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Christopher Gebhardt University of Oregon B.Arch Candidate 2014

cwgebhardt@gmail.com (720)-224-5412 1750 Alder St. #7 Eugene, OR 97401 2589 Lake Meadow Dr. Lafayette, CO 80026


Studio Projects -Skinner Butte Visitor’s Center -Portland Culinary Institute -Commercial-Broadway SkyTrain Station -West Campus Academic Village I am a fourth year B.Arch student at the University of Oregon, from Boulder, Colorado. I got in to architecture because of the positive effect I saw it could have on people’s lives and that concern is always highest in my mind while designing. With that in mind I often focus on issues of human context, responsiveness to local conditions, evidence based design, and sustainability while also trying to design buildings that are beautiful and spaces that enrich the lives of those who occupy them.

-Takasegawa Master Plan

Other Coursework - Eugene Depot Post-Occupancy Evaluation -Building Enclosures

Extra-curricular Projects -Graphic Design -Photography


BIKE SHELTER B

N

Skinner Butte Park

Visitor’s Center

DOWN

and Historical Museum Eugene, OR

The Skinner Butte Visitor Center is located in Eugene, Oregon, near the site of the original cabin built by the town’s founder, Eugene Skinner. It houses exhibition space, a café, and a library for the local historical society. For me, this second year studio was about designing with realistic structural systems and creating interesting, special but unpretentious, and flexible spaces.

DOWN

SPECIAL EXHIBITION HALL

RESTROOM CAFE

RESTROOM MECH. ROOM

STORAGE

RECEPTION AREA

JANITOR’S CLOSET

MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM

DOWN

WORKSPACE

A

DOWN

MAIN EXHIBITION HALL

LIBRARY BIKE SHELTER

B 0

5’

10’

20’

A


SOUTH ELEVATION

0

5’

20’

10’

LIBRARY

WORKSPACE

NORTH FACING SECTION (A) 0

5’

10’

0

20’

5’

10’

20’

MAIN EXHIBITION HALL


B

SW 11th Ave.

CUL I

SW WASHINGTON St.

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

E UT

Y INSTI R T NA

UP

DELIVERY STAGING AREA

DN

CAFÉ

LAUNDRY

N

TLA

W.C.

PROVISIONER’S OFFICE

A W.C. SERVER STATION

WAREWASHING DRY STORAGE

HOT PREPARATION

DN

MAIN KITCHEN WALK-IN REFRIGERATOR

A

STREET SEATING (CULTURAL CONNECTION)

RESTAURANT

UP

WALK-IN REFRIGERATOR

It was my first opportunity to develop a complex program in an intensely urban setting. Part of the challenge was to sustainably respond to the challenging cooling requirements of the kitchens. My final scheme incorporated stack ventilation, night flushed thermal masses, heat exchangers, and radiant heating and cooling.

STAFF LOCKERS AND TOILETS

WALK-IN REFRIGERATOR

The program for this studio was to design a culinary institute for a site in Portland that would incorporate a public restaurant, classrooms, and teaching kitchens.

LOBBY

WALK-IN FREEZER

OR

D

OF

P

COLD PREPARATION PRE-PREPARATION

UP

B 0’

5’

10’

20’


SECOND FLOOR PLAN

B

MEETING ROOM

STAFF WORK SPACE

DN UP

MEETING ROOM

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES

LOUNGE

STUDENT LOCKERS

A

A

LECTURE CLASSROOM FACULTY OFFICE

W.C. DN

UP

FACULTY OFFICE

W.C.

DN UP

B

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

0’

B

5’

20’

10’

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN

B

ROOF SEATING PASTRY TEACHING KITCHEN

DN UP

FACULTY OFFICES DN

CULINARY TEACHING KITCHEN

FACULTY OFFICE ROOF GARDENS FACULTY OFFICE

OPEN TO BELOW LECTURE CLASSROOM

OPEN TO BELOW

ROOF SEATING ROOF GARDENS

A

A

DN

W.C.

A

COMPUTER LAB

CULINARY TEACHING KITCHEN

LECTURE CLASSROOM

W.C.

LIBRARY

A

UP

DN

W.C.

FACULTY OFFICE

W.C.

UP

B

FACULTY OFFICE

DN

B

DN


concept: a building that...

- fills out and adds interest to the urban fabric. - displays both pride and humility. pride as a virtue: pride of craftsmanship, pride of integrity, pride in excellence. humility as a virtue: respect for neighbors, traditions, and aesthetic of neighbor hood. - celebrates and interacts with both the street and the horizon. it should contribute to the neighborhood life at the street level. it should celebrate the horizon for both those inside and out.

SOUTH-EAST ELEVATIOn

0’

5’

20’

10’

restaurant

SECTION B: Facing NORTH-west

0’

5’

20’

10’

FACULTY OFFICE

CULINARY TEACHING KITCHEN ATRIUM

LOUNGE

WALK-IN REFRIGERATOR MAIN KITCHEN

BASEMENT MECHANICAL ROOM

LOBBY

STAFF WORK ROOM

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE


student lockers

roof garden

north-EAST ELEVATIOn

0’

5’

20’

10’

street seating

SECTION A: Facing south-west ROOF GARDEN AND SEATING

CULINARY TEACHING KITCHEN

FACULTY OFFICE

0’

5’

10’

LIBRARY

LECTURE CLASSROOM

ATRIUM

STUDENT LOCKERS

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE

STREET SEATING (CULTURAL CONNECTION) RESTAURANT

LOBBY

STAFF LOCKERS

20’


Start your commute

off right at...

concourse plan DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

Ground floor plan

UP

UP

UP

UP

UP

SUPPORT SPACES DN

COMMERCIAL-

UP

UP ATTENDANT

Y A W D A O R B

UP

UP

UP

UP

UP

ATTENDANT

Fare Zone Boundaries Burrard

Waterfront

Granville

Vancouver City Centre

Stadium–Chinatown

Yaletown–Roundhouse Rupert Gilmore Renfrew

Main Street– Science World

King Edward Oakridge–41st Avenue

Vancouver Canada Line

Broadway–City Hall

Commercial– Broadway

Production Way– Sperling– University Burnaby Lake

Holdom

Lougheed Town Centre

Burnaby

29th Avenue

Braid

New Westm inster

Patterson

Columbia New Westminster

Metrotown

Marine Drive

Royal Oak

22nd Edmonds Street

Expo Line Templeton Sea Island Centre

Coquitlam

Lake City Way

Nanaimo

Joyce–Collingwood

Langara–49th Avenue

YVR Airport

Brentwood Town Centre

Millennium Line

VCC–Clark

Olympic Village

Sapperton

N

Surrey Scott Road Gateway Surrey Central King George

Bridgeport Aberdeen

Lansdowne

Richmond

Richmond–Brighouse

LEASABLE COMMERCIAL SPACE

N

longitudinal section

90 2100 900 6 A 1500 1400 175 130 700 300 600 30 80 1 2 5 0 2500 2800 125 800 500 CGC 150 100 50 23US 500 800

The Skytrain station at the intersection of Commercial and Broadway in Vancouver, B.C., is the busiest in the city. It is the main link between intercity mass transit and the Skytrain routes outbound to the suburbs. This is a proposal for the planned expansion of the north concourse of this station. This studio placed an emphasis on designing a distinctive, functional, and structurally sound roof for the expanded concourse.

urban context


VANCOUVE R

Adult Fares starting at $2.50

Student Disc

ounts

Kids under 5 ride FREE

is best experi

enced by ...

SKYTRAIN

Inquire at station abou t DAILY PASSES

Mast cap section

mast details

lighting

Model

Banner attachment

transverse section

One of the challenges in this project was designing within Translink’s strict design guidelines for station accessibility and design, especially regarding placement of elements on the platforms and surge zones around stairs and escalators.

corner plaza


GROUND FLOOR

0’

10’

25’

50’

WEST CAMPUS ACADEMIC VILLAGE

LOADING DOCK

PARKING RAMP

UP

RESTROOM

DN

UP

KITCHEN

UP

RESTROOM

FOOD COURT

DINING HALL

A

A

UP

UP

DN

DN

Alder Street

The University of Oregon Campus Planning Department is currently considering developing a parking lot next to campus into an academic village with residence halls, dining facilities, classrooms and lecture halls.

B

This studio was intended to explore the feasibility of fitting the desired program onto the site; this was the main challenge of the studio. Other challenges included developing good circulation on this crowded site, organizing the adjacencies between the different program elements, and relating to the main campus in a modern, but cohesive fashion.

UP

UP

UP

Kincaid Street

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

UP UP

EVENT ROOM

600 SEAT LECTURE HALL

200 SEAT LECTURE HALL UP

UP

14th Street B

THE JOHNSON AXIS


Building Hearth B

SECOND FLOOR 25’

10’

RESTROOM

50’ UP

RESTROOM

CROSS CULTURAL CENTER

UP

HOUSING ADMIN AND STUDENT LOUNGE

FACULTY APARTMENTS

UP

HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT DN

A

A

“Create a social hearth for every building. Place the hearth at the building’s perceived center of gravity and beside a path that everyone uses.” -UO Campus Plan Policy 11

DN

DN

DN

100 SEAT LECTURE CLASSROOM

UP

STUDENT HOUSING

100 SEAT LECTURE CLASSROOM

Building Complex and Connected Buildings

UP

ROOF DECK

B

“Isolated buildings can be symptoms of a disconnected campus community.” “The buildings should be conceived as a collection connected by arcades or bridges defining and embracing outdoor spaces.” -UO Campus Plan Policy 11

B

TYPICAL HOUSING FLOOR 0’

10’

25’

LAUNDRY

0’

50’

UP

UP DN

UP

DN

STUDY

A

DN

HEARTH HEARTH

STUDY

A

LAUNDRY

Activity Nodes

UP

HEARTH

STUDY

UP

LAUNDRY

B

“When locating buildings, place them in conjunction with other buildings to form small nodes of public life. Create a series of these nodes throughout the university, in contrast to the quiet, private outdoor spaces between them, and knit these nodes together with a network of pedestrian paths.” -UO Campus Plan Policy 11


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

RESIDENCE HALL ROOM STUDY ALTERNATE FURNITURE CONFIGURATIONS

19’

www.autodesk.com/revit

14’ VIEW FROM JOHNSON AXIS

SECOND FLOOR CIRCULATION CENTER Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

ROOF DECK

{3D}

GROUND FLOOR CIRCULATION CENTER

No.

10’

SOUTH ELEVATION Tectonic Copyright 2007

0’

10’

25’

50’

Description

Date

EAST ELEVATION 0’

10’

25’

50’

19’

Owner Project Name Unnamed Project Number Date Drawn By Checked By

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

1 3:56:46 PM

1


Future Expansion

“Consider the possibility of future expansion and change when designing a new building or addition.” -UO Campus Plan Policy 11

Main Building Entrance

Main Building Entrance Main Building Entrance

13th

13th

13

Downtown

Downtown

Downtown Johnson Axis

Johnson Axis

Johns

South South and West University and West University Neighborhoods Neighborhoods

SECTION B

SECTION A 0’

10’

25’

50’

“Placing thethe main entrance(s) is perhaps the single “Placing main entrance(s) is perhaps the single most important stepstep taken during theand evolution of a of a South West University most important taken during the evolution building plan. building plan. Neighborhoods THEREFORE: Place the the mainmain entrance(s) of theofbuildTHEREFORE: Place entrance(s) the inging at aatpoint immediately visible fromfrom the main av- builda point immediately the main avenues of the approach, and givegive it avisible bold shape in the “Placing main entrance(s) is perhaps the enues of approach, and it a bold shape in thesingle front of the building.” front of the building. ”taken during the evolution of a most important step -UO Campus Plan Policy 11

building plan. -UO Campus Plan Policy 11 THEREFORE: Place the main entrance(s) of the building at a point immediately visible from the main avenues of approach, and give it a bold shape in the front ofWings the building. of” Light -UO Campus Plan Policy 11

“Shape buildings in ways that allow natural light to penetrate far into their centers. Use ideas like light shelves to bounce daylight even further into the building’s spaces. Usually this will mean buildings that have wings less than about 50 feet in width.” -UO Campus Plan Policy 11


Takasegawa Master Plan Kyoto Summer 2012

with Will Green and Joel Grogan

This studio took place in the summer of 2012, in Kyoto, Japan. City officials were interested in student proposals for a new master plan of a the Takasegawa canal neighborhood in downtown Kyoto. I teamed up with two landscape architecture students to develop a plan for the canal that was designed to attract users and business more evenly distributed around the day, instead of the seedy nightlife that currently dominates the area. The centerpiece of our design was the conversion of a parking lot into a grand plaza that would serve as a hub for this part of downtown and connect the Takasegawa canal to the commercial hub of downtown, Kawaramachi-dori, and to the Kamo River. At the end of our visit these proposals were presented to several officials from the City of Kyoto and locals from the neighborhood of the Takasegawa.

(CANAL AND STREET SECTION) (CANAL AND STREET SECTION)


Collaboration The Kyoto 2012 Summer Studio gave Oregon students an opportunity to visit Japan and design a project in a new and unfamiliar cultural setting, and was beneficial for the City of Kyoto because they were looking for proposals for this downtown area’s redevelopment that would “bring up ideas that would never occur to someone who has lived here his whole life� as one official put it.

While working on this project we met extensivly with city officials from various departments as well as a local historical society and many community members.


Enclosures Building Enclosures is a course that covers the theory and practice of thermal envelope design. The bulk of the course is a thorough survey of the most common cladding materials covering the advantages and disadvantages of each, as well as their unique challenges in terms of detail design and how the detail design can affect the overall aesthetic of a building. The projects for this class were about designing details for buildings with various cladding systems. The first project was an entrance for a community center remodel that had wood stud walls and a roof supported by heavy glulam beams. The second was a wing of a campus building that had some window walls, and some sections of walls with a terra cotta rainscreen mounted on a CMU backup wall.

7

8

WINDOW DETAILS

WINDOW CORNER DETAIL

WINDOW TO WALL JUNCTION

GYPSUM BOARD VAPOR BARRIER SCREEN

9

WINDOW GLASS CASING SILL FLASHING RAINSCREEN SIDING

MOUNTED ON 1X4 FURRING STRIPS

30lb BUILDING FELT MOISTURE BARRIER ¾” PLYWOOD SHEATHING FIBERGLASS BATT INSULATION

SCREEN ROUGH FRAMING SILL VAPOR BARRIER GYPSUM BOARD

WINDOW GLASS CASING SILL 2x8 STUDS FLASHING NAIL FIN CORNER BOARD FURRING STRIPS 30lb BUILDING FELT MOISTURE BARRIER ¾” PLYWOOD SHEATHING FIBERGLASS BATT INSULATION

SOLE PLATE BASEBOARD FLASHING SEALANT CEMENTBOARD RIGID INSULATION

PRESSURE-TREATED MUDSILL ANCHOR-BOLT CONCRETE SLAB

6

ROOF OVERHANG

TURN UP PANEL END 45° Z - CLIP

STANDING SEAM ROOF SEAM

¾” PLYWOOD SHEATHING

30lb ASTM RATED BUILDING FELT 2x6 FURRING STRIPS RIGID INSULATION

FLASHING FASCIA 3” ROOF DECKING 15” GLULAM BEAM

CONCRETE-RATED MOISTURE BARRIER 4” OF COMPACTED GRAVEL

DRIP NOTCH ¾” PLYWOOD SHEATHING FIBERGLASS BATT INSULATION VAPOR BARRIER GYPSUM BOARD RAINSCREEN SIDING MOUNTED ON 1X4 FURRING STRIPS


Terra Cotta: 3” Extruded EPS:

5

.8 System U-Value (from Kawneer chart) : .37

15

Barriers:

.06

Gypsum Board:

.45

WINDOW HEAD at TERRA 1.11 COTTA WALL CMU: Inner Air Film:

WOOD BLOCKING

Total:

BOSTON VALLEY TERRACLAD™ PANEL VERTICAL TRACK FASTENER

BOSTON VALLEY TERRACLAD™ COPING COUNTER FLASHING 1 STEEL CURB = .054

18.27 Wall Type Window Terra Cotta

VERTICAL TRACK INSULATION STEEL ANGLE

U-Value .28 .054

Calculating R-Values TERRA COTTA WALL

.68 18.27

Terra Cotta U-Value:

System R-Value: 2.7

Area 48’2 92’2

PAVER

ΔT 1 1

13.44 4.96 18.408

Total Wall U-Factor: 18.408 = .13 140

VEGETATION GROWTH MEDIUM ROOT REINFORCEMENT LAYER DRAINAGE LAYER

Area of Glass / Wall Unit: 48sf

OPERABLE

PPG Solarban 60 on Starphire Glass U-Value (From PPG): .28

MODIFIED BITUMEN INSULATION

Total Wall R-Value:

SLAB

1 = 7.6 . 13

WINDOW WALL SHADING

TERRA COTTA WALL SHADING

Area of Terra Cotta: 92sf

Terra Cotta R Value (from MEEB): Outside Air Film: .17 Terra Cotta: .8 3” Extruded EPS: 15 Barriers: .06 CMU: 1.11 Gypsum Board: .45 Inner Air Film: .68 Total: 18.27

WOOD BLOCKING BOSTON VALLEY TERRACLAD™ COPING CMU COUNTER FLASHING

BOSTON VALLEY TERRACLAD™ PANEL VERTICAL TRACK FASTENER

VAPOR and MOISTURE BARRIERS

VERTICAL TRACK STEEL ANGLE

MODIFIED BITUMEN INSULATION SLAB

CASTELLATED BEAM DENSGLASS™

Terra Cotta U-Value:

THERMALLY BROKEN STEEL ANGLES TO SUPPORT LINTEL

FLASHING

KAWNEER VENTROW ISOLOCK® VENTILATOR FLASHING

6

WINDOW SILL at TERRA COTTA WALL

KAWNEER VERSOLEIL SUNSHADE

VISUAL QUALITY STEEL SILL BOSTON VALLEY TERRACLAD™ PANEL

CASTELLATED BEAM KAWNEER VENTROW ISOLOCK® VENTILATOR EXTERNAL SHADE MECHANISM KAWNEER VERSOLEIL SUNSHADE

PPG SOLARBAN 60 STARPHIRE GLASS KAWNEER 5525 ISOWEB WINDOW

KAWNEER INLIGHTEN LIGHT SHELF

METAL TRIM

KAWNEER 1600 SYSTEM 3 CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM PPG SOLARBAN 70XL GLASS

DENSGLASS™ CMU

Wall Type Window Terra Cotta

UValue .28 .054

Area

ΔT

48sf 92sf

1 1

Total Wall U-Factor: Total Wall R-Value:

VERTICAL TRACK FASTENER VERTICAL TRACK INSULATION VAPOR AND MOISTURE BARRIERS

7

WINDOW WALL AND ROOF

13.4 4.96

18.4


Eugene Depot: Post-Occupancy Evaluation

Traces of Use Bench Scratches

Windows Glued Shut BY-PRODUCT OF USE: EROSION

with Alex Clohesey and Justin Hebels

Finally we integrated all of the data we had collected and presented it along with an evaluation of how well the building was performing its function and how it could be improved. We also generated a set of general design guidelines based on our evidence that could be applied to future designs, transit oriented or not.  

VERIFYING USER QUESTION: When you sat on this bench did you slide against the back or seat before completely stopping?

ADAPTION FOR USE : SEPERATION HYPOTHESIS: The windows were sealed shut to prevent people from opening them and messing the mechanical HVAC systems.

HYPOTHESIS: When people sit on the slippery benches, they slide a little before coming to a stop.

My term project in my Human Context of Design class was to conduct a post-occupancy evaluation of Eugene’s train station. We analyzed the building using a variety of techniques including trace analysis, behavior mapping, interviews of employees and train riders, and historical research which included contacting the architects behind the station’s renovation in the 1990’s.

REMOVED WINDOW LATCH

VERIFYING USER QUESTION: Would you open these windows if you could?

GLUE

Behavior Mapping 4 February 2011, 2:00-3:15PM As far as we can tell Friday afternoon is the busiest time of the week at the train station. The Express bus to Portland and the northbound Amtrak Coast Starlight both leave Eugene around 2:45 and they are popular routes with people who are going to spend the weekend in Portland, Seattle, or Vancouver B.C.. There were already almost ten people waiting when observation started at 2:00. This number increased steadily for the next 45 minutes, peaking at the 2:45 reading with about 35 people. A couple minutes after 2:45 the bus was announced and about ten people left on it. The Coast Starlight didn’t pull in until a little after three, everyone else who had been waiting left on it. After the train had left there was a little residual traffic as disembarking passangers talked with the station agents or waited to get picked up, when observation ended at 3:15 there were only three people in the place.

♫ DOOR C DOOR B

T

MAP KEY - WOMAN - MAN

♫- LISTENING TO MUSIC - TALKING ON THE PHONE

- MOVING

- READING

♫♫

- TALKING (NOT ON PHONE)

B - GOING TO BATHROOMS T- GOING TO TICKET OFFICE

- OBSERVER LOCATION

45-60 minutes

15-30 minutes

DOOR D

T TT

DURATION OF USER’S STAY 0-15 minutes

♫ DOOR A

30-45 minutes

observer and people who were in the station at 3:15, after everthing had left.

T TT

0’

5’

10’

20’


Future Design Guidelines

Interviews 2/5/11 DATE:_____________________

Christopher Gebhardt INTERVIEWER:_________________________ Jenny INTERVIEWEE:_________________________

M / F

(CIRCLE ONE)

Private Seating for Public Waiting

2:45 TIME:_____________________ Main waiting room PLACE:____________________

20’s Traveller ROLE:________________________ AGE:________________

At first she thought she wouldn’t have anything to contribute, she said she doesn’t really think about architecture all that much.

She’s taking the train to Portland, meeting a friend who lives there Tries to use the train as much as possible, it’s cheaper and the experience is way better then airplanes, plus it it more environmentally friendly.

She had her stuff all spread out on her bench so it takes up the whole section.

She likes how you can just walk in and take a seat with your bags, then get on the train, there’s no hassle. She usually gets to the station 20-25 minutes early; she forgot that you don’t need to do any check in or other fuss when you get there.

I was sitting across from her and the benches were just far enough apart that I felt like I had to lean forward to talk to her and she was leaning forward as well. There might have been a noise issue there too as the station was pretty full and pretty noisy.

She really likes the building, she thinks the yellow paint is nice and cheerful; the room is clean and nice. It fits with that “chill Northwest attitude” She said the station feels really safe, she’s sure that there is crime on Amtrak, but its probably pretty rare and there are no big reminders of it.

She kept going back to “the experience” how nice it was compared to other forms of travel, whenever she talked about architectural features it was always how it contributed to the pleasant experience of train using.

She says the security at airports makes her feel less safe. She really likes how when they re-did the architecture of the building they respected the old building, they didn’t try to make it all modern looking.

In waiting spaces, design seating as multiple sub-sections based on expected group sizes. Facing benches as parts of the same space

She can’t think of anything she would like to change, she really likes the old architecture and the cheerful wall colors and the old fashioned benches.

Presentation Summary Maps People liked looking at posters and historical pictures on the wall.

People liked the yellow walls, they said it felt cheerful.

Most people liked the built in wooden benches. However, a couple people strongly didn’t. DOOR D

DOOR C

Group using the whole bench

Single people staking out territory

Families sit in the round part because it’s big and they can fit a lot of people.

Most dramatic hellos and good-byes happened here.

DOOR C

DOOR D

Facing benches as different spaces

DOOR B

People enjoyed the large windows and the light that came through them.

0’

5’

10’

20’

DOOR A

Train schedule signage was really confusing for users.

DOOR B

People used their bags and coats to stake out a territory, usually one section of a bench

0’

5’

10’

20’

DOOR A

People tended to either sit as near to the ticket office as possible or as far as possible, the middle sections filled in last.

Our observations indicate that a seating group designed for three or four people is small enough for one person to claim as their territory, and big enough for most groups waiting for public transit. If the distinctions between seating groups are ambiguous then single people can emphasize their distinction by claiming a territory with their things, while groups can ignore the distinction and treat it as a larger single area.


Tired? Stressed? Need a Vacation?

Graphic Design

Picture yourself here...

Extracurricular graphic design projects I have done for fun and practice with digital design tools. Some were done for organizations I am involved with.

Rocky Mountain

Competition winning t-shirt design for the University of Oregon chapter of the AIAS

National Park

Illustrator practice

Vector tracing of photo for Illustrator practice.

O L O R A D O

O L O R A D O

Uniform design for Colorado Cutthroat Youth Ultimate Championships Team with Thomas Gebhardt

O L O R A O D L O

O R A D O

18

18


Photography Photographs I have taken recently. Many of them are from my trip to Japan this summer, some are from closer to home. Photography is a fun way to record my experiences while also developing my eye for composition, color, and light.



Architecture Portfolio 2013