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GUARDIAN A Publication of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

Volume 26, Issue 4 4th Quarter 2019

CVSA Jurisdictions Inspect More Than 9,200 CMVs Transporting Hazardous Materials/ Dangerous Goods Nearly 800 People Attend CVSA’s 2019 Annual Conference and Exhibition in Biloxi, Mississippi Arizona DOT Partners with Hopi Tribe on Commercial Vehicle Safety Inspections Groups Come Together to Launch New Truck Safety Program in Colorado


GUARDIAN

GUARDIAN Fourth Quarter Volume 26, Issue 4 www.cvsa.org

A Publication of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

IN THIS ISSUE n

Insight President’s Message.......................................................................................................1 Executive Director’s Message..................................................................................... 2 Letter to the Editor......................................................................................................... 3

n

Regional News Updates from Puerto Rico Transport and Other Public Services Bureau...........4 Keeneland Race Course Outreach and Enforcement Detail................................5 Updates from North Carolina State Highway Patrol.....................................................6 Updates from Florida Highway Patrol........................................................................10 Bridge Weight Limit Is Serious Business...................................................................... 13 Groups Come Together to Launch New Truck Safety Program in Colorado........................................................................................................................14 Knowing the Stress Points and Deficiencies of Coupling Devices....................... 15 Updates from Mexico........................................................................................................16 Arizona DOT Partners with Hopi Tribe on Commercial Vehicle Safety Inspections............................................................................................................19 York Regional Police Routine Inspection Yields Half Million Dollar Cannabis Seizure............................................................................................................20

n Cover Story CVSA Jurisdictions Inspect More Than 9,200 CMVs Transporting Hazardous Materials/Dangerous Goods..............................................................21 n n

CVSA Committee and Program News CVSA Transitions to New Leadership for 2019-2020............................................23 Nearly 800 People Attend CVSA’s 2019 Annual Conference and Exhibition in Biloxi, Mississippi.............................................................................24 Government News Shipping HAZMAT? Send It Safely...........................................................................26 The Legislative and Regulatory Rundown............................................................. 27 FMCSA Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse...............................................................28 FMCSA Announces Winners of Children’s Road Safety Art Contest.............. 30

n Knowledge Matters GHSA Offers New Toolkit to Help States Strengthen Interactions with Law Enforcement..............................................................................................31

n Inspector’s Corner The Importance of Support...................................................................................................32 n From the Driver’s Seat Distracted Drivers and How Professional Truck Drivers Anticipate Hazards................................................................................................................ 33 n Industry Perspectives Engagement and Complacency................................................................................34 Make Your Inspection Reporting Work for You....................................................35 n

RAD Inspection News Current WIPP Routes....................................................................................................36 CVSA Holds Level VI Industry Awareness Class in New Mexico.........................36 CVSA Holds Its 176th Level VI Certification Class.................................................. 37 Nebraska Holds Joint Level VI Refresher Training............................................... 37 Level VI Roadside Inspections (2019 - Fiscal).......................................................38 Level VI Roadside Inspection Violations (2019 - Fiscal).....................................38

GUARDIAN “Guardian” is published quarterly by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance with support from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. CVSA and FMCSA are dedicated to the government and industry working together to promote commercial motor vehicle safety on North American highways. Phone: 301-830-6143 • Website: www.cvsa.org CVSA Staff: Collin B. Mooney, MPA, CAE, Executive Director • Adrienne Gildea, CAE, Deputy Executive Director • Carlisle Smith, Director of Level VI Inspection Program • William Schaefer, Director of Safety Programs • Ken Albrecht, Director of Multimedia Development • Bill Reese, Director of COHMED Program • Kerri Wirachowsky, Director of Roadside Inspection Program • Christopher Turner, Esq., Director of Crash and Data Programs • Nicole Leandro, Manager of Communications • Iris Leonard, Manager of Member Services • Daniel Zimmerman, Manager of Government Affairs • Amanda Wagner, CMP, Manager of Conference and Event Services • Mark Mills, Multimedia Specialist • Wendy Smith, Learning Management System Specialist • Moniladae Adewoyin, Accountant • Amelina Kassa, Administrative Assistant Copyright 2019, CVSA. All rights reserved. No part of this issue may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. For comments, suggestions or information, email communications@cvsa.org. Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

@CVSA

CVSA Communications

This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration under a grant/cooperative agreement/subaward. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and/or the U.S. Department of Transportation.


INSIGHT

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Attending CVSA Meetings and Conferences By Sgt. John Samis, Delaware State Police, CVSA President

In September 2019, I began my term as president of CVSA at the CVSA Annual Conference and Exhibition in Biloxi, Mississippi. While in Biloxi, I received a phone call from back home: A young child had been killed in a crash involving a commercial motor vehicle.

these CVSA events, especially the fall annual conference. These achievements are possible due to all of you who attend. Your expertise, experience and dedication to commercial motor vehicle safety is critical in keeping the public safe as industry moves commercial freight across our roadways.

Unfortunately, we sometimes receive these calls, but they especially bother me when I am out of town. I start to think of my family back home and worry about their safety as they go about their daily activities. Part of me feels helpless because I am not there with them. Then, I look around at what is being accomplished at CVSA and I feel good knowing that we are all working hard to make our roadways safer.

As you know, these CVSA events bring together enforcement personnel, federal regulators and industry experts, each of whom may have different ideas on how we can keep our highways safer. When we interact at these meetings and express our ideas and opinions, we feed off each other’s contributions and through the prioritization of safety, we determine the best approach to solving problems.

As I traveled home from the conference, I had time on the airplane to reflect on what we had accomplished during the week. It never ceases to amaze me how much gets done at

Our partnerships are the determining factor in making CVSA successful. I recently overheard someone say at one of our meetings that industry and law enforcement are on opposite

sides of the fence, heading in the same direction. I thought about that statement and it rings true. Law enforcement is tasked with keeping our roadways safe, enforcing our traffic laws and the federal regulations. Industry is tasked with moving people and freight across our roadways in the most efficient way possible. Industry and law enforcement obviously have different functions, but we both want to accomplish our goals while keeping our roadways safe. Input from each side is critical to keeping the roadways safe. We are headed in the same direction. If you have not attended a CVSA event or do not attend regularly, I hope you will consider joining us in our mission to lower fatalities involving commercial motor vehicles. Our next CVSA Workshop will be held April 19-23, 2020, in San Antonio, Texas. I look forward to seeing you there. n

Plan to attend the upcoming CVSA Workshop, April 19-23, 2020, in San Antonio, Texas. For more information, visit www.cvsa.org/ eventpage/events/cvsa-workshop.

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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INSIGHT

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S MESSAGE A Strategic Goal – The Importance of Providing a Modernized Roadside Inspection Software Solution By Collin B. Mooney, MPA, CAE, Executive Director, Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

Strategic Plan Enhance Programs and Services 1.1 Ensure uniform, consistent and reciprocal application of the North American Standard Inspection Program. 1.2  Create and promote accountable and effective online training curriculum and certification programs and resources. 1.3 Support and enable member use of technology in enforcement. 1.4  Improve data quality, collection and analysis capabilities.  1.4.1 Identify data analysis needs and gaps.  1.4.2 Promote implementation of smart logic and functional specifications.  1.4.3 O  ffer training and information webinars to states emphasizing importance of data collection.  1.4.4 C  oordinate with members of CVSA, federal agencies and jurisdictions.  1.4.5 Facilitate international data exchange.  1.4.6 Assist with software development to expand data collection when needed in response to trends.

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My last article highlighted the importance of enhancing consistency and uniformity in the commercial motor vehicle (CMV) roadside enforcement and inspection process. The data generated from that process is the cornerstone and foundation of the roadside enforcement and inspection program’s success. Building upon this importance, the Alliance is poised to make a very important programmatic enhancement by investing in our future and taking the next step in our evolution. To further advance the Alliance’s mission to improve CMV safety and uniformity throughout Canada, Mexico and the U.S. by providing guidance and education to enforcement, industry and policy makers, CVSA leadership and membership have prioritized investment in data collection enhancements necessary to elevate the way roadside enforcement and inspection data is collected, stored and analyzed. These enhancements will advance and fine-tune the roadside North American Standard Inspection Program. During the last two iterations of CVSA’s strategic plan, Alliance leadership and membership agreed that in order to effectively improve data quality, collection and analysis capabilities, CVSA needed to acquire a roadside software solution that could be provided to all jurisdictions as a member benefit. In advance of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) solicitation seeking proposals for the replacement of the CMV roadside inspection reporting platform Aspen and/or the information collection system SAFETYNET, CVSA, on behalf of its membership, is in the process of acquiring the Roadside Inspection Management Software (RIMS) roadside inspection software application from CVO Solutions LLC, a subsidiary of Seikosoft LLC.

Seikosoft has extensive experience consulting and working with clients to develop effective software solutions within a wide variety of niche markets. With more than 40 years of experience in specialized CMV software development, Seikosoft has been a longtime leader in the development of software solutions specifically for the CMV enforcement and regulatory community. Seikosoft already has experience working directly with FMCSA and state governments to test, certify and document federal and state processes to ensure software solutions meet and exceed federal and state standards. Seikosoft was recently awarded the UCR 2.0 National Registration System (NRS) contract issued by the Unified Carrier Registration (UCR) Plan. This contract consisted of the development of a modernized web-based registration solution and a long-term maintenance and support agreement to support the system. The UCR NRS includes a state-specific web-service interface, an interface for state enforcement, a public registration interface for motor carriers, and a state-specific administrative interface for running reports, auditing, soliciting and registering carriers. CVSA will emulate this same proven business model with Seikosoft’s RIMS solution. The Alliance will acquire RIMS from Seikosoft, while also developing a proposed SAFETYNET replacement, and will enter into a long-term service agreement for Seikosoft to provide continual support and timely software updates necessary to meet CVSA’s and its members’ safety initiatives. Seikosoft will provide public sector nonprofit organizations, the UCR Board and CVSA membership with absolute control of our software solutions. These are exciting times, so please continue to stay tuned as programs and services evolve. n


INSIGHT

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

 MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Clarifying Post-Accident Testing

COHMED

By Adam Lang, CDS, Chief Risk Officer, Halvor Lines Inc. Regarding the article on page 38 of volume 26, issue 3, of Guardian magazine, titled “Increasing Marijuana Legalization and Use Raises Concerns for Trucking,” there were some omissions that I feel should be included. I believe it to be a wonderful article; however, I see the potential for misapplication of the rules of post-accident testing. The purpose of this letter is not to criticize the author or the publication, but simply to provide clarification of the statutes, as both motor carriers and law enforcement may make decisions based on some of the items contained within the publication. When the author notes the six reasons for Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) drug and alcohol tests and describes post-accident testing, the description implies that anytime there is a fatality, injury or vehicle tow-away, a post-accident test must take place. This is not always true and is the purpose of this response. The vehicle tow-away must be considered disabling damage per Part 390.5T definitions. When the author mentions injury, the injury described must require the individual to receive immediate medical treatment away from the scene of an accident per the definition of an accident in Part 390.5T. Someone can be injured in a commercial motor vehicle accident without it being classified as an injury as it pertains to drug or alcohol testing. My final point is, I believe, the most important clarification that both carriers and law enforcement need to understand, which is that a fatality requires a post-accident drug and alcohol test within the allotted time described in Part 382. However, a tow-away or injury (or both) do not immediately require the driver to have a post-

TYPE OF ACCIDENT INVOLVED

accident test. Drivers who receive a citation for state or local law moving traffic violations arising from an accident must be tested for alcohol within eight hours. If a citation is issued within 32 hours, the driver must receive controlled substances testing. This is per Part 382.303 on post-accident testing.

CONFERENCE Jan. 27-31, 2020 Omni Louisville Hotel Louisville, Kentucky

Also, FMCSA guidance for Part 382.303 allows tests by federal, state or local law enforcement agencies to substitute for a Part 382.303 test. According to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), law enforcement agencies investigating accidents provide similar protection based on the local court’s prior action in such types of testing. Since such testing is meant to document an investigation for a charge of driving under the influence of a substance, it should be allowed to substitute for an FHWA-required test. Finally, while the employer is required to test each surviving driver for alcohol and controlled substances as soon as practicable following a qualifying accident, if an alcohol test is not administered within eight hours, and a controlled substances test within 32 hours, of the accident, the employer must cease attempts to administer the test(s). The employer, however, must prepare and maintain a record stating the reason(s) the test(s) were not promptly administered. I have also included a chart directly from the regulation to further clarify. Again, the spirit of the original article is not missed. It poses very important questions and risks associated with marijuana in our industry. I would only ask that when post-accident testing is mentioned, further clarification should always be used to ensure everyone knows the circumstances and requirements surrounding the regulation. n

Citation issued to Test must be the CMV driver performed by employer

i. Human fatality

YES NO

YES YES

ii. B  odily injury with immediate medical treatment away from the scene

YES NO

YES NO

iii. Disabling damage to any motor vehicle requiring tow-away

YES NO

YES NO FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION I

Updates from Puerto Rico Transport and Other Public Services Bureau

By Leticia Jover Lucio, Communications Specialist, Puerto Rico Transport and Other Public Services Bureau

New Online Services App

Given the need to modernize the systems that offer services to citizens, the Puerto Rico Transport and Other Public Services Bureau (TPSB) presents its new digital platform, through which all transactions and arrangements – which commonly require an in-person visit to the offices – can instead be carried out online. The platform began as a pilot program for Transportation Network Company driver requests. Over time, the platform has been modified to guarantee better services and increase the quantity of services available.

REGIONAL MAP Region I Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, U.S. Virgin Islands and Vermont Region II Alabama, American Samoa, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia Region III Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Northern Mariana Islands, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin Region IV Alaska, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Mexico, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming Region V Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Nunavut, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan and Yukon

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“We have already received requests through this webpage, without the need for people to wait in long lines at the bureau and without any inconveniences in the process. Furthermore, we have a team of professionals who keep working daily on the petitions we receive through the system,” explained TPSB Chairman Luis García. Currently, all transactions can be carried out online, such as operator licenses (including the hazardous materials endorsement), without having to wait in line on-site. Renovacionesonline.com is an electronic transactions engine, specializing in service

requests and renovations for different departments of the government of Puerto Rico, such as the TPSB.

CDLs to Arrive in Puerto Rico

TPSB Chairman Luis García announced the arrival of commercial driver’s licenses (CDLs) in the implementation of the third phase of the TPSB’s Code of Regulations next year. “Ensuring the safety of drivers and people who transit the public roads of the Commonwealth is one of our responsibilities. With these licenses, we make sure that drivers have more rigorous training, which complies with state and federal regulations. Likewise, we certify that drivers have the same opportunities to transit heavy vehicles in the Commonwealth as in any state of the United States,” García explained. The license is processed through the TPSB. License applicants must pass additional skills and knowledge tests to those required for regular licenses. Holders of CDLs will be evaluated differently when operating any type of motor vehicle on public roads, given their training for obtaining the license. Due to this, serious transit infractions that holders commit will affect their capacity to keep their CDL endorsements. n


REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II

Keeneland Race Course Outreach and Enforcement Detail By Capt. Tristan Truesdell, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement, Kentucky State Police

Kentucky State Police (KSP) Commercial Vehicle Enforcement, in conjunction with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) Kentucky Division and the Lexington Division of Police Traffic Unit, conducted an enforcement detail at the Keeneland Race Course in Lexington, Kentucky, during the most recent yearling horse sale. Keeneland is host to one of the premiere yearling sales in the United States, with hundreds of yearlings sold and transported during the auction.

The three-day detail produced a number of violations, including no operating authority, no or inactive USDOT number, no commercial driver’s license and no medical certificate, as well as several parts and accessories violations, such as brakes, tires and lighting.

The focus of the detail was on interstate carriers operating without authority or without the proper authority to act as a for-hire motor carrier, as well as any other violations of Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations.

Michael Stewart (FMCSA Kentucky Division) organized the event upon invitation from Keeneland officials. FMCSA provided several educational outreach events at the race course in the months leading up to the fall sale. With KSP and Lexington Metro units providing personnel for enforcement, Lt. Richard Bolduc and Lt. Neil Johnson (KSP Program Support Branch) along with Sgt. David Flannery (Lexington Division of Police) supervised the detail.

“This detail wasn’t just about enforcement; we organized it with education and outreach in mind,” said Lt. Richard Bolduc. “In fact, for every enforcement contact we made, we had dozens of outreach opportunities with the public in addition to the horse and transportation industries.”

The main objective was safety of the motoring public, as well as the safety of the horses being transported. Detailed arrangements were made prior to any enforcement action to ensure all horses that required offloading due to out-of-service conditions were handled in a safe and timely manner. n

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II

Updates from North Carolina State Highway Patrol Safe DRIVE Conference

North Carolina State Highway Patrol (NCSHP), Motor Carrier Enforcement Unit hosted the 2019 Safe DRIVE (Distracted, Reckless, Impaired, Visibility, Enforcement) Conference Sept. 9-12, 2019, in Wilmington, North Carolina. Safe DRIVE is a high-visibility education and enforcement initiative designed to deter driver behaviors that contribute to enforcement efforts. The following partner agencies attended the 2019 Safe DRIVE Conference: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, Institute for Transportation Research and Education (ITRE), Alabama Law Enforcement Agency Motor Carrier Safety Unit, Georgia Department of Public Safety Motor Carrier Compliance Division, South Carolina Department of Public Safety State Transport Police, Texas Highway Patrol Commercial Vehicle Enforcement, Tennessee Highway Patrol Commercial Vehicle Enforcement and the Virginia State Police. Safe DRIVE partners presented topics such as human trafficking, electronic logging devices, and future Safe DRIVE projects. In addition, strategies were discussed to target high-crash locations on interstate corridors with a goal of crash prevention to eliminate fatalities, injuries and property damage. The North Carolina State Highway Patrol Motor Carrier Enforcement Unit is appreciative of the continued collaboration with our partner agencies. NCSHP and Partner Agencies

Tpr. Joe Berrong Earns Master Instructor Certification The National Training Center (NTC) offered the Master Instructor Development Course Sept. 4-6 in Austin, Texas. North Carolina State Highway Patrol trooper and instructor Joe D. Berrong II was selected to attend this course. The master instructor is considered a prestigious position and requires applicants to demonstrate continuous commitment and dedication to training. Tpr. Berrong completed the course and received master instructor certification to become one of 32 NTC master instructors. Tpr. Berrong frequently teaches alongside veteran master instructor, auditor Mark R. Herring. This year, thus far, master instructors Herring and Berrong have taught and/or attended nine NTC Courses with approximately 167 students in attendance. The Motor Carrier Enforcement Unit strives to provide excellent commercial motor vehicle inspection training to its in-state and out-ofstate attendees.

Master Instructor Tpr. Joe D. Berrong II NCSHP and ITRE

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NCSHP

Auditor Mark R. Herring


REGIONAL NEWS

Troopers Attend and Compete at 2019 North American Inspectors Championship

From Aug. 13-17, 2019, Tpr. Charles V. Barrett, Tpr. Destry C. Moose, Sgt. Kendell E. Jackson, and Capt. William A. Hook attended the North American Inspectors Championship in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Tpr. Barrett was one of 51 commercial motor vehicle inspectors selected to compete in CVSA’s annual championship. Tpr. Barrett received training on commercial motor vehicle safety trends and the latest technologies, and had the opportunity to share ideas and experiences with other inspectors. The North Carolina State Highway Patrol Motor Carrier Enforcement Unit looks forward to competing at 2020 NAIC in Indianapolis, Indiana.

26th North Carolina State Highway Patrol Student Trooper Program June 16-21 marked the 26th annual North Carolina State Highway Patrol Student Trooper Program. The Student Trooper Program takes place at the North Carolina State Highway Patrol Training Academy in Raleigh. The program is designed to simulate a week in the life of a state trooper for students interested in pursuing the career field. The curriculum included physical fitness, gang awareness, first aid and motor vehicle law, among other various topics essential to the training of a North Carolina State Highway Patrol member. Among the many activities, a Motor Carrier Enforcement Unit inspection demonstration was conducted. Tpr. Brandon S. Johnson performed the inspection demonstration on a commercial motor vehicle provided by North Carolina Trucking Association Road Team Driver John T. Haithcock with FedEx Ground.

North Carolina State Highway Patrol Student Trooper Program Class Tpr. Charles V. Barrett

Tpr. Destry C. Moose, Tpr. Charles V. Barrett, Capt. William A. Hook, Sgt. Kendell E. Jackson

Tpr. Brandon S. Johnson and Student Troopers

North Carolina Trucking Association Road Team Member John T. Haithcock and Student Troopers

Tpr. Charles V. Barrett and NAIC Contestants

Tpr. Charles V. Barrett

FedEx Truck and NCSHP Vehicle

Student Troopers

Continued on next page FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II Continued from page 7

Annual North Carolina Truck Driving Championship

May 9-11, 2019, marked the annual North Carolina Truck Driving Championship held at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh. Members of the North Carolina State Highway Patrol served as judges for this event. The Truck Driving Championship promoted safety and education for North Carolina traffic safety members located throughout the state. The North Carolina Truck Driving Association valued the participation of the North Carolina State Highway Patrol and requested the patrol’s continued involvement for the 2020 championship.

Tpr. Joe D. Berrong II

North Carolina State Highway Patrol

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North Carolina Truck Driving Championship


REGIONAL NEWS

 MARK YOUR CALENDAR Field Training Inspection Program Implementation The North Carolina State Highway Patrol Motor Carrier Enforcement Unit developed a Field Training Inspection (FTI) Program. The FTI Program is designed for members seeking any or all North American Standard Inspection (NASI) certifications and is separated into two phases. The first phase of the program consists of the applicable NASI school. The second phase consists of supervised field inspections with a certified field training inspector. The program was introduced in January 2019 and has certified approximately 60 field training inspectors across the state of North Carolina. The FTI Program was designed to eliminate the cost of travel, lodging and the student inspectors’ time away from their respective duty stations. Thus, the FTI Program has resulted in great cost-savings. In addition, the FTI Program has allowed consistent and superior quality inspections, which may result in the reduction of commercial motor vehicle incidents statewide and beyond. n

NORTH AMERICAN INSPECTORS CHAMPIONSHIP

August 18-22, 2020 Indianapolis, Indiana

First Sgt. John P. Bobbitt III and Tpr. Ryan D. Thomas

Tpr. Benjamin J. Holder and Tpr. Ryan D. Thomas

Tpr. Benjamin J. Holder and Tpr. Ryan D. Thomas

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II

Updates from Florida Highway Patrol Florida Conducts Two Operation Shield Against Impaired CMV Drivers Details in August

During the month of August, Troop I members conducted two Operation Shield Against Impaired CMV Drivers details in the Pensacola and Lake City districts. The purpose of the details was to identify dangerous alcohol- or drug-impaired commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers and unsafe vehicles and to remove them from operation on Florida’s roadways. Troopers conducted lawful traffic stops and completed North American Standard Level I, II and III Inspections of commercial motor vehicles and drivers to identify violations of Florida laws and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. Troopers also sought to detect criminal activity, such as drug trafficking, human trafficking, vehicle and cargo theft; apprehend fugitives from justice; and gather intelligence associated with any possible criminal activity. On Aug. 21, 2019, from 6-11:30 p.m., Troop I Pensacola District troopers, including a drug recognition expert (DRE) and a Troop A K-9 team, conducted the detail at the Florida Department of Transportation scale facility, located on I-10 in Pensacola. Sixteen CMV safety inspections were completed, resulting in 12 safety citations, two CMVs and four drivers being placed out of service, one criminal arrest, one fuel tax permit violation and four other uniform traffic citations. On Aug. 23, from 6 p.m.-12 a.m., Troop I Lake City District troopers, including a K-9 team and a Troop B DRE, conducted the detail at the Florida Department of Transportation scale facility, located on I-75 at White Springs. Twenty-one CMV safety inspections were conducted, resulting in two misdemeanor drug arrests, 12 safety citations, and five CMVs and three drivers being placed out of service. The DRE administered standardized field sobriety exercises to two CMV drivers who were determined not to be impaired. This detail was one of many to come. The troopers worked great together, which resulted in a safe and productive detail. Although impaired CMV drivers were not identified during the detail, the Troop I members impacted the safety of traffic on I-10 and I-75 by placing dangerous commercial motor vehicles and drivers out of service for safety violations. The increased visibility of CVE troopers actively working in the Florida Department of Transportation facilities no doubt had a rippling safety effect on CMV traffic operating in the area during the operations. Future enforcement details utilizing CVE troopers, certified DREs and Criminal Interdiction Unit teams with K-9s will be conducted at various locations throughout Troop I to contribute to a safer driving environment on Florida’s interstate roadways.

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REGIONAL NEWS

On Sept. 10th, 2019, Master Sgt. May conducted safety outreach with the Gulf Shore Insurance Group and some of its clients. The meeting was held in Naples and lasted for two and a half hours. There were 35 people in attendance, representing 20 different carriers/companies. Topics discussed included weight enforcement, over dimensions and permits, commercial driver’s licenses, commercial motor vehicle drivers driving under the influence, the move over law, tips for safely sharing the road, safety inspections, load securement and cell phone usage in commercial motor vehicles.

The Pensacola District conducted a multi-carrier outreach for the master logger continuing education program. Capt. Park, Sgt. Henderson, Tpr. O’Quinn, Tpr. Simmons and Lt. Blansit attended the outreach. The following topics were discussed: traffic laws, the code of federal regulations, distracted driving, medical certificates, commercial driver’s licenses, seatbelts, texting, cell phones, inspections and load securement. The outreach was a great success and the officers received high praises for their participation.

Members of the Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement (CVE) and members of the Florida Department of Health’s Bureau of Radiation Control participated in training on systems used to detect and identify Class 7 (radioactive) hazardous materials being transported throughout the state. CVE troopers use these vehicle-mounted platforms during routine patrol, at special events and for targeted enforcement details throughout the year. Sgt. Gonzalez and Lt. Torres conducted education outreach at Sheridan Technical College in Broward County on Aug. 19. The college has a nine-week training course to teach students about the safety equipment, laws and the driving practice they will need to get their CDLs. There were 30 CDL students that attended along with three CDL instructors.

Continued on next page FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II Continued from page 11

Capt. Chuck Smalley of the Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement conducted educational outreach in Orlando for the Florida Onsite Wastewater Association on Aug. 2, 2019.

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II

Bridge Weight Limit Is Serious Business By Mary Ann Kearns, The Ledger Independent, Maysville, Kentucky Officers with Kentucky State Police Division of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement (CVE) were in Maysville in August, monitoring traffic on the Simon Kenton Memorial Bridge. The officers brought portable scales with them to weigh vehicles, particularly trucks suspected of exceeding the bridge’s weight limit, and set up near the Mason County Public Library. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) had recently reduced the weight limit on the historic bridge crossing the Ohio River after an inspection revealed issues with the bridge’s cables. While the issues do not appear to present any immediate danger, engineering analysis shows that the reduced weight limit is needed as a traffic safety precaution and to prevent possible further damage until the structure can be repaired, officials said. “The damage we found on several hanger cables warranted the weight limit posting,” said KYTC spokesperson Allen Blair. If the new three-ton limit is not enforced, state officials said the bridge could be closed to traffic until repairs can be made. “We understand that the lower weight limit impacts a number of travelers, particularly commercial vehicles, but the change is very important to ensure traffic safety and to prevent further damage until we can make

repairs,” Blair said. “We ask for the public’s cooperation in obeying the weight limit so we do not have to close the bridge to all traffic.” Following the decision, weight limit signs were clearly posted on roadways leading to the bridge and on approaches. Electronic signs also warned of the reduced limit as drivers headed toward the bridge from U.S. 62. Additional signs are also being installed, Blair said. Despite the signage and directions that heavier vehicles should use the newer William Harsha Bridge, trucks continued to use the older bridge and were spotted crossing in both directions on a daily basis. Maysville Police Department (MPD) Assistant Police Chief Jared Muse said the department had reached out to CVE through Larry Faris, a former MPD officer who is now with CVE, after receiving complaints that truck drivers were still using the bridge, hoping to get ideas on how to keep truck traffic off the bridge. MPD does not have the manpower to monitor bridge traffic around the clock and is looking for ways to discourage truckers from using the span, such as making it harder to turn onto the bridge, among other ideas, he said. Mason County Sheriff Patrick Boggs said his department, like MPD, does not have

enough officers to monitor the bridge on a continuous basis. But, he said, deputies will write tickets if they spot a driver using the bridge unlawfully. The strict three-ton limit bans most everything beyond passenger cars and pickup trucks, Boggs said, including cattle trucks, school buses, RVs, box trucks and armored cars, along with tractor-trailers. Even some larger SUVs and pickups may exceed the limit. Muse and Boggs said officers will cite drivers with a disregarding a traffic control device (weight limit signs) citation when they observe violations. The priority is to repair the bridge and restore a more normal weight limit as soon as possible. “The Transportation Cabinet has already begun making repair plans,” Blair said. “The first steps will be to gather more data about the damage, take measurements and perform a more detailed engineering analysis. Some of that work will involve closing the bridge temporarily. The schedule will be announced as soon as possible.” n Source URL: https://maysville-online.com/ top-stories/171192/bridge-weight-limit-is-seriousbusiness

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION III

Groups Come Together to Launch New Truck Safety Program in Colorado By Evan Lockridge, Freelance Trucking Journalist Law enforcement, transportation, trucking and service providers all came together in August to unveil an initiative to help enhance safety for truckers traveling through Colorado’s mountainous areas. “The Mountain Rules” is a comprehensive, strategic and safety-focused effort to inform and educate trucking companies and drivers of the challenges of driving in Colorado’s mountains. It includes information on potential hazards and a consistent reminder of the need to be slow, steady and safe for the long haul. The program was announced during a press conference and live demonstration in collaboration with the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), Colorado State Patrol (CSP), Colorado Motor Carriers Association (CMCA) and in-cab driver alert and weigh station bypass service providers. The I-70 Mountain Corridor will be the initial pilot for The Mountain Rules. CDOT said it plans to expand the program to other mountainous locations. “It’s no secret that our mountains create immense challenges for semi-truck drivers,” said Shoshana Lew, CDOT executive director. “‘The Mountain Rules’ has a simple mission – get everyone home safely – and this campaign…is a major step toward achieving that goal.”

In addition to an educational effort, The Mountain Rules consists of infrastructure and informational improvements. This includes: • New signs at certain chain stations, with information on brake check locations for truckers • Restriping an exit ramp into a moredefined short-term truck parking area where overheated brakes can cool down and equipment checks can take place prior to the final descent • Gathering information on the feasibility of a new ramp and other measures to mitigate runaway trucks, such as geometric and signage improvements. “I want to dispel any misconceptions, myths or rumors about truck ramps for all commercial carriers who travel our mountain corridors,” said CSP Col. Matthew Packard. “Commercial carriers will not be cited by law enforcement for using truck ramps. Should your brakes fail, please save lives and use the ramps.” This safety effort also includes new in-cab alert systems from weigh station bypass providers. The visual and audible alerts notify truck drivers about specific areas where brake failures could occur, as well as the location of brake check and runaway truck ramps along I-70.

Alerts notify truck drivers of steep grades ahead and also notify them as they approach any of the five runaway truck ramps along the route. Drivers also receive alerts for seven sites along I-70 where they can perform brake checks, as well as complete truck tire chainups or removals in the winter. “These dynamic alerts will improve highway safety by notifying truck drivers well in advance of steep grades and sites where they can check their brakes,” said Terry Maple, regional director for PrePass Safety Alliance. Maple, a former superintendent of the Kansas Highway Patrol, said the additional alerts will minimize distractions because they require no interaction on the part of the driver. “Our mountains and the highways winding through them provide some of the greatest vistas in the world and make Colorado special,” said CMCA Chairman Jim Coleman. “These same roadways, such as I-70, pose a particular challenge for truck drivers and truck brakes, with long and steep downgrades of up to 7%. This outreach effort and program will go a long way in educating truck drivers of how to navigate through our mountains, which will enhance safety for all highway users.” n

The truck driver is shown how the new safety alerts for I-70 will appear on the in-cab device, and the location of brake check and chain-up areas for trucks along I-70. Credit: Andrew Johnson A truck driver gets an in-cab demonstration of how the new safety alerts for I-70 will appear on the in-cab device, warning about specific areas where brake failures could occur and where runaway truck ramps are located. Credit: Andrew Johnson

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION IV

Knowing the Stress Points and Deficiencies of Coupling Devices By John Watkins, Motor Carrier Services Patrol, Montana Department of Transportation Montana is home to many different transportation industries. These include long haul, construction, logging, mining, oil and agriculture. These industries all have unique facets to their respective businesses. The one constant that remains unchanged is safety.

Fifth wheel riser cracked and peeling. Photo by Thomas Renz MCS44.

Last quarter, Montana completed 1,713 Level I and 3,803 Level II Inspections. There were 4,997 violations with 1,025 commercial motor vehicles and 247 commercial motor vehicle drivers placed out of service. The difference between driver and vehicle out-of-service rates emphasizes that mechanical deficiencies continue to be too frequent. There are many ways to attach a trailer to the power unit – a gooseneck, pintle hook and fifth wheel assemblies are just some of the options. Inspectors must be aware of many different stress points of the working parts and the possible deficiencies of a coupling device, as these areas can quickly become out of service. No matter the size of the combination or the type of truck, safety remains imperative. Montana’s inspectors have the responsibility of ensuring that our roadways remain a safe place to travel and work. n

Cracked fifth wheel upper plate with spreading of the trailer frame. Photo by John Watkins MCS54.

A detached trailer due to improper receiver hitch (bumper hitch). Photo by John Watkins MCS54.

A cracked fifth wheel plate affecting the locking bar. Photo by John Watkins MCS54.

Broken pintle hitch missing locking latch. Photo by John Watkins MCS54.

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION IV

UPDATES FROM

Mexico’s SCT DGAF, Policía Federal and ANPACT leadership met with CVSA Executive Director Collin Mooney, along with Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration leadership and Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators leadership, in Puebla, Mexico.

SCT DGAF, CVSA, FMCSA, CCMTA and ANPACT Meet in Puebla, Mexico On Oct. 17, 2019, in Puebla, Puebla, Mexico, Salomón Elnecavé Korish, general director of Federal Autotransport (DGAF) for Mexico’s Ministry of Communications and Transportation (SCT) met with CVSA Executive Director Collin Mooney; Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) leadership; Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators Board of Directors Chair Doug MacEwen and President and Chief Executive Officer Allison Fradette; along with industry members associated with ANPACT at the 2019 Expo Transporte ANPACT (National Association of Bus, Truck and Tractor Truck Producers). The meeting was held to discuss a proposal to develop elements for a technological route for motor carriers in North America with

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innovations in the industry and the expected or possible scenarios for motor transport in the next years, through a joint working group. The discussions and work will continue into 2020.

DGAF Participates in 2019 CVSA Annual Conference and Exhibition

General Director Salomón Elnecavé Korish spoke at the general session during the 2019 CVSA Annual Conference and Exhibition in Biloxi, Mississippi, on Sept. 23, 2019. The annual conference provided an excellent opportunity for DGAF to meet with U.S. and Canadian government officials and industry representatives, and to obtain valuable information on the latest policies, practices and technologies used throughout North America in the pursuit of improvements to commercial motor vehicle safety.

DGAF Salomón Elnecavé Korish spoke during the CVSA Annual Conference general session.


REGIONAL NEWS

DGAF-FMCSA Meeting in Mexico City FMCSA and DGAF met in Mexico City, Mexico, on Aug. 6, 2019, to pursue driver, vehicle and regulatory safety initiatives. DGAF is proud of the long history of cooperative actions taken to promote safe and fluid cross-border motor carrier operations and improve roadway safety by reducing crashes, injuries and fatalities involving large trucks and buses. Cross-border truck crossings at the U.S.-Mexico border have increased from 4.8 million in 2008 to more than 6.3 million in 2018, with an increase of approximately 5% from 2017 to 2018. With the constant growth in the number of commercial motor vehicle crossings at the common border, there is no time like the present to investigate the best ways to promote safe cross-border motor carrier operations, improve roadway safety, and reduce crashes, injuries and fatalities. In this spirit, both agencies asked their staff to coordinate and begin the process of determining the next series of safety initiatives that would benefit both countries. For vehicles, FMCSA is ready to continue the work with DGAF on training CVSA-certified commercial motor vehicle inspectors and inspector trainers, and is committed to the development of a CVSA cargo tank training course for commercial motor vehicle inspectors.

CVSA OFFERS TRAINING COURSES FOR ENFORCEMENT AND FOR INDUSTRY Industry Training Courses

Receive inspection training comparable to roadside inspectors, modified and optimized to provide industry with a better understanding of regulatory requirements and out-of-service conditions. Gain the skill set to ensure your fleet and drivers are fully prepared to pass roadside inspections.

Regional COHMED Training Courses

CVSA offers COHMED training to its members throughout the United States, giving hazmat specialists the opportunity to receive advanced hazmat training, closer to home. To view the 2020 calendar of COHMED and industry training courses, visit www.cvsa.org/trainingpage/training.

SalomĂłn ElnecavĂŠ Korish with his DGAF work team and the FMCSA and National Training Center work team during the Aug. 6 meeting in Mexico City. Continued on next page FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION IV Continued from page 17

2019 Safety Enforcement Inspections

SCT of Mexico joined Canada and the U.S. to carry out the operational TDG/HM Road Blitz of hazardous materials and dangerous goods on Aug. 12-16, 2019. The blitz was a nationwide review of commercial motor vehicles or vehicle configurations that transport hazardous materials or waste.

2019 Vehicle Weight and Dimensions Enforcement Inspections

Inspections were performed to verify that commercial motor vehicles or vehicle configurations that provide cargo services comply with, and do not exceed, the weight and dimensions established by the Official Mexican Standard (NOM-012-SCT-2-2017) for federal motor transportation on Mexican interstate roadways.

2019 Weight and Dimensions Review

During 2019, several operations have been carried out alongside SCT field offices nationwide. With information at the end of September, SCT obtained the following results: • Total vehicles reviewed: 111,850  • Vehicles sanctioned: 3,871 (3.4%) • 1,383 (1.2%) overweight and/or dimensions violations • 1,668 (1.4%) other types of violations  • 820 (0.7%) lack of express authorization violations, which is the lack of registration of a vehicle that travels on federal jurisdiction roads in double articulated tractor configurations (fulles) • 39 (0.03%) cases of co-responsibility – carriers and cargo owners n

An inspection of dangerous materials and goods.

This road blitz was carried out in the same way SCT performed the 2019 Operation Brake Safety Week, which was carried out on Mexico’s federal highways from Sept. 16-20, 2019.

Vehicle weight and dimensions enforcement inspections are conducted.

SCT participated in 2019 Brake Safety Week in September. Inspections are conducted.

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION IV

Arizona DOT Partners with Hopi Tribe on Commercial Vehicle Safety Inspections Officers use mobile ports to check semis driving through the reservation To enhance safety on state highways, the Arizona Department of Transportation’s (ADOT) Enforcement and Compliance Division partnered with the Hopi Tribe to set up a mobile commercial motor vehicle inspection site on the reservation. Concerned that overweight semitrailers and those in violation of safety regulations may be using state roads that pass through the Hopi reservation to evade commercial ports of entry, the tribal government reached out to ADOT for assistance. ADOT sent officers to set up a mobile inspection site along State Route 264 near the junction with State Route 87, while officers patrolled other parts of State Route 264, State Route 87 and Indian Route 2 to ensure commercial motor vehicles weren’t evading the mobile inspection site.

Partnering with tribal governments is one way that ADOT strives to connect all Arizonans, promote safety and create the nation’s most reliable transportation system. “We look forward to further developing a relationship with the Hopi Tribe and assisting the need to train local Hopi officers for commercial vehicle enforcement,” said Gary McCarthy, chief of the Enforcement Services Bureau. Officers checked that commercial motor vehicles complied with weight restrictions and permit requirements. They also checked hours of service to ensure drivers weren’t fatigued and posing a safety risk to themselves and others. Officers conducted thorough safety inspections on the commercial motor vehicles.

Hopi law enforcement officers and members of the tribal council visited the inspection site to show support for ADOT’s presence and Hopi officers expressed interest in becoming certified to inspect commercial motor vehicles. “The effort in total was a success and greatly appreciated,” said Michael Lomayaktewa, director of the Hopi Department of Transportation. “Acknowledging and meeting our request shows that we are viewed as important as Arizona’s metropolitan cities while experiencing similar issues.” n

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION V

York Regional Police Routine Inspection Yields Half Million Dollar Cannabis Seizure By Sgt. Dan St. Amand, Road Safety Bureau, York Regional Police Created in 2006, the York Regional Police Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspection Unit is comprised of four police constables and one sergeant. Its mandate is to conduct enforcement and educational awareness for commercial heavy-truck operators with the goal of improving road and truck safety. In addition to commercial motor vehicle inspections, the team is responsible for a wide variety of other initiatives and investigations, including mechanical inspections for vehicles involved in serious and fatal collisions, tow truck enforcement blitzes, car seat clinics, training and education sessions for front-line officers and Project ERASE (Eliminate Racing Activity on Streets Everywhere) enforcement. Despite all of the above, it remains the routine police patrol and enforcement that tends to yield the most interesting cases. On June 12, 2019, Constable Greg Castle was patroling the area of York Region known as the Holland Marsh, just outside of Bradford, Ontario. This area is comprised of numerous farms and is known for its extremely fertile land and, subsequently, a high volume of medium- and heavy-truck activity. At approximately 1:30 p.m., Constable Castle spotted a white Ford cube van with two

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occupants traveling south on Highway 11. A traffic stop was initiated for the purpose of conducting an inspection of the vehicle. Upon identifying the driver, Constable Castle became suspicious of the information regarding the travel itinerary and the explanation by the driver as to where he was traveling. Constable Castle commenced a vehicle inspection and upon requesting the driver to open the van to check for the load security, he observed a large quantity of cannabis plants, ranging from 2-4 feet in height. Both parties were arrested for possession for the purpose of trafficking. An investigation determined the plants were destined for the illegal cannabis trade market. The driver was in possession of what appeared to be a fraudulent cannabis production permit. Both the driver and the passenger were charged with multiple offences, including production of cannabis without a permit Section 12(1)(a), distribution with intent to sell Section 13(1) and possession for the purpose of distributing Section 9.2 contrary to the Federal Cannabis Act. An inventory of the vehicle revealed approximately 600 plants with an estimated street value of $500,000. n


COVER STORY

CVSA Jurisdictions Inspect More Than 9,200 CMVs Transporting Hazardous Materials/ Dangerous Goods Enforcement personnel in Canada, Mexico and the U.S. inspected 9,259 commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) transporting hazardous materials/dangerous goods (HM/DG) as part of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods/ Hazardous Materials (TDG/HM) Road Blitz on Aug. 12-16, 2019. Inspectors identified 683 outof-service HM/DG conditions. During the North America-wide 2019 TDG/ HM Road Blitz, 15,197 HM/DG packages were inspected; 8,594 were non-bulk packages/ small means of containment and 6,603 were bulk packages/large means of containment (5,730 cargo tank and 873 other bulk). Inspectors found 66 violations for package integrity (leaking) and 204 violations for loading and securement, all resulting in outof-service conditions. There were 181 other packaging violations, resulting in 50 out-ofservice conditions. Of the 432 total placarding violations, 102 were out-of-service conditions. There were 1,156 shipping paper violations; 226 were out-of-service conditions. Out of 171

markings violations, 35 were out-of-service conditions. In addition: • Class 1 explosives, such as ammunition, fireworks, flares, etc., were inspected 262 times. • Class 2 gases were inspected 2,108 times. Class 2 gases are categorized as flammable, non-flammable/non-poisonous and poisonous. • Class 3 flammable liquids were inspected 5,446 times. Examples of flammable liquids are acetone, adhesives, paints, gasoline, ethanol, methanol, some pesticides, etc.

nitrate fertilizers and oxygen generators. • Class 6 toxic and infectious substances were inspected 200 times. This means any material, other than a gas, that is so toxic to humans that it presents a health hazard during transportation. Cyanide, biological samples, clinical wastes and some pesticides are examples of Class 6 hazards. • Class 7 radioactive materials, such as cobalt and cesium, were inspected 87 times.

• Class 4 materials were inspected 276 times. Class 4 materials are flammable solids, substances liable to spontaneously combust and substances that, on contact with water, emit flammable gases.

• Class 8 materials were inspected 1,728 times. Class 8 corrosive substances, such as sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide, are liquid or solid corrosive materials that cause full thickness destruction of human skin at the site of contact within a specified time.

• Class 5 oxidizing agents and organic peroxides were inspected 339 times. Class 5 materials include chemicals, such as hydrogen peroxide, potassium permanganate, sodium nitrite, ammonium

• Class 9 miscellaneous HM/DG and articles were inspected 667 times. Acetaldehyde ammonia, asbestos, elevated temperature materials and benzaldehyde are Class 9 materials. Continued on next page FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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COVER STORY

Continued from page 21

The goal of this TDG/HM Road Blitz initiative is to:  Heighten awareness of the rules and regulations in place to keep the public and the environment safe from HM/DG during transportation.  Call attention to the hard work of the enforcement community that inspects CMVs transporting HM/DG and enforces regulatory compliance.  Highlight the steps taken by safety-compliant drivers, shippers and motor carriers to ensure HM/DG is appropriately marked, placarded, contained and secured while being transported from location to location.

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Since 2012, Transport Canada and CVSA member jurisdictions in Canada have held this annual week-long national enforcement blitz to conduct inspections and verify compliance with Canada’s TDG Regulations. This year, however, was the first time that the U.S. and Mexico joined Canada in this initiative focused on the inspections, regulatory compliance and enforcement of HM/DG regulations. As a combined North American initiative, this event allowed enforcement partners across national borders to foster North America-wide uniformity of HM/DG enforcement activities and gather and share valuable compliance and enforcement information. “Every day, hazardous materials are shipped throughout North America,” said CVSA President Sgt. John Samis with the Delaware State Police. “Such materials are often necessary for people’s way of life; however, these materials can also be dangerous and without proper care, rules and regulations, there is the potential to endanger human life and damage the environment. That is why it is so important that drivers, inspectors, motor carriers, manufacturers and governments continually work together to ensure the safe transportation of HM/DG and to eliminate any risk of incidents.” Governments in Canada, Mexico and the U.S. have rules, policies, statutes and regulations that apply to the transportation of HM/DG, as well as inspection and enforcement programs to ensure compliance with safety regulations. The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) is responsible for regulating and ensuring the safe and secure movement of hazardous materials. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration is the modal agency responsible for highway transportation safety and its hazardous materials regulations are specific to highway transportation through its Hazardous Materials Program. To minimize threats to life, property or the environment due to HM-related incidents, PHMSA’s Office of Hazardous Materials Safety develops Hazardous Materials Regulations and standards for the classification, handling and packaging of more than 1 million daily shipments of hazardous

materials within the U.S. Members of the CMV enforcement community in U.S. states and territories enforce the Hazardous Materials Regulations by conducting inspections on CMVs transporting hazardous materials to determine compliance with all pertinent sections of the regulations and by taking enforcement actions, when appropriate, to ensure proper compliance. In Canada, the TDG Act and TDG Regulations promote public safety when dangerous goods are handled or transported. The TDG Regulations are the rules that prescribe safety standards and shipping requirements for thousands of dangerous goods. The regulations also establish safety requirements for the transportation of dangerous goods. Effective TDG enforcement requires that knowledgeable inspectors monitor the flow of dangerous goods shipments to ensure compliance with the TDG Act and TDG Regulations. Inspectors are designated under the TDG Act to cover the many facets of packaging and transportation of dangerous goods and are given powers to safeguard the public. Inspectors are entitled to inspect the consignment and use the powers given to them under the TDG Act to ensure that any movement of dangerous goods is made in compliance with TDG Regulations. In Mexico, the Official Mexican Standards (Normas Oficiales Mexicanas or NOMs) augment the Mexican regulations for the land transport of hazardous materials and wastes. Mexico’s Secretariat of Communications and Transportation is responsible for publishing and maintaining the NOMs. In addition, other Mexican government agencies have published standards relevant to the transportation of hazardous materials within Mexico.   “Regulated hazardous materials are transported on our roadways every day and we need to ensure those shipments are traveling safely and securely,” said Sgt. Samis. “Canada, Mexico and the U.S. all participated in this 2019 TDG/HM inspection and enforcement initiative demonstrating the universally held need to safeguard compliance, safety, efficiency and responsibility when packaging, storing, transporting, monitoring and handling HM/DG.” n


CVSA COMMITTEE AND PROGRAM NEWS

CVSA Transitions to New Leadership for 2019-2020 CVSA transitioned to its new leadership for the 2019-2020 term on Sept. 25, 2019, at the CVSA Annual Conference and Exhibition in Biloxi, Mississippi. Sgt. John Samis of the Delaware State Police is the president of the Alliance. Capt. John Broers with the South Dakota Highway Patrol is CVSA’s vice president. Maj. Jeremy “Chris” Nordloh with the Texas Department of Public Safety was elected by the membership to the position of secretary. President Sgt. John Samis has been with the Delaware State Police for more than 25 years and is currently the Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP) supervisor of its Commercial Motor Vehicle Unit. He served CVSA Region I for two years as vice president and two years as president. Sgt. Samis was chair of the CVSA Election Committee and the CVSA Finance Committee. He attended CVSA’s annual leadership meetings in Washington, D.C., for six years and was also an active participant in developing CVSA’s strategic plan. Vice President Capt. John Broers has been with the South Dakota Highway Patrol for 19 years and is commander for the Motor Carrier Division which oversees MCSAP functions, size and weight enforcement, and permitting operations. He served as CVSA Region III vice president for two years and president for one year. Capt. Broers chaired an ad hoc committee and was a member of the CVSA Election Committee and the CVSA Finance Committee. He attended CVSA meetings regularly for nearly a decade, leadership meetings in Washington, D.C., for two years and was a participant in the development of the CVSA strategic plan.

enforcement. Maj. Nordloh has participated in CVSA meetings for nine years, served as chair of the CVSA Size and Weight Committee for two years, and he is a member of the CVSA Automated CMV Working Group. The path to CVSA presidency starts when an individual is elected by the voting membership to the position of secretary. That person will serve one year as secretary of the Alliance, while concurrently serving on the CVSA Finance Committee, the next year as vice president, the year after that as president, then three years as past president – making the entire process a six-year commitment. President Sgt. John Samis

Chief Jay Thompson of the Arkansas Highway Police resumes his term as past president. At the end of 2018, CVSA President Lt. Scott Carnegie retired from the Mississippi Department of Public Safety. As a result, the CVSA Board of Directors selected Chief Thompson, who was president in 2015-2016 and was serving his three-year term as past president, to assume the role of president for the remainder of the 2018-2019 term, which he completed with the Alliance’s transition to 2019-2020 executive leadership. In addition to the executive leadership transition, the new president of Region I is Sgt. Eric Bergquist with the Maine State Police and vice president is Tpr. William Alarcon of the New Jersey State Police.

Vice President Capt. John Broers

View CVSA’s current committee and program leadership at www.cvsa.org/ about-us-page/about-cvsa/who-we-are/ current-leadership. n

Secretary Maj. Chris Nordloh has been with the Texas Department of Public Safety for 23 years and in commercial vehicle enforcement (CVE) for 20 years. He served as the CVE program manager for eight years, including the Motor Carrier Bureau, MCSAP grant management, border enforcement, and size and weight Secretary Maj. Chris Nordloh

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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CVSA COMMITTEE AND PROGRAM NEWS

Nearly 800 People Attend CVSA’s 2019 Annual Conference and Exhibition in Biloxi, Mississippi CVSA held its annual conference, providing the opportunity for government officials, law enforcement personnel and industry members to work together to address the topics and issues affecting the commercial motor vehicle community in an effort to improve commercial motor vehicle inspections, enforcement and safety throughout North America. Nearly 800 individuals attended this year’s CVSA Annual Conference and Exhibition, which took place Sept. 22-26, 2019, in Biloxi, Mississippi. CVSA’s annual conference consists of open meetings of its 10 standing committees: Crash Data and Investigation Standards, Driver-Traffic Enforcement, Enforcement and Industry Modernization, Hazardous Materials, Information Systems, Passenger Carrier, Policy and Regulatory Affairs, Size and Weight, Training and Vehicle. These committee meetings are open to everyone in attendance – law enforcement, government agency and industry members. CVSA’s five regions, which consist of states, provinces and territories of Canada, Mexico and the U.S., also meet at the annual conference. Law enforcement and industry members meet separately to discuss issues and topics specific to each community. Then, industry and law enforcement come together to have open discussions, sharing each community’s perspectives to solve issues and discuss important topics affecting transportation safety. The annual conference is also an opportunity for programs and their members to go over achievements since the last meeting and to plan upcoming enforcement and outreach initiatives. The following programs met: International Roadcheck, Operation Airbrake,

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Operation Safe Driver, the North American Inspectors Championship, Level VI Inspections and Cooperative Hazardous Materials Enforcement Development. The general session kicked off the conference and included regulatory updates from the chair of the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA), Compliance and Regulatory Affairs (CRA) Committee, Mexico’s general director of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Transportation General Directorate of the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation (SCT), and the deputy administrator of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). CCMTA’s CRA Chair Krista Cull provided an update on Canada’s National Safety Code safety fitness framework and mechanical fitness standards, national standards for entrylevel training, International Roadcheck results for Canada, and the nation’s legalization of cannabis. CCMTA CRA Chair Krista Cull

There was also a separate information session on Canada’s electronic logging device (ELD) mandate. Transport Canada, the governmental department responsible for developing regulations, policies and services for interprovincial transportation in Canada, led the information session and provided updates on Canada’s recently adopted amendments to hours-of-service regulations, including application of the rule, regulatory and statutory exemptions, technical specifications, third-party testing and certification, and implementation timing. General Director Salomón Elnecavé Korish of Mexico’s SCT also spoke at the general session. “The work of CVSA, dedicated to the harmonization of regulations for the supervision of motor transport in North America, has allowed the SCT, as a member jurisdiction of Region IV, to recognize and implement best practices in order to improve road safety of carriers on our roads, as well as harmonizing our inspection programs with those of Canada DGAF General Director Salomón Elnecavé Korish


CVSA COMMITTEE AND PROGRAM NEWS

ABOVE: CVSA membership raised nearly $3,475 for the Gulf Coast Center for Nonviolence LEFT: CVSA held a Weigh-in-Motion Symposium at the 2019 CVSA Annual Conference and Exhibition.

and the United States, as in the case of Official Mexican Standard NOM-068 SCT-2-2014, for the supervision of the physical and mechanical conditions of federal motor transport vehicles that circulate on federal highways,” said General Director Elnecavé Korish.

improvement, comprehensive investigation, comprehensive investigation improvement, data quality and data quality improvement, commercial motor vehicle fatality rate and commercial motor vehicle fatality rate improvement.

FMCSA Deputy Administrator Alan Hanson provided an update during the general session on the agency’s grant awards; its proposed rulemaking to change hours-of-service regulations; the Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse final rule and Jan. 6, 2020, effective date; and the under 21 military commercial driver’s license pilot program. FMCSA Deputy Administrator Hanson also provided an update on the Dec. 18, 2017, ELD mandate and reminded everyone that on Dec. 17, 2019, all commercial motor vehicles must use an ELD-compliant device.

As one of his last duties as CVSA president, Chief Jay Thompson of Arkansas Highway Police presented the coveted CVSA President’s Award to three individuals – Renee Hill, SafetyNet/ASPEN coordinator for the Arkansas Highway Police; Chief Derek Barrs with the Florida Highway Patrol; and CVSA Deputy Executive Director Adrienne Gildea. The President’s Award is reserved for individuals who have made significant contributions to CVSA. The three award winners have joined an exclusive and distinguished group of honorees from past years.

In addition, FMCSA Deputy Administrator Hanson announced the jurisdictions that received Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP) Awards in the categories of safety enforcement, safety enforcement FMCSA Deputy Administrator Alan Hanson

Hosted by the CVSA Size and Weight Committee and organized in cooperation with the International Society for Weigh in Motion, a Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) Enforcement Symposium was held on Sept. 24. CVSA previously held a similar one-day WIM workshop in 2015; however, since then, advances have occurred in WIM technology, and safety enforcement agencies in North America and abroad have gained additional experience using WIM for enforcement. Lessons learned were presented and there were discussions about WIM enforcement implementation issues. WIM technology was also on display in the exhibit hall for further exploration.

attendees with a tour of the NASA Commercial Vehicle Inspection Station. Each year at the annual conference, a raffle is held and the proceeds are donated to a charity selected by the current CVSA president. With guidance from the Mississippi Department of Public Safety Motor Carrier Safety Division, Chief Thompson selected the Gulf Coast Center for Nonviolence as the recipient of funds raised from the conference auction. CVSA membership raised nearly $3,500, which will be used to provide comprehensive services to victims impacted by domestic violence, sexual assault and homicide. On Sept. 25, 2019, CVSA transitioned to its new leadership for 2019-2020. Sgt. John Samis with the Delaware State Police is the new president of the Alliance. Capt. John Broers with the South Dakota Highway Patrol is CVSA’s vice president. Maj. Chris Nordloh with the Texas Department of Public Safety was elected by the membership to the position of secretary. Chief Jay Thompson will resume his term as past president. See page 23 for more information. Next year’s CVSA Annual Conference and Exhibition will take place Sept. 20-24, 2020, in Wilmington, Delaware. n

In addition, the Mississippi Department of Public Safety’s Motor Carrier Safety Division provided interested annual conference FOURTH QUARTER 2019

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GOVERNMENT NEWS

Shipping HAZMAT? Send It Safely. Is Hazardous Matt, or his friends, hiding in your package? Each year, an estimated 3 billion tons of regulated hazardous materials (hazmat) are transported within the United States. These materials include explosive, poisonous, corrosive, flammable and radioactive materials. When these materials are not properly declared, or identified as hazmat, the increased risk of accidents poses significant safety threats to inspectors, commercial motor vehicle drivers, mechanics and vehicle maintenance personnel, transportation professionals, motor carriers, emergency responders, the general public and the environment. Approximately 1,500 undeclared hazmat transportation incidents are reported each year. Undeclared and improperly packaged hazardous materials can be dangerous in transportation. These incidents put people’s lives at risk. The most frequent explanation for undeclared shipments, according to federal hazmat experts? A shipper's lack of knowledge. By addressing unawareness or misunderstanding of the requirements for properly declaring and transporting hazardous materials, we can prevent incidents and save lives. Everyone has a role to play to prevent hazardous materials from causing accidents and injuries. That’s why it is important to always CHECK THE BOX to ensure you are safely shipping hazardous materials. For assistance, visit www.checkthebox.dot.gov or contact the Hazardous Materials Information Center at 1-800-467-4922 or 202-366-4488 or by e-mail at infocntr@dot.gov.

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GOVERNMENT NEWS

THE LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY RUNDOWN By Daniel Zimmerman, Manager of Government Affairs, Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

Congress Continues Discussions on Next Highway Bill At the end of July, the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works (EPW) took the lead on moving the reauthorization of a highway bill forward by passing the America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act. Although the EPW Committee has jurisdiction over a large portion of the highway bill, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation is responsible for the motor carrier title of the bill. Beyond EPW’s initial passage of the America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act, no formal action has been taken on the highway bill by the Senate or House of Representatives. The question of how to pay for the bill still remains a primary focus and discussions will likely continue into next year. With the upcoming presidential election in 2020, the likelihood of passing a reauthorization bill before the current highway bill expires in September 2020 seems increasingly unlikely.

CMV Policy Efforts

Meanwhile, CVSA has been focused on a number of commercial motor vehicle (CMV)-related issues. At the CVSA 2019 Annual Conference and Exhibition in Biloxi, Mississippi, the CVSA Board of Directors approved 16 legislative priorities for the next highway bill reauthorization. These priorities represent a portion of what the Alliance will be advocating that Congress include in the next iteration of the bill. CVSA’s Reauthorization Task Force is continuing discussions on the Alliance’s priorities and will issue additional recommendations for legislative priorities to the board. CVSA staff continues to meet with legislative staff on Capitol Hill to discuss issues of importance to the Alliance’s membership, including automated driving systems, driver fatigue, exemptions, commercial driver’s license age requirements, hours of service and electronic logging devices (ELD). In addition, the Alliance filed comments to a number of rulemaking notices, including items related to the hours-of-service regulations, the agricultural commodity definition, the Federal

Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) crash preventability determination program and changes to Part 350 of the Code of Federal Regulations, which relates to the Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program. Additionally, CVSA filed comments on several exemption requests published by FMCSA. CVSA members can keep up with the Alliance’s most recent petitions, comments and letters by reading our bi-weekly legislative and regulatory updates sent via email or by visiting the policy section of CVSA’s website at www.cvsa.org/policypage/policy.

AOBRD Grandfather Period Ended Dec. 16, 2019

Motor carriers that had automatic on-board recording devices (AOBRD) installed prior to Dec. 18, 2017, had been permitted to use the devices in place of an ELD; however, as of Dec. 17, 2019, all drivers who are subject to the use of ELDs must have a registered ELD installed, as these grandfathered AOBRDs no longer satisfy the requirement for a record of duty status. n

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

27


GOVERNMENT NEWS

GET NEWS AND UPDATES AT: https://clearinghouse.fmcsa.dot.gov

Coming January 6, 2020

What is the FMCSA Commercial Driver’s License Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse? The Clearinghouse is a secure online database that will give employers, FMCSA, State Driver Licensing Agencies, and State law enforcement personnel real-time information about CDL driver drug and alcohol program violations, thereby enhancing safety on our Nation’s roadways. An act of Congress directed the Secretary of Transportation to establish the Clearinghouse.

When must I use the Clearinghouse? JANUARY 6, 2020: Authorized users will be

required to complete the actions described in the Clearinghouse final rule. At this time, employers will be required to conduct both electronic queries and traditional manual inquiries with previous employers to meet the three-year timeframe, required by FMCSA’s drug and alcohol use testing program, for checking CDL driver violation histories. Drivers may also view their own records for information recorded on or after January 6, 2020. JANUARY 6, 2023: Once three years of violation data

are stored in the Clearinghouse, employers are no longer required to also request information from the driver’s previous FMCSA-regulated employers under 391.23(e); an employer’s query of the Clearinghouse will satisfy that requirement.

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The Clearinghouse contains information about drivers with commercial driver’s licenses (CDL drivers) who are covered by FMCSA’s drug and alcohol program. This also includes drivers with commercial learner’s permits (CLPs). For more information on drivers affected by the Clearinghouse, see opposite page.

How will the Clearinghouse improve highway safety? Make it easier for employers to meet their preemployment investigation and reporting obligations. Make it more difficult for drivers to conceal their drug and alcohol program violations from current or prospective employers. Provide roadside inspectors and other enforcement personnel with the means to ensure that drivers receive required evaluation and treatment before performing safety-sensitive functions, such as driving a commercial motor vehicle (CMV). Make it easier for FMCSA to determine employer compliance with testing, investigation, and reporting requirements.


GOVERNMENT NEWS

What information will the Clearinghouse contain? The Clearinghouse will contain information on all CDL driver drug and alcohol program violations. These violations include: Report for duty/remain on duty for safety-sensitive function with alcohol concentration of 0.04 or greater or while using any drug specified in the regulations (Part 40), other than those prescribed by a licensed medical practitioner

Alcohol use within eight hours of an accident, or until post-accident test, whichever occurs first

Alcohol use while performing, or within four hours of performing, a safety-sensitive function

Refusing to submit to a required alcohol or drug test

Test positive for use of specified drugs

How will I use the Clearinghouse? EMPLOYERS Report drug and alcohol violations and check that no current or prospective employee is prohibited from performing safety-sensitive functions, such as operating a CMV, due to a drug and alcohol program violation for which a driver has not successfully completed a Return-To-Duty (RTD) process. CDL DRIVERS View own record, provide consent to current or prospective employers to access details about any drug and alcohol program violations, and select a Substance Abuse Professional, if needed.

MEDICAL REVIEW OFFICERS Report verified positive drug test results and test refusals. SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROFESSIONALS Report RTD initial assessment and eligibility status for RTD testing. CONSORTIUM/THIRD-PARTY ADMINISTRATORS On behalf of an employer, report drug and alcohol program violations and perform driver queries as required. STATE DRIVER LICENSING AGENCIES Query the Clearinghouse prior to completing licensing transactions.

What types of drivers and employers will the Clearinghouse affect? All CDL drivers who operate CMVs on public roads, and their employers and service agents. This includes, but is not limited to:

School bus drivers Construction equipment operators

Municipal vehicle drivers (e.g., waste management vehicles) Federal and other organizations that employ drivers subject to FMCSA drug and alcohol use testing regulations (e.g., Department of Defense, municipalities, school districts)

Limousine drivers

STAY INFORMED: https://clearinghouse.fmcsa.dot.gov 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590 | clearinghouse@dot.gov

VERSION 1.2, APRIL 2019

Interstate and intrastate motor carriers, including passenger carriers

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

29


GOVERNMENT NEWS

FMCSA Announces Winners of Children’s Road Safety Art Contest The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced the winners of its Our Roads, Our Safety partnership program children’s road safety art contest. First grader Jessica Liu from Livingston, New Jersey, and sixth grader Xufeng Zou, from East Brunswick, New Jersey, won top honors for their artwork that demonstrates that everyone who uses the roads has a role to play in safety. This includes large trucks, buses, cars, bicyclists and pedestrians. The two winners were joined by 10 other talented students who were also recognized for their participation in the contest. The Our Roads, Our Safety campaign supports FMCSA’s mission of reducing crashes, injuries and fatalities involving large trucks and buses. As part of this effort, FMCSA partners with other organizations, including CVSA, to educate all drivers, cyclists and pedestrians on the importance of safely sharing our roads. The more we understand each other’s road experience, the better we can look out for one another. FMCSA’s public safety awareness campaign for Our Roads, Our Safety provides unique points of view across the full range of road users.

Artwork submitted by Jessica Liu from Livingston, New Jersey.

To view all of the winning entries, visit www.fmcsa.dot.gov/ourroads/2019-roadsafety-art-contest-winners. And if you know a young artist who may be interested in creating a submission, visit www.fmcsa.dot.gov/ OurRoadsArtContest in spring 2020 for more information on next year’s contest. n

Artwork submitted by Xufeng Zou from East Brunswick, New Jersey.

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KNOWLEDGE MATTERS

GHSA Offers Toolkit to Help States Strengthen Interactions with Law Enforcement The Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) released a toolkit of resources to help state highway safety offices (SHSOs) strengthen partnerships with law enforcement agencies in their state around the issue of traffic safety. The toolkit was developed to enhance and support law enforcement and highway safety office interactions. Law enforcement is a critical partner in efforts to prevent crashes and eliminate roadway deaths and injuries. High-visibility enforcement efforts are a proven countermeasure that deters individuals from participating in highrisk driving behaviors. “Every day, law enforcement is faced with a tremendous number of competing priorities,” said GHSA Chair and Washington Traffic Safety Commission Director Darrin Grondel, who spearheaded the development of the toolkit. “We created these resources to help SHSOs develop and enhance relationships with agencies in their state in order to encourage wider participation in traffic safety activities.”

The toolkit includes: • A self-assessment tool for SHSO executives to review their law enforcement outreach and engagement activities and develop plans to strengthen these relationships • A directory of state-level law enforcement association contacts • Case studies examining effective state law enforcement liaison programs and their relationship with SHSOs • A customizable PowerPoint presentation for SHSO executives to use in meetings with law enforcement executives • A companion guide for the PowerPoint presentation that includes customization instructions, talking points and discussion topics

 MARK YOUR CALENDAR

2020 CVSA ANNUAL CONFERENCE AND EXHIBITION Sept. 20-24, 2020 Wilmington, Delaware

“Law enforcement and SHSOs are a powerful pairing in the fight to make our roadways safer,” said GHSA Executive Director Jonathan Adkins. “This is another way GHSA supports efforts to strengthen these partnerships and provide SHSOs with relevant and useful resources.” n

The toolkit can be found at www.ghsa.org/resources/ law-enforcement. For more information, contact Amadie Hart at ahart@ghsa.org or 202-580-7933.

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

31


INSPECTOR’S CORNER

INSPECTOR’S CORNER The Importance of Support

By Sgt. Benjamin Schropfer, Nebraska State Patrol; 2019 North American Inspectors Championship Grand Champion Usually, when I talk about support, I am teaching a hazmat class and talking about cargo tanks. However, I would like to take this opportunity to talk about a different type of support. Just like a cargo tank, to be truly effective, a person must have support. With no, or weakened, support a cargo tank will fail. Likewise, a person without proper support cannot be as successful. Like a cargo tank, if a failure happens, it will likely be when you are under great stress and truly need that support. The same way a cargo tank with more support can carry more load, a person can handle more with greater support. There are many demanding professions in the commercial motor vehicle world and all of them play a role in commercial motor vehicle safety. All of these professions need support. For drivers to be effective and concentrate on operating safely, they must have support, which can come in many forms. It starts at home before a driver leaves on a trip. Having loved ones who can take care of things at home allows the driver to focus and not be distracted worrying about what is going on at home. It also extends to professional support as well. A company must support its drivers by giving them safe equipment to operate and the training necessary to operate it safely.

helping each other learn the regulations and laws better. We were also always willing to help each other, no matter if it was with an inspection or moving furniture at home.

growing or has it become stagnant and needs to be refreshed? If you allow your support for someone else to deteriorate, you are doing a disservice to that relationship.

Furthermore, I am fortunate to work for an agency that is supportive. I have always been able to get the training and equipment I need. I also have had leaders who were willing to mentor me and help me develop professionally as I progressed in my career.

Contemplate those relationships and what they have meant to you. Everyone has someone who supports them. Try to imagine where you would be without those relationships. Now, think of what you can do to foster new supportive relationships. You may be surprised by the support you receive in return for showing your support for a new coworker and making them feel welcome. This could take the form of a driver seeing another driver struggle with adjusting their axles. Stopping to help that driver may make you a contact that will pay dividends going forward. If you are a leader in your organization, take the time to mentor someone. That will hopefully turn into a relationship of mutual support as well. Even if you are not a formal leader in your organization, you can still mentor others. Helping a new inspector learn to conduct inspections may turn into a lifelong relationship of mutual support.

Like supports on a cargo tank, our support systems are interrelated. Support must go both ways, so to speak. In order to have great support, you must be willing to provide it as well. I cannot expect support from my wife if I did not give her support when she needs it as well. The support I have gotten from my coworkers would not have grown to what it is without me reciprocating their support. The agency I work for would not be as effective and, therefore, not able to support me, if I was not willing to support the agency’s mission. Similar to supports on a cargo tank, our support relationships must be constantly evaluated. Look at who is there for you. Think of what you have gained from them and what you have done for them. Is the relationship

If you pay forward support once shown to you, at worst, you will help someone else out. At best, you may change the world. n

I am fortunate in more than a few ways. I was raised by supportive parents who taught me my work ethic and desire to succeed in whatever I do. Another way I am fortunate is that I was able to somehow convince my wife to spend her life with me. She is one of the most supportive people I have ever known. I would not be the person I am today without her. She takes wonderful care of our children and everything at home. This happens all the time, but it is especially felt when I am away at training or even just on the days I get called to something and cannot make it home on time. I am fortunate to have support at work as well. When I graduated from training camp and was placed in my first duty station, I started with another new trooper. He and I grew to be close friends and we have always been there for one another. The two of us pushing each other to increase our knowledge and abilities has helped get me to where I am today. We were constantly discussing the safety inspections we completed and

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Sgt. Benjamin Schropfer (right) is pictured with his family and his awards at the 2019 North American Inspectors Championship in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. From left to right: His wife, Trina, and daughters Amber, Rachel, Sarah and Lucy.


FROM THE DRIVER’S SEAT

FROM THE DRIVER’S SEAT Distracted Drivers and How Professional Truck Drivers Anticipate Hazards

By Dee Sova, Professional Truck Driver for Prime Inc.; America’s Road Team Captain As a professional over-the-road truck driver who has experienced personal loss as a result of distracted driving, this topic is personal for me.

an understanding of when a distracted or reckless driver – in any type of vehicle – might make a dangerous maneuver.

Every day, truck drivers, like me, see the subtle weaving on highways and even city roads and we always know the cause: distracted driving.

Some drivers, sometimes even intentionally, will cut in front of large trucks in order to kick on our forward collision mitigation systems or kick off our adaptive cruise control. Truck drivers appreciate collision avoidance systems – they can really save lives – but our companies also track hard-braking incidents and times when the systems have to be used. So, we try to anticipate dangerous driving behaviors before they happen in order to avoid triggering our collision avoidance systems. Sometimes, truck drivers will manually turn off adaptive cruise control and ease onto the brakes to avoid hard-braking incidents. This can help avoid the more sudden and jarring braking while improving safety for those around us by being proactive instead of reactive.

It can come in the form of texting, eating, reaching for something in the vehicle or dozens of other causes. From our high position in the truck, we see it all and we do our best to see it coming. On my way from Arizona to New Mexico a few weeks ago, I noticed a driver ahead of me who was swerving within the lane, a telltale sign of distraction. As a professional truck driver, I have a few options. I can either stay back and keep my safety cushion in the front or pass this person and continue to watch them in my mirrors. In this scenario, because the person began to abruptly slow down on the highway to a dangerous speed, I made the decision to carefully pass to the left. As I passed, I confirmed that the driver was texting. Seeing someone up ahead and approaching them carefully is one hazard, but good truck drivers also try to anticipate the drivers who are recklessly speeding up from behind. Using the same skills we employ to monitor for emergency vehicles, we can identify reckless drivers approaching our trucks at high speeds while swerving. This is where anticipation becomes a major and sometimes underappreciated part of our job as truck drivers. When you’ve driven millions of miles, you start to get

These tips can be particularly useful in winter months when conditions can worsen quickly. We, sometimes, see drivers using the same behaviors in winter months as they would in summer months, which can be especially dangerous on slick roads. One nice feature of the newer tractor-trailers is a surface temperature detection system that alerts me when the pavement is getting colder and potentially icy. Since not all vehicles have that feature – and even for the ones that do – drivers need to know the conditions of the road ahead before their trips start.

• Make sure they see you.

For instance, as I was trucking from New Mexico to Colorado Springs in early October, I anticipated icy and snowy conditions in Colorado. Trucking is not a nine-to-five job. We cannot just show up and hope the roads are clear and the weather is good. We have to plan our routes, review traffic and road conditions in the towns, cities and highways along the way, and rely on our resources. Because I have friends on social media who are spread out across the country – as I’m sure many drivers have – we can look at the feeds of our friends in the places we’re going to get a sense of the weather conditions we’ll be approaching. All drivers can use non-traditional resources, like social media, to inform their safe driving decisions. For truck drivers, this is the reality of our jobs: being smart planners, anticipating other drivers’ moves, and being the safe and efficient delivery champions for our companies by getting our loads to the destinations safely and on time.

Or, the mnemonic phrase I like to use to remember these steps: “All Good Kids Love Milk.”

And any assistance we can get from law enforcement or the motoring public to achieve those goals is helpful and appreciated. n

One way we prevent hard-braking incidents and maintain safety is through the Smith System, which I’m sure all law enforcement officers are trained in. As a reminder, which we can all use at times, here are the five core tenets of the Smith System: • Aim high in steering. • Get the big picture. • Keep your eyes moving. • Leave yourself an out.

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

33


INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES

Engagement nd Complacency By Dana Spencer, Director of Safety/Compliance, Gardner Trucking Inc.

It is great when everyone feels comfortable in their job, knowing what’s expected of them and understanding the performance measures. But when management and drivers start feeling too comfortable, it’s time to watch for signs of complacency, one of the greatest detractors from workplace safety.

•D  rivers taking shortcuts to complete routine tasks

Complacency Knows No Bounds

•R  ecognition for adhering to safety protocols

Complacency can affect all levels of a company. Administration staff and drivers may become overly comfortable in their positions. This can lead to inattention, resulting in serious administrative errors, accidents or injuries. Management can also become complacent. When our safety record is good, it’s easy to shift focus to other areas, such as productivity, quality, sales or customer service. In turn, this shift in management focus may be misunderstood by driver managers/supervisors and drivers, further swinging their attention away from safety in favor of other company objectives. As a supervisor, it’s also easy to become complacent. Supervisors are often bombarded with high-priority tasks, so they assume and expect their drivers to perform as they’ve been trained. To counter the effects of complacency, here are three things front-line driver managers/ supervisors can do.

1. Observe Behaviors

It is extremely important for driver managers/ supervisors to monitor their drivers for signs of complacency. Supervisors know their staff better than anyone and should be able to identify when drivers become too comfortable or overconfident. Telltale signs of complacency are: • Drivers overlooking small details and requirements

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GUARDIAN

If drivers are displaying these signs, you need to introduce methods that will challenge them regularly to remain safe on the job. These can include: • Individual goal setting for driving safety performance • S afety awareness campaigns with driver participation Keep safety at the forefront of driver consciousness and remind them that safety must not be compromised to meet other objectives.

2. Supplement Group Training with Individual Coaching

Gardner Trucking has training programs that comply with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) safety training mandates. These training seminars are often held for groups, in conference or training rooms. But believing too much in the effectiveness of group training is one way that companies display their complacency. A driver manager/supervisor’s job is to ensure that the group training is reflected in individual on-the-job situations. You must make the training immediately relevant to the drivers. Drivers can sit through the training sessions and then go to work and circumvent inspections to save time, or work around a defective piece of equipment without requesting proper repair. Any time a driver is found performing a task contrary to his or her safety training, the supervisor must address it on the spot. Individual work instructions are very effective when delivered immediately, in response to an unsafe work practice.

3. Communicate Upwards

Driver managers/supervisors are accustomed to receiving instruction from higher-level management and disseminating the information among the workers. However, communicating safety needs from drivers to managers is a great way to fight complacency. Whether it’s a safety concern raised by a driver or a vigilant driver manager/supervisor’s observation of frequent unsafe behavior in the same area of the workplace, communicate it. Notifying management of unsafe conditions keeps everyone focused on safety. Just remember to follow up with both the management and the driver(s) involved. Drivers want to know that their driver managers/supervisors truly are concerned with their individual well-being and managers are people, too; they may forget or get sidetracked. Keep in mind that the goal is to get results when we become aware of any unsafe conditions or areas in need of improvement.

Conclusion

Anyone can become complacent at work. Front-line managers/supervisors are in an excellent position to provide the individual attention needed to keep workers and management focused on workplace safety, while working together to achieve other profitable company objectives. More frequent conversations will establish a mindset of continuous improvement, rather than evaluation, enabling employees to address challenges as they’re occurring and improve skills throughout the year. n


INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES

Make Your Vehicle Inspection Reporting Work for You By Robert Blair, President, LITE-CHECK Fleet Solutions Inc. Roadside inspection numbers consistently show heavy-duty brakes, tires and lighting as primary out-of-service items. Operators are required to perform annual vehicle inspections. There are literally thousands of forms in use, with the technician making handwritten entries that may be unreadable and incomplete.

Level I Inspection procedure, collecting the data automatically with one trip around the vehicle in less time than the present method. Complete readings of trailer electrical conditions, precise air system loss, complete ABS information, along with tire conditions and brake operation, can be compiled in a simple-to-read report.

The common recording practice is with a pen and paper form. The technician is required to write observations according to his/her best judgment and is free to perform the Department of Transportation (DOT) inspection task in any manner. Data, such as tire measurements, are manually entered into the fleet system, requiring a second step.

There can be a mix of pre-trip tractor, trailer and combination vehicle reports on file for instant recall by authorized personnel. As reports are finished, management can remotely view all shop operations. As reports are collected, vehicle and technician history are available for review. With the standardized format, data analysis of components, especially tires and maintenance practices, is readily available.

However, there is now technology available that can make your vehicles’ DOT periodic/ annual inspection one with a payback. True verifiable digital vehicle reports that meet DOT requirements are now possible. Such reports may include day/time stamps, vehicle descriptions, a required technician signature and detailed vehicle information, all in one report. Photos and comments can also be included in the digital report. Imagine a process with a digital device that requires the fleet technician to follow many aspects of the CVSA North American Standard

 MARK YOUR CALENDAR

2020

ENFORCEMENT INITIATIVES INTERNATIONAL

ROADCHECK

CVSA

INTERNATIONAL ROADCHECK May 5-7, 2020

With verifiable digital DOT periodic/annual inspection reporting, the shop becomes more efficient, with less downtime, reduced road issues and an improved Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) score. Such a system could also be used in accident investigations, speeding up the collection of vehicle information in a consistent format. Standard digital vehicle modules could simplify the accident investigator’s input for instant recall. n

OPERATION SAFE DRIVER WEEK July 12-18, 2020

BRAKE SAFETY WEEK August 23-29, 2020

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

35


RAD INSPECTION NEWS

About ‘RAD Inspection News’

Current WIPP Routes

‘RAD Inspection News’ features news and other stories pertaining to the North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program for transuranic waste and highway route controlled quantities (HRCQ) of radioactive material. This inspection is for select radiological shipments that include enhancements to the North American Standard Level I Inspection Program and the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria with added radiological requirements for transuranic waste and HRCQ of radioactive material. Learn more about the Level VI Inspection Program at www.cvsa.org. ‘RAD Inspection News’ is made possible under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. Since January 2007, it has run as a section inside CVSA’s “Guardian.” n

Source: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management

CVSA Holds Level VI Industry Awareness Class in New Mexico As part of CVSA’s cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad [New Mexico] Field Office (CBFO), CVSA’s Level VI Inspection Program is tasked with providing industry awareness training to the motor carriers contracted with the CBFO to move transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. On Sept. 10-12, 2019, Level VI National Instructors Reggie Bunner of the West Virginia

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Public Service Commission and Rion Stann of the Pennsylvania State Police provided instruction to new drivers and mechanics employed by CAST Transportation, the CBFO’s contract carrier for shipments to the WIPP. The industry students were given a review of the applicable Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations as well as applicable Hazardous Materials Regulations. Industry students who passed the Level VI industry class were then sent on to take the full Level VI class. n

Level VI National Instructor Reggie Bunner reviews the safety regulations with U.S. DOE contract carrier employees during the September industry awareness course.


RAD INSPECTION NEWS

CVSA Holds Its 176th Level VI Certification Class Level VI Inspection Certification Class 176 was held in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, by the Pennsylvania State Police on July 9-12, 2019. In attendance were students from the Pennsylvania State Police, New York State Police and the Delaware State Police. Joining CVSA Director of Level VI Inspection Program Carlisle Smith to provide classroom instruction were Rion Stann of the Pennsylvania State Police, Kelly Horn of the Illinois Emergency Management Agency and CVSA Director of Roadside Inspection Program Kerri Wirachowsky. n

CVSA 2020 Level VI Training Schedule

CVSA National Instructor Kelly Horn works with students on survey techniques on packages containing radioactive materials.

JAN. 27, 2020

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY

CVSA Director of Roadside Inspection Program Kerri Wirachowsky provides instruction on the Level VI Out-of-Service Criteria.

This eight-hour refresher course is being offered at the 2020 COHMED Conference. For more information, visit www.cvsa.org/ eventpage/events/cohmed-conference. Participants must register in advance with Carlisle Smith at carlisles@cvsa.org.

Nebraska Holds Joint Level VI Refresher Training FEB. 25-27, 2020

The Nebraska State Patrol conducted joint CVSA Level VI Inspection refresher training in Broken Bow, Nebraska, June 26, 2019. Level VI inspectors from Iowa Motor Vehicle Enforcement and the North Dakota Highway Patrol joined Level VI inspectors from Nebraska. Students were provided real-world experience as the refresher training incorporated a CVSA Level VI Point of Origin Inspection on a return shipment of highway route controlled quantity of Cobalt 60 from a local irradiation facility. Inspectors were also given a tour of the irradiation facility. The eight-hour recertification class meets the inspector maintenance of certification requirements as specified in CVSA Operational Policy. n

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS This Train the Trainer class is for state Level VI trainers who must attend this training every 24 months. For more information, visit www.cvsa.org/trainingpage/training/trainthe-trainer.

MAY 11-14, 2020

ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO To register for this certification course or if you have any questions, contact carlisles@cvsa.org.

JUNE 22-25, 2020

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS To register for this certification course or if you have any questions, contact carlisles@cvsa.org.

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

37


RAD INSPECTION NEWS

Level VI Roadside Inspections (2019 - Fiscal) LEVEL VI INSPECTIONS

Federal

State

Total

% of Total

Number of Level VI Inspections

0

1,078

1,078

100%

Point of Origin

0

536

536

49.72%

En Route

0

541

541

50.19%

Point of Destination

0

1

1

0.09%

Unknown Location

0

0

0

0%

Level VI Inspections with No Violations

0

1,057

1,057

98.05%

Level VI Inspections with Violations

0

21

21

1.95%

0

6

6

0.56%

Level VI Inspections with Out-of-Service Conditions

Level VI Roadside Inspection Violations (2019 - Fiscal) Violation Code

Violation Description

# of Violations

% of Total Violations

# of OOS Violations

OOS %

396.3A1

Inspection, Repair and Maintenance of Parts and Accessories

4

5

17.24%

1

20.00%

393.45D

Brake Connections with Leaks or Constrictions

2

2

6.90%

0

0%

393.47E

Clamp or Roto Type Brake Out of Adjustment

2

2

6.90%

0

0%

393.9A

Inoperative Required Lamps

2

2

6.90%

0

0%

393.48A

Inoperative/Defective Brakes

2

2

6.90%

1

50%

393.25F

Stop Lamp Violations

2

2

6.90%

1

50%

393.75A3

Tire-flat and/or Audible Air Leak

2

2

6.90%

2

100%

393.45B2

Brake Hose or Tubing Chafing and/or Kinking

1

1

3.45%

1

100%

393.53B

CMV Manufactured After 10/19/94 has an Automatic Airbrake Adjustment System that Fails to Compensate for Wear

1

1

3.45%

0

0%

395.3A2 PROP

Driving Beyond 14-Hour Duty Period (Property Carrying Vehicle)

1

1

3.45%

0

0%

393.201A

Frame Cracked/Loose/Sagging/Broken

1

1

3.45%

0

0%

172.203D10

No Indication for Highway Route Controlled Quantity of Class 7 “HRCQ” on Shipping Paper

1

1

3.45%

0

0%

393.55E

No or Defective ABS Malfunction Indicator Lamp for Trailer Manufactured After 03/01/1998

1

1

3.45%

0

0%

172.301A1

No Proper Shipping Name and/or ID# Marking on Non-Bulk Package

1

1

3.45%

0

0%

393.95A

No/Discharged/Unsecured Fire Extinguisher

1

1

3.45%

0

0%

392.2

Operating Vehicle in Violation of Local/State Laws

1

1

3.45%

0

0%

383.23A2

Operating a CMV without a CDL

1

1

3.45%

0

0%

393.75A1

Tire-Ply or Belt Material Exposed

1

1

3.45%

1

100%

1

1

3.45%

0

0%

393.60EWS Windshield - Obstructed

38

# of Inspections

GUARDIAN


CVSA LEADERSHIP BOARD OF DIRECTORS REGION PRESIDENTS Region I Sgt. Eric Bergquist Maine State Police

REGION VICE PRESIDENTS Region I Tpr. William Alarcon New Jersey State Police

Region II Lt. Allen England Tennessee Highway Patrol

Region II Capt. Adrian Kelleher Louisiana State Police

SECRETARY Maj. Jeremy “Chris” Nordloh Texas Department of Public Safety

Region III Capt. John Hahn Colorado State Patrol

Region III Maj. Jon E. Smithers Indiana State Police

PAST PRESIDENTS Chief Jay Thompson Arkansas Highway Police

Region IV Lt. Daniel Wyrick Wyoming Highway Patrol

Region IV Maj. Russ Christoferson Montana Department of Transportation

Deputy Chief Mark Savage Colorado State Patrol

Region V Richard Roberts British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure

Region V Sean Mustatia Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure

ASSOCIATE MEMBER PRESIDENT Dave Schofield Oldcastle Materials

Information Systems Committee Holly Skaar Idaho State Police

ASSOCIATE MEMBER VICE PRESIDENT Stephanie Kendall CDL Consultants

Passenger Carrier Committee Tpr. William Alarcon New Jersey State Police

PROGRAM CHAIRS Cooperative Hazardous Materials Enforcement Development Phillip Haskins Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

North American Inspectors Championship Richard Roberts British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure

COMMITTEE CHAIRS Crash Data and Investigation Standards Committee Capt. Bryant Gay Florida Highway Patrol

Policy and Regulatory Affairs Committee Col. Leroy Taylor South Carolina Department of Public Safety

International Driver Excellence Award Brett Graves K.L. Breeden and Sons LLC

Operation Airbrake Shelley Conklin Landstar Transportation Logistics

Driver-Traffic Enforcement Committee Capt. Chris Barr Indiana State Police

Size and Weight Committee Brad Marten Montana Department of Transportation

PRESIDENT Sgt. John Samis Delaware State Police VICE PRESIDENT Capt. John Broers South Dakota Highway Patrol

Buzzy France Maryland State Police

LOCAL PRESIDENT Ofc. Jason Belz Arlington (Texas) Police Department LOCAL VICE PRESIDENT Ofc. Thomas Mrozinski, Jr. Frisco (Texas) Police Department

NON-VOTING LEADERSHIP

Enforcement and Industry Modernization Committee Vacant Hazardous Materials Committee Sgt. Brad Wagner Nebraska State Patrol

Training Committee Lt. Ron Jenkins Oklahoma Highway Patrol Vehicle Committee Tpr. John Sova North Dakota Highway Patrol

International Roadcheck Maj. Michael Forman Mississippi Department of Transportation Level VI Inspection M/Sgt. Todd Armstrong Illinois State Police

Operation Safe Driver Chief David Lorenzen Iowa Department of Transportation PBBT Users Lt. Joseph Greene Kansas Highway Patrol

North American Cargo Securement Harmonization Public Forum Tpr. Jeremy Disbrow Arizona Department of Public Safety

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

39


CVSA SPONSORS PREMIER

DIAMOND

Black Pantone 109

PLATINUM

GOLD

40

GUARDIAN


CVSA SPONSORS SILVER Airgas American Bus Association American Pyrotechnics Association Austin Powder Company Brake Tech Tools Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators Cargo Transporters Inc. FoxFury LLC Geotab Inc.

Great West Casualty Company Hendrickson International Society for Weigh in Motion JNJ Express Inc. Kenan Advantage Group Inc. Laser Technology Inc. MANCOMM Inc. Mississippi Trucking Association Platform Science Schlumberger

Swift Transportation Company Techni-Com Inc. Transportation Compliance Safety Group United Motorcoach Association US Ecology Inc. Usher Transport Walmart Werner Enterprises Inc.

BRONZE

Admiral Transport Corporation Anderson Trucking Service Inc. Arkansas Trucking Association Asplundh Tree Expert DATTCO Inc. Direct ChassisLink Inc. General Electrodynamics Corporation Greatwide Truckload Management

Greyhound Lines Inc. Groendyke Transport Inc. Intelligent Imaging Systems Inc. Intercomp Company Jade Transportation Services J.E.B. Environmental Services LLC Kistler Instrument Corporation Loadometer Corporation

Lytx METTLER TOLEDO Nordion PITT OHIO Specialized Carriers & Rigging Association Western Express Inc. WorkforceQA

FRIENDS OF CVSA American Coatings Association Inc. Cassidy’s Transfer & Storage Ltd. Commercial Vehicle Safety Associates of Florida Inc. Envirun Inc.

Greg Neylon Grocery Haulers Inc. Horizon Freight System Inc./Kaplan Trucking Co. Institute of Makers of Explosives Link Engineering Company

Missouri Trucking Association Praxair Inc. Quality Carriers Inc. Transportation Compliance Services Western States Trucking Association

NEW CVSA ASSOCIATE MEMBERS As of November 4, 2019 Alabama Motor Express Anderson Rentals Inc. Applied Concepts Cargo Securement Academy CRST International CSATF Dallas Charter Bus Company Dohrn Transfer Company LLC Duit Holdings Inc. Fundamental Underwriters H & J Trucking Inc. Home Depot USA Inc. Ike Robotics InfoStream International Transportation Services Inc. Interwest Transportation KADE Logistics LLC

Marshall Hauling Services LLC Matrix Medical Network MG Dyess Inc. MIA Safety Services Motor Carriers of Montana Northern Industrial Training LLC Panasonic Platform Science Schnitzer Steel Seikosoft LLC SIRVA Inc. Terminal Service Company Transportation Safety Services U.S. Legal Services Vanguard - CIMC Workforce QA Xpress Global Systems LLC

NEW CVSA LOCAL MEMBERS As of November 4, 2019 City of Pasadena Police Department (Texas) Euless Police Department (Texas)

McKinney Police Department (Texas)

FOURTH QUARTER 2019

41


6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310 Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319

CVSA WORKSHOP APRIL 19-23, 2020

San Antonio, Texas For more information and to register, visit www.cvsa.org/eventpage/events/cvsa-workshop.

Profile for CVSA

Fourth Quarter 2019  

This edition features stories on the importance of providing a modernized roadside inspection software solution, Colorado's new truck safety...

Fourth Quarter 2019  

This edition features stories on the importance of providing a modernized roadside inspection software solution, Colorado's new truck safety...

Profile for cvsaorg