Issuu on Google+

CWU Wellness Center  Annual Report 2009­2010 

INSIDE  THIS ISSUE 

JU Executive   Summary 

Teamwork &  Collaboration 

Performance  Indicators 

4­7 

Budget  &  Financial  Overview 

8­11 

Sexual   Assault   Response 

12 

Recognition  & Awards 

12 

Student  Health 101 

13 

Sexual   Violence   Education &  Prevention 

14­15 

CCC &  Neighbor­ hood   Relations 

16­17 

Assessment  18­19  & Evaluation  Prevention &   20­21  Research  Photos 

22­23 

     

The mission of the Wellness Center is to provide services within  a framework of cultural competence to reduce high­risk behavior  related  to  alcohol  and  drug  misuse;  to  provide  sexual  assault  prevention, response and advocacy; and to promote other   positive health behaviors among all CWU students.    A core value of the Wellness Center is that educational programs  and  services  are  developed  through  the  application  of  scientific  evidence and relevant research. The strategic plan of the   Wellness Center begins with the following four goal statements:    Decrease  the  misuse  of  alcohol  and  marijuana  by  CWU  students.    Decrease  the incidence  of  sexual  assault  and improve  the  sexual assault response to the CWU community.    Promote  positive  health  behaviors  of  CWU  students  through collaboration with other departments.    Deliver  all  programs  and  services  with  respect  and  with  special  attention  to  the  racial,  ethnic  and  other  diverse  backgrounds and needs of our students. 


P AGE

2

A Message from the Director        As another exciting year winds down, the Wellness Center has contin­ ued to expand its reach in promoting positive health behaviors among all  CWU students, making a difference in the lives we touch.   Through both  new and expanded collaborative efforts with students, faculty, and commu­ nity, we continue to use research­based environmental strategies to re­ duce high­risk behavior related to alcohol and drug misuse and provide  sexual assault prevention, response and advocacy.         For the second year in a row, all incoming students were required to  take an online alcohol education class, and we have seen a dramatic de­ crease in number of first year students who are involved in alcohol incidents in  residence halls. Approximately 200 students access alcohol and drug classes offered by  the Wellness Center each year. Assessment data confirms that students are chang­ ing their high­risk behaviors and are experiencing fewer negative consequences.  We reached more than 400 students, faculty and staff at our second annual Rock against  Rape. The Green Dot violence prevention program continues to gain momentum. Sixty  students participated in the Green Dot bystander training programs, and student evalua­ tions indicate they will do something in a high ­risk situation to reduce the likeli­ hood of violence. Through our work, the university is setting a standard in violence pre­ vention not only on this campus but among statewide institutions. More than 55 partici­ pants from 15 different agencies attended the Green Dot facilitator training in May.        We have collaborated with faculty to provide students with meaningful, real life pro­ jects. Sociology students in SOC460 (Community Structure and Organization) looked at  the issue of late night transportation, and HHPN students in HED440 (Social Marketing),  developed social marketing proposals for our neighborhood relations program. Our own  social marketing efforts have reached into niches most used by students, including Face­ book pages for Wellness, Green Dot, and the Campus­Community Coalition and twitter  accounts for Wellness and the CCC.  Another vehicle reaching students through online  media is Student Health 101. With monthly, relevant articles written by our own peer  health educator (student) staff, this is not only an efficient and cost effective way to dis­ seminate important heath information to college students, but it has also dramatically  improved readership and provided us with great feedback.        The good neighbor campaign expanded from off­campus neighborhoods to a collabo­ rative effort with housing staff to work with students in residence halls and on­campus  apartments.  Work on neighborhood relations on campus, in the neighborhoods, and  downtown, is showing results.  An increasing number of community members sur­ veyed think CWU students make good neighbors.         And these are just the highlights. In the pages that follow, we will expound upon  these and much more as part of the 2009­2010 Wellness Center Annual Report.    Sincerely,  Gail Farmer, Director 


P AGE

 

3

Team Work and Collaboration 

    Andrew Carnegie said,  “Teamwork is the ability to  work together toward a com­ mon vision.  The ability to di­ rect individual accomplishment  toward organizational objec­ tives.  It is the fuel that allows  common people to attain un­ common results.”         As a university, we are a  united team, preparing stu­ dents for responsible citizen­ ship, responsible stewardship of  the earth, and enlightened and  productive lives.        The Wellness Center plays  its part through positive health  promotions and prevention of  high­risk behaviors.  Our mis­ sion could not be accomplished  without the collaborative fuel  from the campus and the com­ munity that continually gives  life to our activities.  We are  grateful for the energy, creativ­ ity and vision of all our partners  this past year.         It has been particularly ex­ citing to expand our work with  faculty and students, helping us  gain a broader perspective from  the student point of view while  also giving us the opportunity  to provide real­life learning ex­ periences to students. What a  great two­way street!         While not an exhaustive list,  some highlights of collaborative  partnerships this past year in­ clude:    Work with Assistant Profes­ sor Judy Hennessy  (Sociology) and SOC 460  class (Community Structure  and Organization) on late  night transportation project,  along with collaborative  work on this issue with  members of the ASCWU  BOD and other students.  Work with Art Professor  Glen Bach’s graphic design 

class to develop the Rock  against Rape logo design.  Work with Public Health As­ sistant Professor Jennifer  Lehmbeck’s HED 440 (Social  Marketing of Health Educa­ tion) to create social market­ ing campaigns for on­ campus Good Neighbor pro­ grams.  Support from Public Health  faculty Jennifer Lehmbeck  and Becky Pearson to deci­ pher results from the 2009  Safety Survey.  Provide CCC job shadow op­ portunities to students from  Public Relations and Adver­ tising Assistant Professor  Xiaodong Kuang’s classes.  Collaborate with Assistant  Professor Kara Gabriel  (Psychology) on a number of  research projects, including  analyzing the Alcohol Wise/ Electronic Check Up To go  data, revising and strength­ ening the evaluation of Prime  for Life, and developing  poster presentations for a  national conference in New  Orleans and for CWU Source.  Collaborate with the Civic  Engagement Center to pre­ sent training for our student  staff and for Ellensburg  Downtown Association Board  members on the CEC Take  Action web site, to expand  its utilization by campus and  community partners alike.   Marketing support for SH101  articles from University Rec­ reation and Outdoor Pur­ suits, and course design,  bibs, water and race day  support from them for the  First Annual Run for Water  6K.   Developed partnership with  the ROTC Air Force program  and presented prevention 

education regarding prob­ lems associated with alcohol  at the ROTC Leadership  Seminar.  Amazing support and crea­ tivity from the Housing web  support staff (including stu­ dent staff), on the develop­ ment of Green Dot and  Neighborhood Rela­ tions web sites.  Strengthened part­ nership with the El­ lensburg Chamber of  Commerce in train­ ing for event volun­ teers on ID check  and overservice,  participation on each  other’s committees,  and marketing sup­ port through Face­ book, Twitter, and  articles in the Cham­ ber monthly news­ letter promoting the  work of the CCC.   Continued monthly  collaboration with  local prevention pro­ viders to share in­ formation and re­ sources and elimi­ nate potential dupli­ cation of efforts in  the community.  Renewed collabora­ tive efforts with  CWU students and  administrators to  develop a late night  transportation system for  students. 

“Alone 

we can  do so  

little;  

together  we can  do so 

much.”  Helen  

Keller 

  Thanks to all of our partners,  together we have been able to  do so much. We look forward to  keeping this fuel burning in the  year to come. 


P AGE

4

 

Performance Indicators  1. DRINKING TRENDS, PRIME FOR LIFE, ALCOHOL WISE 


P AGE

2. ALCOHOL WISE  28% increase in average test score   between pre and post test concludes that  students are educating themselves on  alcohol and the associated behavioral  health issues.  

Results show a positive behavior change  and awareness of consequences of   drinking and driving    *62% reduction in student driving   after consuming 3 or more drinks  *59% reduction in students being   a passenger with a driver who had 3 or  more drinks 

Students agree that the course provides  valuable information and is helpful.   

*41% of students increased their   agreement between pre and post test   regarding correlation of alcohol and   academic success    *48% of student increased their   agreement between pre and post test   regarding correlation of alcohol use and  adverse effects on their peers’ quality of  life 

5


P AGE

6

3. CAMPUS­COMMUNITY COALITION 

 

If I was having a party I  would... 100% 75% 50% 25%

2008

0%

CWU students have  shown some improve­ ment in areas charac­ teristic of safe & re­ spectful partying. 

2009 Notify  Control #  Check with  Shut it  neighbors Invited neighbors  down when  after out of  control

Most areas of concern in  the neighborhoods have  shown a slight decline  over the last few years.  

Problems in the  Neighborhood 30% 20% 2008 10%

2009

0% Parking Parties Garbage Speeding Noise

# of Tickets for Noise Complaints 150

100

North End 50

City Wide

0 2007

2008

2009

The number of non­students  who believe CWU students  make good neighbors has  steadily increased over the  last few years. 

Noise complaints in the  north end of town, where  the Good Neighbor Survey  has been a focus, have de­ creased.  


P AGE

4. SEXUAL VIOLENCE PROGRAMS  *72.41% of students said they would  DEFINITELY do or say something next  time they see a situation that feels  “high risk” or concerning to them.    *98.25% of students said they would  do at least one proactive green dot to  communicate the importance of the   issue, and may do many more. 

As a result of SAVA  training, 90% of   participants feel they  can effectively advise  a sexual assault   victim. 

31% of females, and  15% of males reported  experiencing some sort of  unwanted sexual   experience since   becoming a CWU student 

7


P AGE

8

 

Budget and Financial Overview     The Wellness Center  continues to be an ex­ cellent steward of stu­ dent monies. We have  been vigilant in keeping  costs down while at the  same time providing  excellent evidence­ based programs and  services to students.       A little history: until  fall 2008, the Wellness  Center was housed with  Student Health & Coun­ seling (SHCC).  Well­ ness operations were  funded by an allocation  of the Student Health,  Counseling and Well­ ness fee ­ approxi­ mately $12 of the $72  SHCC fee was used to  fund Wellness opera­ tions.  In addition, we  received state money  to fund about 25% of  the Campus Commu­ nity Coalition position.  Budget concerns fueled  an analysis of services,  programs and the types  of students served and  resulted in a realign­ ment of the Wellness  Center. In fall 2008 we  joined the Office of  Housing and New Stu­ dent Programs. 

   The unprecedented  economic downturn  and consequent reduc­ tion in state support at  CWU effectively elimi­ nated 100% of all  state money from the  Wellness Budget.  Funding sources are  now limited to the stu­ dent fee (reduced 25%  to $9) and the Office  of Housing and New  Student Programs. As  Table 1 on page 7 indi­ cates, next year Hous­ ing will provide 21% of  our total operations  and 36% of staff sala­ ries and benefits.       As chart 1 illus­ trates, professional  salaries have risen  modestly but benefits,  an expense we have  no control over, con­ tinue to rise and will  likely continue to do  so.     Goods and Services  refers to expenses that  support the program­ ming efforts of the  Wellness Center. De­ spite a significant re­ duction  in Goods and  Services, the Wellness  Center has consistently 

improved both the  quantity and quality  of programming to  CWU students! This  includes a budget  line that financially  supports students  who need access to  community based al­ cohol assessments.  Chart 2 reveals that  Goods and Services  have been kept in  check while our em­ phasis on student  employment has re­ sulted in an increase  in this line item over  time.     Chart 3 demon­ strates that profes­ sional salaries as a  percentage of our to­ tal budget are antici­ pated to decline  while student salaries  are expected to rise.  The Wellness Center  is committed to pro­ viding students with  opportunities to gain  significant work ex­ perience in their field  while at the same  time earning money  to contribute to the  cost of tuition and  living expenses. 


P AGE

TABLE 1     Total Salaries  Total Benefits  Student Salaries  Goods & Services 

2008 

2009 

2010 estimated 

2011 projected 

165,911  46,455  20,491  44,815 

167,085  46,784  9,963  51,713 

168,425  50,528  24,007  40,229 

163,804  57,331  29,250  41,430 

CHART 1    

2008 

2009 

2010 estimated 

2011 projected 

Student Salaries 

20,491  

9,963  

24,007  

29,250  

Goods & Services 

44,815  

51,713  

40,229  

41,430  

Student Salaries and Goods & Services 61,000  68,000  51,000 

58,000  41,000  48,000  31,000 

38,000 

21,000 

28,000 

11,000 

18,000 

1,000 

8,000  2008

2009

2010  estimated

2011 projected

CHART 2 

Goods & Services

Student Salaries

9


P AGE

10

Budget and Financial Overview (cont.)      

2010 estimated 

2011 projected 

168,425 

163,804 

Total Benefits 

50,528 

57,331 

Student Salaries 

24,007 

29,250 

Goods & Services 

40,229 

41,430 

283,840 

292,693 

Total Professional Salaries 

Grand Total 

Percentage of Total Budget  Student Salaries  Staff Salaries 

2010 

2011 

8% 

10% 

59% 

56% 

Salaries as % of Total Budget 15% 14%

65% 59%

60% 56%

13%

55%

12%

50%

11%

45% 10%

10%

40%

9%

35% 8%

8%

30% 2010

2011

CHART 3 

Student Salaries Staff Salaries


P AGE

  

2008 

Professional Salaries 

 

   Wellness Budget     State Budget     Housing Budget 

2009   

2010 estimated   

2011 Projected   

143,243 

103,164 

104,504 

104,823 

22,668 

23,121 

23,121 

40,800 

40,800 

58,981 

168,425 

163,804 

Total Salaries  165,911  167,085  Professional Benefits           Wellness Budget  40,108  28,886 

  31,351 

36,688 

6,474 

6,936 

11,424 

12,240 

20,643 

46,455   

46,784   

50,528   

57,331   

212,366 

213,869 

218,953 

221,135 

Student Salaries 

  20,491 

  9,963 

  24,007 

  29,250 

Student Benefits 

284 

227 

651 

878 

  

20,775 

10,190 

24,658 

30,128 

  

 

 

 

 

44,815 

51,713 

40,229 

41,430 

 

 

 

 

277,956 

275,772 

283,840 

292,693 

211,689 

224,631 

231,400 

77% 

79% 

79% 

   State Budget 

6,347 

   Housing Budget 

  Total Benefits 

   Total Professional Sal & Ben    

Goods & Services     Total Budget  Student fees ($9) 

 

% of total budget covered by student fees 

11


P AGE

12

Sexual Assault Response       Over the past few years  we have seen an increase in  the number of students (see  chart below) seeking services  from the Sexual Assault Re­ sponse Coordinator (SARC).  Especially in the last year  there has been a renewed  collaboration with our local   agency, ASPEN, and copies of  resource information hand­

outs were placed in the rest­ room placard holders in the  SURC, both likely contributors  to the spike.       Collaboration with faculty  and staff continues to help  spread the word about ser­ vices, and the addition of  Green Dot (see page 11) has  certainly provided more visi­ bility to the issue. In spring of  2010 an  evaluation  was devel­ oped to de­ termine stu­ dent satisfac­ tion with ser­ vices pro­ vided by the  SARC, as  well as other  departments  such as Fi­ nancial Aid,  Registrar’s 

Office, Student Affairs, and  the local police agencies. Re­ sults from students seen  during the 2009­2010 year  will be available in fall of  2010, but preliminary data  shows CWU is doing a great  job supporting victims.        With nationally publicized  cases like the one involving  partner violence of two la­ crosse players at the Univer­ sity of Virginia, we are re­ minded that this can happen  anywhere. We will continue  to actively promote a culture  of safety, express utter in­ tolerance of violence  through programming and  individual actions, and sup­ port victims of violence in  order to reduce the amount  of violence within our com­ munity.         

Recognition and Awards  Our staff and students have been recognized  Lindsey Borgens­Most Creative, Wellness  with various awards this year and we’d like to  Center.  share those accomplishments here.   Andrea Easlick­Outstanding Peer Education  Advisor, Bacchus Network Area 1; Top 5 Pro­ Nikki Newsome­Student Empowerment  gram, NWACUHO; nominated for Most Inspira­ Award, Women’s Achievement Celebration;  nominated for Student Employee of the Year.   tional Staff Member and Partners in Excellence  Amanda Sell­Impact Award, University Hous­ Award.  ing; Professionalism Award, Wellness Center.  Lynne Harrison­10 years of service to CWU.  Kate Sansom­Dean’s Award: Health, Human  Gail Farmer­10 years of service to CWU.  Rock Against Rape­PACURH Program of the  Performance and Nutrition; Most Willing to  Year (regional); Finalist for NACURH Program  Lend a Hand, Wellness Center; Women’s  of the Year (national).  Health Month Video Winner, Student Health  Congratulations to all of you, and thank you  101.  for your continued dedication to our office!   


P AGE

is an    1 0 1 alth,    e h h t   l f o a   y e t Studehantt d eHlivers a wiednet v wareiellness info rmmeas­­ “It helped open my eyes to  how important all areas of  t n e   i v t e i r t n i i e s z p   o health are important. It’s not  a r p g   e online m asuccess, and othnts. It focuses ontter decisions.  just  about being physically  fit. We also need to know  wellness,thly to our stude ents to make be     n i   1 the tools that will help us  n d 0 lth 1 a e tion mo o encourage stu H   t   n succeed whether it be get­ e % sing Studr we reached 150   s sages t e ting more sleep or other  c c a   n r e a o e f e b     y e   e s t v s n things.” Dejanae  a a e p c  h Students umbers and this that we have a liagazine!  m g n ns  increasinlicense. This mea 00 accessed the  of our  students but 36 “One of my friends has bulimia.  2400  This helped me know how to 

13

ask her about it.” Whitney 

“I love to read  about real advice  and tips for real  problems we face  everyday.” Anisha 

“I’ve recently been  having a problem with  a friend that was up­ set with me and de­ cided to share her  feelings with our  group of friends.  Needless to say, their  opinion of me was not  too great. I was really  hurt and frustrated  that she would talk so  poorly of me and that  she didn’t bother to  find out what was go­ ing on in my life. After  using the techniques  presented in the arti­ cle, ‘How to Talk To  Anyone,’ we resolved  the issue and she  apologized to our  friends for not being  fair. Thank you so  much!”  Feliciti 

“The article about winter­ time blues (SAD) was in­ teresting because I’m cer­ tainly in that boat. The  suggestions for dealing  with it sound promising.”  Jonathon 

“The articles are al­ ways very helpful and  beneficial. I think this  online magazine is  great!” Amanda 

“I learned that it is  better to speak up  in class instead of  being shy.”   Carolyn 

“Student Health 101  is actually a positive  magazine that I can  read unlike all the  magazines at stores  which just make me  feel worse about  myself. This maga­ zine actually pro­ vides helpful infor­ mation that is very  useful at my age!”  Sarah 

**All comments are from CWU student readers of Student Health 101** 


P AGE

14

2nd Annual Rock Against Rape      This year’s second 

annual Rock Against  Rape took place on  Wednesday, April 28.  Over 400 attendees  visited the event,  surpassing the in­ augural event in  2009 by more than  100 people.       Increased atten­ dance was likely  due to a full lineup    of bands including  Poor Folks,  Poor Folks, Live  Live Well  Well, the Holly Star  Band, Lauren    Short, and head­ Holly Star  liner Red Means  Go. Approximately  Band  ten new interactive    stations were  Lauren  added to the roster  Short  which also at­ tracted a larger au­   dience. New learn­ Adam  ing opportunities  Lange  included booths  sponsored by the    Red Means  Center for Excel­ lence in Leadership,  Go  Black Student Un­

2010  RAR  Band  Lineup 

ion, Residence Hall As­ sociation, EQUAL, and  Planned Parenthood.       Students also had a  chance to learn more  strategies to prevent  future instances of  power­based personal  violence by taking part  in a Green Dot bingo  game. Returning favor­ ites from 2009 included 

2010 RAR logo by CWU  student Janie Winslow 

Walking the Walk, an  interactive game to  learn about a real life  survivor’s story of sex­ ual assault, These  Hands Don’t Hurt, at  which visitors could  take a pledge stating  they would not commit  violence, and the Art  Battle.       Over 220 visitors  completed program  evaluations at the  event. When asked  “What did you like  about the activity that  was most enjoyable for  you?” 61% said it was  interactive, and 37% 

said because they  learned new infor­ mation. Overall,  94% of respondents  were either satisfied  or very satisfied with  the event.       A special thanks  goes to the following  groups for their con­ tributions to the suc­ cess of this year’s  event: University  Housing & New Stu­ dent Programs, Pub­ licity Center, CWU  Dining Services,  Wildcat Shop,  Jerrol’s Book and Of­ fice Supply, Equity &  Services Council,  RHA, Scheduling  Center, Shirtworks,  88.1 the Burg, and  CWU Police.      Thanks for an­ other great year and  we look forward to  RAR  2011! 


P A G E

1 5

Violence Prevention with Green Dot  Bystander Training       In the fall of 2009  CWU launched its  newest violence pre­ vention effort, Green  Dot. This innovative  strategy which fo­ cuses on the role of  bystanders in high­ risk situations, began  in Kentucky and has  slowly saturated the  state of Washington,  especially CWU.       This year five by­ stander trainings were  held for students,  each about seven  hours in length. Rep­ resentatives from stu­ dent government,  athletics, Music, Black  Student Union, and  more were taught how  to recognize high­risk  situations, identify  their personal obsta­ cles to action, and  brainstorm realistic  examples of interven­ ing. Small group dis­ cussions and various  uses of technology are  popular highlights of  the workshop, and re­ sulted in very rich  conversation.  

     Approximately 60  participants were  trained and most of  them plan on helping  spread the word  about the issue to  others. More than  72% of students said  they would DEFI­ NITELY do or say  something next time  they see a situation  that feels “high risk”  or concerning to  them, and 98.25% of  students said they  would do at least one  proactive green dot to  communicate the im­ portance of the issue,  and may do many  more. A campus wide  survey will be con­ ducted in spring 2012  to determine the  broader effect this  program is having on  our campus.    

Facilitator Training       In May 2010  Green Dot creator  Dorothy Edwards and  fellow trainer Jennifer  Sayre visited to train  folks from CWU and  13 other agencies to  be certified facilita­ tors. The in­ tensive four  day seminar  was attended  by approxi­ mately 55 indi­ viduals from  various univer­ sities, and non

“My hope is   renewed. I can  be a part of   violence   prevention. My  community‐   ­profit and govern­ mental agencies.  Attendees were  trained on the re­ search foundation  and building blocks  of the program, en­ couraged to tap  into their own per­ sonal connections  with the issue in  order to connect  with their audi­ ences, and given  resources to facili­ tate the bystander  trainings at their  home agencies.        Without the  support of Univer­ sity Housing, the S  & A Committee, the  CWU Foundation  Len Thayer grant  program, the Equity  and Services Coun­ cil, and Conference  Services we would  not have been able  to market CWU as  one of the leading  institutions in the  field of power­ based personal vio­ lence prevention.  

Ellensburg‐ will  become a safer  place. Less   people will be  hurt. We can do  this, one green  dot at a time. I  know it, I feel it,  and now I’m   going to live it!  Thanks so  much!”  ‐Facilitator   Training   Participant


P AGE

16

Campus­Community Coalition 

Neighborhood Relations       The Good Neighbor mes­      During the fall and winter  sage took front and center  quarters, student teams once  prominence on and off campus  again went to neighborhoods  this year. Precipitated by com­ with a high incidence of noise  munity needs, in the neighbor­ complaints. They talked with  hoods and the downtown, the  students and community mem­ Campus­Community Coalition  bers, conducted the Good  focused much of its efforts on  Neighbor Survey, and distrib­ good neighbor programming  uted educational door hangers  this year.  containing information on laws       The Neighborhood Relations  and sanctions, tips on being a  Committee works to increase  good neighbor and how to have  students’ knowledge of state  a safe and legal party, and how  and local laws and sanctions  to recognize and respond to  regarding alcohol, increase  signs of alcohol poisoning.   landlords’ knowledge of their       This year, 294 Good  rights and responsibilities under  Neighbor surveys were com­ law and as members of the  pleted (compared with 281 in  community, and improve com­ 2008 and 209 in 2007), more  munication among students and  neighborhoods were visited, and  community members. The goal  more community members par­ is to change the environment  ticipated (84 in ’09; 67 in ’08;  within which students make de­ 24 in ’07).  cisions about drinking.        Results showed that the       In the fall we launched the  committee’s work is having an  Neighborhood Relations web  impact. Of particular note were  site ­ http://www.cwu.edu/~nr  responses demonstrating com­ ­ to enhance students’ off­ munity members having higher  campus experiences through  satisfaction rates regarding stu­ connections with the greater  dents as neighbors. According to  Ellensburg community, to im­ the Ellensburg Police Depart­ prove neighborhood relations,  ment, noise complaint citations  and to improve quality of life  in north end Ellensburg  for all.  neighborhoods (where our work 

We don’t like the  problems pigeonholed  against the college kids.  It is not always college  students; they are  getting a bum rep. It  used to be worse.1

1Comment from Downtown Perception 

of Problem Survey, Fall 2009

was  concen­ trated)  dropped nearly 15% from  2008 to 2009. In addition,  door to door follow up was  conducted in the spring for  the first time, increasing fol­ low up participation exponen­ tially (from 3 responses  spring 2009 to 37 in spring  2010). The surveys provide  us with data from which to  develop educational program­ ming and help us evaluate  our work.      Students with off­campus  noise citations are also now  referred for a discussion  about good neighbor strate­ gies, as part of their sanction  with the university. For the  2009­2010 academic year, 59  students followed through on  their noise sanction referral.       We also initiated on­ campus good neighbor pro­ gramming, in collaboration  with Housing staff.  On­ campus door hangers and  posters were created, infor­ mation is slowly being added  to the web site to help stu­ dents living on­campus, and  posters were created  to be placed in each  residence hall and  apartment. Program­ ming to develop skills  to communicate effec­ tively and reduce stu­ What is going on with the  downtown can really serve as a  dent to student con­ template for a broader effort,  flict was piloted in the  mirroring the work by the CCC. spring and will be part  Daily Record Editorial, 10/22/09 of next fall’s first six  weeks programming.  On­campus program­ ming both helps stu­ dents as they live on  “There’s a misperception  campus and as they  that this is a problem caused  by CWU students, but  prepare to transition  drunken disorder is not the  off campus.  exclusive province of any one  demographic.”     Daily Record Editorial, 10/22/09


Campus­Community Coalition 

P AGE

17

Downtown Relations       The downtown is also our  neighborhood.  Concerns in­ volving students, alcohol and  downtown nightlife issues be­ came a focal point for many  City Council meetings this past  year. Specific problems articu­ lated to the Council included  noise, disorderly conduct/ pub­ lic urination, vomit on the  sidewalks, fights, vandalism  and destruction of property.   The Hospitality Resource Alli­ ance (HRA), working collabora­ tively with the City Council and  the Ellensburg Downtown As­ sociation (EDA), worked to ad­ dress these problems and de­ velop measurable outcomes to 

assess progress. One of the  first steps was to develop  baseline data.  Two surveys  were developed and imple­ mented in the fall – the Down­ town Perception of Problem  survey and the Downtown  Business Survey.  Follow up  was conducted in the spring  and data is being analyzed.  The HRA continued its efforts  through education and train­ ing, and supported three other  new programs: the downtown  sidewalk clean­up through the  EDA and increased enforce­ ment efforts by the Ellensburg  Police Department (Serving  the Standard) and  

LATE NIGHT TRANSPORTATION  On and off the table for the past two years  has been the issue of late night transporta­ tion.  It is back on and moving forward this  year in collaboration with students  from SOC460, student Board of  Trustees member, the ASCWU­ BOD, and university staff and com­ munity partners. 

                  the Liquor Control Board  (Location of Strategic Inter­ est).  These are all parts of the  CCC’s environmental manage­ ment approach, using strate­ gies designed to change the  environment within which high ­risk drinking takes place. 

In addition to using social media ven­ ues for communicating with students  and community, we presented  monthly guest columns in the Daily  Record. The columns covered issues  of alcohol and substance abuse.   Through ads and articles, we also  kept a presence in the Observer  throughout the year. 

Recent data from the Washington State Liquor Con­ trol Board (LCB) shows that the work of the HRA is  having an impact. LCB citations in Ellensburg for fur­ nishing alcohol to minors or allowing minors to be in  a bar or tavern consuming alcohol decreased from 21  in 2007 to 4 in 2009. Citations for sales to or allow­ ing an intoxicated person to consume went from 14  in 2007 to 3 in 2009. And the total number of alcohol  citations went from 35 in 2007 to 18 in 2009. 


P AGE

 

18

Assessment and Evaluation in Progress  Project  Project

Description  Description

Expected   Expected   Completion Date  Completion Date

Comments  Comments

PRIME FOR LIFE (PFL)    ­an 8 hour in­person  class for students who  violate alcohol policy 

Pre, post & follow­ up surveys that  measure learning  outcomes and be­ havior change. 

Ongoing. Most recent  data analyzed fall and  winter 2008, fall 2009. 

Annual assessments indicate  strong outcomes. PFL is effec­ tive. 

ALCOHOL WISE   ­a 1­hour web­based  curriculum that all first  year students are re­ quired to take 

Pre, post & follow­ up surveys that  measure learning  outcomes and be­ havior change. 

Ongoing.  Most recent  data for fall 2009 com­ pleted April 2010. 

In 2009 we conducted re­ search to see if Alcohol Wise  demonstrated superior out­ comes to Electronic Check­Up  to Go. (See below) 627 stu­ dents completed the pre and  post tests, and 384 completed  the follow­up. Assessment  indicates Alcohol Wise is ef­ fective. 

SEXUAL ASSAULT VICTIM  ADVISOR (SAVA)  TRAINING  ­free workshop avail­ able to CWU students,  staff, and faculty to be  trained in basic re­ sponse techniques for  sexual assault victims. 

This workshop is  evaluated using a  post­test that as­ sesses whether or  not the learning  objectives of the  workshop were  met.       

At least one workshop  is offered each quarter  and at the end of the  academic year all of the  workshop data is  looked at collectively  and assessed on  whether or not the  learning objectives  were met. 

2009 annual assessment indi­ cates the workshop is helpful  and the learning objectives  are being met in each session.  Approximately 175 partici­ pants have been trained since  the creation of the program in  2004.    

GREEN DOT­BYSTANDER  INTERVENTION PROGRAM  ­ provides information,  knowledge, and skills to  students about how to  address potentially high ­risk situations among  their peers. 

The goal of this  program is to re­ duce instances of  power­based per­ sonal violence  among CWU stu­ dents.    

There is baseline data  regarding instances of  power­based personal  violence from the  spring 2009 Safety Sur­ vey that will be re­ peated in either spring  2011 or spring 2012 to  determine the change  in these statistics. 

Approximately 60 students  have attended the Green Dot  Bystander Trainings since its  launch in fall 2009 and anec­ dotal data suggests they are  putting the skills and knowl­ edge into practice. 

SEXUAL ASSAULT RE­ SPONSE COORDINATOR  (SARC) SERVICES  ­the SARC provides  various services to stu­ dents who have experi­ enced sexual violence  including assistance  with academic accom­ modations, information  regarding reporting  options, referral infor­ mation to other campus  and community re­ sources, etc. 

The purpose of the  SARC is to increase  the likelihood that  students will con­ tinue enrollment at  CWU following a  sexual assault, and  to aid in the stu­ dent’s recovery  process by facilitat­ ing access to re­ sources.    

An evaluation of SARC  services was recently  developed and will be  disbursed to students  served beginning in  early spring quarter  2010. This will be an  ongoing process to con­ tinually evaluate the  effectiveness of these  services.       

There has been a slight in­ crease in students seeking  SARC services from 18 (07­ 08), to 20 (08­09), to 34 (09­ 10).    


P AGE

Project  Project 

Description  Description 

Expected   Expected   Completion Date  Completion Date 

Comments  Comments 

CAMPUS­ COMMUNITY COALI­ TION­Downtown  Perception of  Problem Survey  The Survey was  created in re­ sponse to City  Council request to  Hospitality Re­ source Alliance &  Ellensburg Down­ town Association  to develop meas­ urable outcomes  regarding late  night issues. 

The purpose of the Per­ ception of Problem sur­ vey was to establish  baseline data specifically  regarding problems re­ lated to noise, trash, hu­ man waste, and vandal­ ism. 

It was administered  October/November  2009; a follow­up  survey was com­ pleted in May 2010;  results are being tal­ lied.    

Survey sample included 83 busi­ ness owners, managers and resi­ dents in the downtown core.  Re­ sults showed that noise was not  perceived to be as great a problem  as had been communicated to the  Council by some. Areas of con­ cern, including trash and disor­ derly conduct, are being addressed  by a sidewalk clean up program,  increased educational efforts, and  increased enforcement programs  by EPD and the LCB. The follow up  survey is to see if programs have  created a positive change in per­ ceptions. 

CAMPUS­ COMMUNITY COALI­ TION­Downtown  Alcohol Business  Survey ­the Busi­ ness Survey was  also created in  response to City  Council’s request  to develop meas­ urable outcomes  regarding late  night issues. 

The purpose of the Busi­ ness Survey was to de­ termine if businesses  with alcohol licenses had   written policies for em­ ployees regarding sales  and service of alcohol,  and to find out about  other activities to reduce  drinking and driving.  Businesses without poli­ cies are aided in develop­ ing one. 

The survey was ad­ ministered October/ November 2009; a  follow­up survey in  process, to be com­ pleted by the end of  the summer.    

Survey sample included 13 busi­ nesses with alcohol licenses in the  downtown core. We found that the  majority of businesses did NOT  have a written policy; however, all  but one of the bars did have a pol­ icy, and the one that did not had  one in progress. We are working  with the businesses to help them  develop policies; the follow up will  be to see how many have devel­ oped written policies since the fall. 

GOOD NEIGHBOR  SURVEY (GNS)  ­ part  of the  Neighborhood Re­ lations program,  survey assesses  how people deal  with parties,  knowledge of is­ sues related to  alcohol, and the  state of neighbor­ hood relations. 

The survey is adminis­ tered in person by stu­ dent volunteers going  door to door in neighbor­ hoods that have a high  incidence of noise com­ plaints.  Data from sur­ veys is used to guide  educational programming  and to assess progress. 

The third annual GNS  was administered  October 2009 – Feb­ ruary 2010.  A follow  up survey was com­ pleted in May and  results are being tal­ lied.    

Survey sample included 294 stu­ dent renters (71%) and non­ student residents (29%). There  has been a significant increase in  the number of non­students who  think students make good  neighbors, from 66.7% in 2007 to  nearly 83% in 2009.    

ALCOHOL WISE/  E­CHUG  ­ comparison of  two web­based  alcohol tools. 

Pre, post and Follow­up  surveys that measure  learning outcomes and  behavior change. 

Data collected from  all 3 surveys and  awaiting analysis by  Dr Kara Gabriel. Due  end of May 2010. 

Encountered some problems with  retention. Only 400 students vol­ unteered for the research and on  follow­up, that number had dwin­ dled to less than 90. 

19


P AGE

The Prevention Puzzle 

20

    Research based, comprehen­ sive, well­coordinated programs  with a focus on student engage­ ment form the guiding principals  at the Wellness Center. Our Pre­ vention Planning Model ad­ dresses the general student  population (Universal Preven­ tion); students who are known to  be in a high­risk group (Targeted  Prevention); and students who  have demonstrated high­risk be­ haviors (Indicated Prevention).      All first year students who  came to campus in fall 2010  were required to complete a web ­based alcohol prevention cur­ riculum from 3rd Millennium  Classrooms called Alcohol­Wise.  Alcohol­Wise was created to  change campus culture, educate  college students about the harm­ ful effects of alcohol, and act as  prevention for future alcohol­ related violations.      Prime For Life is an 8­hour  class that is offered four times a  quarter to students who have  been sanctioned by the courts,  Student Affairs, or the Office of  Housing as a consequence of vio­ lating state alcohol laws or the  student code of conduct.  In ad­ dition to the class, students com­ plete an online alcohol and drug  assessment and a one­on­one  interview with the facilitator of 

the class. Except for DUI related  the classes because they are of­ offences, Prime For Life is a court fered in a non­biased, non­ ­approved alternative to the AL­ judgmental format with protocols  COHOL & DRUG  INFORMATION SCHOOL  emphasizing personal choice,  (ADIS) offered in the community.  support for change, and chal­ If a student has been court or­ lenging outcome expectancies.   dered to receive an alcohol and     Gail Farmer, Director of Well­ drug evaluation, they need to  ness was invited to present a  have this completed by a state  poster at the national Alcohol  certified agency in the commu­ Strategies Conference sponsored  nity.  by NASPA* in New Orleans  in      Under The Influence and  winter 2010.  The poster, A  Marijuana 101 are both web­ based classes that take approxi­ Comparison of  Two Web­ based, Brief Alcohol Interven­ mately 1.5 – 2 hours to com­ plete. Typically a student will be  tions for First Year Students   provided a summary of  the re­ asked to take Under The Influ­ ence for a minor alcohol offense  search collaboration with  Gail  that violates the student code of  Farmer, Dr Kara Gabriel, CWU  and Dr Jason Kilmer at UW.  conduct or the housing policy.  Marijuana 101 is typically as­ *National Association of Student  signed to students who violate  state law or university policy with  Personnel Administrators  respect to marijuana.  The courts  often accept it as an alternative  to the ADIS, but students need  to confirm this with their  probation contacts.  Evidence­based alcohol &      National data and evi­ dence collected at CWU  drug programs that are   support the efficacy of all  successfully challenging   of these interventions.  These classes are effec­ beliefs & attitudes that   tive because they follow  directly contribute to   best practices as noted  by the NIAAA, NASPA*  high­risk drinking  and others. Students like 

Alcohol & Marijuana  Classes 250 200 150 100 50 0

Alcohol Wise Prime for Life

Marijuanaa UTI Prime For Life 2007

2008

2009

2010

Marijuana 101 Under the Influence


During fall 2009 we con­

Research Opportunities 

ducted a research experiment  to see if we could duplicate  the excellent results we have  received with Alcohol ­Wise   by utilizing another web­based  tool called Electronic Check  Up To Go.  This research  would not have been possible  without the assistance of Dr.  Kara Gabriel, Central Washing­ ton University and Dr. Jason  Kilmer, University of Washing­ ton.    Study Design – The fall 2009  incoming class was randomly  assigned to two groups; one  completed Alcohol­Wise and  the other Electronic Check  Up To Go. We had roughly  800 students in each group.  Participating in the research  was entirely voluntary and we  were able to secure 440 stu­

dents for our baseline sample.  We experienced a significant  drop out of participants at the  post­test and the sample size  dropped to 144. Retention  continued to plague us at the  follow­up survey and the sam­ ple size dropped to 84.    Findings – The sample size  was not only disappointing but  makes interpretation of any  results quite problematic. Not  only did we have issues with  the total sample size but we  also had difficulty with the  gender distribution of partici­ pants. By the time the follow­ up survey was administered  the demographics were 75%  female and 25% male. This is  not representative of the  demographics of our first year  student population. Because  extreme caution is advised 

P AGE

21

when interpreting data in  studies plagued by the issues  we confronted, they are not  included in this report.*    Some Good News­ 41% of  students reported that they  did not drink at all.  And 74%  of them did not initiate drink­ ing at the time of the follow­ up survey. This suggests that  we could emphasize this posi­ tive health behavior in our so­ cial marketing strategies.     *If you would like a copy of  the research findings prepared  by Dr Gabriel, contact Gail  Farmer at farmer@cwu.edu 

Social Marketing­Facebook, and Twitter, and blogs...oh my!    Wellness Center  Green Dot  CCC        Wellness Center  CCC   

We kept an online presence at  every opportunity this year,  from the CWU intranet to so­ cial media venues, reaching  out to students and the greater community in  the places they frequent.  Check out our pages: 

Wellness Center  Green Dot  Neighborhood Relations   Campus­Community Coalition 

 


P AGE

22

 

A Few Snapshots 


P AGE

Thanks to All of Our Student Staff! 

23


Wellness Center    400 E University Way, SURC 139, Ellensburg, WA 98926­7489  Phone: 509­963­3233      Fax: 509­963­1813  E­mail: wellness@cwu.edu  Web: www.cwu.edu/~wellness 

CWU is an EEO/AA/Title IX Institution. Persons with disabilities  may request reasonable accommodation by calling the Center for  Disability Services at 509­963­2171 or TDD 509­963­2143 


CWU Wellness 2009/2010 Annual Report