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friday, 11/09/12

volume xliv, issue 11

Battles of the heart:

Star from “The Big Bang Theory” speaks to CWRU students on her Jewish faith, acting career >>mikeMCKENNA research&innovationsREPORTER<<

How a Marine Corps veteran redefines the meaning of strength shannon snyder / observer Berl Jones, 75, continues to exercise three days a week at Eliza Bryant Village on Cleveland’s East Side. The former Marine deserved to hold a world record in the deadweight lift during his youth, but racism kept his name out of the record books. >>tylerHOFFMAN editor.inCHIEF<<

M

arines are trained to fight in battles, and Berl “Dee” Jones, 75, has fought his fair share. But not once did it cause him to travel overseas or lift a weapon. “I remember my first day of basic training [in South Carolina],” Jones says with his gleaming eyes fixated on the corner of his small, sparse apartment. “There was a water faucet...that said ‘Whites Only;’ the other said ‘Blacks Only.’” Though more than 50 years elapsed since Jones served as a stateside Marine in the Korean Conflict, he recalls his introduction to the United States Marine Corps and a Jim Crow South as if not a single day had passed.

“I never saw anything like that before. I’m from Cleveland. I didn’t know about that black and white stuff. I couldn’t fathom...it just couldn’t register,” he says as his chiseled features momentarily reflect the shocked countenance of a younger self. Dismissing the entrenched segregation, Jones attempted to steal a sip from the fountain when a white drill instructor stopped him. But Jones ignored the instructor’s racism, and the resulting fight left the young recruit facefirst on the pavement surrounded by an audience of his peers. The drill instructor said “get on up, I got some more for you,” he recalls. “I said that’s alright...I got enough...sir.” to JONES | 3

President Obama wins reelection, campus groups respond after year of campaigning >>victoriaROBINSON student.affairsREPORTER<<

“Four more years, four more years” chanted the Case Democrats and fellow supporters. Screams and shouts of excitement stirred throughout the Jolly Scholar as CNN declared President Barack Obama’s victory. “When the news networks projected Obama the winner of the election around 11:15, I, as well as the rest of the room, was overwhelmed with a sense of excitement and joy, but also a sense of relief,” said Dwayne Coleman, the public relations chair for the Case Democrats. “We had been working so hard for the past

months and it was great to see that it all paid off.” At the end of Tuesday night, Obama had won a total of 303 electoral votes, while Mitt Romney had taken 206. A key part of Obama’s win was, as it usually is, the state of Ohio. “Ohio was critical in the election,” said Brylan May, a member of Case Democrats. “This was evident by the fact that both candidates have visited repeatedly in the past few months. Ohio is always a battleground state and is always critical in determining who will run this country.” As it turned out, when Presi-

to ELECTION | 3

Last week, Case Western Reserve University had a bit of star power – actress Mayim Bialik, best known for her role as Amy Farrah Fowler on “The Big Bang Theory,” presented a talk entitled “Neuroscience and Acting: How I Got to Where I Am Today.” With a frank sense of humor, and none of the awkwardness reminiscent of her character on “The Big Bang Theory,” Bialik spoke to a crowd of several hundred people in Strosacker Auditorium. While she did extensively discuss her acting career, including her current work on “The Big Bang Theory,” the main focus of Bialik’s talk were the seven things that keep her sane while working in the rigors of Hollywood. As the event was organized through CWRU’s Hillel Foundation, the school’s Jewish group, Bialik discussed her Jewish heritage, and said that many of her points are rooted in her Jewish faith. However, she noted that she was not promoting one belief system over another and was hoping that the audience would “look past the differences and see the larger points” in her talk. Bialik began the “teaching” portion of her talk by discussing the importance she places in “super complex relationships.” She says her Jewish heritage values these interactions, and her weekly studying with a partner of the complex relationships found in the Torah, Judaism’s primary holy book, allows her not to be swept up in the world of show business. “Anyone who has read the Old Testament knows that the stories of betrayal, and exile, and marrying two sisters come very soon after you start reading,” Bialik said. “I love that I come from a tradition that’s not afraid to deal with those super complicated relationships.” Bialik then addressed the need for routine in life. Her personal example was her strict weekly observance of the Sabbath, where she unplugs from electronic devices, and makes everything wait. She

to BIALIK | 5

index

austin sting / observer The reelection of President Obama was announced shortly after he was declared the winner of Ohio’s 18 electoral votes around 11 p.m. on Nov. 6.

1 news 6 A&E 8 opinion 10 fun page 16 sports


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Outside the Circle News >>sarahGROFT national.newsREPORTER<<

New telescope finds early light The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected starlight emitted from some of the very first stars in the universe. Marco Ajello, an astrophysicist at the University of California, Berkeley, piloted his research at Stanford University. According to Ajello’s scientific background, the first stars in the universe were large and mostly made of hydrogen. There is a possibility that they used all of the hydrogen quickly and then exploded into supernovas. This may mean that the stars no longer exist. However, the light they produced may still be traveling towards us. It is impossible to see this light because the light from our galaxy is so overwhelmingly powerful. Therefore, in order to see this starlight, scientists used gamma rays.

Gamma rays are used to find blazars, or galaxies that are far away and emit gamma rays. “They are located at different distances from us,” said Ajello, “and from them we are able to measure the amount of starlight in different epochs.” Using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, researchers have been able to collect information about light in the universe 4 billion, 8 billion, and 11 billion years after the Big Bang. Ajello hopes that further research and experiments will produce light data from the beginning of the universe. Ajello concluded by saying, “Since the universe is always expanding, the best way to measure is to go as early as possible in the history of the universe.”

Pretrial hearing begins for accused soldier

courtesy daviddarling.info Recent reports have stated found that Koshik, a young male elephant at the Everland Zoo in South Korea, can understand and communicate some Korean words.

Highway shooter arrested A suspect was arrested this past Monday in Detroit after he was believed to be involved in dozens of random shootings along highways in four Michigan counties. All of the shootings took place within the past month. The shootings began in the middle of October in the small Detroit suburb of Wixom. Ingham County Sheriff Gene Wriggelsworth informed the Associated Press that his force had recently obtained a search warrant for the entire county. “We’re trying to confirm whether he’s our guy or not.” Wriggelsworth continued, “We’ll have to see how this shakes out.” The number of seemingly random incidents in the past month total 24. All of them occurred along Interstate 96. One of the victims was on his way to a World Series game in Detroit on Oct. 27 and

was shot in the hip. The man was able to limp into a gas station to ask for help. Emily Roll was the employee present when the victim came in. “First he said to call the cops. I thought he got robbed, but then he said ‘I just got shot off the highway.’” Thirty minutes before and only one mile away, another car had been shot through the back window, but the driver was not injured. Bob Bezotte, the Livingston County Sherriff, said that if someone had been in the backseat of the vehicle, he or she would have been impacted by the bullet. Thankfully, the man who was shot in the hip was the first to receive any injuries from the shootings. The ATF, FBI, and Crime Stoppers were offering $102,000 for any information about the suspect or his/ her whereabouts.

Elephant speaks Korean Koshik, a young male elephant at the Everland Zoo in South Korea, can speak Korean. Though his vocabulary is limited, he can say things like “annyong” (hello), “anja” (sit down), “aniya” (no), “nuo” (lie down), and “choah” (good). He speaks by putting his trunk in his mouth. In order to make sure they weren’t hearing things, native Korean speakers were asked to listen to the elephant and write down what they heard. Angela S. Stoeger, a biologist at the University of Vienna, was one of the main investigators of this surprising occurrence. “We also compared his imitative vocalizations with those of other elephants,” she said. “It was very different.” Not only does Koshik appear to speak Korean, but he also seems to imitate the pitch and timbre of human speech; more specifically, the pitch and timbre of his trainer’s speech. Researchers believe that Koshik’s ability to speak arose from his desire to socialize. For his first seven years,

Koshik was the only elephant at the Everland Zoo. It is not quite known how much Koshik understands or whether he will continue to learn more Korean words. Stoeger commented, “He’s basically using this as a social function, but not really to communicate with the keepers.” For example, although he knows the word for sit, he does not show any recognition as to whether the trainers actually sit or not. In 2002, Koshik received a female Asian elephant companion. He is still able to interact and socialize with her in a normal animalistic way, but has not stopped using the Korean words he learned in his youth. Other than Koshik, Stoeger and her colleagues have also come upon an African elephant that imitates the sounds made by its Asian elephant neighbor, and another African elephant who can imitate the sound of a truck engine.

Staff Sergeant Robert Bales was accused of murdering 16 Afghani civilians in this past year. A military prosecutor, Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Morse, explained the government’s case against Bales at a pretrial hearing on Monday, Nov. 5. According to The New York Times, this case was said to be one of the nation’s worst war crimes cases in decades. On March 11, local Afghani families were awakened by a cloaked individual firing a weapon. Multiple children were shot in the thighs and heads, and 11 bodies, mostly of women and children, were placed in a pile and burned. Morse spoke about Bale’s demeanor upon arriving at an Army post in Kandahar Province. Bale “was lucid, coherent, and responsive.” However, Morse also described Bale’s clothes which were soaked through with blood. If he is found guilty, Bales, a 39-yearold male and an 11-year military veteran, could face the death penalty. The hearing occurred at the joint base Lewis-McChord in Washington and was the first step in the military justice process.

Thirty-five witnesses are expected to testify over the lengthy investigation. At the conclusion of the hearing, Colonel Lee Deneke, the presiding officer, will announce his recommendations for Bales, including whether the death penalty should be a viable option. One of the witnesses, Corporal David Godwin, informed the court that he had disobeyed Army rules on the evening of March 10, by drinking alcohol with other soldiers, including Bales. Godwin admitted to having a couple of drinks of Jack Daniel’s but stated that none of the soldiers appeared to be intoxicated. Through cross-examination, however, there were some abnormalities discovered, like the possibility that Bales was perhaps intoxicated, and that he arrived back at the Army base wearing a cape, which was not typical. John Henry Browne, one of Bale’s lawyers, informed the court that Bales suffered from post-traumatic stress and had several wounds from his multiple deployments. Test results have shown that blood found on his clothing matched that of some of the victims.

On the Beat >>cwruPOLICE

Usually when students are deciding on a university to attend, they look at things like academics, available majors, geographic location, and so on. While these issues take the forefront in most cases, there is also no denying that there is an important social aspect to attending college as well (or we would all just remain in our parents’ basements taking internet classes – not the same somehow). Living away from home for the first time, meeting new people, and forming new relationships are a vital part of the university experience. Unfortunately, some relationships end badly. In most cases, the individuals concerned handle things themselves; in some cases, additional resources like the police get involved. There are a few basic facts to remember about issues relating to sexual conduct and relationships. When it comes to sexual conduct, the key issue from a strictly legal point of view is consent by both parties. Consent cannot be given if someone is under 13, impaired because of a mental condition or advanced age, by someone under threat of force, or by someone too intoxicated to give consent. On college campuses, CWRU included, the vast majority of sexual assaults reported involve

issues of consent and alcohol as opposed to “stranger in the bushes” type assaults. This is something to keep in mind. When it comes to relationships, if you are in one that involves physical violence, it is not healthy and it is illegal. Seek help from someone you trust. If you feel you are being stalked or harassed, whether in person or by telephone/text or other electronic means, call CWRU PD at 216-3683333 for help. Call right away if the communications involve threats of violence. And always be wary of giving out personal information on social media sites. Let’s look out for each other and have a great rest of the semester.

>>police blotter

10/29 to 11/5

Oct. 29 - Phone taken from office, theft, Olin Building Oct. 31 - Tablet computer taken from backpack, theft, Thwing Center Nov. 1 - Tablet computer taken off desk, theft, Adelbert Hall Nov. 2 - Cash and phone taken from office, theft, Thwing Center Contact On the Beat at policecolumn@case.edu.


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austin sting / observer CWRU’s student group Young Americans for Liberty held an event in the Cleveland Room of Thwing on election night. from ELECTION | 1 dent Obama was announced the winner of Ohio’s 18 electoral votes, he also surpassed the total of 270 required to win the presidency. While the Case Democrats celebrated at the Jolly Scholar, the Case College Republicans watched the results come in at the Cuyahoga County Republican Party’s election night watch party in Independence, Ohio. “The results of any important or influential moment for the nation results in a certain amount of uncertainty for the future,” said Erin Law, the public relations director for the Case Republicans. “After this election, never before has this uncertainty seemed so great that it caused me great anxiety for our future.” In this election, both campus political groups played a large role on campus. They each put up booths, registered voters, participated in a debate against each other as well as the Young Americans for Liberty, and overall tried “to make sure that the campus population was informed on the issues so that they could make an informed choice,” as Coleman said. Case Western Reserve University was

s w s e nw e s n ws e w n sne w s e w n e n

Write for the news section! Contact gcb20@ case.edu u d e e. s a c

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not the only college which held several political events this election season; colleges across the nation tried to improve their campuses’ political awareness in an attempt to increase voter turnout. “Colleges and college students are becoming an increasingly important part of the electorate. This is evident by both candidates paying close attention to the college vote this election cycle,” said Coleman. “I believe that college students are beginning to pay closer attention to issues that directly affect them, such as student loans, grants, and health care.” However, the Case Democrats believed students and voters were paying even more attention to economics in this election. The Case Republicans disagreed. “I’m a little disappointed in America,” said Sam Lehnecker, a member of the Case Republicans. “I’m definitely not against the LGBT community and, in fact, I support it whole-heartedly. I just think that this election turned into one on social issues when, in reality, America needs a better economy.” “Republicans are hopeful that Obama will find some way to find a solution to our economy that avoids the horrible situation

Ohio Election 2012

State

50.1% 26, 672, 302

Cuyahoga County

State Cuyahoga County

68.8% 420, 953 48.2% 2, 571, 539 30.2% 184, 485

State .9% 48, 672 Cuyahoga .5% County 3, 281

3

(Democrat)

President Barack Obama (Republican)

Mitt Romney (Libertarian)

Gary Johnson

Source politico.com meilyn sylvestre / observer

in which Europe now finds itself,” said Case Republican treasurer Janis Cava. This election season was one of many ups and downs for both political parties as various news programs discussed the “winners” of each debate. “Overall, I think election season was great. There was a lot of good discussion and it really brought some attention to the problems our country is facing,” said Kassie Stewart, the media correspondent for the Case Democrats. “There were some defining moments for the media, like the sound clips from debates and the leaked video of Romney, but I don’t think these single occurrences were make-or-break moments.” “I believe that Barack Obama was the best candidate in this election because of where he stands and who he is,” said Coleman. “He is a man of conviction who

means what he says and who deeply cares about all of us.” “His balanced approach to economics and his longing for all Americans to be considered equal is what this country needs. And the fact that he wants to do all of this in the spirit of compromise is what we believe is going to move America forward.” In the end, both political parties need to remember, as Stewart said, that the elections don’t just happen every four years and that the votes people cast every general and primary election are important and have a major impact, as well. “We need to be thinking about the direction our country is going all the time, not just every four years,” said May. “Politics are important; the government and the country are always changing no matter who is in office.”

from JONES | 1 Across the beige hallways and dimly lit rooms of Eliza Bryant Village, the nation’s oldest African American-based nursing home in operation, residents rest in rigid beds and wingback chairs, many of whom represent a creased and worn shadow of their former selves. However, Jones, who inhabits the independent living portion of the village on Cleveland’s East Side, does not portray one’s former self. He portrays multiple selves, all of which dot the course of his turbulent yet vibrant life. Since arriving at the village in December 2010, this Marine veteran has retained both his independence and his loneliness, accompanied only by a few cans of food that rest on the white linoleum of his kitchen countertop and the exercise equipment down the hall. Following his tour with the Marines, Jones channeled his strength into weightlifting, which he discounts as a hobby despite the numerous trophies that cast a golden glow across their pedestal, a humble end table occupying the corner of his living room. “I could tell you [how much I lifted] but you wouldn’t believe me,” Jones says, as his eyes widen with anticipation. “I deadlifted up to 720 [pounds]. I weighed 219 pounds...I have pictures of it and everything...I was a bad, strong, young man,” he remarks with a proud smile. But the color of his skin ultimately proved more influential than the weight of his achievement, and his rightful place in the record books was never acknowledged. Though the gruff exterior Jones portrayed at the time of his accomplishment has since been muted, he continues to exercise three days a week in the modest gym that lies only steps away from his apartment. “I have more trophies than that,” Jones softly explains as he points to his display of accolades, “but I fell astray a little bit, too. I started drinking alcohol, and I quit lifting be-

shannon snyder / observer Jones lives in a single bedroom apartment at Eliza Bryant Village. The former champion weightlifter keeps a picture of his late partner in his coat closet because it is too painful for him to see. tween ’82 and ’83. But, I got myself straight. I haven’t had a drink since September of 1999.” However, it was the love for a woman, not the thrill of competition that Jones credits for his decision to quit drinking. Thirty-four years ago he encountered his future partner, Naomi Alexander, at a party. “I was bigger then…really big up here,” Jones says as he gestures to his chest. “She was scared of me…a lot of people see a big guy and they think violent things; I don’t have that on my mind.” Despite Alexander’s attempt to give a false address, the young weightlifter found her house in the city projects. “I showed up and she was all embarrassed,” he recalls. The couple courted and proceeded to spend three decades together. However, Naomi’s kidneys began to fail, and she died on April 4, 2010. “I stopped drinking before

she passed on me so I could help her,” Jones says, “I was good and straight when she passed. I gave her all of her insulin shots, gave her her baths, took her to dialysis three times a week...I did everything for her. I loved that woman so much.” With grace and purpose, Jones walks to the corner of his apartment and opens the white, wooden door of his coat closet. Maneuvering through the obstacles of winter jackets, men’s shoes, and lawn equipment, he uncovers a worn picture, enclosed in a tarnished, gold frame. “Oh my God...there my baby is...that’s my hand on her shoulder...and that’s she and I…that’s my baby,” the Marine whispers as his callused hands begin to tremble under the weight of the delicate portrait. With Shannon Snyder, photography editor


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Flora Stone Mather Center for Women launches first social media campaign for feminism why they need feminism in their lives, regardless of age or gender, and become the star of a campaign poster. “What’s up with the ‘F’ word?” “Our vision of the ‘Who Needs FemiThe provocative statement is the official nism’ campaign will be taking dry erase title of the Flora Stone Mather Center for boards that say ‘I need feminism because’ Women’s first social media campaign for on the top and allow people to have the feminism – the Case Western Reserve Uni- opportunity to write in their own reason,” versity version of the national “Who Needs Greene said. Feminism” campaign, which originated “If they’re comfortable, we’ll take a at Duke University and has now spread photo and feature the person on our camacross the country. paign posters, which we will be using next The main organizers of the campaign semester,” she said. “If they’re not comand undergraduate student assistants at fortable, we’ll have a big poster where the Flora Stone Mather Center for Wom- people could write their reasons why they en, Radhika Mehlotra and Tessa Greene, need feminism without having to take are hoping that the catchy title will draw their photo.” more than just its usual following of supThis aspect of the campaign is not porters advocating unique to CWRU. for women’s rights, Variations of the istorically, it’s been so radical. All the “Who Needs Femiand ultimately convey a more univer- word really means is that women deserve nism” campaign sal presence of the equal rights to men. Not that women are have been using the word “feminism” on superior to men, (but) that we’re just dry erase board phoequal.” campus. to advertisement as -Radhika Mehlotra, main campaign a way to empower “The reason we organizer advocates and dedecided to have this event is because mystify the word at the word seems really taboo on campus,” the national level since it began. Mehlotra said. “A lot of times you can’t state a fact “We decided it would be a good place about why feminism is good, so you have to start a conversation in terms of what the to tell people why it’s important to you or word really means.” the people in your life,” Greene said. The campaign will kick off in the Nord “Our end goal is to take away anything atrium on Nov. 13 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. to FEMINISM | 5 by inviting passersby to voluntarily reveal >>jennaMILLEMACI asst.newsEDITOR<<

courtesy case.edu The Cleveland Education, Leadership, and Learning Symposium, sponsored by Sigma Nu and Sigma Phi Epsilon, supported the Great Lakes Science Center.

Fraternities collaborate in combining philanthropy with intellectual stimulation >>nooraSOMERSALO student.affairsREPORTER<<

November 12 & 13

photo by Peter Jennings

On Saturday, Nov. 3, students gathered in Strosacker Auditorium to hear nine accomplished speakers from the Cleveland area share stories about success, failure, and leadership as a part of Cleveland Education, Leadership, Learning Symposium (CELLS), a philanthropy event benefiting the Great Lakes Science Center. The event was co-hosted by Sigma Nu and Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternities. The speakers included Case Western Reserve University’s own faculty, such as Mark Turner, professor of cognitive science, and David Schiraldi, professor of macromolecular science and engineering. Other speakers included operations manager of think[box] Ian Charnas, and Amanda Whitener, Director of Visitor and School Engagement at Great Lakes Science Center. The topics ranged from linguistic research to practical tips for getting oneself organized in the middle of a busy schedule of a typical college student. Bringing a completely new philanthropy event on to the CWRU campus required careful planning on behalf of the two fraternities. “The brothers of Sigma Nu approached us with the idea of doing something along the lines of ‘TED Talks,’ but featuring our esteemed faculty and accomplished individuals from Cleveland,” said Grant Pignatiello, a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon and one of the organizers of CELLS.

“A group of us started planning the event in the summer, and I think we met at least 20 times over the months of June to November to plan the event,” he continued. This was the first time Sigma Nu and Sigma Phi Epsilon collaborated in organizing a philanthropy event. “In order to increase the number of people available to help with the event and to increase the potential speaker connections we had, we needed to partner up with another organization. SigEp turned out to be the perfect choice,” said Jack Borsi, philanthropy chair of Sigma Nu. “They brought a lot of enthusiasm and ideas to the partnership and were essential in making CELLS a success. This was an incredibly positive result for the first event and we have very high hopes for next year.” Besides raising money for the Great Lakes Science Center, the organizers also hoped to achieve another goal with CELLS – intellectual engagement. “CELLS is about providing something of value to the Case community and bringing together students, staff, and other Clevelanders for an intellectually stimulating shared experience,” said Borsi. “We really wanted to do something interesting that had never been done before,” said Pignatiello. He continued, “We wanted to provide an interesting venue for our community to learn something new and challenge the way they perceive the world.”

“H

OPEN AUDITIONS! For the 2013 Spring semester Drama productions in Eldred Theater: Fifth of July

by Lanford Wilson February 22-March 3 Directed by Catherine Albers

The Crucible

by Arthur Miller April 12-21 Directed by Donald Carrier

Mon. 11/12 & Tues. 11/13 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. 2nd floor theater in Eldred Hall - 2070 Adelbert Rd. (on Case quad behind Millis Science Center) • Open to all members of the CWRU community. • Sign-up sheets are posted in Eldred's 1st floor Gallery. Please sign-up in advance for audition time. • Theater majors: prepare monologue of your choice, not to exceed 2-minutes. • Non- theater majors: monologue is not required; text will be provided. • Visit theater.case.edu for more information.

Questions? Call 216-368-5926

theater.case.edu


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CWRU celebrates Diwali >>tanviPARMAR special.assignmentsREPORTER<<

At 6 p.m. on Nov. 10 in the Thwing Ballroom, the undergraduate Indian Student Association (uISA) will light up Case Western Reserve University with the Diwali Dinner. The food for the celebration will be provided by Jaipur Junction. The appetizers and drinks for the event will be samosas, chaat, and mango lassi. On the menu for dinner are malai kofta, shahi paneer, navratan korma, channa masala, naan, and chavaal. Desserts will be gulab jamun and ras mulai. “I can’t wait for Diwali Dinner so I can finally eat Indian food again,” said freshman Soumya Rajupet. Diwali (also known as Deepavali or Devali) is a holiday that is better known as the “Festival of Lights.” It is celebrated by Hindus, Jains, Buddhists, and Sikhs. Technically, this year Diwali falls on Nov. 13. The name “Diwali” translates into “row of lamps,” which are traditionally small clay lamps filled with oil. They are said to represent the victory of good over evil. These lamps are usually lit and kept outside houses during the night. They are said to make the goddess Lakshmi feel welcome. People clean their houses and put out lights to impress Lakshmi since she is the goddess of wealth and prosperity. Many people celebrate Diwali by wearing new clothes, eating sweets and snacks with family and friends, and bursting firecrackers. The firecrackers are said to drive away evil spirits. This holiday is during the end of the har-

vest season in most of India and, traditionally, the closing of accounts for businesses which depend on agriculture. Farmers and businessmen give thanks for the year that went by and pray for a good harvest for the year to come. Blessings from Lakshmi usually signify a good year ahead. “Diwali is a time of celebration and reflection. It is a time to celebrate with those close to us. As a freshman, it’s my first time celebrating Diwali without my parents, and I’m certainly sad that I’m not able to be with them on this occasion. But, I’m also excited to be celebrating this festival with all my new friends that I have become extremely close to in the past three months. I want this Diwali to be a great success so I hope everyone can come out and celebrate with us,” said uISA Freshman Representative, Aravindan Krishnan. Prasad, which is an edible offering that is blessed by God, are distributed at the end of all the religious rituals and pujas. Diwali also signifies the return of the god Lord Rama, his wife Sita, and his brother Lakshman from their 14 yearlong exile. It is said that they defeated a demonking named Ravana. The people of Ayodhya, Lord Rama’s kingdom, celebrated the return of the king by lighting diyas (clay lamps) and bursting firecrackers. Nowadays, Diwali has spread all over the world to places like Australia, New Zealand, United States, Europe, and the Caribbean. Freshman Sasha Ali said, “I’m really excited to go to Diwali dinner! I’ve never experienced Diwali before. It’ll be interesting to learn what it actually means.”

5

from BIALIK | 1 says that she is lucky that “The Big Bang Theory” has a schedule such that she rehearses Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, and the long tape day is not until the following Tuesday. “It kind of makes for a hectic Sunday because my family chooses to not drive,” Bialik said, ���But it’s absolutely something that refreshes me for the week ahead and really gives me a sense of rhythm and routine for the week.” Staying on the topic of routine, Bialik noted that despite the light-hearted nature of the show, filming “The Big Bang Theory” can still be stressful. “It looks a lot like a laugh riot to go to my job and there is a lot that is fun,” Bialik said. “But it is a business, so there is a constant interchange of negotiation. I’m definitely not saying anyone should feel sorry for me, but for me, it’s important to find things throughout the week that are relaxing or enjoyable.” As a self-described music person, Bialik unwinds through music. A pianist, she can be found many evenings playing the instrument. Shifting gears a bit, Bialik then addressed the need for being a person of good character in her industry. She says that there is a lot of gossip in Hollywood which she, albeit sometimes not easily, chooses to ignore. “I don’t think that choosing to ignore gossip necessarily makes me the most popular person sometimes,” Bialik said. “I don’t wave a big banner about it, but it’s pretty clear to people that I’m not a person to come to if you want to bad-mouth somebody. [Gossip] makes me feel yucky inside.” According to Bialik, not spreading gossip is not the only thing that sets her apart in Hollywood. She has come to terms with the sense of “being an other” since her strict adherence to the Jewish religious calendar with its many religious holidays can create scheduling issues. “It’s been an interesting challenge to try and embrace some certain aspects of being different,” Bialik said. “I put that positive spin on it because it reminds me to help other people that are also different.” Bialik then discussed her belief in something bigger than herself, in her case, God. She says her view is not always “the most popular” in her industry, but that engaging in religious dialogue helps bring her sanity. Bialik’s closing point discussed the “notion of a global existence.” Since her job does not take her far from Los Angeles, Bi-

courtesy imdb.com Mayim Bialik, best known for her role as Amy Farrah Fowler on “The Big Bang Theory,” presented a talk entitled “Neuroscience and Acting: How I Got to Where I Am Today” last week. alik loves travelling so that she can break out of her comfort zone. After discussing her seven points, Bialik then addressed student questions, which ranged from how she got involved in “The Big Bang Theory” to how – since she has a doctorate in neuroscience from the University of California, Los Angeles – the acting world compared to academia. One particularly interesting bit of information that surfaced from that portion was that Bialik had never seen “The Big Bang Theory” until she auditioned during the show’s third season for the role of a “female Jim Parsons.” Parsons plays Sheldon Cooper, one of the show’s main characters. Students were able to meet Bialik after she delivered her talk during a meet and greet session at the Hillel building. Freshman Julia Bianco was one of the several hundred students who attended the event. As a member of Hillel, Bianco was impressed with Bialik’s message. “I thought that she was extremely interesting, and I really liked hearing her perspective on Judaism,” Bianco said. “I think it’s great that she is able to balance her religious life, her acting life, and her academics so well.”

from FEMINISM | 4

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that would be offensive about the word feminism,” Mehlotra said. “Historically, it’s been so radical. All the word really means is that women deserve equal rights to men,” she said. “Not that women are superior to men, (but) that we’re just equal.” The Flora Stone Mather Center for Women’s Associate Director for Programs, Amanda Kenney, is also one of the main organizers of the event. “Feminism isn’t only a women’s movement,” she said. “Men can definitely be feminists too.” Still relatively new to the CWRU campus, the Center was established in October 2003 by Dorothy Miller, current Director of the Flora Stone Mather Center for Women and faculty member at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences. The center now resides in the Thwing Student Center. While the center celebrates female students, faculty, staff, community and alumnae, men are always welcomed, Kenney noted. “It’s so gendered,” Mehlotra said, when asked why CWRU needs feminism. “Our campus is extremely gendered in terms of our academics, and I think that everyone feels that. But in my four years, I’ve never seen anyone do anything about it,” she said. “I think that is my number one reason that CWRU needs feminism – because the women here are great.”


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arts & entertainment 11/09/12

Eldred Theatre presents Dancing at Lughnasa >>josephVERBOVSZKY theatre&danceREPORTER<< From the people who brought you “Rocky Horror Show” comes a tale quite different in nature: “Dancing at Lughnasa” (pronounced Loo-nasa). It is a bittersweet tale of five sisters as they experience the small human joys that flit briefly on the winds of hardship continually blowing through their lives. The sisters live in a quiet rainy town on the west coast of Ireland, in the county of Donegal. They have just received their first wireless radio, nicknamed Marconi, which offers an unreliable respite from their daily toiling. It is the season of Lughnasa, the harvest festival from which the play derives its name. Though Ireland is fastidiously Catholic, many people still take part in this passionate, but pagan, ritual. The sisters feel this

passion too, and, though they can only look away from their daily chores for a moment, it lifts their spirits. The unexpected arrival of the long lost Father Jack serves as a surprise for the sisters who have not seen him since he left for missionary work in Africa over 20 years ago. But not all is well with the once greatly respected pastor who now seems to have gone native during his many years among the heathen tribes. The play was written in 1990 by Brian Friel, who is sometimes called the “Irish Chekhov.” Along with “Philadelphia, Here I Come!,” “Dancing at Lughnasa” is one of his most famous plays, although he has written over 30 throughout the years. I had a chance to go and take a look at the production before the opening this weekend and was thoroughly impressed. The set, although not completely fin-

ished, shows the quiet, rural atmosphere of Ballybeg, the town in which the play is set. Superb yet subtle lighting brings the audience into lovely rendering of the dawn and dusk in the little yard of the Mundy sisters. An ancient Marconi radio rests atop a corner table next to the hearth and cups hang neatly from the cupboard hinges. The sights and sounds of Ballybeg are also brought to life by characters on stage as they dance, sing and clang pots over their heads to the tune of Irish folk dancing. Each character speaks in the local dialect, a most difficult feat, to create an immersive experience. I also interviewed some of the cast and asked them about their characters. Kelly McCready plays Kate Mundy, a strict Catholic and equally strict schoolteacher who is described as a “straight laced bitch with a lot of love and pride for her family.” All that strictness has a purpose, as Kate

is the only sister who works outside the home and does her best to keep the family together, even as it slowly slips away. Kelsey Petersen plays Chris Mundy, the lovely single mother for whom love may yet blossom with her son’s charming but irresponsible father, Gerry Evans, played by Nicholas Pilla. By far the most entertaining of the sisters, Maggie, played by Hilary Wheelock, serves as both the main homemaker and the joker of the family. Yet under the façade of her sarcasm and riddles, she possesses a certain charm and wisdom that brings a sense of balance to the sisters as they contend with their imperceptibly changing lives. “Dancing at Lughnasa” premieres tonight at 8 p.m. with further performances on Nov. 10, 15, 16, and 17 at 8 p.m., as well as Sunday matinees on Nov. 11 and 18 at 2 p.m.

all courtesy sheehan hannan/observer

(L-R) Hillary Wheelock, Kelsey Petersen, Maggie O’Brien, Hannah Cooney, and Kelly McCready (top) appear in Eldred’s production of Dancing at Lughnasa.


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observer.case.edu

Footlighters present Avenue Q

(L-R) Jay Lee, Beau Reddington, and Surya Ravindran appear in Footlighter’s production of Avenue Q, presented in Carlton Commons. >>elainaLIN theatre&danceREPORTER<< The lights brighten the stage, revealing the actors’ expressions, along with voices harmonizing together, filling up the room. Footlighters, a student-run musical theater group, will be performing the modern musical “Avenue Q” this weekend at Carlton Commons. The musical covers thematic issues and anxieties that come as part of adulthood. The characters reflect on how in their childhood, watching children’s television programs reassured how they were “special” and “could do anything.” However, as adults they face the reality of how they are no more “special” than anyone else. The show is unique and notable for having puppets alongside the actors. “It’s a very different show from what we’ve done previously. In general, because not too many colleges, if any, have

actually done ‘Avenue Q.’ I can’t think of any that have actually done ‘Avenue Q’ with the puppets, like we have.” Director Mike Suglio explained. “This is probably the biggest thing I’ve ever done. I’ve directed a lot of things; I’ve directed a lot of movies as well. But there’s so much and there is so much scope in this. There are so many things involved here, you have the set, you have the pit, the puppets, and you have all these people. When you are the director, you are working with so many elements.” The cast consists of three human characters and eleven puppet characters. The show draws a parallel to “Sesame Street,” as the puppets interact as if they are human. Freshman Jacob Lang, cast in the role of Princeton, says, “I like how ‘Avenue Q’ keeps the same Sesame-street vibe, but for grown-ups. The puppets are always fun, but it brings it to a more adult-audience.” This makes the show

all courtesy shannon snyder/observer

even more extraordinary since the audience can enjoy and reminisce upon childhood memories, as well as relate to adulthood issues. While pursuing the search for their purpose in life, the characters confront real-world situations, all of which contradict with the rather more simplistic issues depicted in the children’s television programming they grew up with. “My whole character is growing into leaving college. And while I’m not there, I’m still growing into getting into college. I felt it was fun to simply grow with my character over the process,” Lang said. Princeton, a recent college graduate, seeks to discover his meaning in life, along with new neighbors such as Kate Monster, played by Olivia Ortega. The musical numbers of “Avenue Q” reveal and illustrate the emotions and anxieties of the characters through pieces

such as “What Do You Do with a B.A. in English?” and “Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist.” Adding to the comical effect of the show, humorous ones include “The Internet is for Porn” or “I’m Not Wearing Underwear Today.” “It’s really, really funny. I’ve read through the [script] so many times, and we’ve gone through the show many times, but I still laugh every time,” Olivia Ortega said. Whether it’s looking for a comedy, a nostalgic resemblance of your favorite children’s television programs, or a play that discusses serious issues, “Avenue Q” is a musical that will certainly captivate and entertain you. The Footlighters’ production of “Avenue Q” premiere last night at 8:30 p.m. at Carlton Commons, continues tonight and tomorrow at 8 p.m., as well as 11:59 p.m. tomorrow.


opinion

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11/09/12

Editor’s Note Clearing the air As the American Cancer Society prepares to mark its 37th annual Great American Smokeout on Nov. 15, Cleveland State University is keeping a different time in mind: September 2013. By this month, the entire CSU campus must be tobacco-free, as ordered by a policy approved on Nov. 7 by the university’s board of trustees. According to The Plain Dealer on Nov. 7, the ban was created by university administrators and prohibits anyone on the campus from using any kind of tobacco – including the smokeless varieties. Parking lots, walkways, and athletic facilities are included in the policy. CSU is not the first university to take this action, however. Effective Nov. 1, the Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) banned the use of tobacco on its campus, and the university has yet to report any problems with its enforcement. The Plain Dealer notes that no-smoking signs are posted on the NEOMED campus in Rootstown, Ohio, and repeat offenders are subject to the same disciplinary actions used in other violation instances at the school. Miami University and University of Toledo also employ smoking bans on their campuses, while nearby Kent State University is investigating the idea further. Readers who commented on the online version of The Plain Dealer’s article mostly supported the decision, while one commenter noted that smoking remained a legal right in the nation and the ban would be tested during the weeks surrounding CSU’s final exams. So in a world dominated by the need to keep up with the Joneses, it begs the question: should Case Western Reserve University enact a similar policy? I am tempted to argue against employing such a ban at our private institution, especially since CWRU’s track record for enforcing new policies isn’t flawless. Take the posting policy for instance. What was initially a great idea to clean up campus clutter and address fire hazards quickly turned into a guessing game for students, who didn’t know what could be posted where and what consequences for ignoring the policy existed. Also, one of the benefits of studying at a private institution is a sense of autonomy, for the government has somewhat limited control over what rules and regulations the school as a whole must follow. Following the path of state universities is a slippery slope for CWRU that could lead to losing a sense of this independence. The negative effects of smoking – both on the person and those around them – cannot be ignored, however. Therefore, rather than employing a campus-wide ban like CSU, CWRU’s current policy should undergo stricter enforcement. All too often university smokers can be seen lighting up in “unapproved areas” close to residence halls and campus buildings. As unappealing as some may consider it, tobacco use is not illegal. Thus, a balance needs to be struck between a student, staff, or faculty member’s right to use it and another person’s right to avoid it. Tyler Hoffman – EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Want to connect with the editor? Follow him on Twitter @tylerehoffman or drop him a line at observer@case.edu.

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Tuam: a traveler’s tale >> rachel CRAFT | FULL IRISH BREAKFAST Last weekend I went on homestay, meaning I stayed in the home of Irish people and was treated like part of the family. Which, as it turns out, may entail shepherding, Catholic mass, and being bitten by small children. But that wasn’t my experience – that was someone else in my program. I enjoyed a much more relaxing, uneventful weekend. I stayed with Patricia and Michael, whose children are grown and who now live a quiet life in the countryside near the quaint town of Tuam (pronounced “choom”). Patricia and Michael have a lovely, comfortable home and a little bow-legged Jack Russell puppy named Milo. Milo has a little too much energy for his parents, so he stays outside and sleeps in the shed. He spent most of the weekend looking in on us through the glass kitchen door and bouncing up and down like a pogo stick – until we went outside to play with him, when he bounced up and down nipping at our arms. My roommate Anya (another American student) and I, being dog lovers and missing our pets back home, were happy to give him some much-needed attention. We even got him a toy in town to play with, because the apple he was gnawing on just looked a little sad. Besides that, we didn’t do much during our stay. We spent most of the day Saturday wandering around town looking for souvenirs. Saturday night was TradFest, so we enjoyed some traditional Irish music in the pubs. On Sunday, we took advantage of the nice weather and went for a walk around the countryside to take pictures of sheep, horses, and the general greenery. The best part was probably the food. Our homestay parents cooked for us – and by “cook” I don’t mean “reheat leftovers,” which is the only kind of cooking that goes on in my apartment. While Americans are often happy with straight-from-thefreezer meals, the Irish prefer real,

hearty, home-cooked goodness, inevitably served up with a cup of hot tea. On our first night, we had the most delicious apple pie (homemade, of course, with homegrown apples). I’m not usually a fan of pie, but let me tell you, that pie was the stuff of legends. Anya and I spent the next day conniving how to (politely and nonchalantly) score another serving of that pie. We eventually decided to flatter Patricia on her superior baking skills and ask her for the recipe. When we did, not only did she give us the recipe and serve us another slice, she pulled an entire pie out of her freezer for us to take home. Needless to say, the other Americans were jealous when we got on the bus to go home. After dinner with our homestay parents, we watched “Moone Boy,” a sitcom about a goofy little Irish boy with an imaginary friend. Then we talked to Patricia at length about various television phenomena like “The X Factor” and “My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding.” Apparently she is very familiar with the gypsies, or “travellers,” as they’re called in Ireland. Travellers live in “caravans” (RVs, essentially), but they don’t travel around so much anymore – they have to hold down real jobs in order to afford their famously enormous weddings. They invite people by word of mouth, so the number of guests is enormous. The wedding gowns, and often the bridesmaid gowns, are enormous and gaudy. There’s a woman in Britain who is apparently the go-to dressmaker, who by now must be enormously wealthy. The amount of money spent by the bride’s family is, needless to say, enormous. Next item on my Ireland to-do list: seek out the travellers. Preferably the ones who look like Johnny Depp in “Chocolat.” Rachel Craft is a super senior majoring in materials engineering. Her mundane super power is finding four-leafed clovers.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed by the columnists and contributors in this section are solely their own. They do not reflect the views of The Observer or Case Western Reserve University.

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opinion

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courtesy bloomberg.com

.We did it. andrew SCHRIVER | APPLY LIBERALLY For once, I’m left utterly speechless. It’s over; after all, there’s nothing left to harp on or whine about or wax eloquent over. I’m tremendously happy with the results, and while I still am left with a vague feeling of disbelief, I’m absolutely giddy. So, in lieu of my ranting or any post-victory rubbing-it-in, I’m just going to share with you what was going through my head as I was celebrating with my fellow campaigners while the races were called. I’m so proud of my state, my county, my city. We won the presidency here, by winning Ohio. We won Ohio because turnout in Cuyahoga County this year was 66.5 percent, 5.5 points higher than in 2008, and because Cuyahoga voters went for Obama (and Sherrod Brown, the Senator whose campaign I have worked on for months) by a 70-30 margin – ten points better for the blue team than in 2008. This is absolutely astonishing. I’m proud of everyone who voted, especially everyone who was voting for the first time – what a first time! You’ll never forget it, I promise. Along that same line, if exit polls are to be believed, a higher percentage 48 percent - of eligible 18-29 year old

voters cast a ballot than in any election since 1972, the first election in which 18-year-olds could vote. For that, I’m proud of my generation, and everyone who worked to ensure our voices were heard. A special thanks to student organizations like the Case Democrats, who helped make that possible. I’m proud of everyone who got involved in any of the campaigns, who went out and knocked on doors or made phone calls or drove voters to the polls or did anything to assist. This was a humongous effort and we could not have won without the hundreds of dedicated volunteers who gave their time. I’m equally proud of the paid staffers, who always get overlooked in these things but are constantly tearing their hair out trying to get that extra vote. I’m proud of all the people who continued to go out in miserable weather or sketchy neighborhoods. I’m proud of everyone who gave their time on Election Day to make sure that the polls ran smoothly and people knew how and when and where to vote. I’m proud of our ground game in general, the resilience of everyone involved, and the never-say-die attitude that people brought with them. I’m proud that we came out and rejected

the notion that elections can be bought with enough super-PAC money, proved that candidates can’t simply lie their way to victory, and demonstrated that victory is always possible, even when the pundits say you’re doomed. I’m proud of the 150+ students from Columbia University who took a bus nine hours to our staging location and others in the county on Saturday and remained in the area to help get out the vote until Tuesday morning. I’m equally proud of the hundreds or thousands of other individuals who left non-competitive states to come make a difference in places like Ohio, Florida, and Virginia. I’m proud of my country for rejecting hate and embracing love across the board – voters in Maryland and Maine became the first in the country’s history to approve gay marriage via popular vote. Washington seems to be heading in that direction, though at the time of this writing it’s still too close to call. Minnesotans shot down a proposed constitutional amendment banning gay marriage, as well. Finally, in Wisconsin, Tammy Baldwin made history by becoming the first openly gay U.S. Senator. I’m proud of her for her historic achievement and the fine example she is setting.

I’m proud, too, of voters in Missouri and Indiana, who rebuked candidates Todd Akin and Richard Mourdock for their disturbingly revealing takes on rape and childbirth. It is reassuring to know that their brand of misogyny and religious paternalism has no place in government. I’m proud of the American people for making the right choice, I’m proud to say that I was there, where it was all decided, but more than anything else I’m proud of everyone who successfully endured several months of awful campaign ads and my badgering about voter registration and absentee ballots. Overall, this election didn’t affect the status quo. The government in January will look very similar to how it looks right now. However, this election was important. It was a rejection of our worst impulses and an embrace of our best. America has spoken out in favor of tolerance, unity, and diversity; we have made it clear that those voices that have been silenced in the past will be heard. Andrew Schriver is a senior biology major and a brother of the Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity.

andrew BRELAND | THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM This is a column I never wanted to write. It was my hope that I could wake up Wednesday morning (after sleeping less than a few hours) excited about the impending Romney presidency. I would sit down to my computer to write a column thanking Americans, applauding the Romney campaign, and encouraging the president to gratefully step down from his position on Jan. 20. The piece would not only have thanked the president for his service to the country but also would have forecast a better America on the horizon. But obviously that is not the column I am able to write. Instead, we live in a country that reelected Barack Obama – a country whose voters endorsed Obama’s vision of a larger welfare state, more government mandates in education, and Keynesian economics. That is fine. But in reelecting the president, the country has also endorsed Obama’s record of trillion dollar debts, spending at 23 percent of GDP, and a unilaterally deciding policy from the Oval Office. Again, fine.

Americans voted and I happened to come out on the losing end of that vote. In the coming weeks, Democrats will applaud Americans, and continue with their policies of the past four years. Hey, if it worked once, why can’t it work again? Members of my party though, will lament the election, the ignorant voter who did not take time to research the issues, and the disparity among the parties in racial votes. My party will attack itself as being too conservative or too moderate and ultimately the argument will become a moot point. That is, because “Gosh darn it, there’s an election in two years. We need to be ready.” But party identity is an argument I will approach in time. No, instead, I will argue that both parties need to understand what they are elected to do: make laws. No one expects them to adhere to party platform religiously. No one expects them to go to Washington, scream ideological slurs, and hope for agreement from the other (insulted) party. What everyone does expect is compromise on

policy, compromise on politics, and compromise for the country. As long as our country continues to grow and succeed, I will be a happy American. The next month and a half will decide whether that comes true. In the next month, Washington has to deal with expiring tax cuts for all Americans, a rapidly approaching debt ceiling, and sequestration – cuts to the Department of Defense and other government workers that threaten as many as three million American jobs. Even now, the economy has reentered a period of instability. The day after the election, European markets closed down nearly four percent in some cases. Wall Street opened down two percent and kept falling all day. I know we can emerge from these challenges as a unified country, but that means that politicians will have to do more than normal. Politicians will have to become statesmen and “compromise” has to return as a good word in D.C. President Obama has a daunting term ahead of him. Conflicts abroad over European debts, Iranian nuclear

courtesy enstarz.com

Forward to the past

weapons, and Chinese economics will combine with domestic concerns about our own economy, entitlements, and immigration. All of these issues, and more, will be addressed during the next four years. But if we can come together and legislate not as politicians, not as Democrats or Republicans, but as Americans, we can only foresee a brighter American future. Good luck to the reelected president. Thank you to Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan for leaving everything on the field. We will need all the help we can get to come out of this conflict. And with that, there is only one thing to say: God Bless America. Andrew Breland is a sophomore planning to triple major in Political Science, English, and History. At CWRU, Andrew serves as the Vice President of the Case College Republicans and the treasurer for the Case Western Mock Trial Team. After graduation, Andrew plans to attend law school and pursue a career as a civil litigation attorney specializing in Tort defense.


fun page

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11/09/12

Sudoku

easy

hard(er)

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ACROSS 1. Formal dance 5. Unrefined 10. Desire 14. Wings 15. Fertile areas 16. Initial wager 17. Exile 19. 57 in Roman numerals 20. Estimated time of arrival 21. Holdup 22. To scour 23. Time available for relaxation 25. Small islands 27. Half of a pair 28. A star-shaped character 31. Bestow 34. Toward the outside 35. French for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bonâ&#x20AC;? 36. A soft sheepskin leather 37. Unlawful rate of interest 38. Hodgepodge 39. Consume 40. Not full

41. Refine metal 42. Willing to comply 44. G 45. Hot chocolate 46. Unhappiness 50. Indolence 52. Nigerian monetary unit 54. ___ and pail 55. Tibetan monk 56. Temple 58. Not under 59. Maxim 60. A noble gas 61. Cautious 62. Assail 63. Care for DOWN 1. Biblical tower 2. Winged 3. Hawaiian veranda 4. Floral necklace 5. Stick together 6. Bog hemp 7. Applications 8. Odontology 9. Eastern Standard Time 10. A person who travels by foot

11. Impossible to see 12. Blend 13. Inheritor 18. Bypass 22. Sleigh 24. Any day now 26. Remain 28. Critical 29. Dirt 30. Clove hitch or figure eight 31. District 32. Rich soil 33. Recent arrival 34. Promenade 37. Part of an ear 38. Portent 40. Every single one 41. 4-door car 43. ___ public 44. Loft 46. Blockade 47. Master of ceremonies 48. Sage 49. Go on a buying spree 50. Not fast 51. Magma 53. Garments of goat hair 56. Bar bill 57. Picnic insect

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observer.case.edu

Twelve Bands, Twelve Dollars: Believe in Cleveland at Peabody’s

courtesy bravoartist.com

Affiance, a favorite within the local music scene, will be headlining the Believe in Cleveland concert series at Peabody’s. >>anneNICKOLOFF musicREPORTER<< An affordable Friday night concert with lots of variation: what more is there to ask for? Later today, Peabody’s introduces a sharp lineup of 12 local bands, including headliner Affiance, a Cleveland favorite. This concert, presented by BravoArtist, is a CD release show for Affiance, whose second album, The Campaign, will be released on Tuesday, Nov. 13. The 11 other bands are Wilson, Sirens & Sailors, Skies of December, Along Came a Spider, Envoi, Cinema Sleep, These Reasoning Animals, Visionaries, Reflections of a Ghost, Strangers to Wolves, Of Myth and Legend, Motives, and Lakota de Kai. Though this long list is quite a mouthful, each band has a different taste to add to the concert’s platter. These Reasoning Animals guitarist Kevin Nielsen believes “this lineup consists of almost every band that has successfully made a name for themselves in the Cleveland scene.” What I would call “varied metal music” is going to be shown not only by Affiance, but also Skies of December, Sirens & Sailors, Visionaries, Of Myth and Legend, and Along Came a Spider. If one thing’s for sure, metal lovers will adore this concert. All of the music is on the heavier side, but the concert offers more than just metal. Different types of hardcore music will be performed by Strangers to Wolves, Motives, and Reflections of a Ghost. Each provides a different take on the genre, twisting in flares of indie and rock. Cinema Sleep brings in alternative rock with steady beats and some light synth effects. Their music is packed with emotion, changing with its catchy guitar chords and layered vocals. Wilson,

a different band that currently showcases many bearded musicians, performs heavier rock, landing hefty guitar chords against excited drum parts and screeching vocals. I never knew there were so many different flavors of rock, but even more join in the Believe in Cleveland lineup. With a female singer and a sound reminiscent of Paramore, Envoi’s melodic punk-ish music diverges from the heavy tones of hardcore and metal. Guitarist Dave Tirpak states, “We love a good hook, but equally indulge in tasty riffs.” This band is difficult to place into a single genre, and will certainly bring something interesting to the mix of bands. The other two bands are also difficult to label. However, These Reasoning Animals and Lakota de Kai are nothing alike. These Reasoning Animals is a progressive/rock band that drifts into funk and nu jazz while still maintaining its rock atmosphere. Some songs have echo-y, faraway feels and others make the crowd dance with excited rhythms and melodies. Lakota de Kai mixes catchy guitar riffs with touches of screamo, but comes out more indie than many of the metal bands. Guitarist Nathan Staab says, “I feel that we bring something a little unique and fresh to the Cleveland music scene.” The doors open at 5:30 p.m. for this concert, and the show starts at 6:00. Tickets at the door cost $12 but VIP tickets are also available for $15. The VIP package includes a meet and greet with Affiance, an autographed Affiance poster and early entry to the entire concert. There’s a special connection offered at local shows that bands and audiences just cannot get from bigger performances and more prestigious venues. Tirpak puts it best when he says he and his band “enjoy nothing more than seeing our peers connect with our music as we perform.”

by Brian Friel Directed by Ron Wilson

November 9, 10, 15, 16, 17 at 8:00 p.m. November 11 and 18 at 2:30 p.m.

Eldred Theater 2012-2013 Season For tickets call 216.368.6262 Single Ticket $10 Adults 60+ & CWRU Faculty/Staff $7 Students with I.D $5

theater.case.edu


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11/09/12

Disney to remake Boy Meets World

>>drewSCHEELER film&televisionCRITIC<< A casual glance at the television schedule makes any sane person wonder if there are any original ideas left in Hollywood. The television landscape is dominated by spinoffs, reboots and shows that blatantly plagiarize preexisting series. Take the format of “Pawn Stars.” The original series airs for at least twenty hours per week on the History Channel. When you factor in knockoffs and related series like “American Pickers,” “Comic Book Men,” “Hardcore Pawn,” “Storage Hunters,” “Pawn Queens,” “Storage Wars,” “Auction Hunters,” “Auction Kings,” “American Restoration,” “Counting Cars,” “Oddities,” “Ball Boys,” and “Cajun Pawn Stars,” only basic cable is left. Executives and television viewers love series that viewers can jump right into because they require no explanation. Getting viewers interested in fictional shows is much more difficult than reality series. With reality series, the format is the star – no matter how

many times you repeat the same scenarios, as long as the same beats are hit, audiences will keep tuning in until they get bored or die. You can even cycle out cast members until the all-star season. This is how the practically unchanged “American Idol” has been wildly successful for the last decade. But sitcoms and most other forms of scripted series requires viewers to invest in the characters and how they interact with each other. Look at “Friends” and notice how it was not named “Six Really Annoying Characters In Search Of People To Care About Them.” It takes a lot of faith on the part of the network executives to assume that the writing team can deliver the kind of characters that viewers will want to care about. Rebooting old series is difficult because of the preexisting memories that will bias returning viewers toward even the most well-meant changes. NBC’s recent airing of “Mockingbird Lane” takes “The Munsters” and updates the characters to the 21st century. The pilot was not bad. But it wasn’t brilliant enough to shatter a lot of those old memories

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established by a 1960s sitcom. Trying to recapture the audience of a previous series is a lot easier than trying to replicate the magic from the first go-around. This past week TVLine announced that the Disney Channel is preparing a spinoff series to the ABC comedy “Boy Meets World.” If you have never seen “Boy Meets World,” then you are missing out on one of the all-time greats of the sitcom format. Cory Matthews is the title boy and the series shows him meeting the world as he survives high school and then college with friends like Shawn and Topanga at his side. There’s even a teacher that stalks Cory to every school he’ll ever attend! Characters like Mr. Feeny and Cory’s dunce-of-abrother Eric are played to perfection by William Daniels and Will Freidle. Best of all, everything about “Boy Meets World,” from the episodes to the characters and the plots, hold up incredibly well for a series that is just about to turn twenty. There is a reason why reruns on the Disney Channel, ABC Family and now MTV2 still put up great numbers and inspire trends on Twitter. According to TVLine’s scoop, this new series – creatively titled, wait for it, “Girl Meets World” – will focus on Cory and Topanga’s daughter Riley and include characters like her older brother Elliot. Replacing Mr. Feeny as the man with all of the answers will be Cory himself, now a history teacher. When you think about it, it’s pretty surprising that Disney hasn’t tried to do something like this sooner. People love nostalgia, and for our generation this might be the first taste of a long sequence of pandering to our memories of the 1990s that will eventually encompass the reintroduction of Wonder Balls and tricked out purple cars that look like Putt-Putt. Although the development of a “Boy Meets World” spinoff sounds great in

theory, there are still many things left to be seen. The Disney Channel has turned into a media powerhouse by featuring the same gimmicky tropes that “Boy Meets World” so effortlessly avoided. Riley can’t become a pop star like Hannah Montana. The idea that any tween in America can become a superstar if his or her cards lineup right is a downright ludicrous idea that has hurt the American economy more than any fiscal policy that could ever be enacted by any politician. The Disney Channel is at its best when its series are filled with real depictions of adolescence, even if plots venture to the zany side. “Even Stevens” presented a fantastical depiction of adolescence with characters buying suits of armor and getting trapped on reality shows. But the familiar relationship between Louis, Ren and their parent kept everyone tethered to reality. Even “Lizzie McGuire” was able to remain grounded while its plots got less and less plausible after that Aaron Carter cameo. If all of the stars align for this new series, then “Girl Meets World” might just be the show that sets Disney back on the path toward producing timeless family comedies instead of the glittery junk-food it has been pushing. It is not entirely Disney’s fault – Nickelodeon has more vapid series. But all television executives should know that when you take a can of cola, fill it with tween talent and shake it up, it will explode in your face. Let’s wait to pass judgment until the first season is in the can. When you think about it, no idea is really an original idea and even “Pawn Stars” is just an adaptation of PBS’s longer-running and more highfalutin “Antiques Roadshow.” I’m sure there will be a place for this new “Girl Meets World” series, even if we’ll have to suffer through that Riley/ Mr. Feeny duet.

Naked mole rats may hold the secret to fighting cancer >>owenBELL games&techREPORTER<< The naked mole rat is a strange creature. Hairless, cold-blooded, and totally blind, mole rats live in the deserts of East Africa in colonies similar to those of ants. They have long puzzled biologists. Mole rats do not feel much pain and are very long lived. On average, they live 20 years as opposed to rats, who live only four. Perhaps most extraordinary, though, is the mole rat’s total resistance to cancer and many other diseases. In 2011, a study was conducted by a team at the University of Rochester to determine how the mole rats escape the disease that kills so many people every year. The results of their research were published just a few days ago in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. In most animals, cancerous tumors develop when mutated cells start multiplying out of control, creating masses

of mutant, useless cells. In mole rats, though, the body’s cells are actually capable of detecting when these growths occur. If there are ever too many cells in one place, the mole rat’s cells begin to produce a special protein called IFN-β that causes “massive necrotic cell death within three days.” After the cells have returned to normal levels, the protein stops being produced and the body returns to normal. Despite learning the biological process that prevents the mole rats from developing cancerous tumors, the researchers were unable to find out how the cells detected the tumors. To try and understand the many mysteries of mole rat biology, scientists at the UK’s Genome Analysis Center have been in the process of sequencing the mole rat’s generic code since 2011. Scientists hope to be able to use what they learn to create new cancer therapies as well as potentially learn how aging in humans might be slowed.


sports

observer.case.edu

Gameday Preview

Spartan Spotlight

>>compiledBY staffREPORTS<<

courtesy of supracor.com

sara tillie Sara Tillie is a junior on the women’s swimming and diving team. Tillie is from Fallston, Md. and is majoring in medical anthropology and Asian studies. Ben Yavitt: It is good to hear from you, Sara. How long have you been a swimmer? Sara Tillie: 15 years. BY: Impressive. I know I would have drowned at that age. What inspired you to start? ST: My mother signed me up for swim team at age five so I could rid myself of floaties. BY: She knows what’s best for you. Do you have any other hobbies? ST: Catching legendary Pokémon and petting squirrels. BY: Those rank in my top five hobbies for sure. Let’s switch gears though. Who is your favorite athlete? ST: Chris Butler. Best water polo player ever. BY: If he were as good at water polo as he is at calculus, I would believe it. Do you have any athletics honors? ST: All UAA in the 200 and 400 Medley Relays. BY: Hang those up on the wall. What about academic honors? ST: CSCAA Academic All-American Honorable Mention and All-UAA Academic. BY: The longer the acronym, the more prestigious the award. Very nice. What is you best swimming memory? ST: Bringing tears of joy to Coach Emily Wylam’s eyes after our 400 Medley relay got third at UAA’s last February.

courtesy of rollingstone.com

BY: I assumed those tears were from all the chlorine. Lets hear your favorite quote. ST: LOFO MOFO, LOFO (means last one fast one by the way…). BY: I don’t care what it means as long as it isn’t YOLO. Where do you see yourself in the next 10 years? ST: Studying any indigenous populations that may be left in the world. BY: That’s kind of sad. Good luck with that one. Tell us, what makes swimming stand out from other sports? ST: You don’t really have to shower after practice cause you’re already clean. You also get to spend a lot of time with your teammates. I mean, a lot of time. BY: Yeah I never thought of your practice as a three hour-long shower… If they made a movie about your life, who would you want to play you? ST: Kathryn Madalena, We look identical and she has had the past 2.5 years to study my life. BY: Sounds like a blockbuster hit. What I really want to know now is, what is your least favorite part about swimming? ST: Having unquenchably dry skin. BY: Switch out the pool water with skin lotion. That might help in the long run. If you could participate in any other sport, which would you pick and why? ST: Equestrian so I could have an unconditional best animal friend that did cool tricks. BY: You might like ostrich racing also. They can do cooler tricks. Tell us, what might we find in your locker right now that might surprise us? ST: Hair regrowth shampoo... The chlorine really takes a toll on my eyebrows. BY: Just the eyebrows? I would be concerned about other areas as well (For me it would be my manly moustache I am growing out for November). What is the one thing that most people don’t know about swimming? ST: Not every swimmer looks as good as Ryan Lochte in a speedo. BY: Really? Why do people watch swimming then? What goes through your mind during a match? ST: Cats. BY: That’s funny, because I am always thinking about cats (even as we do this interview, my cat is attacking my feet). What is the high point of the season? ST: Taper Time, definitely. I’m fairly certain everyone has superhuman strength for the 3 weeks before championships. BY: Who is the best athlete you have ever competed against and why? ST: I once touched Michael Phelps’ butt in the warm-up pool. Does that count? BY: Why yes. It does in fact count. Any insights on how the season is going so far? ST: We are definitely off to a good start and already accomplishing some of our goals. For the women’s team, there is nowhere to go but up and I definitely believe we are capable of that. BY: Wow, that’s great to hear. Thanks a lot Sara, and good luck with the rest of the season!

THE MATCHUP The Case Western Reserve University football team closes out the 2012 campaign versus University Athletic Association-rival Carnegie Mellon University in the 27th Annual Academic Bowl and the Billy Deitmen Memorial Game on Saturday, Nov. 10 at 2 p.m. at Case Field. The Spartans (5-4, 1-1 UAA) lost by a score of 10-7 versus Washington University is last Saturday and will need a win coupled with a Bears loss to gain a share of the UAA Championship. Carnegie Mellon (6-3, 1-1 UAA) defeated the University of Chicago, 31-14 at home, to keep its hopes alive for a shared title. BILLY DEITMEN MEMORIAL GAME The Case versus Carnegie Mellon game has been designated as the Billy Deitmen Memorial Game with all proceeds going to benefit an endowment in celebration of former Spartan captain Billy Deitmen '11, who passed away unexpectedly at the age of 23 on October 18. SERIES NOTES The Spartans and Tartans have met annually since 1970, but the matchup wasn't designated as the "Academic Bowl" until 1986. Carnegie Mellon owns a 26-15 lead in the all-time series, but Case has won the last five meetings, including a 38-24 triumph in Pittsburgh last season. CMU owns the longest win streak in the series, having won seven-straight from 1975 to 1981. LAST MEETING Then sophomore running back Kenny Riordan rushed for 108 yards with two touchdowns as Case Western Reserve defeated Carnegie Mellon in the 26th Annual Academic Bowl on Nov. 12, 2011 at Gesling Stadium. The Spartans' eighth-straight victory in 2011 clinched a fourth UAA Championship in five seasons. SCOUTING THE SPARTANS Through nine games, the Spartans average

13

21.2 points, 136.3 yards rushing, 184.1 yards passing and 320.4 total yards. Case opponents average 15.7 ppg, 82.1 yards rushing, 222.3 yards passing and 304.4 total yards per game. The Spartans have a -10 turnover ratio after leading the UAA at +12 last season. SPARTAN LEADERS Offensively, senior quarterback Erik Olson has completed 123-of-221 passes (55.7%) for 1,512 yards with 13 touchdowns and 10 interceptions. Sophomore running back Manny Sicre has a team-high 618 yards rushing on 165 carries (3.7 ypc) with four touchdowns. Sicre also has 25 receptions for 313 yards and two scores. Sophomore wide receiver Sean Lapcevic has a team-high 35 receptions and has 461 yards (13.5 ypc) and three TDs. Defensively, senior outside linebacker Ryan Ferguson has recorded a UAA-high 100 tackles with a forced fumble, an interception and six pass break-ups. Senior linebacker Kevin Nossem has 80 tackles, a teamhigh two forced fumbles, and a blocked field goal attempt. Senior cornerback Cary Dieter has an interception and is tied with senior safety Dan Calabrese with eight break-ups. SCOUTING THE TARTANS Through nine games, the Tartans average 30.6 points, 193.4 yards rushing, 204.8 yards passing and 398.2 total yards. Carnegie Mellon opponents average 23.3 ppg, 163.0 yards rushing, 220.2 yards passing and 383.2 total yards per game. The Tartans have a +7 turnover ratio. TARTAN LEADERS Junior QB Rob Kalkstein has completed 110-of-167 passes (65.9%) for 1,787 yards with 13 TDs and four INTs. Senior RB Patrick Blanks has rushed for a team-high 661 yards on 114 carries (5.8 ypc) with 10 TDs. Blanks also has 228 yards receiving on 18 receptions (12.7 ypc) with two scores. Junior WR Tim Kikta leads the team with 737 yards receiving on 35 catches (21.1 ypc) and five TDs.

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sports

14

11/09/12

Volleyball takes home fourth-place for third year at UAAs Four named to all-conference team, most since 1999

The Case Western Reserve University volleyball team picked up its third straight fourth place finish at the University Athletic Association Championship Tournament at the Woodruff Physical Education Center. The Spartans lost to the host No. 15 University of Chicago, in the third place game in four sets. The Maroons won by scores of 25-15, 25-22, 22-25, and 25-17. The Spartans finished a successful season with a 24-11 record overall and finished with a solid record in the highly competitive UAA at 5-5. The 24 total victories match the 2010, 2009, and 1998 teams for the third most in school history. The fourth place finish was Case’s third straight. No. 4 Emory University took home the conference title with a four-set victory over No. 3 Washington University. Chicago finished third over Case, who was fourth. Carnegie Mellon University topped the University of Rochester in the fifth place game. Brandeis University took home seventh place in the tournament after New York University chose not to attend due to the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. The weekend also saw four Spartans named to the All-Association team, tied for the program’s most with the 1999 squad. Senior libero Rachel Gulasey and sophomore middle hitter Natalie Southard earned honors on the second-team All-UAA squad. Senior right side hitter Hanna Collins and freshman outside hitter Carolyn Bogart were named honorable mentions. In addition to being named to the All-UAA second-team, Gulasey also pushed her way into the record books as she broke the Case school record for digs, finishing with 2239 in her four year career. Gulasey surpassed Andrea Lamont’s (2006-09) record of 2190

during the team’s first match of the weekend against Carnegie Mellon University. Southard, last year’s UAA Rookie of the Year, earned second year honors after finishing second on the team and ninth in the conference in kills with 298 kills, despite missing six matches due to illness. Southard also finished first on the team and fourth in the conference with 85 blocks. Collins finished the season on an impressive hot streak, finishing third on the team in kills per set against UAA foes with 1.61 and finished with 2.36 kills per set in her final 10 games. She also led the team with a .352 hitting percentage over that period. Bogart proved herself as one of the conference’s top rookies as she led the team with 392 kills, fifth in the UAA. The fourth-seeded Spartans reached the third-place match with Chicago after beating rival fifth-seed Carnegie Mellon (15-17, 3-6) in the opening match of the tournament. The opening match was a bit worrisome for the Spartans, who dropped the first set to the Tartans, 25-19. Case took the next two sets by impressive margins of 25-15 and 25-13. Carnegie Mellon forced a fifth set with a 25-20 win in the fourth. The Spartans were able to round out the match and finish strong with a 15-11 win. The next match for the Spartans came against No. 4 Emory, the eventual UAA champions. The Spartans gave the Eagles (315, 8-1) all they had, but in the end it wasn’t enough as the Eagles took the match in four sets: 25-15, 25-22, 20-25 and 25-14. The Spartans will graduate six seniors after this season, including Gulasey and Breana Freeman, the program’s leading career setter with 3739 assists. Also departing will be Collins from the attack and defensive specialists Alexandria Drake, Kara Monnin, and Olivia Stanton-Ameisen.

Women’sSoccer

Volleyball

>>peterCOOKE sportsEDITOR<<

Conf. Washington 6-0-1 Carnegie Mellon 4-1-2 Emory 3-1-3 Chicago 4-3-0 Brandeis 2-3-2 New York 2-4-1 Case Western 2-4-1 Rochester 0-7-0

Pts. 19 14 12 12 8 7 7 0

All Win % 16-1-1 .917 11-1-4 .812 11-1-6 .778 12-6-0 .667 13-4-2 .737 10-7-1 .583 8-6-4 .556 3-13-1 .206

Peter Cooke

Conf. Emory 8-1 Washington 8-2 Chicago 8-2 Case Western 5-5 Carnegie Mellon 3-6 Rochester 3-7 Brandeis 1-8 New York 1-6

xaioyu li/ observer Senior libero Rachel Gulasey serves one of her 122 career aces, third in program history. Gulasey also set the career record for digs against Carnegie Mellon, finishing this season with 2239.

Men’s Soccer

Football

All Win % 31-5 .861 29-3 .906 28-10 .737 24-11 .686 15-17 .469 22-12 .647 19-13 .594 17-14 .548

Conf. Washington 2-0 Carnegie Mellon 1-1 Case Western 1-1 Chicago 0-2

All Win % 4-5 .444 6-3 .667 5-4 .556 4-5 .444

Matt Vann Shinici Inoue Alexandria Drake Heath Hudgins

Carnegie Mellon Brandeis Washington Emory Rochester Chicago New York Case Western

Conf. 4-2-1 4-2-1 4-2-1 4-2-1 3-1-3 2-3-2 2-4-1 0-7-0

Pts. All Win % 13 12-3-1 .781 13 16-2-1 .868 13 10-4-2 .688 13 10-6-2 .611 12 10-3-3 .719 8 8-4-5 .618 7 10-7-1 .583 0 3-14-1 .194

Bernie Jim

Erica Iafelice

Officer Mark

SAGES Guru

W. Basketball

CWRU PD

IND

IND

IND

IND

NYG

NYG

NYG

NYG

NYG

TEN

MIA

MIA

MIA

MIA

TEN

DET

DET

MIN

DET

MIN

MIN

DET

NE

NE

NE

NE

NE

NE

NE

NE

ATL @ NO

ATL

ATL

ATL

ATL

NO

ATL

ATL

ATL

SD @ TB

TB

SD

SD

SD

TB

TB

TB

TB

DEN @ CAR

DEN

DEN

DEN

DEN

DEN

DEN

DEN

DEN

OAK @ BAL

BAL

BAL

BAL

BAL

BAL

BAL

BAL

BAL

NYJ @ SEA

SEA

SEA

NYJ

SEA

SEA

SEA

SEA

SEA

DAL @ PHI

PHI

PHI

DAL

DAL

DAL

PHI

PHI

DAL

STL @ SF

SF

SF

SF

SF

SF

SF

SF

SF

HOU @ CHI

CHI

HOU

HOU

CHI

HOU

HOU

HOU

CHI

KC @ PIT

PIT

PIT

PIT

PIT

PIT

PIT

PIT

PIT

Observer

The Jolly Scholar

Observer

Volleyball

IND @ JAX

IND

IND

IND

IND

NYG @ CIN

NYG

NYG

NYG

TEN @ MIA

MIA

MIA

DET @ MIN

DET

BUF @ NE

Want to learn the story behind the picks?

M. Swimming

see more sports online at

observer.case.edu


sports

observer.case.edu

15

Spartans sweep opening weekend Cleveland City Tournament Men improve to 6-0, women to 3-3, to face Oberlin in championship >>peterCOOKE sportsEDITOR<<

The Case Western Reserve University swimming and diving teams both swept the opening weekend of the Cleveland City Tournament last weekend at the Veale Natatorium. Competing against Division II foes Lake Erie College and Notre Dame College, the two teams swam to comfortable victories. The Spartans took down Notre Dame on Friday, Nov. 2 by a combined score of 332.5145.5. The next morning, Case topped Lake Erie 306-168. The two victories put the men at 6-0 on the season and the women at 3-3 before the two teams head to Oberlin College tomorrow for the Cleveland City Tournament Championship. The Spartans were led by junior diver Daniel Jacobson. Jacobson swept all four diving events on the weekend. He finished first against Lake Erie with 295.1 points on the one-meter springboard and 295.7 points on the three-meter springboard. He won against Notre Dame with 276 points and 299.95 points on the one- and three-meter boards, respectively. The quartet of wins earned him recognition as the University Athletic Association diver of the week, one week after he placed second in both events at the UAA Invite.

Against Notre Dame, Case was led by double-winner Sean Nickley who won both the 100-yard backstroke in 55.08 seconds and the 200-yard individual medley in a time of 2:00.91. The women picked up a pair of wins from double-winner Rebecca Pakradooni. Pakradooni, a freshman, won the 50-yard freestyle in 25.33 seconds and the 100-yard butterfly in 1:00.58. Pakradooni also won the 500yard freestyle against Lake Erie. Freshman diver Riki Drout won both diving events with scores of 148.35 points in the one-meter event and 171.60 in the three-meter event. Sophomore Elliott Kerbel also had an impressive performance against Lake Erie in the 50-yard freestyle with a time of 21.43 seconds, the ninth fastest time in program history. The Spartans won one of the meet’s two relays against Lake Erie with sophomore Eric Haufler teaming up with juniors Heath Hudgins, Scott McHenry, and Gus Bailey in the 400-yard freestyle relay. The quartet touched the wall with a time of 3 minutes 11.67 seconds. Junior Sara Tillie picked up a pair of wins against Lake Erie to go with her win in the 200-yard freestyle against Notre Dame. Tillie won the 1000-yard freestyle and the 100-yard freestyle with times of 11:01.17 and 55.61. Fellow third-year Maggie Dillione finished the weekend with three individual wins, as

well as she added wins in the 50-yard freestyle (24.90 seconds) and the 200-yard butterfly (2 minutes, 10.81 seconds) to go with her victory Friday in the 200-yard individual medley. Drout also matched Jacobson’s wins on Saturday, winning the one-meter with 183.2 points and the three-meter with 193.7 points. The women won both relays against Lake Erie, with freshman Alison Thirion, senior co-captain Krysta Payne, Dillione, and Pakradooni touching the wall first in 4:12.00 in the 400-yard medley relay. In the 400-yard

freestyle relay Tillie and freshmen Nicole Thompson, Thirion, and Rachael Loek won with a time of 3 minutes and 47.37 seconds. The Spartans will travel to Oberlin tomorrow for the finals of the inaugural Cleveland City Tournament. The meet is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. Next week the Spartans will travel to No. 2 Kenyon College for a quad-meet against Kenyon, Grove City College, and Division II Gannon University. The meet will kick off at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17.

shannon snyder/ observer Gus Bailey swims the 50-yard freestyle against Lake Erie College. Bailey picked up a second place finish, touching the wall in 21.51 seconds.

Ten-game losing streak marks end of Spartans’ season Rochester tops Spartans 3-0, four-way tie for UAA title >>peterCOOKE sportsEDITOR<<

The Case Western Reserve University men’s soccer team concluded a disappointing 2012 season with a 3-0 loss to No. 21 University of Rochester. The host Yellowjackets pulled away in the second half with three late goals to give them the win and ensure that the Spartans would end the conference season at the bottom of the table, with zero points. The Spartans ended their season with a 3-14-1 overall record and 0-7-0 record in the University Athletic Association. The season comes just one year after Case won the UAA conference title by going 15-5-0 overall and 5-2-0 in the UAA. The No. 21 Yellowjackets ended their season with a 10-3-3 record overall, finishing 3-1-3 in the UAA. The UAA standings saw an unprecedented four-way tie atop the table with Brandeis University, Carnegie Mellon University, Washington University, and Emory University all finishing with 4-2-1 records and 13 points. Rochester finished fifth with 12 points. The University of Chicago finished 2-3-2 with eight points in sixth, while New York University finished 2-4-1 with seven points. Case was eighth with zero points. No. 6 Carnegie Mellon took home the UAA’s automatic qualifier by virtue of owning the tiebreakers. The Tartans tied with Brandeis with 2-1-0 records amongst the four gridlocked

teams but the Tartans defeated the Judges in their head-to-head matchup, 2-1, on Oct. 28. Against Rochester, the Spartans continued their stellar play early, but again it was the late goals that hurt them the most. With just five shots in the scoreless first half, the match looked to be a defensive struggle. That trend continued for much of the second half until a Rochester cross glanced off a defender past Spartan goalkeeper Ryan Koepka for an own goal. With Rochester taking the lead in the 68th minute, the Spartans were forced to attack, straying from their defensive stance. The Yellowjackets continued the pressure, however, and added an insurance goal in the 76th minute as Jack Thesing tipped in a cross near the right post from Jeffrey Fafinski on the left side. With the clock winding down in the final minute and the Spartans headed to an inevitable 10th loss in a row, the hosts managed to find the back of the net for the third time of the evening when Andrew Greenway beat Koepka low to the left side with just 46 seconds left in the Spartans season. Koepka finished the match with a single save while Rochester’s Scott Garfing had four of his own. The Spartans will set their sights on the 2013 season and attempt to put this one behind them. The Spartans finished the season on a 10-game losing streak with an abysmal 1-6-0 record at home. Case has nine seniors on its roster, including leading goal scorer Eric Erb,

angie li / observer Senior Eric Erb and the Spartans finished a disappointing campaign with a 3-0 loss at the University of Rochester on Saturday, Nov. 3. Case finished the season on a 10-game losing streak.

who had four goals on the season, as well as Ross Twanmoh and Aaron Mayer, who each had two goals. The Spartans will be losing

nearly half of their goal scoring production from 2012, which tallied just .94 goals per game, down from 2.6 gpg in 2011.


sports

Page 16

11/09/12

Bears sneak by Spartans on Seniors’ Day, 10-7 Need win vs. Tartans, help for share of UAA Championship >>shinichiINOUE asst.sportsEDITOR<<

The Case Western Reserve University football team lost the inside track to a fifth University Athletic Association Championship in six years with a 10-7 setback versus Washington University on Seniors’ Day at Case Field. The Spartans (5-4 overall, 1-1 UAA) will need a win and a Bears (4-5, 2-0 UAA) loss next Saturday to earn a share of the league title. In a game that saw little offense generated by either side, Washington held the Spartans to a season-low 184 total yards of offense and scored all 10 of its points in a span of 2:08 in the third quarter. The Spartans first got on the board late in the opening period, when senior quarterback Erik Olson connected with senior wide receiver Vinny Bell for a 12yard touchdown pass. Bell’s first career score ended a six-play, 44-yard drive, and freshman Won Kun Park hit the extra point to make the score 7-0 with 1:42 remaining in the first quarter. After each side saw several drives fizzle out, the Bears threatened to cut into the lead with 4:55 left in the first half. However, the Spartan defense held its own territory and forced a 41-yard field goal attempt that missed wide to the right. The game went to halftime with the hosts ahead by a 7-0 score. On their opening drive of the second half, the Bears drove deep into Spartan territory with a nine-play, 40-yard drive that ended in a 25-yard field goal by Alex Hallwach at the 7:31 mark of the third quarter. After forcing Case to a three-andout, the Bears’ offense hit the biggest play of the game, when quarterback Eric Daginella connected with wide out Tim Bartholomew for a 64-yard pass that put

austin sting/ observer Quarterback Erik Olson connected with wide receiver Vinny Bell to score the Spartans’ only touchdown in the team’s 10-7 loss to UAA rival Washington University. the visitors at the Spartan one-yard line. One play later, Daginella rushed into the end zone to cap the four-play, 65-yard drive. Hallwach hit the point after, and the Bears led 10-7 with 5:23 remaining in the third. Several possession changes then occurred before a botched snap on a Spartan punt set the Bears up with a first down at the Case five with 10:41 left to play. However, the Spartan defense came through once again and held Washington to a 23-yard field goal try that was blocked by senior linebacker Kevin Nossem at the 6:02 mark.

Unfortunately, the Spartan offense couldn’t drive out of its own end of the field on its following two possessions, and the Bears held on for the three point win. Sophomore running back Manny Sicre rushed for a game-high 68 yards on 23 carries and added 38 yards receiving on four catches. On defense, senior linebackers Ryan Ferguson and Wade Self tied for game-high honors with 12 tackles apiece. Washington was led by Daginella’s 196 yards passing – 98 of which went to Bartholomew. Defensive tackle William

Small totaled six tackles, 1.5 sacks and a forced fumble. The Spartans wrap up the season on Saturday, Nov. 10 vs. rival Carnegie Mellon University in the 27th Annual Academic Bowl at 2 p.m. at Case Field. The game has also been designated as the Billy Deitmen Memorial Game with all proceeds going to benefit an endowment in celebration of former Spartan captain Billy Deitmen ‘11, who passed away unexpectedly at the age of 23 on Oct. 18. All former Spartan teammates of Deitmen are invited to participate in a pregame ceremony and presentation.

Women close out season with 2-1 comeback at Rochester Spartans clinch sixth place tie in UAA on Levey’s game winner

cago tied for third place with 12 points. Chicago reached third place with a 4-3-0 record in the UAA and 12-6-0 record overall while the Eagles finished 3-1-3 in the UAA and 11-1-6 overall. Rounding out the bottom half of the UAA standings were Brandeis University (107-1, 2-3-2) in fifth with eight points, Case and New York (10-7-1, 8-6-4) tied for sixth with seven points, and Rochester in last with zero points. Against Rochester, the Spartans came out a bit on edge, getting just one shot off in the opening 45 minutes. The Yellowjackets managed to get four shots off; however, arianna wage / observer the two teams would hit the Deena Levey scored the go-ahead goal in the Spartans’ 2-1 comeback win locker rooms in a scoreless over the University of Rochester. The Spartans finished the season 2-4-1 in tie at the half. the UAA, tied with NYU for sixth. After the half, the home team opened the scoring early >>peterCOOKE the University Athletic Association with New on with a goal nine minutes in, as Hayley sportsEDITOR<< York University. No. 3 Washington University won the Engel punched in the rebound after Heather The Case Western Reserve University conference outright with an impressive un- Alico’s shot hit the post. The goal gave the women’s soccer team picked up a 2-1 come- defeated record in the UAA. The Bears fin- Yellowjackets the lead in the 54th minute and back victory in the final game of the season ished 16-1-1 overall and 6-0-1 in the UAA forced the Spartans to go on the attack. over conference rival University of Roch- with 19 points. In a tight race for second Case found the answer to Rochester’s ester, Saturday, Nov. 3 at Edwin Fauver place, No. 17 Carnegie Mellon University goal with an equalizer just 12 minutes later Stadium. The Spartans picked up a pair of finished 4-1-2 in the UAA and 11-1-4 overall as sophomore Christine Straka knocked in goals in the second half to pass the home Yel- to grab second place with 14 points. No. 16 a cross by sophomore Jessica Sabers on the lowjackets and clinch a tie for sixth place in Emory University and the University of Chi- left side to even the score. The score was

Straka’s second of the season and the Sabers’ second assist. Continuing to pressure the Spartans once again beat Yellowjacket goalkeeper Bridget Lang as senior midfielder and captain Deena Levey scored in the 73rd minute with the game-winner. Levey, who was named to the Capital One Academic All-District VII First Team squad last week, launched a rocket from 20-yards out to gain the lead. In goal, freshman goalkeeper Megan Romelfanger was able to keep the Yellowjackets at bay for the remainder of the game as she improved to 5-4-3 on the season. Romelfanger had three saves on the day as she concluded her rookie season. For Rochester, Lang picked up the loss along with two saves on the day. The Spartans outshot Rochester 14-9 on the game, including 13-5 in the decisive second half. Case also held a 6-1 advantage in corner kicks. The Spartans have just four seniors on the roster this year, including Levey, midfielder Devyn Lee, defender Maeve Goede, and forward Alyssa Lauzau. The good news for the Spartans is that they have a strong group of young players for head coach Tiff Crooks to build around as 82 percent of the Spartans’ goal production will be returning, including Sabers, who led the Spartans with seven goals in her sophomore campaign. Case also returns the majority of its backline and will have back sophomore goalkeeper Cameron Casson, who started the initial nine games of the season before an injury sidelined her.


Issue 11: Nov. 9, 2012