mallie and Val Williams along with Melissa received flowers from Bama Services Crews, as part of International Womens Day celebrations.

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recognition and reconciliation Recognition and reconciliation are common threads that are woven through all of the work that Cape York Partnership does. We

believe

that

every

single

Australian should have a deep understanding

and

appreciation

of Indigenous culture and history; that this is a key ingredient for true ‘reconciliation’, which amounts to more than just the sum of the word. True reconciliation cannot occur, however, until Australia’s Indigenous peoples are recognised as its first peoples. To this end, we seek constitutional reform as a means of affording Indigenous Australians the recognition they deserve as a culturally rich and diverse peoples; Australia’s first inhabitants who hold a deep spiritual connection and attachment to this land.

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constitutional reform Australia’s Constitution does not recognise or protect Indigenous peoples, their rights and interests. The Constitution came into force in 1901 and is still embedded with out-dated views about ‘the inferior or coloured’ so-called races. Originally, Indigenous people were explicitly excluded from the Constitution because they were considered a ‘dying race’. While the 1967 referendum removed the explicit exclusions of Indigenous people from the Constitution, it left unresolved issues. Now, Indigenous peoples are not mentioned at all in the constitutional text. Two racially discriminatory clauses also remain: one that talks about banning races from voting and one that empowers the government to pass race-based laws. The Constitution has presided over decades of discriminatory laws and policies in relation to Indigenous people. As a result, Indigenous advocacy for serious constitutional reform has continued into the present day. Cape York Institute believes this should be rectified. We seek the following package of constitutional and legislative reforms: • remove s 25 of the Constitution (provision contemplating barring races from voting) • amend s 51(xxvi), the Race Power, to become a power to make laws with respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples • insert a new Chapter 1A, to establish an Indigenous representative body, guaranteeing Indigenous peoples a voice in the laws and policies made about their affairs • enact an extra-constitutional Declaration and a Statute of Reconciliation to give effect to the symbolic statements of recognition and set in place some high-level agreed principles that should govern Indigenous affairs.

HOW DOES CYI WORK TOWARDS CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM? COMMUNITY ADVOCACY

PARTICIPATION IN NATIONAL POLICY DEBATE

CYI recognises that the first step in achieving constitutional reform is ensuring that Indigenous peoples themselves understand and appreciate its importance, and have the opportunity to reach a majority-consensus position.

CYI is a leading voice in the national policy debate around constitutional recognition and reform. Between January–June, we have contributed to public policy debate through:

To this end, CYP advocates for constitutional reform throughout Cape York and throughout Australia, speaking to Indigenous communities and leaders from all corners.

• the publication of several media articles about the need for constitutional reform, including in The Australian and The Age

Between January–June, CYI has advocated at numerous public forums and debates, and has undertaken many individual and group meetings within Indigenous communities. We also hope to work closely with the Referendum Council in its forthcoming Indigenous process.

• appearances on radio and television to discuss the benefits of constitutional reform, including Viewpoint with Chris Kenny, The Point with Stan Grant on NITV and The Bolt Report with Andrew Bolt • the publication of The Forgotten People: liberal and conservative approaches to recognising Indigenous peoples, published by Melbourne University Publishing

Recently CYI collaborated with the Constitution Education Fund Australia, City of Melbourne and Melbourne University Press to hold a book launch of The Forgotten People, which explores liberal and conservative views on constitutional recognition. The Forgotten People, co-edited by Damien Freeman and Shireen Morris (Senior Policy Adviser and Constitutional Reform Research Fellow at CYI), was launched by the Hon. Jeff Kennett, former Premier of Victoria. The launch was attended by about 100 people.

• Noel Pearson’s speech at the National Press Club in January, and appearances at public discussion forums including the National Native Title Conference in Darwin, the Melbourne Conversations forum and the Australian Christian Lobby conference.

AN AUSTRALIAN REFERENDUM

To change the Australian Constitution, a referendum must be held. In order to pass, a proposed change must receive a majority of ‘yes’ votes in the majority of the states, plus a majority overall.

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PROGRESS TOWARDS CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM EVIDENCE OF PROGRESS

AREAS WHERE FURTHER PROGRESS MUST BE MADE

We have made good progress building awareness amongst Indigenous people locally in Cape York. We have also made good progress building support amongst conservatives. We have made excellent progress shaping and contributing to the public debate and substantive reform proposals.

A national consensus-building process now needs to be undertaken around Australia. This will be led by the Referendum Council and CYI seeks to play an active role. More work now needs to be done to consolidate support on the political ‘right’, to ensure bipartisan consensus going into a referendum hopefully in 2017.

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Profile for Cape York Partnership

Family Empowerment Report - Jan-Jun 2016  

Family Empowerment Report - Jan-Jun 2016