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ISSUE 1 JAN - MARCH 2013

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ////////// YOUR QUARTERLY NEWSLETTER FROM THE CARIBBEAN YOUTH ENVIRONMENT NETWORK TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CHAPTER

ECO | LIFE P3 / THE THREE UNSPOKEN TRUTHS

P7/ CARIBBEAN ABUZZ WITH PD3M

OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

ACTIVITIES

and their work across the

Our featured member article from

P3DM stands for Participatory

next quarter. Lots of fun

Caribbean in particular Trinidad

Ryan Assiu.

Three-Dimensional Modelling and

activities and events!

P1 / WHO IS CYEN?

P8 / UPCOMING ACTIVITIES Find out what to expect in the

Get to know more about CYEN

its name describes it perfectly.

and Tobago.

WHO IS CYEN?

Never doubt that a group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has .

Ma r g a r e t Me a d e

Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) is a 20 year old regional youth

come out with a bang to remind the country

The Trinidad and Tobago Chapter continues to

environmental NGO. It is without a doubt

and the Caribbean that it has the passion,

build momentum in 2013 with a new executive

that this Network is the largest youth

commitment and is determined to make their

team that has strengthened its capacity and

group that represents all Caribbean

mark in the environmental world.

drive to fulfil its goal in empowering youth to

islands, with over 600 members across

2012 was a spectacular year, CYEN – T&T

raise their voices for a more sustainable future.

the Caribbean.

gained

We are not only active on the local front but

The Network has been active since 1993

Managed Project Activity” as well as gained

have

and involved in advocacy, environmental

support

to

conferences, such as COP18 in Durban and

education

the

Regional

from

BGtt

Award and

for

It’s

“Best Up

also

participated

in

International

building

MEnivronmental to educate schools on the

TUNZA Youth Environmental Conference in

programs. The Trinidad and Tobago

green economy and establish recycling

Kenya.

Chapter, though previously inactive, have

programs.

We stay true to our motto “Unity, Strength

and

capacity

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Purpose”.


Be the change that you want to see in the World. Ghandi

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Services given by WETLANDS World Wetlands Day celebrated February nd 2 , the 2013 theme: Wetlands and Water Management.

1. WETLANDS ARE NOT JUST SWAMPS

2.

HABITATS

Wetlands include coral reefs, mangrove forests sea grass beds, lagoons and marshes. Luckily our islands have representatives of each type of wetland. For example, the Buccoo Reef, Caroni and Nariva Swamps, Bon Accord Lagoon to name a few, all of which are legally protected areas.

Wetlands support large populations of birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish and invertebrates. The diversity of these populations gives an indication of the health of the environment.

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The Three Unspoken Truths about Sustainable Development Ryan Assiu

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The Climate Change debate is a red herring Regardless of an individual’s belief that humans are influencing the global climate, the fact of the matter is that all scientific data indicates that the global climate is changing. Pointing fingers at who is to blame, or working on mitigation measures won’t change the fact, however, the vast majority of discussion on the issue is centered on those two aspects. A complex system is in motion towards a warmer tomorrow and mitigating human-generated green house gases is as likely to reverse the trend as removing the single straw that broke the camel’s back is likely to fix it. The real discussions should be on how to enhance our build and social adaptive capacity and create resilience in our communities.

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The Population Bomb was the low hanging fruit In the year 1804, the global population reached 1 billion. In 1960 it reached 3 billion and by 1974 just 14 years later, another billion was added. What had previously taken almost 2000 years to achieve occurred within one generation. Since then much has been documented on the threat of population growth and the sustainability of the Earth. Demographers, now estimate that population would stabilize just shy of 9 billion by 2050 due to an ever increasing global population growth rate. Though the additional 2 billion people to our current figure still seems disheartening to those concerned about the Earth’s carrying capacity but it is inevitable, unless unethical methods such as genocide or mass sterilization to be conducted. Thus to ensure a sustainable and socially just future for all we look at Paul Ulrich’s famous equation: Impact on the Earth = Population x

Affluence x Technology. Many believe that human ingenuity will allow us to trump our increasing environmental problems with new technologies – however this is an unwise gamble, when literally the world is at stake. A concerted effort must be made towards reducing the affluence of the global population. An unsavoury suggestion indeed when over consumption is not only the norm but the aspiration of many. Humankind must direct our creative energy to find ways to break the misconception that an environmentally responsible lifestyle is of lower quality that current, wasteful norms. More so, we need to face the reality that changing the world begins with changing ourselves. We must change our behaviour. Want to know what is No. 1? Continue onto page 5

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3. NATURAL REGULATORS

Wetlands are the fundamental regulators of water regimes. They also provide many ecosystem services such as filters for land based run off as well as erosion control.

4.

5. NATURAL DEFENSES

CARBON SINKS

Acting as a storage for excess carbon these wetland provide a significant service especially now during this global warming period.

Wetlands form a protective line of defence from storm damage and other coastal hazards by reducing wave friction and strength. They also protect against coastal flooding.

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MEMBER OF THE QUARTER DANIEL ROBINSON

NEW EXECUTIVE ELECTED AND GETS TO WORK!

Seen here proud with their leatherback sand turtle at the Matura Beach Clean Up, from left Khadija La Croix (PRO 2), Petal Brathwaite (Asst. Secretary), Ezra Bartholomew (V.P.) Kemba Jaramogi (Projects 2), Sharlene Subit (Gen. Secretary), Channan Patrick (Projects 1), Rianna Gonzales (President) and Dr. Sharda Maharaj (Adviser), missing Dizzanne Billy (PRO1).

For the first time in its history, CYEN-TT has voted amongst the executive to highlight a member that has stood out from the group. This member was chosen based on attendance at general meetings, participation at events, presence on social media in terms of promoting CYEN and the environment as well as commitment in CYEN activities. We are proud to announce Mr. Daniel Robinson as the Member of the Quarter January – March 2013!

Congratulations!

IT’S NOT JUST ALL WORK! WE HAVE FUN TOO!

As nature lovers we also take time to enjoy nature, in all its forms 

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We at CYEN-TT seek to encourage members and the public to engage in innovative reuse of materials. In keeping with this objective, we are very proud to see Ms. Katrina Khan’s beautiful work of art. Using acrylic, pencil and silver pen she recycled this piece of Medium- Density Fibreboard (MDF)

Continued from page 3

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Sustainability cannot be achieved Sustainability is not a destination. This idea seems to contradict the familiar schematic of sustainable development; the borromean rings where sustainable development is the “sweet spot” between the competing needs of society, economy and the environment. Truely sustainable development is one in which society and the economy aligns with the environment as opposed to being at odds with it. Thus, if we draw a conceptual framework of sustainability; it would not be three separate circles in a triangular fashion – with a small section of each overlapping, but rather three circles directly transcribed unto one another – forming one single circle. Advances in thought in areas such as industrial ecology, biomimicry and cradle to cradle design, bring us closer to this ideal model however we are still far from it and realistically, would never truly get there. Yvon Chouniard, describes it best when he says “Sustainability is a process, not a real goal, and all you can do is work towards it”. Such an ethereal concept is comparable to the Buddhist idea of “nirvana” – a transcendent state of perfect peace and happiness which cannot be achieved but merely strived towards. Therefore one can describe sustainability as a state in which man is in perfect harmony with nature – a state we cannot fully achieve, but merely strive towards.

Good job Katrina!!!

Ryan Assiu graduated from the University of the West Indies with a degree in Environmental and Natural Resource management and is currently pursuing his MSc in Sustainable Development & Climate Change at Antioch University of New England. He works actively with NGOs to research and develop community currency systems to foster community resilience and adaptive capacity.

Water History World Water Day is celebrated on the 23rd March as such here is a little piece of water history for you. DID YOU KNOW? The Tobago Main Ridge Forest Reserve is on record as the oldest legally protected forest reserve geared specifically towards a water conservation purpose. It was established on April 13th 1776, by an ordinance which states in part, that the reserve is “for the purpose of attracting frequent showers of rain upon which the fertility of lands in these climates doth entirely depend.”

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FUN PAGE

       

Down 1. A plant 3. All members of a species living in the same habitat 6. An organism which causes dead organisms to decay 9. An organism that that needs to eat to live 10. Non – living components 13. A meat and plant eater 15. A group of ecosystems of similar characteristics

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Caribbean Region Abuzz with P3DM Activities Farzaana Baksh P3DM stands for Participatory Three-Dimensional Modelling and its name describes it perfectly. It is a three-dimensional model that is constructed using a participatory approach – an approach which ensures that all relevant stakeholders are engaged in the process. P3DM is ideally a tool for building resilience of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) to the impacts of climate change. It is used to bring communities together and empower them to make decisions that will affect their livelihoods, culture, heritage and the natural resources found in their communities.

The map-making exercise was facilitated by Kenn Mondiai, from Partners with Melanesians and Kain Zindapan from the Philippine Association for Intercultural Development, Philippines. The event was organized by the Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (CANARI). In November 2012, the model was used by the people of Tobago to produce a civil society agenda addressing climate change issues on the island. This activity was also facilitated by CANARI. The P3DM process has since been replicated in two other Caribbean countries. In Union Island of the Grenadines - after much hype and anticipation by the people of St Vincent and the Grenadines - the P3DM activity ended in March 2013. In Grenada, the process ended in April 2013. The activities in these two Caribbean countries were facilitated by Sustainable Grenadines (SusGren).

In October 2012, the phrase ‘P3DM’ became popular to many Tobagonians. On October 13 2012, the pilot model in the Caribbean - of Tobago - was handed over to the people of Tobago. The model was built by a total of 107 residents of Tobago including students and volunteers from the island, elders and invited guests.

Regional facilitators pose with the almost completed 3D model of Tobago. Three of our members were part of this team, Farzaana Baksh, Kemba Jaramogi and Che Dillon. Taken in October 2012. Photo credit: CANARI

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BECOME A MEMBER OF CYEN

Becoming a member is simple, just go onto our website, click on the “Become a member” tab, fill out the relevant information and submit. If you would like further information about CYEN or you have questions and/or comments on the newsletter, please contact us.

16 – 20 Anva Plaza, E.M.R. Tunapuna (868) 739 - 6343 cyen.tt.chapter@gmail.com www.cyen.org Also find us on

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ONE DAY THINK TANK RETREAT

UPCOMING ACTIVITIES

DATE: Sunday 19th May, 2013 TIME: 9:00am – 5:00pm LOCATION: Fondes Amandes Resource Centre We would like to invite all members who would like to attend. This retreat is to construct our path forward for the next six (6) months. So if you have any ideas that you would like to share and would like to be part of the planning process of the activities in the Chapter, please indicate your attendance by emailing to cyen.tt.chapter@gmail.com or

SAN C IT Y GR EEN E XP O

see link https://www.facebook.com/events/511082108940485/?ref=3 This four day Expo seeks to showcase environmental products, services, NGOs and CBOs in a fun and eco-friendly expo showcase. CYEN-TT will have a booth throughout the event displaying information as well as items from our upcoming “Upcycling Concept” project. Volunteers for the days are welcome!!

TURTLE W ATCHIING, GRAND RIVIERE

DATE: Friday 24th May, 2013 TIME: 7:00pm – 12:00am

Sancity Green Expo 2013 Thursday April 25th - Sunday April 28th 10am - 10pm daily Skinner Park San Fernando

LOCATION: Grand Riviere

https://www.facebook.com/SancityGreenExpo2013

this!! For more information, email cyen.tt.chapter@gmail.com or

COST: $100.00 We will be heading to the highest density beach for nesting leatherback turtles in the world! It will be an experience so you don’t want to miss contact Channan Patrick or Sharlene Subit at 474-6389 or 732-1164. W ORLD ENVIRONMENT DAY

GENERAL MEETING

DATE: Saturday May 18th

World Environment Day is celebrated on the

TIME: 3:00 – 5:00 pm

5th June every year. This year there are several

LOCATION: Frank Stockdale Building, UWI

activities for you to take part in:

AGENDA:

Green on the Avenue: Friday 31st May @

-

Welcome

Adam Smith Square, 4pm – 10pm

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Overview of San City Green Expo 2013

Fondes Amandes Community Reforestation

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Presentation on United Global Shift Seminar

Project – 5th June @ Fondes Amandes St

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Upcoming events

Ann’s, 10am – 12noon

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Announcement of 'Member of the Quarter' for CYEN-TT

UNDP Knowledge Fair – 5th June @ NAPPA,

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Other matters

POS, 9am – 6pm. CYEN-TT will be having a booth here and Sustain T&T will be launching

Send us an email at cyen.tt.chapter@gmail.com or call 739-6343 for more information

their new film “A Sea Change”

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ECO Life  

A quarterly newsletter produced by the Caribbean Youth Environment Network - Trinidad and Tobago (CYEN-TT). It highlights environmental issu...

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