Issuu on Google+

Volume 18, Issue 3

Third Quarter 2011


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Table of Contents

Guardian

Insight President’s Message ......................................................................................................1 Executive Director’s Message ..........................................................................................2 Letters to the Editor ........................................................................................................3 The Legislative Rundown ................................................................................................5 Knowledge Matters ........................................................................................................7

Federal News Ask the Administrator ......................................................................................................8 FMCSA Names Five to Truck-Safety Committee ................................................................9 NTC News Briefs ..........................................................................................................10 NTSB Reviews Progress, Discusses Current, Emerging Issues At Large Truck and Bus Safety Forum ........................................................................11 NTSB Announces Top 10 List To Reduce Transportation Accidents and Save Lives ............11

6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310 Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319 Phone: (301) 830-6143 Fax: (301) 830-6144 www.cvsa.org Dedicated to government and industry working together to promote commercial vehicle safety on North American highways.

HEADQUARTERS STAFF

CVSA News More Than A Competition: NAIC's History Steeped In Developing Future Leaders, Strengthening Industry, Enforcement Partnerships............12 CVSA Urges Use of Emerging Technologies for Radioactive Materials Shipments ..............15 CVSA Joins World Partners in Support of U.N. Decade of Action ....................................16 European Union Mandates Roadside Inspections by January 1st, 2012 ............................16 Operation Safe Driver Program Spreads the Word About Educating Youth on Safe Driving Around Large Trucks, Buses ....................................17 Staff News: Gildea Joins CVSA as Director of Policy and Government Affairs ....................17

Cover Story/Feature CVSA’s Roadcheck Keeps Commercial Vehicle Safety in Check ........................................18 Yukon Territory Participates for First 48 Consecutive Hour Roadcheck ..................................19 Manitoba Infrastructure & Transportation’s Motor Carrier Division Ensures Passenger Safety Through Bus Inspections ....................................................19

Inspector’s Corner Committee News

Published by: Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

..................................................................................................20

Pitts Enterprise Issues Recall for ABS Issue As a Result of CVSA Petition to NHTSA ..........21 Avoiding Wheel Loss By Installing Them Right the First Time ..........................................22 Comings & Goings: CVSA Announces Committee Chair Updates ....................................23

Regional News South Carolina Implements New Intrastate CMV Program Designed to Make State Roads Safer ........................................................................24 Ten States Recognized As a Nationwide Leaders in Reducing Truck Crashes........................25 New State-of-the-Art Weigh Station Employs New Technologies to Help South Carolina Focus on Non-Compliant Motor Carriers ....................................26 Spotlight on Idaho State Police's Commercial Vehicle Safety, HazMat Division ..................27 Nebraska State Patrol Identifies Need, Develops Post Crash Inspection Course ................28 Washington State Police Address CMV Safety Concerns on Rails and Roads ....................30 Ticketing Aggressive Cars and Trucks in Utah ..................................................................30 Michigan State Police Increase Truck Enforcement Operations ........................................31 Florida Motor Carrier Compliance Office Conducts Motor Coach Inspection Detail in Orlando ....................................................................................31 Pittsburgh Police Team Up With York Canadian Police to Conduct Commercial Vehicle Blitz ..........................................................................................32 Grand Prairie, Texas, Police Department Joins CVSA ......................................................32

Regional Rap ............................................................................................................33 Associate Member News Operation Lifesaver Unveils Rail Safety Challenge: A “Virtual” Learning Program for Professional Truck Drivers ........................................................................................36 ATRI Releases Updated Operational Costs of Trucking Report..........................................37 Comments on Crash Data Guidelines Sought Traffic Records Forum Meeting Date and Location Set by GHSA ......................................................38 Newly-Developed Load Binders Used With Chain Tie Downs Standard Released ..............38

RAD Inspection News ............................................................................................39

Stephen A. Keppler Executive Director Collin B. Mooney, CAE Deputy Executive Director Larry D. Stern Director, Level VI Inspection Program Richard D. Henderson Director, Government Affairs Adrienne Gildea Director, Policy and Government Affairs William P. Schaefer Director, Vehicle Programs Randy J. West Director, Driver Programs Laura M. Zabriskie Director, Communications and Marketing Iris R. Leonard Manager, Program Services J. Craig Defibaugh Controller Wanica L. Foreman Administrative Assistant For comments, suggestions or information, please email us at communications@cvsa.org.

About the cover: Maine State Police Motor Carrier Supervisor Patrick Plourde applies the CVSA decal on a commercial vehicle during Roadcheck 2011. Guardian is a publication of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.


Guardian I

N

S

I

G

H

T

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Inspectors Key To Effective Enforcement By Capt. Steve Dowling, CVSA President

As I write my last Guardian article as CVSA President, I wanted to envision what I see for the future. So many things are progressing with technology that it is difficult to know what tomorrow will bring. Last week I heard someone refer to “decals” as “so 1970's.” Of course if that is true we are definitely not a progressive organization since the decals’ history began in the 1980's, but the point of the statement has merit. CVSA's future will likely not include a paper decal, and technology will continue to confront and require inspectors to embrace their benefits. Regardless of what advanced technology brings, I will make one bold prediction: Inspectors will still be the key to an effective enforcement program. We must never forget that technology is designed to enhance the effectiveness of both the driver and inspector. But, as long as vehicles are operated by people, and not machines, face-to-face contact with an inspector will have an impact that technology cannot replicate. This month, CVSA will again host the North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC) and I find it a timely event for this discussion. Throughout our history, CVSA has understood that the key to safety is consistent, thorough roadside inspections and NAIC is the organization's opportunity to honor the best of the best inspectors. As representatives from around North America will gather, more than just a competition or training will happen. NAIC represents the lifeblood of which CVSA was and is in the future. We represent roadside inspectors with a mission of ensuring industry is operating safely

Capt. Steve Dowling

through enforcement and education. That focus has been the same since the beginning of CVSA and will live into the future as well. Another event that underscores the impact of uniformity in roadside inspections is Roadcheck. One week to the day before our annual kick off in Virginia, a horrible tragedy occurred in that state. A bus driver, way over his hours of service and fatigued, fell asleep on I-95 causing the bus to strike a guard rail, tip to its side before slamming into a pole sheering it from end to end. In the end, several passengers were injured and 14 were killed. CVSA strongly believes that this fatal crash, and numerous others, could have been prevented if law enforcement were permitted to inspect these buses and their drivers – enroute – during their trip. Predictably, some interests oppose enroute inspections. While we respect their differing opinions, CVSA members stand united in voicing our belief that enroute inspections are a

critical tool to aid law enforcement in helping to root out and take aggressive action on the illegal and unsafe commercial operators. Our Vice President Maj. David Palmer, with the help of CVSA's staff, prepared and presented testimony in June before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee outlining ways to improve bus safety. In addition, The Hill magazine recently published our op-ed in reiterating our position. Before wrapping up my thoughts, I want to take a moment to recognize the CVSA staff that I have had the pleasure to work with this past year. Most of you will never know the amount of time and effort that our staff puts into what they do, but the team that is assembled has never been better or more effective at maximizing our voice and resources. We are privileged to have Steve Keppler as our Executive Director and if you will take the time to reflect on the progress he has made for the organization in the short time he has been in this new role, I think you will be pleased. Other associations have money and resources, but CVSA has an outstanding reputation and staff that make us a voice that is consistently requested to represent safety. That reputation is due to the pureness of our cause, safety, and the character of our people. As Abraham Lincoln once said, “Character is like a tree and reputation like a shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.” With that in mind, I see great things in our future. Thank you for allowing me the opportunity to represent this outstanding organization; it has been my distinct honor and privilege!

1


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Executive Director’s Message By Stephen A. Keppler, CVSA, Executive Director

The last few months have been a blur. There are major safety issues on the table and impacts on its future that are hanging in the balance, everything from EOBRs, Hours of Service, Bus Safety, CSA, the Cross Border Pilot Program, Roadability, Training, Safety Rating Reciprocity, Transportation Reauthorization, Funding, etc. etc. etc. This, coupled with the struggling economy and the recent tragic weather events that have occurred across the continent can be viewed by some as painting somewhat of a bleak picture. Indeed, for those that have been affected it most certainly is and our hearts go out to them and their families and loved ones and wish them all the best for a quick return to normalcy. It is out of difficult and trying times that stars are born. Effective leadership requires a steady hand and an ability to stay the course and staying true to your principles. In light of this, I recently had the chance to experience CVSA’s key principles (Uniformity and Reciprocity) and organizational values (Integrity, Professionalism, Leadership and Teamwork) in action. This was all on display at the Roadcheck media kickoff event on June 7 in the suburbs of Washington, DC in Dumfries, Virginia. The event, hosted by the Virginia State Police, brought together a number of key

Stephen A. Keppler

stakeholders to champion and celebrate the embodiment of what is the roadside inspection program. There were over 15 media outlets present and our message was loud and clear - we are out there day and night and are having measurable impacts on countless lives. By we I am talking not just about enforcement, but also industry. A number of members and associate members were in attendance at the event, and it was exciting to see everyone clearly engaged and focused on the goal of saving lives. The great thing about Roadcheck is what was going on in Virginia was going on in countless places all across the continent. It is very powerful and moving to know that over that three-day period

Roadcheck is that one point in time during the year where the stars align and all the work we do each and every day is on display to the world.

2

there are 10,000 inspectors working themselves to the bone, and the amount of media attention that was generated as a result is nothing short of incredible. U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood even blogged about it (go to http://fastlane.dot.gov/2011/06/roadcheck-2011.html.) Now, WE all know that these inspections go on each and every day – to the tune of close to four million per year – but the general public does not. Roadcheck is that one point in time during the year where the stars align and all the work we do each and every day is on display to the world. It is crisp, it is pure, and it is potent. It is an impressive sight, and I am privileged to be a part of it. The great thing about this organization is we will get the opportunity see and experience these principles and values on display once again at the 2011 North American Inspectors Championship in Orlando. We are extremely pleased to continue NAIC’s longstanding partnership with FMCSA, ATA and the National Truck Driving Championships. If you have never had the chance to experience NAIC and the NTDC, it is a truly fantastic event and I encourage you to attend and participate, whether it is as a contestant or volunteer. It is an experience you will never forget. Roadcheck and NAIC clearly demonstrate that the members not only talk the talk but walk the walk, and that there is strength in numbers. As we continue to go through the rollercoaster of ups and downs and challenges that 2011 has put before us, keep clarity of purpose, stay focused on results and empower your colleagues. As John F. Kennedy once said, “Things do not happen. Things are made to happen.”


Guardian I

N

S

I

G

H

T

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Arkansas Highway Police, Industry Share Safety Goal Sgt. James “Buckie” Thomas

I decided to write you about both an individual and an organization that I feel goes above and beyond [in promoting highway safety] - Sgt. James "Buckie" Thomas and his organization, the Arkansas Highway Police. The trucking industry within Arkansas is extremely fortunate to have a great working relationship with the Arkansas Highway Police. This is easily accomplished since we share the same goal in ensuring commercial vehicles and drivers are safely operating on our state highways. Chief Ron Burks and his staff have always been supportive to our industry and each year, in a collaborated effort, we conduct

the Inspector's Competition and the state truck driving championship. In addition, numerous members of the Arkansas Highway Police, to include Sgt. Thomas, have provided training to our association and served as guest speakers during our Safety Management Council meetings. With the onset of CSA, our company began educating our drivers to include the production of a video for our January 2011 safety meeting. In order to stress the importance of CSA, and capture the audience, we felt we needed someone who was an authority on the subject; a great communicator; and someone who the drivers would listen to. Immediately we thought of Sgt. Thomas

and made the request for his assistance. True to form, the Arkansas Highway Police responded allowing Sgt. Thomas to participate. The end result was the production of an informative, educational and comprehensive video concerning CSA which was instrumental in helping us educate our drivers. You will find no better organization than the Arkansas Highway Police or a better representative of the type officer you want on our highways inspecting our drivers and equipment than Sgt. Thomas.

Sam Cates, Director of Safety and Security ABF Freight System, Inc.

Teens And Trucks - A Deadly Combination Young drivers and their passengers continue to perish on North American highways at an alarmingly high rate. Often these fatal crashes involve an encounter with a large truck or bus. The result can be a deadly combination but it need not be. There are several factors that often lead to a hazardous action that ultimately results in a serious or fatal crash involving a young driver. A general lack of knowledge about how to safely share the road with commercial vehicles, a propensity of the young driver to engage in various behaviors that distract them from the task of driving, peer pressure to take risk, and a false sense of immortality all can result in tragedy on the highway. Many drivers, especially the young and inexperienced, do not understand the unique operating characteristics of large trucks and buses. For example, on average it takes a semi tractor-trailer 430 feet, or 91 percent further than a passenger vehicle to stop while traveling at a speed of 55 miles per hour. Another example, many drivers are not aware of the blind spots or ‘NoZones’ in front of, behind, and on both

sides of a large truck. Consequently, young drivers in particular often place themselves in a very vulnerable position around a truck where they are invisible to the truck driver. Driver distraction continues to proliferate as a causation factor in more and more deadly crashes, especially involving young drivers. There is an ever increasing array of electronic devices being placed in motor vehicles. Young drivers, due to their inexperience and their addiction to personal electronic communications devices, are more prone to distraction while driving than any other age group. As we all know from personal experience, youth and a sense of immortality go hand in hand. Unfortunately, crash statistics show that regardless of age, no one is immortal or exempt from the many dangers inherent to motor vehicle travel. Teens and trucks do not have to be a deadly combination. With the proper edu-

cation and mentoring, young drivers can learn to safely share the road with all vehicles, including large trucks and buses. They can also become more in touch with their own sense of vulnerability and mortality, they can learn to more effectively deal with peer pressure, and they can learn to resist the many potential distractions available to them while driving. Yes, young drivers can safely share the road with commercial vehicles. Programs such as the Teens and Trucks initiative developed by CVSA and its partners can be very effective in providing young drivers with the knowledge they need to avoid a deadly confrontation with a large truck or bus. For more information about the Teens and Trucks program please contact CVSA at 202-7751623 or on the web at www.cvsa.org. Capt. Bob Powers (ret.) Michigan State Police

CVSA’s Guardian welcomes your letters and comments. To submit a letter, send an email to communications@cvsa.org or write to CVSA, c/o Guardian, 6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310, Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319.

3


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Closing Safety Rest Areas Severely Impacts Drivers – Especially Truckers In order to save money in these challenging economic times, states are focusing their attention on closing safety rest areas. However, there is already a severe shortage of truck parking throughout the country. Without a safe and legal place to park, truck drivers must decide between continuing to drive while fatigued or find an illegal, possibly unsafe location to rest. Safety rest stops can not only help reduce the incidents of motorists who drive while fatigued, but they can also

help minimize accidents caused by “distracted drivers.” The term refers to motorists who continue to drive while texting, talking on the phone in general, or looking up directions. Many truck drivers who cannot find a legal place to park resort to stopping on highway or ramp shoulders. Too often, a serious injury or fatality results when a car crashes into the parked vehicle. Studies by FMCSA indicate that truck driver fatigue could be a factor in up to 40 percent of truck crashes and

play a significant role in almost a third of fatal crashes involving truck drivers. When truck drivers approach their federally required driving-time limits and search for a safe, legal place to rest, it is incumbent on government agencies to ensure that they have that opportunity. There are also commercial issues involved. Limiting truckers’ access to convenient and safe places where they can rest can result in late deliveries, increasing customers’ costs -- costs which will be passed on to consumers.

enforcement, our current operational environment is changing rapidly; whether you are an inspector or a program manager, we are all being asked to go farther, accomplish more, innovate and become more effective with fewer resources. Remarkably, due to the dedicated work of our members, we have done exactly that. The next five years will be critical to the Alliance’s success. As an Alliance, we must identify and address these potential challenges, because an issue in one jurisdiction, whether it be a regulatory compliance issue such as EOBR/CSA or a fiscal issue like shrinking budgets, is likely not unique to that jurisdiction. To succeed the Alliance must: 1. Explore opportunities to increase, not only the effectiveness of the communication, but also the size of the audience. We need to engage all members and external stakeholders in more frequent and effective dialog. 2. Increase the value of the Alliance for all stakeholders by continuing our important work on our core principles, such as international uniformity, reciprocity and consistency in the application of our daily activities.

3. Understand the importance of succession training and planning for leadership within the Alliance. 4. Identify and form strong partnerships with all stakeholders both in North America and abroad in an effort to learn and share success. Admittedly, the Alliance and its membership will be faced with significant obstacles in the next few years; however, we are also in a unique position to not only overcome these obstacles but also grow. We can do this by educating the communities that we serve about our unique partnership and its effectiveness. CVSA staff understands this and actively promotes our collective interests to decision makers. CVSA staff has recently been doing a remarkable job of advocating for our interests on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. If you had the opportunity to listen to Vice President Palmer in mid-June you are aware of his excellent testimony in front of the House. He did a great job representing us all. However, his testimony was not a singular effort; he was well prepared by an educated and involved CVSA staff that clearly knew the issues. But advocating in Washington, D.C. alone will not be enough. We must face

OP-ED As an Alliance, we all know the last few years have been tough for many of our members - both industry and enforcement alike. The economy has challenged all of us to do more with less. We have seen good members retire as state and local governments have reduced services, and safe and effective transportation companies close their doors. Indeed, this recession has challenged all of us to re-think how we operate regardless of whether we are in government or industry. Unfortunately, in the next few years, the Alliance and its membership will continue to be challenged with significant obstacles that will test the Alliance’s ability to succeed. Law enforcement will continue to be faced with challenges to our already thin and overworked resources. Some may find opportunity in reducing the budgets of safety enforcement agencies that perform life saving work across North America. At the same time, many will see the constricting economy as an opportunity to challenge the regulatory environment as being too strict. Already the national and local political environment has been less friendly towards regulation, including CMV safety regulation. These trends will continue. It is a known fact that for law

4


Guardian I

N

S

I

G

H

T

The Legislative Rundown When states close safety rest stops, they are putting lives at risk in order to achieve what amounts to extremely small savings within their overall budgets. The low investment needed to maintain safety rest areas will yield significant safety and economic benefits, and these shortsighted approaches must be abandoned. Shazia Noreen American Trucking Associations

our threats head-on by advocating for our work at the federal, state, provincial and local level. As members, we need to highlight our strengths and educate those who simply do not understand the value of our Alliance and our critical public safety work. We must proactively educate all of our stakeholders about the important work we do, so that when budgets are cut or logical safety-based regulation is threatened we are in position to successfully defend ourselves. In many cases our enforcement agencies are limited in our ability to impact change, but this is exactly the benefit of the Alliance. By forming strong partnerships with industry and other law enforcement organizations, we can leverage those relationships to strengthen our programs, the Alliance and accomplish our goals of improving traffic safety. Maj. Mark Savage Colorado State Patrol Maj. Savage has been with the Colorado State Patrol for 16 years and is currently nominated as CVSA’s Secretary/Treasurer.

By Richard D. Henderson CVSA, Director, Government Affairs

Passage of Six Year Reauthorization Bill This Year Is in Doubt On the House Side – Rep. John Mica, Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, as of this writing, continues to say that he will introduce his bill within the next week or 10 days. The measure is expected to authorize an overall funding level of $219 billion which is $60 billion less than what SAFETEA-LU authorized. We don’t yet know (until we see the copy of the bill) whether this means that authorized funding levels for MCSAP and the other state safety grant programs will be reduced from 2010 levels (highest limits under SAFETEA-LU). At various hearings, including the most recent bus safety hearing held by the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee (during which CVSA was a witness), Chairman Mica has said that he wants to be sure that state enforcement agencies are provided the tools and resources needed to do their job. So, we can only hope that at least the current level of funding will be maintained. The big question (as of this writing) is whether Chairman Mica will actually introduce the bill and report it out of his Committee without assurances from the House Republican Leadership that House Floor time will be scheduled for discussion, debate, and a final vote on the bill by the end of July, or at the latest, by September 30, 2011 when the current extension of SAFETEA-LU expires. The unresolved issue of increasing the Federal debt limit may consume most of the available House floor time. If he were to circulate his bill, and/or introduce it without such assurances, he could run the risk of having his bill subject to

Richard Henderson

review and criticism for an indefinite period of time. On the other hand, the Chairman and his Committee staff have worked consistently and diligently to write a bill since January of this year. A number of Committee hearings were held across the country culminating with a two-day marathon hearing in Washington, D.C. He may want to introduce a bill as evidence to his colleagues in the Congress and the public that he is doing his part to draft a bill that takes into account the current fiscal constraints that are affecting all Congressional legislative activity and yet maintains the “core” needs of a national surface transportation program. On the Senate Side – Sen. Barbara Boxer, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works that has jurisdiction over the highway titles of a Reauthorization bill has said that she is close to releasing a bill. Until recently, she has talked almost exclusively about a six-year bill. However, within the past week, she has indicated that maybe a two-year bill would be more feasible that would at least maintain current funding levels (Mica’s six-year bill has to be at reduced funding levels because of Highway Trust Fund revenue constraints). It should be noted that even funding for a two-year bill could not be sustained at current levels unless another $12 billion is “infused” to the Highway Trust Fund. Sen. Boxer has said she is working with Senate Finance Committee Chairman, Sen. Max Baucus, to come up with proposals to make up for the estimated $12 billion shortfall. The Senate Commerce Committee, which has jurisdiction over the motor carrier safety title of a reauthorization

5


Third Quarter 2011

bill, is reportedly working on a two year bill, but there are no indications as to when it might be introduced. In an earlier Legislative Update, we reported that the Commerce Committee has taken action and voted a bus safety bill out of Committee. Likely Outcome for Reauthorization This Year – Despite Chairman Mica’s best efforts, there are signals from the House Leadership (Speaker and Majority Leader) that a new six-year surface transportation bill is not on the “front burner” at this time. Rep. Mica himself has shown no interest in pursuing a shorter two-year bill. Sen. Boxer’s Committee may well report out a twoyear bill after another round of hearings, but the bill would be unlikely to come to

6

www.cvsa.org

a vote on the Senate Floor, until the House passed their version of a Reauthorization bill, and as mentioned above, that is unlikely. Thus, the odds are against Congress passing either a six- or two-year transportation bill by September 30 of this year when the current extension of SAFETEA-LU expires. What Might Pass, if Anything – The Senate Commerce Committee reported out a bus safety bill (S. 453) in early May. At that markup, Sen. Lautenberg, Chairman of the Surface Transportation Subcommittee, and Ranking Member, Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, both said they were committed to getting that bill passed this year. Late last year, an effort was made to pass a bus safety bill under suspension of the rules by a voice vote on the Senate floor if all 100 Senators agreed. One member of Senate put a “hold” on the bill preventing passage. This time around, the bill would likely go the conventional route of being sent to the Senate for debate, discussion, and possible amendments, or become part of another SAFETEA-LU extension even though SAFETEA-LU extensions thus far have been “clean” extensions. The question then becomes what other safety measures may be added to the bus bill, and will it in fact turn into a mini-motor carrier safety bill, perhaps not including all of the issues that would otherwise be included as part of a full six-year bill, but nevertheless containing some safety policy issues that would be revenue neutral such as bus safety, grant streamlining, and Maintenance-ofEffort (MOE) reform. We will have a better idea of what the scenario will be during the month of July.

FY 2012 Appropriations The House Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation and Housing and Urban Development is scheduled to report out an FY 2012 funding bill on July 14. The overall Subcommittee allocations are based on a House Resolution that is based on the so-called Ryan budget (Rep. Ryan’s earlier proposal to cut the overall DOT budget by 35%). However, the Subcommittee has discretion to move funding around within its overall allocation. The following scenarios are possible. The Subcommittee could cut motor carrier safety funding back to the levels of 2006 or 2008. There is also the possibility that motor carrier safety programs would be funded at current levels. This is because MCSAP is not a controversial program and did not experience a sharp spike in funding over the last few years. UCR 2012 Carrier Registration Fees At its recent meeting on June 15 in Park City, Utah, the UCR Board voted to keep the current fee structure in place for 2012. Plans are to start sending the 2012 registration notices beginning October 1, of this year. Bus Safety Hearing On June 13 CVSA Vice-President, David Palmer delivered testimony on behalf of CVSA before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee on ways to improve bus safety. In addition, CVSA drafted an Op-Ed piece that was published in the Congressional news daily, The Hill. As you can see bus safety has become an important issue for enforcement, the Congress, and the traveling public.


Guardian I

N

S

I

G

H

T

KNOWLEDGE MATTERS

Safety Is Job One for Jack Van Steenburg

As Chief Safety Officer and Assistant Administrator, Mr. Van Steenburg serves as the agency’s chief safety advocate promoting partnerships with federal, state and local governments and provides direction over all national commercial vehicle safety programs. This is one of three career positions that require Presidential approval at the U.S. Department of Transportation. Prior to his appointment in May 2011, as Chief Safety Officer and Assistant Administrator, Jack Van Steenburg served as the Director of FMCSA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance since May 2008. In that position, he led all enforcement programs that contribute to commercial vehicle transportation nationwide. Before coming to FMCSA, Mr. Van Steenburg retired from the New York State Police after serving 25 years holding the ranks of Trooper, Sergeant, Lieutenant, Captain, Major and Staff Inspector. One of the highlights of his career was being elected the president of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance and serving on its executive committee for 10 years. Mr. Van Steenburg has received an associate’s degree in Criminal Justice from Hudson Valley Community College, bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Plattsburgh State University and a master’s degree in Public Administration from Marist College. Question: What in your background has prepared you to take on the role of FMCSA’s Chief Safety Officer? Answer: Proudly, my career has been focused exclusively on making our roads safe for all users. Being Chief Safety Officer is a natural progression for me, and I don’t take a minute of it for granted.

During my 25-year career in the New York State Police, I professionalized the commercial motor vehicle unit. Later my involvement with CVSA gave me a fuller appreciation of the commercial motor vehicle industry. CVSA also allowed me to see what my counterparts were doing in other states and my 10 years of active participation on the CVSA Executive Committee led me to an opportunity to interact with the federal government. Throughout my career, I have seized opportunities to promote highway safety. My willingness to get involved opened doors that led me to where I am now and where I can make the greatest impact on safe travel for the American people. I don’t look for excuses when I see what needs to get done. I say, let’s do it, and not look for reasons not to do it. In the work of safety, we can’t afford to look the other way. Question: What experience as a state trooper has stayed with you to this day? Answer: As a relatively new trooper back in 1986, I responded to a fiery car crash very late on a Friday night that resulted in the deaths of three young people. The car traveled at 82 mph straight into a tree. Nothing was left. Besides speeding, drinking alcohol caused this tragedy. That night I had to make four notifications to three sets of parents. I will never forget the crash scene, the parents’ grief-stricken faces and my own feelings that night. It is a constant reminder that what we do, all of us, is to continually improve highway safety and keep families intact. Question: What are your goals for FMCSA and its safety agenda?

Pictured, from left to right: SC Department of Public Safety Director Mark Keel; FMCSA Assistant Administrator and Chief Safety Officer Jack Van Steenburg; SC State Transport Police Colonel Nick Moore, and; SC State Transport Police Size & Weight Specialist Johnny Shuler.

Answer: As Chief Safety Officer, I won’t be at my desk 24/7. My goal is to get out and stay involved with our state partners and with safety organizations whenever and wherever possible. I want to strengthen our external network and build robust relationships with groups like the Governor’s Highway Safety Association, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the American Moving and Storage Association, the American Bus Association, the United Motorcoach Association and the Intermodal Association of North America. CVSA can still expect to see me at their conferences, particularly COHMED because the safe transportation of hazardous materials is an important area that requires a high level of cooperation between federal, state and local agencies. My plan is to get out to states as much as possible as I did recently at the latest Roadcheck events in South Carolina and Georgia. At Roadcheck, I witnessed impressive actions by our federal and state inspectors and progressive technology systems; folks doing the right things and getting results. In August, I plan to attend the North American Inspectors Championship and the National Truck Driver Championship both in Orlando. I am honored to represent FMCSA and look forward to meeting the finest inspectors and drivers as they compete with the best across North America. Their dedication to safety continues to inspire me.

7


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Ask the FMCSA Administrator

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administrator Anne S. Ferro answers your questions. In this issue, the Administrator details what the agency is doing to improve motorcoach bus safety and previews upcoming CSA training on a new investigative tool for safety. Question: How long will FMCSA continue the current emphasis on bus safety? Answer: As you are no doubt aware, this year has been the worst period in recent history for motorcoach safety, with six crashes causing 25 deaths and numerous injuries just since January. Over the past few months, you have been called upon to provide extra time and energy in our all-out crackdown on dangerous and illegal passenger carriers. You have performed more safety inspections and compliance reviews during weekends, late nights and early mornings to stop the risk to passengers created by unsafe and illegal motorcoach carriers. First of all, thank you for rising to the challenge. I sincerely appreciate your dedication to safety and the hard work and countless hours involved in our relentless

8

efforts to find and shut down these irresponsible carriers and drivers. The current emphasis on bus safety must be considered the “new normal.” We cannot let our guard down. These carriers are continually finding new ways to evade federal safety regulations. Also, we cannot let an emphasis on passenger carriers take away from our enforcement of unsafe trucks and truck drivers. Bus and truck safety are both of the highest priority. We need stronger authority from Congress to make enforcement of motorcoach companies more effective. To do this, FMCSA has asked Congress for authority to 1) conduct en-route bus inspections; not just at points of origin and destination; to 2) establish a federal “successor liability” standard to charge a new company when it reincarnates from an unsafe carrier; to 3) require pre-authority safety audits before a company can receive passenger carrier authority; to 4) raise the penalty to $25,000 per violation for bus companies that attempt to operate illegally; and to 5) regulate ticket sellers, known as brokers, just like we do brokers of freight and household goods carriers. This additional authority can

tighten the safety net around unsafe operators and drivers, preventing needless injuries and deaths. But we cannot wait for Congress to move forward on bus safety. We must continue to tighten safety standards and increase the numbers of inspections and enforcement actions. Because of our outstanding partnership, since January, FMCSA has declared eighteen bus companies unsatisfactory and has proposed that rating for another fifteen operators. In the first two weeks of May alone, we conducted more than 3,000 surprise inspections and comprehensive safety reviews of bus companies The critical job of safety requires the most effective tools possible. Using every resource at our disposal, I am confident that we will improve passenger carrier and driver safety because the traveling public deserves not only affordable but safe motorcoach bus services. Question: What is happening next with CSA? Answer: During the summer months, CSA enters its second phase when we begin training to use the “Safety Management Cycle” as part of all investigations. The safety management cycle is an important tool for an investigator to use while meeting with a carrier. It helps analyze the breakdown in the process which caused the violation to occur. Often there may be several causes to a process breakdown and using this cycle helps identify the variety of safety problems that contribute to a violation. The six management processes in the safety management cycle include 1) policies and procedures, 2) roles and responsibilities, 3) qualification and hir-


F

ing, 4) training and communication, 5) monitoring and tracking, and 6) meaningful action. During the FMCSA nine-state 30month operational model test, which concluded in the summer of 2010, we found that use of the safety management cycle helped safety investigators and motor carriers go beyond “what is wrong” to “why it is happening.” In one example, using the safety management cycle helped a Minnesota state partner identify the cause of load securement violations when the carrier could not stop them on his own and the cause of the problem was not apparent on the surface of the investigation. According to Pam DeGrote, an investigator with the Minnesota Department of Transportation, “use of the safety management cycle tool at a recent closeout interview helped a carrier see that they needed better training and communication of load securement regulations for all their drivers.” In addition, Missouri Department of Transportation investigator Steff Copeland told FMCSA that “the SMC is a great tool to engage the carrier in self-awareness in recognizing the area of a breakdown in process.” Because of reports just like these from our state colleagues, we strongly believe that the Safety Management Cycle will facilitate faster and more sustainable corrective actions on the part of motor carriers. We also find that some carriers use the safety management cycle to get ahead of driver or equipment issues before a crash or violation occurs. Training of federal and state investigators on the safety management cycle begins in July and runs through September. I hope everyone can take advantage of this useful training. The safety management cycle tool will surely improve compliance, and through its widespread use, save lives as a result. Thank you for your diligence to our safety mission. The work you do makes safe travel possible and I value the contributions made by each of our state and local partners!

Guardian

E

D

E

R

A

L

N

E

W

S

FMCSA Names Five to Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee FMCSA has appointed five new members to its Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC), a committee established by Congress in 2006 to provide the agency with advice and recommendations on motor carrier safety programs and regulations. The five new MCSAC members are: • Robert Abbott, Vice President, Safety Policy, American Trucking Assns. (ATA) • Paul Claunch, Major, Arkansas Highway Police • Henry Jasny, Vice President and senior counsel, Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety • Janice Mulanix, Asst. Chief, California Highway Patrol • Calvin Studivant, motorcoach driver, Community Coach, Inc. “MCSAC is a vital resource for bringing a full and broad range of safety ideas to the table,” said Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood in a statement. “These individuals are committed to the challenge of reducing, and ultimately eliminating, fatal crashes involving large trucks and buses. I thank them for their service to our county.” Composed of 19 members overall, MCSAC includes representatives from national safety organizations, the trucking and bus industries, state law enforcement agencies, labor unions, and the commercial insurance sector, said FMCSA Administrator Anne Ferro. “They also symbolize the critical necessity of everyone coming together to move our safety-first mission forward,” Ferro noted. “Their work is helping to save lives every day.”

9


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

NTC NEWS BRIEFS

Travel Made Easy By Joe DeLorenzo, FMCSA, Director, National Training Center

CSA Update There are a number of Compliance - Safety - Accountability (CSA) events taking place this summer and continuing through autumn. In mid-June, CSA instructor candidates came together for Instructor Development training, as well as training in the delivery of: • CSA Policy Update to Federal and State officers, and • Safety Management Cycle to all those involved in investigations of motor carriers.

Our most valuable resource at the National Training Center is our instructors. Without these extraordinary people, we couldn’t do the important work we do. As part of an initiative to provide them with the best possible support, we have made a top priority of ensuring that they travel to their destinations on schedule and without complications. Improved Communications We’ve improved the way we communicate with instructors on travel. Email communication has now been standardized. All travel-related email is now being sent to a centralized mailbox ntctravel@dot.gov. Travel Status Log A centralized Travel Status Log, accessible to both the Travel Specialist and Course Specialists, has been established. It allows our travel team to respond to instructor questions right away. If you have a travel-related question or concern, please email ntctravel@dot.gov. Traveler Information Our newly produced NTC Traveler Information brochure provides important information that every NTC traveler should know - how to indicate flight preferences, federal policy on car rentals, and many other areas. An electronic version of the brochure is now being sent to instructors along with their Travel Authorizations. A printed version of the brochure is also available upon request. Instructor Certification The NTC Instructor Certification Program is designed to prepare partic-

10

ipants to instruct on behalf of NTC. The certification process is divided into two phases: • Phase 1: The candidate completes an NTC Instructor Development class (or NTC-approved equivalent). • Phase 2: The candidate is evaluated by an NTC Master Instructor in the instruction of a course for which he/she is seeking certification. Over the last year, NTC has graduated two Instructor Development classes and two Master Instructor Development classes. The remaining classes this fiscal year are: • August 1, 2011 – NTC Instructor Development • September 2, 2011 – NTC Instructor Development For more information on the NTC Instructor Certification Program and Instructor/Master Instructor Development training, please contact John Waters at john.waters@dot.gov.

CSA instructor candidates were also given an overview of Electronic Mapping and Monitoring Technology (EMMT), including how it can be investigated from both the roadside and the company-investigation perspective. The CSA training schedule has been finalized and disseminated to all FMCSA Division Offices and Service Centers. Training will begin July 12th and run through September. For further information, contact your State’s FMCSA Division Office or the National Training Center. EMMT Project NTC is developing two courses on Electronic Mapping and Monitoring Technology. EMMT Basic Awareness will be a two-hour course geared to State personnel responsible for conducting commercial motor vehicle inspections to include participants of the North American Inspectors Championship. EMMT Basics, Investigative Process and Application of Policies will be a fourhour course designed for Safety Investigators and State personnel responsible for conducting compliance reviews.


F

Guardian

E

D

E

R

A

L

N

E

W

S

NTSB Reviews Progress, Discusses Current, Emerging Issues At Large Truck and Bus Safety Forum By Julie Perrot, National Transportation Safety Board, Safety Recommendation Specialist

On May 10-11, 2011, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) convened a public forum to review the progress that has been made in large truck and bus safety since the agency held a series of public hearings on the same topic in 1999-2000. Among other objectives of the forum were discussions of current and emerging issues and initiatives. Day 1 included sessions on carrier oversight and the determination of carrier safety fitness by federal, state, and industry organizations; truck operations issues, such as electronic onboard recorders, hours of service, and safety culture; and bus operations, including discussions on the safety of the curbside and low-cost bus industry. Day 2 focused on four additional concerns: driver safety, including driver crash risk factors and approaches for increasing driver safety; the state of driver health and wellness programs and progress toward comprehensive medical oversight for interstate commercial drivers; the state of enhanced vehicle technologies, including crash avoidance technologies such as electronic stability control and collision avoid-

ance systems; and advances in crash mitigation, such as passenger restraints, vehicle crashworthiness, vehicle compatibility, and highway barrier systems. Although presiding Board Member Robert L. Sumwalt acknowledged in his opening statement that, from 2005 to 2009, there has been a steady drop in the fatality rate due to heavy vehicle accidents, he reminded participants that each data point recorded in the Fatality Analysis Reporting System represented a family member who will never again come home to loved ones. The forum was attended by representatives from government, industry, and advocacy groups, including Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, the American Bus Association, the American Trucking Associations, CVSA, the Federal Highway Administration, FMCSA, the Government Accountability Office, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, the National

Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the National Private Truck Council, the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association, the Truck Manufacturers Association, the Truck Safety Coalition, United Motorcoach Association, United Transportation Union, and Women in Trucking. Further information on the forum, including the archived webcast and transcripts, is available on the NTSB website: h t t p : / / w w w. n t s b. g o v / e v e n t s / 2 0 1 1 / truck_bus_safety/forum.htm. The NTSB also held a press conference on June 23, 2011, to announce updates to its newly remodeled Most Wanted List. The event webcast, the new brochure, and background information on highlighted issue areas are available on the NTSB website: www.ntsb.gov. (See related story) In late July, the NTSB will hold a Board Meeting on a cargo tank semitrailer rollover accident that occurred on October 22, 2009, in Indianapolis, Indiana. The meeting will be webcast. Please check the NTSB website for further information on date and time: www.ntsb.gov.

NTSB Announces Top 10 List to Reduce Transportation Accidents and Save Lives The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) recently announced its new list of the most critical transportation issues that need to be addressed to improve safety and save lives. The new “Most Wanted List” highlights 10 safety issues that impact transportation nationwide. The announcement of the new list came at a press conference in Washington, D.C. in which each of the five members of the Board spoke briefly about the issues on the list. “The NTSB’s ability to influence transportation safety depends on our ability to communicate and advocate for changes,” said NTSB Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman. “The Most Wanted List is the most powerful tool we have to highlight our priorities.” NTSB began issuing an annual Most Wanted List in 1990. The list released today is the first one produced under a revised format developed by the agency over the past several months in an effort to modernize and streamline the list. This year’s list features 10 broad issue areas that the NTSB will highlight in its advocacy efforts during the next year. The new Most Wanted List can be found on the NTSB’s remod-

eled website. The effort to update the website began at the end of last year and was a revealed today. “Our new website, with a landing page dedicated to the Most Wanted List issues, provides pertinent, easy-to-find information along with videos and NTSB recommendations that support all of the issues on the list,” Hersman said. The issue areas on the new Most Wanted List are: • Promote pilot and air traffic controller professionalism • Address human fatigue • Promote teen driving safety • Improve general aviation safety • Improve motorcycle safety • Require safety management systems • Improve runway safety • Address alcohol-impaired driving • Improve bus occupant safety • Require image and onboard data recorders

11


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

More Than a Competition NAIC’s History Steeped In Developing Future Leaders, Strengthening Industry, Enforcement Partnerships By Paul Tamburelli, CheckMark Safety Services, Inc., Vice President of Government Relations Since its inception, CVSA actively focuses on enhancing the development and training programs available to roadside inspectors. Roadside inspectors are highly-trained professionals who save lives every day by keeping unsafe commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and drivers off the roads. The work of a commercial vehicle inspector is not easy but it is one of the most vital in public safety. Each year, CVSA recognizes the best of the best by inviting member jurisdictions throughout North America to participate in the North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC). NAIC develops future leaders, strengthens industry and enforcement partnerships and promotes camaraderie between inspectors, jurisdictions and countries. This in turn, ensures the quality, uniformity and reciprocity of the more than four million roadside inspections conducted each year across North America. NAIC gives inspectors the chance to compete for top honors in individual event categories in pursuit of

the Jimmy K. Ammons Grand Champion Award. The events sharpen their skills and provide a snapshot of the current roadside inspection environment as well as a forum to evaluate both successes and areas for improvement. Not only does NAIC recognize the best of the best CMV inspectors, it also provides member jurisdictions with a better understanding of the strengths and weakness of their CMV safety program. Creating Lasting Impressions “What you may not realize, however, is the lasting impact NAIC can have on an inspector’s career and all those who volunteer to make this event happen,” said Collin Mooney, CVSA’s deputy executive director and past NAIC competitor. “A dedicated team of international, interagency and private industry people assembles each year with the sole focus of providing NAIC contestants with a memorable and rewarding experience. This is the 19th year of NAIC and over the past near two

NAIC Provided a Pathway to Become Involved Maj. Ron Cordova, CVSA Past President (2005) The North American Inspectors Championships has always had a special place in my heart. I started participating in inspectors competitions since the inception in 1993. Although I did not win our state competition in 1993, it did not deter me from participating the following year. In 1994, I won our state competition and had the opportunity to represent NM in Tampa, Florida. I did not know what to expect at Challenge ‘94. It was one of the highlights of my career. I met officer/inspectors from North America that are still great friends today. The networking and friendships built are amazing at NAIC. I continued to participate after 1994 as staff, a judge and in 1999 became a cochair for the event. The experience as co-chair enabled me to become more involved with CVSA. As a result, I served as Chair of the ITS Committee from 20012003. In 2003, I was elected as Secretary/Treasurer for CVSA. In 2005, I ultimately had the privilege and honor to serve as President through 2006. CVSA is a tremendous organization and leader in highway safety across North America. NAIC provided me the pathway to become involved in this great organization.

12

decades we can see the impact it has had on a number of people and their career trajectory. It’s not just another program or event for CVSA. NAIC can have a critical impact on people’s lives. When inspectors participate in NAIC and they have a positive influence, it stays with them for years.” However, the importance of NAIC was not always seen. In late 1998, when the government was facing a lack of funding and the “Challenge” was at risk of being terminated, CVSA stepped in because the association did not want to see the competition fall by the wayside. CVSA and our Associate Advisory Committee stepped up with significant funding that first year to help pay for the competition and expenses. In addition, a whole new staff of unpaid workers stepped forward and gave their time and energy to make it happen. Several CVSA members stepped forward and worked as judges and took unpaid leave to staff the event. Maj. Ron Cordova (New Mexico Dept. of Public Safety) and I had worked together as judges and unpaid worker bees since 1993 at the first Challenge Competition in Denver, so we knew the bits and pieces that made a competition work. That first year in Tampa during August of 1999, we all worked 20 hours a day to make sure the contestants had a great experience. Ron and I drove a new Tahoe with a trailer attached from New Mexico, stopping along the way to pick up materials, bus ramps and additional staff for the event. Fortunately for us, everyone at CVSA including all the committee Chairs, Vice Chairs, members and associate members pitched in and almost everything went smoothly. One of our key NAIC staff members that year who handled the vehicle set up and defects was Jimmy Ammons, who had recently retired from the MS Public Service (continued on page 14)


Guardian C

V

S

A

N

E

W

S

NAIC Provides Winners Opportunities to Expand Career Horizons and Involvement in CVSA Richard Roberts, British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, NAIC 2006 Grand Champion

In 2006 I competed at NAIC in New Orleans. What an experience! I never would have expected to receive the Grand Champion title. So what really does happen after NAIC? Well, I returned home and it was back to work as normal. Prior to leaving for NAIC I was selected to assist with developing an hours of service course on the new rules. This was going to get my feet wet with instructing. I then went to St. Catherines, ON to become certified as an instructor for Part A and B. Later I completed my certification for Part D Motorcoach in Surrey, BC. Then it was off to Saskatoon, SK for CVSA instructor development. I’ve also taken on several instructor roles within our department, Emergency Vehicle Operation training, Mobile Inspector training, Radar training and cargo securement. Along with this has been involvement in several course developments. I’ve also had the opportunity as an acting assignment the position of provincial CVSA Coordinator, which I am currently doing. And all this time trying to figure out a way back to NAIC! In 2009 I was asked to take a position on the NAIC committee. Unfortunately, due to the tough economics we faced I was unable to accept. Fast forward to the 2011 CVSA Workshop and I was once again asked. This time I was pleased to accept. Would all of this happen without the big win? Who knows? But I’m sure it hasn’t hurt. A lot of people asked, “What did you do to prepare yourself?” I think I can best answer that by saying I focused on what I thought were my weak areas, utilized the training provided, and had a great time with all the talented inspectors I met. I’m sure most will agree that this is the highlight of your career. I am looking forward to working with all of the committees, CVSA staff and meeting this year’s competitors. It’s looking like another great NAIC!

NAIC Gave Me a Personal Glimpse of the Passion of the Organization Maj. David Palmer, Incoming CVSA President NAIC 1999 Grand Champion My participation in the 1999 North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC) was an outstanding learning experience early in my career as a commercial vehicle enforcement trooper with the Texas Department of Public Safety. NAIC provided me with experience and knowledge of the broader, big picture, aspects of commercial vehicle enforcement and safety. The training expanded my knowledge while the competition challenged my skills and abilities as a certified commercial vehicle inspector. I also cherish the many relationships that were developed with my fellow competitors, event judges, and others from across North America. These continuing relationships would have never been possible without this experience. NAIC was my first direct exposure to CVSA and it gave me a personal glimpse of the passion of the organization and, more importantly, the people behind it. It was clear that commercial vehicle safety was the unequivocal goal of CVSA. This “first impression” helped strengthen my passion for commercial vehicle safety then, and continues stronger than ever today.

13


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

At NAIC, I Was Made to Feel I Had the Most Important Job in the World Kerri Wirachowsky, CVSA Vehicle Committee Chair, NAIC 2001 Grand Champion

When I was selected to compete at NAIC back in 2001, I had no idea what I was in for and I was overwhelmed with the entire experience. I went with the notion that I would do the best I could and try to have a good time. I readily admit it was a little intimidating at the start. There were 52 men and me. However, I am used to being outnumbered, so I figured I would survive. Once the training day began, all the nerves went away and we all just started having fun and learning as much as we could in the short time we had. After about the 2nd day, I realized that there was so much more to the CVSA organization than I had been aware of from a roadside inspector standpoint back in my province. I had no idea that roadside officers were a fundamental ingredient to the development and success of CVSA. It was during an open panel session with some of the Committee Chairpersons that I realized CVSA policies and methodology were based on a coming together of all interested parties. I found out that the roadside officer was, in fact, an interested party and we could actually affect change. This event is truly a celebration of what a commercial vehicle inspector does 365 days a year. I never have and never will again have the feeling that I had for that one week. For that week, I was made to feel like I had the most important job in the world. It sent me home with an entire new outlook on my day-to-day routine. It turned my job into a passion. Without NAIC, the average roadside officer, like myself, would never have the opportunity to co-mingle with officers from all over the US, Canada and Mexico. The comradery that is built in one short week amongst all the contestants is extraordinary. It also gives the officer an inside look at CVSA. For the most part, officers are given direction, policies and procedures from CVSA but until they actually attend an event, they cannot understand the magnitude of the Alliance.

(continued from page 12) Commission and was working part time teaching for CVSA. Jimmy would pass away several months after NAIC from to a blood clot after surgery in the fall of 1999. Today, we remember Jimmy and his dedication to CVSA and NAIC each year when we present the Jimmy K. Ammons Grand Champion Award to the NAIC winner. That year, the winner of the first International Grand Champion Award was a wet behind the ears young trooper from

14

I developed friendships during that week that I still have as of today. I was so impressed with the whole process and enjoyed myself so much, that by Friday I was just trying to figure out how I could get back to participate again and become more involved. Little did I know that I had won the event at that point. I do remember after they announced my name, that once the shock subsided, one of the first things that entered my mind was that I had won my way back to NAIC the following year. So all the friends I had met, I would see again and I would be able to see how things operated from the other side of the fence. That second years’ experience made me appreciate, even more, the amount of effort that goes on for the sake of 50 – 60 roadside officers. It is a celebration of what officers do day in and day out with little or no recognition. The unfortunate part of being a roadside inspector is that generally no one is happy to see you and the only time someone pays attention to what a roadside inspectors job is, is when that job is not done. This event allows for officers to get the recognition that they deserve for keeping highways safe. I never could have imagined that 10 years ago when I arrived in Minneapolis to attend my first-ever CVSA event, that I could have won the event competing with some of North America’s finest, then been fortunate enough to be co-chair of the event for four years and now be the Chairperson of the Vehicle Committee. It is like what I said to some of our competitors here in Ontario this year as they prepared to write the entry regional exam. Just write the exam, you never know where it will take you.

Texas by the name of David Palmer. In September, approximately 45 days after NAIC 2011, Maj. Palmer will be sworn in as the International President of CVSA. “When you’re early in your career, you sometimes don’t realize how big the commercial vehicle safety world is and what kind of impact you can have. It gave me personally a bigger national and international taste. It motivates a number of people, if you go down the list of those who have won, to take their new energy and insight into

enhancing their career. It’s one of those things that if it takes place in your formative years, it can really shape whether you stay in CMV enforcement and what path you ultimately may take,” said Mooney. Today, NAIC is managed by CVSA; funded in part by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and is successful due to strong industry participation and sponsorship. NAIC has been recognized by the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) as an event that “Advances America.”


Guardian C

V

S

A

N

E

W

S

CVSA Urges Use of Emerging Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Technologies Would Benefit Safety, Security, Inspections, Tracking of DOE HazMat Shipments CVSA is recommending that the Department of Energy (DOE) choose the most reliable and promising technologies for future use and pay special attention to shipment security and tracking. CVSA recently presented the findings of its report titled “Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments” at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management’s National Transportation Stakeholders Forum in Denver, CO. “The technologies that were examined during this study are changing on a constant basis,” said Larry Stern, CVSA’s Director of the Level VI Program. “Specific technologies that are currently available and that CVSA recommends for the safety and security of radioactive material shipments are RFID, GPS, biometrics, seals and locks. These technologies have been tested, in operation for some time, and have good performance records.” The report, published in April 2011, recommends DOE: Involve the regional

state government groups in the overall process; Address all five technology application areas presented in the report; Pay special attention to shipment security and tracking indicating that stakeholders are especially interested in tracking not just the tractors, but the trailers and shipping casks as well; Make a special effort to involve stakeholders from states who currently do en route inspections due to state laws or policies; Upgrade TRANSCOM to report in real time the dose rate measurements of the package; and, follow the progress of the Hazardous Materials Cooperative Research Program (HMCRP) Project report studying electronic shipping papers and obtain a copy of the final report for review and possible implementation. As part of the report process, CVSA reviewed current technologies considered important to the safety and security of radioactive material shipments then reviewed nine emerging technologies identified by the Transportation Research Board project report with respect to the

five technology applications areas important to the safety and security of radioactive material shipments. CVSA also examined several current and emerging technologies that have potential to benefit the safety and security of DOE radioactive material shipments. The technologies were evaluated for relevance to one or more of five application areas considered having importance to the safety and security of radioactive material shipments. The conclusions address each of the five application areas are as follows: Inspection Technologies; Security Technologies (Driver, Power Unit, Trailer and, Shipping Casks); Radioactive Material Dose Rate Measurement and Isotope Quantification Technologies; Shipment and Tracking Technologies (tractor, trailer, and individual casks); and, Electronic Shipping Paper Technologies. To view the complete report visit www.cvsa.org, click on Programs, then click on the Level VI Program, then “Report updates.”

New CVSA Associate and Local Enforcement Members Arlington Police Department Autobus Ejecutivos, LLC dba Omnibus Express Bear Dog Enterprises Black Hound Delivery Service C&J Energy Services Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors Carlile Transportation Systems, Inc. Concorde, Inc. Crescent Services, LLC Eagle Training Services Earl L. Henderson Trucking

ELSAG North America, LLC FFE Transportation Services, Inc. FirstGroup America Grand Prairie Police Department inthinc Technology Solutions, Inc. J&J Driving School & Logistics, Inc. JMS Russel Metals Corp. J M T Cartage, Inc. KLS Delivery, Inc. MAHA-USA Mobile Trailer Works Northern Indiana Public Service Company PENSKE Logistics

Pepsi Bottling Ventures Q-Line Trucking RAIR Reliance Steel & Aluminum Co. Sammons Trucking Smart Safety Services Stalker Radar Stoughton Trucking, Inc. TransX USA Truck And Trailer Inspection #2 Utah Trucking Association VT LOGISTICS, INC. Vulcraft Carrier Corporation

15


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

CVSA Joins World Partners in Support of U.N. Decade of Action, Urges All Road Users to Actively Engage in Highway Safety

With traffic-related deaths and injuries reaching epidemic proportions worldwide, CVSA stands in support the United Nation’s Decade for Action for Road Safety campaign to increase the public’s awareness of this problem and urges all stakeholders to take action to save lives and prevent deaths and injuries. The campaign was launched on May 11, with ceremonies held throughout the world, including New York City and Washington, D.C. Nearly 1.3 million people worldwide die as a result of road traffic collisions every year, making road traffic injuries the tenth leading cause of death globally. That num-

www.decadeofaction.org

ber is projected to increase to 1.9 million by the year 2020. The Decade of Action for Road Safety has a goal of stabilizing and then reducing the level of worldwide road fatalities by bringing more attention to safety at regional, national, and global levels.

“CVSA shares the U.N.’s concern that road traffic deaths and injuries have reached epidemic proportions and need to be addressed urgently by all people who use public roads,” said Stephen A. Keppler, CVSA’s executive director. “CVSA and its partners work tirelessly to prevent large truck and bus-related crashes. And while the commercial vehicle industry has made significant progress, clearly much more can be done to see that not one additional life is put at risk. We appreciate the U.N. and World Health Organization for raising the global awareness of this issue.”

European Union Mandates Roadside Inspections by January 1st, 2012 By Collin Mooney, CVSA, Deputy Executive Director As of July 5th, 2010, the European Union (EU), has mandated that Member States (Countries) bring into force the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with European Directive 2010-47 EU for Roadside Inspections by January 1st, 2012 at the latest. Over the years, the EU Member States primarily focused on developing well structured annual inspection programs throughout the EU and are just now getting around to coordinating their roadside inspection activities. While many of the EU Member States already have roadside inspection and enforcement activities/programs, European Directive 2000-30 EC formally established these requirements on June 6th, 2000. The “Deficiencies” listed in European Directives 2010-47

16

EU can be subjective and are up for interpretation, just like many regulations here in North America. The EU is now in the same position the Alliance was almost 30 years ago when the uniformity and reciprocity of roadside inspection activities were uncoordinated. As a result, the 27 Member States will more than likely need to further define what constitutes a defective condition/violation and develop out-of-service criterion similar to the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria. The European Directives mentioned in this article only focus on the mechanical fitness of commercial vehicles and if anyone would like electronic copies of these European Directives, please contact Collin Mooney at 301-830-6149 or via email at collinm@cvsa.org.


Guardian C

V

S

A

N

E

W

S

Operation Safe Driver Program Spreads the Word About Educating Youth on Safe Driving Around Large Trucks, Buses at Lifesavers Conferences By Capt. Bob Powers, (ret.) Michigan State Police

CVSA actively promoted the Teens & Trucks program at the 2011 Lifesaver’s Conference. For those not familiar with this program, Teens and Trucks is part of the Operation Safe Driver initiative. This year’s Lifesaver’s conference, held March 27- 29 in Phoenix, Arizona, was attended by more than 1,800 persons from various agencies across North America. This event provided CVSA with an opportunity to educate representatives from law enforcement, the insurance industry, medical and injury prevention organizations, safety advocates, tribal community leaders, governor’s highway safety offices, transportation engineers, the trucking industry and many others about Operation Safe Driver, Teens and Trucks,

and other safety education programs offered by CVSA. It is estimated that CVSA made more than 400 contacts during the conference. The Teens and Trucks Digital Media Kit contains an 11 minute video, a student workbook, an instructor’s lesson plan, a case study and a Sharing the Road Tip Sheet. These media kits were in very high demand. Interest shown by Lifesaver’s attendees about ways to better educate young drivers in how to safely share the road with large trucks and buses was overwhelming and very encouraging. For more information about Operation Safe Driver and the Teens and Trucks program, please contact CVSA at 202-775-1623 or at ww.cvsa.org.

S TA F F N E W S

Gildea Joins CVSA as Director of Policy and Government Affairs CVSA recently hired Adrienne Gildea as Director of Policy and Government Affairs effective August 1, 2011. Gildea will replace Dick Henderson when he retires at the end of 2011. Gildea comes to the Alliance from Blakey & Agnew, LLC, a public affairs firm in Washington, DC, specializing in transportation, where she served as a Senior Associate. In that capacity, she was responsible for managing the Coalition for America’s Gateways and Trade Corridors (CAGTC). CAGTC was founded in 2001 and is dedicated to the expansion and modernization of America’s freight and goods movement infrastructure. Its members include leading transportation associations, major ports, trade corridors, state and local government agencies, and individual rail, trucking, and engineering companies. As CAGTC’s day-to-day manager,

she worked with more than 60 member organizations nationwide in building grassroots support to develop and execute strategy for the influence and passage of federal legislation. She has geared several successful media and Congressional awareness campaigns that have resulted in positive news coverage and feedback, including earned articles and opinion pieces. She also served as the CAGTC’s primary lobbyist, helping develop and execute CAGTC’s policy agenda. CAGTC’s efforts have resulted in multiple pieces of legislation representing CAGTC’s policy goals, as well as a greater understanding, on Capitol Hill and within the Administration, of the nation’s freight and goods movement needs. In addition, for the last year and a half, Gildea wrote a monthly column for Cargo Business News, a national trade publication, focusing on devel-

opments on Capitol Hill and the Surface Transportation Authorization process. Prior to her work on CAGTC, she interned with Podesta Mattoon, a prominent D.C. lobbying firm. Before Adrienne’s tenure with Podesta Mattoon, she served as both deputy press secretary and scheduler for the Scott Newton for Attorney General Campaign in Mississippi. In addition, she worked as a freelance journalist for both the Galveston Daily News, in Galveston, Texas, and the Rogersville Review, in East Tennessee. Gildea graduated from Tulane University with a B.A. in both Political Science and English and a minor in Philosophy. Adrienne and her family, including her six younger sisters, are originally from Memphis, Tennessee. She now lives with her husband on Capitol Hill.

17


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

COVER STORY

CVSA’s Roadcheck Keeps Commercial Vehicle Safety in Check Inspections Emphasize Importance of Vehicle, Driver Compliance to Drive Down Highway Deaths Results from CVSA's annual Roadcheck 2011, the three-day, commercial vehicle safety enforcement and education campaign held June 7-9, 2011, reveal that the commercial motor carrier and motor coach industries continue to improve the maintenance and safety of their operations, with overall out-of-service (OOS) rates being the lowest since Roadcheck began in 1988. “Although overall out-of-service rates are at record lows, there is room for improvement until the roads are free from vehicle and driver violations,” said CVSA's Executive Director Stephen A. Keppler. “Events that focus on ensuring vehicles and drivers are complying with the law, like Roadcheck and all roadside inspections, draw critical attention to out-of-service rates and are shown to also impact crash reductions.” Nearly 8,000 CVSA and FMCSA certified inspectors at 2,550 locations across North America performed 70,712 truck and bus inspections in 72 hours. Inspectors focused on the North American Standard (NAS) Level I inspection, motorcoach inspections, hours of service, and household goods (HHG) carriers. Once again, hours of service violations lead overwhelmingly as a percentage of all driver violations cited (52.5 percent of all driver out-of-service violations). The hours of service rules are designed to reduce driver fatigue, which may be a contributing factor in large truck and bus crashes. Inspectors also queried drivers of

18

their use of electronic logging devices; 14 percent were using them. An additional emphasis was placed on identifying carriers of household goods (HHG) operating “under-theradar” by using improperly marked rental vehicles and/or operating as a for-hire property carrier rather than HHG carrier. The 12 states that participated in the HHG focus activity identified 32 carriers that required enforcement action. During Roadcheck 2011 approximately 16 trucks or buses were inspected, on average, every minute for the 72 hours of the event. Drivers were pulled over or directed into weigh stations or other inspection locations and asked to show their commercial driver's license, medical examiner's certificate and record of duty status. Brakes, tires, lights and every major safety component of the truck or bus, plus proper load securement were also examined during Roadcheck. While Roadcheck has taken place every year since 1988, it is important to note that roadside inspections occur every day across North America, to the tune of more than 3.9 million in 2010. CVSA sponsors Roadcheck with FMCSA, Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA), Transport Canada, and the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation (Mexico). CVSA held its international press conference June 7, 2011, at a weigh station in Dumfries, VA. Speakers includ-

ed Anne Ferro, FMCSA Administrator, Col. Steven Flaherty, Virginia State Police Superintendant, John Saunders, Virginia DMV's Director of Transportation, Rob Abbott, American Trucking Associations Vice President of Safety Policy, Paul Oakley, American Moving and Storage Association Senior Vice President for Government Affairs, and Peter Pantuso, American Bus Association President. “Roadcheck is about law enforcement partners throughout North America working together for greater truck and bus safety,” said FMCSA Administrator Anne S. Ferro. “The fact is, federal, state, and provincial safety inspectors across the continent are on the job every day vigorously enforcing commercial vehicle and driver safety regulations. For all of us, that is our year-round mission and passion.” Roadcheck data from 2011 show the overall vehicle compliance rate at 80.7 percent (80.0 percent in 2010), with an overall driver compliance rate of 95.8 percent (95.6 percent from last year). For NAS Level I inspections, the compliance rates were up to 77.2 percent for vehicles (76.7 percent in 2010) and 96.3 percent for drivers (unchanged from 2010). In addition, there were 296 fewer safety belt violations in 2011 (863 vs. 1,159 in 2010). Inspections of passenger carrying vehicles found a vehicle compliance rate of 91.3 percent in 2011 vs. 91.0 percent in 2010. The motorcoach driver compliance rate was 97.4 percent – in 2010 it was 96.4 percent. Hazardous materials inspections resulted in a vehicle compliance rate of 82.1 percent (83.7 percent in 2010) and driver compliance rate of 97.5 percent (unchanged from previous year). There were 29,609 CVSA Decals issued to vehicles that passed the inspection, up from the number issued in 2010 (26,605).


Guardian

C

Yukon Territory Participates for First 48 Consecutive Hour Roadcheck by Julius Debuschewitz, Government of Yukon, Manager, National Safety Code

O

V

E

R

S

T

O

R

Y

Manitoba Infrastructure & Transportation’s Motor Carrier Division Ensures Passenger Safety Through Bus Inspections By Reg Wightman, Manitoba Infrastructure

For the first time ever, the Yukon Territory conducted a consecutive 48-hour road safety check stop in conjunction with British Columbia that saw officers from various departments take part. Part of an action plan devised by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Whitehorse “M” Division Traffic Services for National Road Safety Week, “Operation Mighty Escrow” took place at the junction of Highway 37 (Cassiar Highway) and the Alaska Highway on May 17 and 18, 2011. The check stop was manned by RCMP members from Fort Nelson, Terrace, and Smithers in British Columbia and RCMP members from Whitehorse and Watson Lake in the Yukon Territory. They were joined by Yukon and British Columbia officers from Environment Canada Wildlife Enforcement Division, Yukon Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Yukon and British Columbia Conservation Officers, as well as CVSA inspectors from both jurisdictions. According to RCMP Cpl. Shawn Pollard, every single private and commercial vehicle was stopped, and approximately 900 drivers were interviewed. While most private vehicles were in good shape and their drivers law-abiding, a total of 47 summary conviction tickets were issued for various violations. Three drivers were suspended for 24 hours and their vehicles impounded. A proceeds of crime investigation resulted in the seizure of $20,000 in cash; this investigation and three investigations under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act are still ongoing. CVSA inspectors conducted 61 Level I inspections on commercial vehicles. Eleven of these units (18 percent) were placed out of service due to mechanical problems, while 20 were restricted. Fifty critical inspection item defects were detected, and nine summary conviction tickets were issued. All participants agreed that the check stop was a worthwhile endeavor, and a similar operation at a different location is being planned. For Roadcheck 2011, Yukon again hosted two CVSA inspectors from Alaska. Both worked very hard at the Whitehorse Weigh Station and were a welcome addition to our inspection staff. RCMP Whitehorse “M” Division Traffic Services provided an officer for each inspection shift, who ran driver checks and also ordered a number of local trucks to report for inspection. Their help was very much appreciated, since many local carriers have special by-pass permits that allow them to conduct business in town without having to report to the scale unless ordered to do so. Both events again proved to all participants that joint ventures are extremely valuable. Officers learn a lot from each other, more legislation is enforced, and more inspections can be conducted.

and Transportation, CVSA Program Development Coordinator, Motor Carrier Division

Motor Carrier Enforcement CVSA Passenger Vehicle certified Officer Brad Kallert inspects a passenger carrying vehicle behind the Club Regent Casino as part of Roadcheck 2011.

In an effort to ensure the safe transportation of passengers traveling to and from area casinos, the Manitoba Lotteries Commission brokered an agreement with Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation’s Motor Carrier Division, to begin inspection of motorcoaches and buses. The Motor Carrier Division recently began working with the casino’s management, security and transportation groups, in an effort to make sure that the inspections caused as little disruption to the casino’s overall operations as possible. Passenger carrying vehicles from Manitoba and outside of Manitoba now all know that they could be subject to a CVSA inspection any time they enter onto the casino’s property. Understanding the safety issues related to the movement of passengers in North America, CVSA’s Region V and Manitoba is fully committed to ensuring passenger carrying vehicle enforcement throughout the region.

19


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Inspector’s Corner By Richard Robinson, Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Transportation Enforcement Officer, NAIC 2010 Grand Champion Richard Robinson

Another year has flown by and now the 2011 North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC) is fast approaching. As preparations in Orlando, FL come together, I cannot help but wonder what is in store for me. This year I am fortunate enough to again be able to attend Ontario’s Provincial competition as well as NAIC. However, this year my experience will be considerably different. Being last year’s champion for Ontario automatically signs me up to be one of the leads for our NSC Challenge Committee for this year’s competition. My main task was coming up with the test questions for the CVSA/general knowledge, hours of service, and dangerous goods tests. I have also been involved with organizing the Regional testing and issuing and marking the tests. This was quite the eye opener. I had no idea that there was so much work involved. The tests had to be challenging, but not so difficult that officers would not be able to complete them. This year, I will get to participate as a volunteer. The days of competing are

20

behind me and now I get to join the ranks of the hundreds of volunteers that work together to ensure the event goes off without a hitch. I will miss the stress and thrills of trying to find all of the defects under the constraints of a stopwatch, however, I am truly looking forward to seeing what happens behind the scenes. So, what have I taken from participating at NAIC and Ontario’s NSC Challenge? As a competitor, I have proven to others, but more importantly to myself, that I have the skills and knowledge to do my job efficiently and thoroughly. More importantly, I have revealed some of my weaknesses, which has allowed me to focus my attention and improve to become an even better officer. I got to spend time with other inspectors, as well as stakeholders, from across the continent and hear their thoughts and opinions and even share a few of my own. Exchanging stories with teammates, hearing what goes on in other jurisdictions, building friendships, and even helping out the people with

whom you are competing – this is what NAIC is all about. As a committee member, I have come to appreciate the dedication, hard work and long hours that go into making both events a success. This year at NAIC, I hope to walk away with meeting new people, making new friends, and a better understanding of the effect that CVSA has on the ever-growing trucking industry. To all who are competing this year in Orlando, I have the same piece of advice that I said in my first article: relax, have fun, and just take it all in. Whether it was through testing or being nominated by your supervisors, you have been chosen to represent your jurisdiction at NAIC. This is one of the few single events that can open the door to many opportunities. When it is all said and done, I encourage you to take part in any capacity you are able to in your home jurisdiction’s challenges, as well as NAIC. Congratulations to all of the competitors and good luck! I will see you in Orlando.


C

O

M

Guardian M

I

T

T

E

E

N

E

W

S

Pitts Enterprise Issues Recall for ABS Issue as a Result of CVSA Petition to NHTSA By Senior Trp. J. T. Bowling, Virginia State Police, CVSA Vehicle Committee, Vice-Chair

On February 6, 2011 the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) notified CVSA that Pitts Enterprise Trailers had initiated a recall of certain model semi-trailers for ABS systems that do not comply with the requirements of FMVSS 121 (Air Brake Systems). This issue came to light as a result of roadside inspectors identifying trailers which did not have an external ABS malfunction lamp as required in 49CFR 393.55(e). Examinations of the trailers revealed they had none of the components commonly found on air braked trailers equipped with ABS. The trailers also possessed an informational sticker indicating that pursuant to a Circuit Court ruling the external malfunction signal for ABS was not required on the vehicle. The system the trailers were equipped with did not meet the definition of an ABS system in 49CFR 393.5 and did not have the external lamp as required in 393.55(e).

393.55(e) Antilock brake systems. Exterior ABS malfunction indicator lamps for trailers. Each trailer (including a trailer converter dolly) manufactured on or after March 1, 1998, and subject to the requirements of paragraph (c)(2) of this section, shall be equipped with an ABS malfunction indicator lamp which meets the requirements of FMVSS No. 121 (49 CFR 571.121, S5.2.3.3). Based on the findings from the roadside inspectors,CVSA petitioned NHTSA to investigate and enforce the FMVSS manufacturing requirements established in §571.121 Standard No. 121; Air brake systems. As a result, NHTSA formally requested certification from Pitts, the

trailer manufacturer, to assure compliance with FMVSS No. 121. Pitts decided to conduct a recall and remedy campaign to address the noncompliance. Vehicles found roadside to be effected by this recall should be supplied with a copy of the recall letter outlined below. The letter identifies the effected units and proposed remedy and contact information for the manufacturer. A copy of the letter to CVSA from NHTSA along with the recall notice is also found in the “member services” area of the CVSA website on the Vehicle Committee webpage located in the 2011 Chicago Agenda file. The information is contained in Attachment 15 NHTSA_CVSA LetterPittsRecall.pdf within the agenda file.

393.5 Definitions Antilock Brake System or ABS. Means a portion of a service brake system that automatically controls the degree of rotational wheel slip during braking by: (1) Sensing the rate of angular rotation of the wheels; (2) Transmitting signals regarding the rate of wheel angular rotation to one or more controlling devices which interpret those signals and generate responsive controlling output signals; and (3)Transmitting those controlling signals to one or more modulators which adjust brake actuating forces in response to those signals.

21


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Avoiding Wheel Loss By Installing Them Right the First Time By Rolf VanderZwaag, Ontario Trucking Association, Manager, Maintenance & Technical Issues, CVSA Vehicle Committee Member

Losing one or more wheels from a commercial vehicle due to equipment or maintenance procedure failures relating to the wheel/fastener/drum interface can have catastrophic consequences. It's the kind of thing that causes nightmares in fleet operations and maintenance departments. When it does occur, it often results in a review of practices and procedures to determine how it could have occurred and how to avoid a repeat event. Too often this type of review fails to go deep enough to be effective. Here are three often seen partial measures likely indicating a fleet hasn't worked hard enough to identify the real problems: 1. The fleet installs colored indicators on the wheel nuts of their vehicles (more on this later). 2. They have a policy for conducting a re-torque of the wheels installed on a vehicle that does not include step by step wheel installation procedures-i.e., the re-torque procedures are left to the individual that works in the tire bay. 3. They fail to provide a written stepby-step procedure to an outside wheel/tire service provider or provide procedures but fail to conduct audits to make sure the steps are followed. A wheel loss event normally results from a combination of mistakes that, by themselves, may not cause a problem, but together result in tragedy. If there are multiple mistakes made and only one is identified and corrected, there is a false sense of security. It's likely the remaining mistakeseventually return as a new hazard. A successful review must really get into the detailed processes of almost all wheelend activity to identify and address the

22

factors that contributed to the loss of a wheel. Even fleets who have never suffered the loss of a wheel and are proactively trying to take the steps to make sure it never happens, need to conduct very detailed analyses of their wheel-end activities. The use of colored markers on wheel nuts is a likely indication that a fleet is not going far enough. The colored markers provide a visual indication, principally to drivers, when a wheel nut is turning. Retorquing only after seeing the colored markers turn falls well short an adequate, comprehensive review of a fleets procedures. The markers do make it easier for drivers (and technicians too) to spot a loose wheel nut. What seems to be missing here is any understanding of why the wheel nut becomes loose in the first place. All truck manufacturers recommend that fleets have a rigid procedure for conducting a follow-up check of wheel nuts after installation. Many fleets set up a program for identifying and documenting wheels that require some form of recheck to spot loose wheel nuts. However, it is very important that fleets also understand what may have caused the wheel nut to get loose so quickly in the first place. And often there is no instruction for what to do when a nut does turn when the re-check is conducted. In many cases the loose nuts are re-tightened and the job is considered complete, but this falls short of a follow up. The answer to avoiding wheel loss is installing the wheels right in the first place. Follow up and preventions steps are a complete waste of time when the installation isn't done properly. Since hub-piloted wheels are now virtually standard on commercial vehicles, the following information focuses on this type of wheel system.

The list that follows represents all items that need to be included in a proper installation of hubpiloted wheels, starting with the wheel end completely disassembled: 1. Make sure the wheel bolts are in good condition, the threads are properly cleaned, and there is no sign of deterioration or thread damage. If you know or suspect that the wheels have been overtightened in the past, replace the bolts. 2. Make sure the brake drum (or rotor) is properly seated against the hub. Use internally threaded sleeves to position the drum and keep it there (you can slide the wheels over the sleeves). There are a number of factors that need to be considered here. Is there dirt or rust between the two? Does the drum fit the hub correctly? Once the drum is in place, will it stay there while the wheels are installed? This also raises an important and problematic issue. The success of the wheel installation can be destroyed because of problems in the drum-to-hub interface, but do you want tire service technicians removing brake drums? 3. Make sure the brake drum and wheel mounting faces are clean, there is no excess paint, no rust and everything is in good condition. Rusty mounting faces are a major problem, so get them refurbished. Make sure any paint is good quality and is fully cured. 4. Make sure every component has been properly inspected and any questionable parts have been replaced and assemble the wheel(s) onto the hub. 5. Make sure the wheel bolts and nuts are properly lubricated. This


C

O

M

Guardian M

I

T

T

E

E

N

E

W

S

Comings & Goings

means a couple of drops of oil between each nut's flange and body, and at least a few drops of oil on the bolt threads. Use motor oil and apply it to the outer end of the treads, so that the nut will carry the oil with it down the entire length of the threads. 6. Tighten the nuts in stages starting with snugging all of them to about 50 ft. lb, then tighten them in sequence to 300 to 400 ft. lb. 7. Tighten the nuts to 500 ft. lb. using an accurate torque wrench. Don't over-tighten the nuts.

CVSA welcomes several new chairs this quarter and would like to recognize those outgoing chairs for their contributions to the Alliance. Lt. Don Bridge, Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles will serve as the new chair of Passenger Carrier Committee. Lt. Bridge replaces outgoing chair Tim Davis. Lt. Tom Fitzgerald, Massachusetts State Police, is the new chair appointed to lead the Driver-Traffic Enforcement Committee. Lt. Fitzgerald steps in for Capt. Dan Meyer who recently retired from the Kansas Highway Patrol. (See related article in Regional Rap.) Sgt. Tom Fuller, New York State Police, replaces Capt. Bruce Bugg as the new HazMat Committee

Check the wheel nuts 50 to 100 miles after installation. When any nut turns, check it again within an additional 50 to 100 miles. Chances are though that because the installation is done right, everything will be fine. If you do the installation right, you don't need pointers on your wheel nuts because they'll stay tight. If you don't do the installation right, you won't need the pointers either because, they won't save you. If you have anybody else install your wheels, you need to be absolutely sure they have written instructions on how you want it done. And you better check that it's done right. Some fleets just decide not to trust anyone and they disassemble every wheel serviced on the road, and go over the details themselves after it gets back to their terminal. If you want a resource for wheel safety, contact CVSA for a copy of “Practical Tire and Wheel Service.” This is a 96page handbook that covers all wheel types and is used for training tire service technicians.

Lt. Don Bridge

Lt. Tom Fitzgerald

Chair. Capt. Bugg of the Georgia Department of Public Safety Motor Carrier Compliance Division (MCCD) steps down from this position after serving since 2003. The HazMat Committee sets policies and procedures concerning inspections of HazMat shipments throughout North America. Capt. Bugg will continue to serve the state of Georgia and CVSA, in regards to commercial vehicle enforce-

Capt. Bruce Bugg

ment and hazardous materials transportation. During his 24-plus year career he has been a true professional in every sense of the word. Among his many other accomplishments he served as the National Chair for the Cooperative Hazardous Material Enforcement Development Program (COHMED) during 2003-2004 after being involved since 1992. He also continues to serve as the Governor’s designee regarding pre-notifications of high level radioactive shipments passing through Georgia. He is the Governor’s designee to various boards and committees recommending policies and practices for transuranic waste shipments, Chairman of the Olympic Planning Committee regarding HazMat safety and security for the 1996 summer games, as well as a member of numerous other boards and committees affecting the safety of the motoring public. For all of these reasons, he was honored with the CVSA Presidential Award for outstanding service in 2006 and his contributions will be greatly missed at CVSA.

23


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

REGIONAL NEWS

South Carolina Implements New Intrastate CMV Program Designed to Make State Roads Safer

V

By South Carolina Department of Public Safety, State Transport Police Division

IV

I

III II

REGION I Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, US Virgin Islands, and Vermont.

REGION II Alabama, American Samoa, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

REGION III Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Northern Mariana Islands, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

REGION IV Alaska, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Mexico, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

REGION V Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, and Yukon.

24

The South Carolina Department of Public Safety’s State Transport Police division will begin implementation of a new program for intrastate commercial motor vehicles that is designed to make state roads and highways safer. The Motor Carrier Registration program will require all intrastate motor carriers to obtain SC Intrastate DOT numbers and display those numbers on all of their commercial vehicles. There is no cost to the companies to obtain the numbers. “This is not a new law,” explained South Carolina Department of Public Safety Director Mark Keel. “This was adopted by South Carolina when the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations were adopted. At that time, the US Department of Transportation (USDOT) did not have the technology to process intrastate numbers. That technology is now in place and the law will be enforced.” “The issuance of an intrastate DOT number does not subject commercial motor carriers to additional or different safety requirements,” said Col. Nick Moore, commanding officer of the State Transport Police. “The intrastate number is one of the components of a quality program that allows law enforcement to efficiently assess and track a commercial motor carrier’s safety rating by tying the vehicles in a fleet to a common identifying number,” he said. Only those companies doing business solely within South Carolina - intrastate are required to obtain SCDOT numbers. Companies that operate in multiple states

- interstate - are required to have USDOT numbers. A company would be required to obtain a SCDOT number if it operates a commercial motor vehicle that: 1) Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating, or gross vehicle weight or gross combination weight of 10,001 pounds or more; or 2) Is designed or used to transport more than eight (8) passengers, including the driver for compensation; or 3) Is designed or used to transport more than 15 passengers, including the driver, and is not used to transport passengers for compensation; or 4) Is used in transporting hazardous materials as defined under federal law. This requirement is not limited to “trucking companies.” As defined by law, a “motor carrier” is any commercial enterprise that uses such vehicles in its business operations and as a result it is subject to Federal Motor Carrier Safety regulations. The program goes into effect October 1, 2011, which will allow intrastate motor carriers adequate time to obtain the required numbers and appropriately mark their vehicles. After that date, failure to register, obtain and display the SCDOT number will subject the carrier to a $100 fine per occurrence. South Carolina will become the 38th state to require in Intrastate DOT number. During the 2009 calendar year, 32 percent of commercial motor vehicle collisions in South Carolina involved at least one intrastate carrier. In that same year, 20 percent of CMV fatalities resulted from a collision involving at least one interstate carrier.


R

E

Guardian

G

I

O

N

A

L

N

E

W

S

Ten States Recognized As Nationwide Leaders in Reducing Truck Crashes By New Mexico Department of Public Safety, Motor Transportation Division

Indiana, New Mexico, Washington, California, Arizona, Michigan, Kentucky, Iowa, Maryland and Nevada were recognized as Top Tier States in the recently released study Predicting Truck Crash Involvement by the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI). New Mexico placed 2nd nationwide in having the most effective traffic enforcement program aimed at reducing the number of truck crashes. New Mexico had previously received the honor of placing 4th nationwide when ATRI published their 2005 truck crash predictor research. In an effort to identify those states that have the most effective enforcement strategies, ATRI developed an objective performance measure that relates the relative percent of truck traffic enforcement to the relative percent of truck crashes that occurred within each state. State data analysis indicates a direct correlation of reduced truck crashes with increased traffic enforcement. The top ten tier states identified by ATRI as having the most effective traffic enforcement programs are: New Mexico has seen a steady decline in serious truck crashes from 24.6 per 100 million vehicle miles driven in 2005 to 15.8 per 100 million vehicle miles driven in 2009. Truck-related fatalities also decreased during this period from 2.04 to 1.37 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles driven. Enforcement activities increased from 60,226 safety inspections and 29,117 traffic citations in 2005 to 129,408 safety inspections and 55,190 traffic citations in 2009. “New Mexico’s declining truck crash rate may be attributed not only to increased overall traffic enforcement but to identifying those specific factors that are the primary contributors to motor

vehicles crashes and concentrating on addressing those contributing factors in selective traffic enforcement planning, said MTPD Deputy Chief Mark Rowley.” “We must understand which commercial driver behaviors are most likely to lead to future crash involvement if we are going to have an effective crash reduction program. ATRI has demonstrated through extensive research that driver behaviors such as improper passing, failure to signal, speeding over 15 mph, failure to obey traffic sign/signal, improper lane change and following too closely significantly increase the likelihood of being involved in a crash. Improper passing violations alone increased the likelihood of being involved in a crash by 88 percent. Prior convictions for failure to use/improper signal increased the likelihood of a future crash by 96 percent. Consequently, driver behavior statistics supplied by ATRI coupled with data obtained from past crashes are essential in planning an effective crash reduction program.” New Mexico’s successful traffic enforcement program incorporates the four components identified by ATRI: • Center on aggressive driving apprehension programs/initiatives. • Target both commercial motor vehicle and non-commercial motor vehicle behavior patterns. • Utilize both highly visible and covert enforcement activities.

• Incorporate an internal performancebased system for managing enforcement by specific crash types, driver behaviors and locations. “The decline in New Mexico’s truck crash rate is also a result of the motor carrier industry taking a proactive approach in managing driver behaviors,” said Secretary Gorden E. Eden, Jr. “The motor carrier industry in New Mexico is very safety conscious and has developed proactive measures and strategies to ensure that their trucks and drivers on our highways are safe.” “Selectivity in hiring, safety incentive programs, safety awareness programs, driver reviews, continuous training and emphasizing company goals and expectations are attributes found in safety-oriented trucking companies.” “It is essential for law enforcement and the motor carrier industry to work together as partners in managing and enforcing driver behavior to effectively reduce truck crashes.” The complete report from ATRI may be found by visiting: http://www.atrionline.org/index.php?option=com_content&view= article&id=58&Itemid=69, clicking on the “Predicting Truck Crash Involvement: A 2011 Update” icon and requesting a copy of the report. Additional information on New Mexico motor carriers may be found by visiting the New Mexico Trucking Association website at: http://www.nmtrucking.org.

25


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

New State-of-the-Art Weigh Station Employs New Technologies to Help South Carolina Focus on Non-Compliant Motor Carriers By South Carolina Department of Public Safety, State Transport Police Division

The South Carolina Department of Public Safety and the South Carolina Department of Transportation held a ground-breaking ceremony Friday, January 14, 2011 on Interstate 95 for a state-of-the-art commercial motor vehicle weigh-in-motion facility. The S.C. Department of Transportation provided the land for the weigh station that will be located near mile marker 74 on northbound I-95 in Dorchester County. The weigh station will be built in what was an unused truck parking area. Actual construction on the project is expected to be completed in midOctober. The station, which will cost $6.2 million, will be maintained by the State Transport Police, a division of the S.C. Department of Public Safety. “We must continue to use technology to improve enforcement of commercial laws and regulations with the objective of targeting unsafe, non-compliant commercial motor vehicle operators,” SCDPS Director Mark Keel said. “This will help the state meet the goals of improving highway safety and reducing highway fatalities involving commercial motor vehicles.” Keel also pointed out that one

26

of primary missions of the Transport Police is the prevention of premature deterioration of our roads and bridges through the STP Size and Weight Enforcement Program. \Overweight trucks tend to do more damage to highways that aren’t designed to handle the heavier loads. Secretary of Transportation H.B. Limehouse Jr. said, “This is another example of SCDOT and SCDPS working together to improve the safety and efficiency of our highway system.” “The Interstate 95 corridor is an important factor in commerce and tourism; it passes through more states than any other interstate highway,” said Col. Napoleon “Nick” Moore, commanding officer of the State Transport Police. He noted that the “technology infrastructure built into this facility will allow STP to focus our efforts on the non-compliant motor carriers.” The new facility will have the latest electronic screening technology installed on the travel lanes of Interstate 95. Through the weigh-in-motion facilities, STP officers can capture and record weights as vehicles drive over an actual scale built into the roadway.

These systems are capable of measuring at normal traffic speeds without requiring vehicles drive at reduced speeds or come to a complete stop. The project also includes improvements to the entrance and exit ramps and inspection facilities including an inspection shed and scale house. Rick Todd, President and CEO of the South Carolina Trucking Association, said the weighin-motion facility “will do everything state and federal governments want with respect to truck weight, safety, tax and registration compliance. It is a wise investment, representing a good use of physical, financial and human resources.” SCDPS provided the design services and will provide construction inspection services. SCDOT provided project design oversight and coordination with state and federal officials. STP currently operates two weigh-in motion sites. Those stations are on Interstate 85 near Townville and Interstate 26 near Harleyville. These sites differ from the Interstate 95 site in that commercial motor vehicles are required to leave the highway, slow to be weighed and then re-enter interstate traffic.


R

E

Guardian

G

I

O

N

A

L

N

E

W

S

Spotlight on Idaho State Police Commercial Vehicle Safety, HazMat Division By Capt. Bill Reese, Idaho State Police, Commander, Commercial Vehicle Safety and Hazardous Materials Division

The Idaho State Police, Commercial Vehicle Safety and Hazardous Materials Division are likely one of the smallest Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Programs in the nation. But, don’t let the small size fool you. With limited personnel and resources they accomplish a lot. When the division is fully staffed, it’s comprised of only 22 commissioned officers and four civilian support staff. The officers complete roadside inspections, safety audits, compliance reviews, post crash inspections, hazardous materials response and mitigation, Level VI inspections, motor coach inspections, public outreach, and assist the Idaho State Police Patrol Division with emergency calls for service. The division is broken down into three teams of five to six officers, each led by a Sergeant. Two teams focus on commercial vehicle safety and one team focuses on hazardous materials. These Sergeants report to Lt. Jim Eavenson who is in charge of field operations. The field officers in the division hold the rank of Specialist, due to the additional training they must attend and the additional responsibilities associated with the assignment. So, it is a promotion when an officer comes into the division. Openings in the division are rare and when they do occur there are usually multiple, very qualified troopers, who apply to be part of this distinctive division. A major commitment for our division is the Level VI Inspection Program. Southeast Idaho is the home of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a very large U.S. Department of Energy site. Six days per week the INL ships Transuranic Radioactive Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. Each of these shipments

must pass a Level VI CVSA inspection before it is allowed on public highways. Two officers are assigned to inspect these shipments. This important assignment requires significant resources from our small program but the commitment has paid off. These shipments have one of the safest records in the country. One recent and notable public outreach effort was our Safety Days, held April 26 and 27. The division’s Project Coordinator, Tecia Ferguson, suggested the idea after reviewing some crash data. She noted that our crash data showed an above average number of drivers between 15 and 25 years old are involved in crashes with commercial vehicles. This group of drivers comprises only 6.1 percent of Idaho drivers, but they are involved in 15.6% of the crashes. In 2009, 11.5% of commercial vehicle crashes involved a teenage driver. Ms. Ferguson applied for a high priority grant to put on the two-day event. The target group was teen drivers in Ada and Canyon Counties, our two most populace counties. We also invited civic and church groups and the general public. The events included: • A driving simulator that simulates distracted or impaired driving. • Seatbelt demonstrations. • DUI demonstrations. • Texting while driving golf carts through an obstacle course. • Riding tricycles through an obstacle course with goggles that simulate impairment. • The American Trucking Associations’ Road Safety Team, who brought their No-Zone truck and demonstrated blind spots around a commercial vehicle. • Presentations by Nurse Pam and Sgt. Rausch.

The highlight of the event was the two hour presentation by Pam Holt, an emergency room nurse from Missouri, and Sgt. Robert Rausch from the Idaho State Police (ISP), Pocatello office. Prior to joining the ISP, Sgt. Raush was a Nurse Practitioner; a certification he still holds. The medical background that Pam and Robert share gives them a unique perspective which they shared with the teen drivers. The teens heard what happens during a crash. What happens in the hospital after the crash, and the lifelong effects of some injuries. Holt and Raush gave their presentations three times each day. After the event, we received a letter from one teacher who had brought her class. In part her letter said, “Every aspect of the event impacted the students in a dynamic way. For example, before the event there were several students who freely admitted to not buckling their seatbelts. When I asked what would they never forget (after attending the event), buckling their seatbelts was the first thing they mentioned.” Because our division is so small, we have made a concentrated effort to balance inspections and enforcement with carrier education and compliance. Our Safety Audit and Compliance Review Specialists use their on-site carrier visits as opportunities to influence fleet safety. Our Specialists are also directly involved with the Idaho Trucking Association’s Safety Council and various truck driving schools in our state. We might have limited resources in Idaho but we use those resources to make Idaho and our nation a safer place. “Saving lives through excellence and efficiency in commercial vehicle and hazardous materials transportation and safety”

27


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Nebraska State Patrol Identifies Need, Develops Post-Crash Inspection Course By Trp. Pedram Nabegh, Nebraska State Patrol

When a Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) is involved in a serious crash, multiple entities with different interests get involved. Regardless of their particular point of view, they all seek the truth in order to facilitate a just and fair outcome which can only be facilitated with a thorough investigation. In Nebraska (particularly with the Nebraska State Patrol) such investigations are facilitated by three separate individuals. The first is the case officer, ultimately responsible for the entire crash investigation. The second is the Crash Reconstructionist; the expert responsible for determining the cause of the crash. However, when a CMV is involved the vehicle components and driver requirements far exceed the Reconstructionist’s expertise. That’s when the third investigator is activated. The third expert is the Post Crash Inspector. These individuals are specifically trained in conducting forensic examinations of crashed CMVs. The purpose of the Post Crash Inspection (PCI) is to determine any and all contributing factors from the CMV components, CMV driver, and possibly the CMV carrier. In turn, they are able to generate a more thorough North American Standard (NAS) Level I inspection. Given the complexity and importance of these investigations, it is difficult to believe that in 2008 there was no course anywhere in the United States to train Post Crash Inspectors. Having identified the need for and lack of training in Post Crash Inspections, the Carrier Enforcement Division of the Nebraska State Patrol (NSP) began to develop its Post Crash Inspection Course. NSP held its first PCI Course in October of 2009, followed by a second in May of 2011. Feedback from the attending students affirmed the importance and high quality of education received.

28

Development of the [course] … is a testament to industry and government working cooperatively… CMV crashes involve a variety of interested entities. They include prosecutors, defense attorneys, the criminal/civil courts, carriers, insurance companies, and injured victims. Due to the additional size and momentum of CMVs, such crashes can be more devastating both physically and emotionally to all parties involved. Evidence and contributing factors should be documented professionally, accurately, and completely. To do so, investigators need the proper tools and knowledge base. Being a NAS Level I-certified inspector gives students the basic foundation needed to facilitate a Level I Inspection. The NSP Post Crash Inspection Course builds on that foundation and gives them the specific expertise needed for a methodical and through forensic examination. The end results, through either criminal or civil processes, are therefore based on all and not just some of the facts. The NSP Post Crash Inspection Course plays a major factor in facilitating the pursuit of truth. Data gathered from Post Crash Inspections will not only facilitate a more thorough investigation of the crash, the collected data may be used to identify and focus enforcement actions to reduce the

occurrence and severity of CMV crashes. In addition, the data can be used to identify manufacturing/design defects, or possible carrier practices which may lead to contributing factors. A fully-loaded cement truck crested a hill approaching a controlled intersection of two major roadways. The cement truck failed to stop in time and enters the intersection under a red light, broad-siding a motorcycle resulting in the death of both of its occupants. The initial interview of the driver of the truck resulted in the statement that the truck failed to stop appropriately upon making the brake application. During the Post Crash Inspection, the inspector discovered that while the push rod travel was within appropriate limitations the brake linings on the rear axle of the truck were failing to make contact with the drums. Without any defects noticed through the inspection of the remaining visible brake components, the inspector disassembled the rear brake canisters and observed a substantial amount of sand compacted within the canisters. The compacted canisters prohibited appropriate force to be applied. A subsequent compliance review led to the inspection of the company’s remaining vehicles. This resulted in 90 percent of the vehicles being placed out of service and identifying the cause of the contributing factor. The practice of the carrier’s drivers was upon returning to the yard, the vehicles would back into a sand pile and clean out any remaining product. Without the dust plugs being in place on the rear canisters, each vehicle’s canisters were packed with sand, jeopardizing the integrity of the brakes. Four days of the week long Post Crash Inspection Course consists of a four-hour block of classroom instruction, followed by a four-hour block conducting actual Post


R

Crash Inspections. One evening block is conducted in order to allow the students to experience the challenges of conducting night time inspections. The Post Crash Inspection Course was designed to replicate real life scenarios and to expose students to as many scenarios as possible during the week. The course provides four to five separate staged wrecked vehicles to be inspected. The vehicles were positioned as they may have been found at the scene; some were even tipped over on their side, thus replicating the challenges students will face in actual Post Crash Inspections. Students practice critical thinking skills and learn how to determine the correct course of action in collecting their data. Examples of this are how to supply air pressure to brake chambers when the vehicle(s) are not operational and how to determine if a defect was present before the crash or caused by it. Additionally, students practice evidence preservation by learning how to properly document their actions and observations. Students are provided with a book containing all PowerPoint presentations and course materials used during the class. This facilitates easy note-taking materials, and the resources needed to address questions in the field well after the course is completed. The student books also include a DVD ROM containing all course material in PDF format. The Nebraska State Patrol has developed a data collection form for Post Crash Inspections. The form is used during the scenarios (and for actual inspections) in order to examine all portions of the CMV. Since the form is continuously being developed, it

E

Guardian

G

is provided electronically in Excel format for students on their DVD Roms. This resource allows students to change the form to meet the needs of their particular agency. The classroom instruction portion of the course consisted of the following items; • Evidence Considerations - This prepares students with the correct mindset that a crash is a crime scene, and the CMV is their evidence. Crime scene procedures, evidence recognition, preservation, documentation and collection were some of the highlights of this class. • Photography - Outlines how a digital camera “sees the world,” basic camera operations, and night time photography techniques. • Vehicle Mechanics - Focusing particularly on brake components and ABS functions. This block of instruction was presented by a representative of Bendix, a manufacturer of brake components which exposed students to the minutia details of brake systems, from the manufacturer’s perspective. It was the block of instruction that sets the course above and beyond any other similar class. • ECM - included instructions of preventing data loss from Engine Control Modules • EOBR/AOBRD - how to obtain, handle, and interpret electronic log data • FMCSA - the capabilities and resources of the FMCSA and how they can assist the Post Crash inspector. • Driver Impairment Awareness - DUI and DUID, driver fatigue and sleep

I

O

N

A

L

N

E

W

S

apnea, and driver focus and interviewing. • Special Problems - outlining how to design and conduct a research project as it relates to CMVs and Post Crash Inspections Personnel from various outside agencies have attended the NSP PCI course. Attending Troopers and Inspectors from Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, South Dakota, and Wyoming have provided positive and supportive evaluations of the course. Student feedback is not dismissed, but rather used to influence future courses. Feedback from the 2009 participants was directly used to improve the 2011 curriculum. The course teaching philosophy was modeled after successful forensic programs. Forensic science depends on the expertise of various professions. The application of any scientific area of study to legal matters defines Forensic Science. Because of this definition, whenever possible, each class was instructed by an available expert in the associated topic and instructors used for each practical scenario were experienced Post Crash Inspectors. This teaching method provided students with up-to-date information from qualified instructors. In our society the quest for knowledge often depends on funding. People’s time and resources tend to be measured with dollars and cents. Development of the NSP Post Crash Inspection Course proved that those who seek the truth know its value. The course is a testament to industry and government working cooperatively, devoting their time and resources. The need for the Post Crash Inspection Course is self evident. The Nebraska State Patrol will pursue the continual development of this course, adapting it as needed to CMV manufacturing methods and emerging technologies. These goals cannot be met without the dedication, cooperation, and investments made by both industry and government. Inspectors must always strive for methodical, thorough, and forensic examinations. Seeking truth brings justice to bear, all for the good of the public.

29


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Washington State Patrol Address CMV Safety Concerns on Rails and Roads By Washington State Patrol, Commercial Vehicle Division

In 2011, Troopers Chris Hooper and Paul Rogojin of the Washington State Patrol saw the need to increase commercial vehicle enforcement in the Port of Seattle area based on the number of vehicles inspected being placed out of service and lack of licensing. Union Pacific and BNSF Railroad Police met with Troopers Hooper and Rogojin advising them there are numerous safety violations involving vehicular traffic and pedestrians at grade crossings. Their concerns were numerous and included CMVs stopping on the tracks;

running railroad (RR) crossings while the train is crossing the intersection; hauling HazMat loads failing to stop at RR crossings; Passenger vehicles running crossings while trains are approaching/in crossing; as well as pedestrians trespassing on RR property, crossing tracks at undesignated locations, and climbing on or through trains. In order to address the issues, a partnership was formed between the two major railroads companies and the WSP. Additional partnerships were formed with other agencies from numerous

jurisdictions. The overall goal was established to increase freight mobility and the safety of the general public. The partnership intends to: Set up a multi-agency enforcement team (task force/strike team) to regulate commercial vehicle traffic within and around the Ports of Washington; Assist the railroad with the rail crossing enforcement statewide; Show how this project can also increase safety pertaining to Homeland Security; Fund full-time positions; and combine resources to make our state infrastructure safer.

Ticketing Aggressive Cars and Trucks in Utah By Sr. Trooper Rick Oaks, Utah Highway Patrol, TACT Program Manager, CVSA 2011 International Safety Team Leader

As part of a federally-funded program the state of Utah has identified four major inappropriate driving behaviors which contribute to accidents involving commercial motor vehicles with other vehicles traveling on our roadways. The four areas identified were: Following to close or tail gating; improper lane change; failure to yield; and speeding. Through this program we have been able to develop educational outreach programs and activities to try and help the motoring public become more aware of their responsibilities in driving in and around commercial motor vehicles. Making the public aware that a commercial motor vehicle cannot stop in the same distance as a car, or that commercial motor vehicles have blind spots are just of few of the messages provided.

30

Our messages are delivered through tv and radio ride alongs and ads as well as billboards. The trucking industry also has donated two 53 foot trailers, which have been wrapped with safety messages, and travel daily on our roadways and freeways. Our program also includes enforcement activities whereby vehicles identified as demonstrating inappropriate behaviors are stopped. During each of these stops the driver is given an educational pamphlet. Warnings and or citations are also given out depending on the circumstances. Are we making a difference because of this program and our efforts? The numbers say ‘yes,’ as accidents involving commercial motor vehicles with other vehicles are down dramatically.


R

Michigan State Police Increase Truck Enforcement Operations By Michigan State Police, Traffic Safety Division

E

Guardian

G

I

O

N

A

L

N

E

W

S

Florida Motor Carrier Compliance Office Conducts Motor Coach Inspection Detail in Orlando By Lt. Jeff Frost, Florida Department of Transportation, Motor Carrier Compliance Office

Working under a grant from the Michigan Truck Safety Commission, Michigan State Police (MSP) motor carrier officers will work specialized truck enforcement team (STET) operations until September 30, 2011. During these STET operations, motor carrier officers will conduct traffic stops on commercial motor vehicles (CMV) in areas identified as having a high CMV crash rate. The operations will focus on driver-related behaviors that have proven to contribute to CMV crashes, such as speed, lane usage, following improperly, disobeying a traffic control device and improper turning. Additionally, officers will be checking driver credentials and vehicle equipment to ensure compliance with state and federal regulations. Motorists are likely to see motor carrier officers working in and around rest areas and other safe enforcement sites throughout the state. It is important that all motorists remember these and other key factors regarding truck safety: • Avoid lingering in a truck’s blind spots (if you cannot see a driver’s face in his/her mirror, it is likely the driver cannot see you). • Do not pass a truck within one mile of your planned exit to avoid crossing too closely in the truck’s lane of travel. • Share the road with respect and courtesy. “To help ensure safe travel this summer, it is essential that commercial vehicles and passenger drivers alike drive in a respectful manner, buckle up and adhere to traffic laws,” said Capt. Harold Love, Commander of the MSP Traffic Safety Division and a member of the Michigan Truck Safety Commission. The Michigan Truck Safety Commission is committed to enhancing truck safety by providing truck driver education and training, heightening all drivers’ awareness of the operational characteristics and limitations of trucks, initiating data collection and research and supporting enforcement of motor carrier safety laws.

The Florida Department of Transportation Office of Motor Carrier Compliance (OMCC) conducted a motor coach inspection detail during high school Grad Night festivities at a major Orlando area theme park. Grad Night is an exclusive all night event for graduating high school classes. During the event, which took place over two weekends in April and May, high school students from throughout Florida attended, most traveling by charter bus An operational plan was developed by Capt. Melinda Connell and her staff working closely with park officials. This included a flyer that informed carriers entering the park that MCCO personnel were onsite and conducting inspections, and a list of companies that could be contacted by carriers with out of service violations for back up support. Message boards identifying the inspection area, traffic cones and lighting devices were provided by the park. As the buses entered the park officers randomly selected buses, collected the driver’s paper work and placed a decal on the windshield identifying the bus as being selected for inspection. After dropping off passengers the buses were directed back to the inspection area. A Performance Based Brake Testing (PBBT) machine was utilized over both weekends. This equipment allows officers to verify the safety and performance of the brakes on motor coaches that would not have been able to be checked during a nighttime enforcement detail. Over the course of the event 26 Department of Transportation/Motor Carrier Compliance officers and three FMCSA agents participated in the detail. Officers conducted 291 inspections placing 26 vehicles and 20 drivers out of service. Officers also issued safety and registration penalties in the amount of $5,215.00. This is the sixth consecutive year that an inspection detail was conducted during this event which consistently receives positive comments from drivers, passengers, and park officials on a successful and professional operation.

31


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

LOCAL MEMBER NEWS

Pittsburgh Police Team Up With York Canadian Police to Conduct Commercial Vehicle Blitz By Officer R. Thomas Jacques, Pittsburgh (PA) Bureau of Police, MCSAP Coordinator

The seventh annual York Regional Police/ Ministry of Transportation commercial vehicle blitz was held on April 27th and 28th. Over 75 law enforcement officers from nine different government and police agencies converged on Canada’s Wonderland Park at 6 a.m. on April 27th – All had one goal in mind ‘Commercial Vehicle Safety.’ This year’s two-day event started with great weather but ended with gale force winds which forced not only the closing of the inspection site but also numerous highways in southern Ontario. On day one, 205 vehicles were inspected by CVSA-certified inspectors. Of these, 66 were placed out of service. Outof-service violations which were detected ranged from brakes, cargo securement, and lighting systems. A total of 141 violations were found on the vehicles inspected. Day one also proved industry is doing a better job. 139 vehicles passed inspections and CVSA decals were placed on the inspected vehicles. Vehicles were pulled into the inspection site and at times had to wait for an

open inspector. The drivers seemed to understand the importance of the vehicle inspections. I walked around and talked to numerous drivers as they were being inspected. The drivers I spoke to understood how important law enforcement’s role is and were eager to learn from the officers on site. Yes, this year had an international flair. The York Regional Police Service recently joined CVSA as a local member. York Regional Service is the first local Canadian department to join CVSA. Spearheaded by Sgt. Jim Slykhuis of the York Regional Police Service, an invitation was sent to the Local Committee to participate in this year’s Blitz. Myself and three other Pittsburgh Police MCSAP inspectors made the trip to assist and learn. It was a pleasure to see an inspection detail of this size and magnitude. The inspectors I worked with are the finest in the CVSA community. An opportunity like this comes along maybe once in an officer’s career. The Canadian departments have been asked to participate in an annual

safety event held in Pittsburgh scheduled for later this summer. Day two of the Blitz started with 60 kmh winds. Understanding this was an event which was entirely geared toward safety a decision had to be made to stop the inspections of vehicles as mother nature started to take over. The Ontario Provincial Police were called to assist with numerous tractor trailers which were blown over due to the high winds. “We drove by five tractor trailers which were blown over as we attempted to make it back to the States” says Adam Elardo with the Pittsburgh Police Department. “Past Wonderland Blitz’s had in excess of 500 commercial vehicles inspected in the two day event. Unfortunately mother nature took control and we had to suspend operations” stated Sgt. Slykhuis. “With the continued support we have from the Ministry of Transportation and our own Command Staff we hope to make up for day two in September of this year. We will also be looking forward to our eighth annual event in April of 2012,” said Sgt. Slykhuis.

Grand Prairie, Texas, Police Department Joins CVSA By Inv. Wes Bement, Grand Prairie (TX) Police Department The Grand Prairie Police Department Commercial Motor Vehicle Enforcement Unit in Texas has been an active MCSAP agency since 2008 and recently joined as an enforcement member of CVSA. The team of two officers, Wes Bement and Mark Calvert inspect over 500 vehicles each year. Officer Bement is certified to conduct HM inspections for all categories and Officer Calvert will soon be attending the courses for HM inspections. Additionally, both officers plan on becoming passenger vehicle certified as well. The Unit, which is supervised by Sgt. Eric Hansen participates in national programs such as Roadcheck and Operation Airbrake. Officer Bement has also helped other agencies in Texas, such as Longview, Killeen, Mansfield, Grapevine, and Hurst, get their DOT programs up and running. The City of Grand Prairie currently has a population of about 175,000 and covers approximately 82 square miles. These officers’

32

are responsible for enforcing the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations, applicable Texas laws, and ordinances for the City of Grand Prairie. Recently, both officers attended a regional competition to select two officers to attend the Texas Challenge. This is the first year that municipal officers have been allowed to participate in Texas. Officer Bement took 2nd place in the regional challenge held in Fort Worth, Texas, in March. He will be heading to College Station in June for the state competition. The unit actively participates in local safety councils in the DFW area and has given presentations to drivers at local companies such as Poly-America and Cardinal Trucking. Grand Prairie’s goal is to reduce the number of commercial vehicle crashes and promote safety in the trucking industry through education and enforcement by partnering with our local trucking companies and shippers.


R

E

Guardian

G

I

O

N

A

L

N

E

W

S

REGIONAL RAP

WISCONSIN STATE PATROL MOTOR CARRIER ENFORCEMENT ANNOUNCES PERSONNEL CHANGES

CCMTA RECOGNIZES PETER HURST, BOB DOLYNIUK AT ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The Wisconsin State Patrol announced personnel changes in its Motor Carrier Enforcement Section (MCES) this June. Both Capt. Charles Lorentz and Lt. Patti Hansen both announced their retirements. Capt. Lorentz’s last day was June 10. Lt. Hansen’s last day was June 24. The interim contact for the section will be Maj. Sandra Huxtable. Capt. Lorentz started his career as an Enforcement Cadet in 1984 with the Wisconsin State Patrol Academy and was assigned as an Inspector in Eau Claire immediately following his graduation. He was promoted in 1990 to the rank of Inspector Sergeant in Madison then transferred to Eau Claire a year later where he would serve until 2006 when he was promoted to MCES Lieutenant at Division headquarters in Madison. In 2008 Capt. Lorentz was promoted to MCES Captain. During his service, he was responsible for statewide CMV programs including: MCSAP (Inspection, Compliance Review, New Entrant); Size/Weight; State Mandated Inspection Programs (school bus, motor coach, human service vehicle). “I thank CVSA for all the support it has given to the Wisconsin Motor Carrier Enforcement Program. CVSA is a difference maker – CVSA saves lives. May your success continue,” Chuck Lorentz. Lt. Hansen started with the Patrol in 1984 and was subsequently promoted to the rank of Sergeant in 1988 and Lieutenant in 1993. Lt. Hansen supervised regional State Patrol trooper and motor carrier operations until 2000 when she was transferred to Central headquarters in Madison to work in MCES. After a brief reassignment to the Bureau of Transportation Safety 2002-2004, she was reassigned to Motor Carriers in 2004 with oversight of state motor carrier operations. From 2007-2010 she oversaw of Federal Motor Carrier operations, personnel and facility operations for the northern 2/3 of Wisconsin. In 2010, she supervised all state and federal motor carrier operations for the State of Wisconsin under Capt. Lorentz. Lt. Hansen reports that her retirement will consist of traveling to MN, SD and all points where the fishing, golfing and Harley weather cooperate.

Pictured – Top Left: Steve Martin, 2010-2011 CCMTA President, presented Peter Hurst, Director, Ontario Ministry of Transportation, with the Distinguished Service Award in recognition of outstanding contributions as Chair of the Standing Committee on Compliance and Regulatory Affairs (2009-2011). Top Right: Steve Martin, 20102011 CCMTA President, presented Bob Dolyniuk, Executive Director, Manitoba Trucking Association with the Associate Member Award in recognition of outstanding contributions to CCMTA (May 2011). Bottom: Bob Dolyniuk, Executive Director, Manitoba Trucking Association, Toronto Police Service Scott Baptist, Kent Speiran, Manager Asset Management, Department of Transportation & Infrastructure Renewal, Steve Martin, 2010-2011 CCMTA President, Mitch Fuhr, Executive Director, Driver Programs, Alberta Transportation, Kim Benjamin, Director, Road Safety Programs, Transport Canada, Paul Gutoskie, Manager, Road Safety Vision, Road Safety Programs, Transport Canada, Peter Hurst, Director, Ontario Ministry of Transportation.

CVSA RECOGNIZES CAPT. DAN MEYER, KANSAS HIGHWAY PATROL Capt. Dan Meyer recently retired from the Kansas Highway Patrol (KHP) Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program. Capt. Meyer served as Chair of the Driver Traffic-Enforcement Committee for the past two years. He is replaced by Capt. Chris Turner of the KHP. “We will be losing a remarkable individual,” said Maj. Mark Savage, Colorado State Patrol. “Dan has not only been a remarkable contributor to CVSA, the State of Kansas and to CMV safety but also a very good friend.” While we will miss him at CVSA we hope to continue working with Dan in his new capacity as State Programs Manager in MO. He will excel in his new position! Best of luck, congratulations on your retirement and we will miss you at CVSA!

33


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

REGIONAL RAP

NEVADA HIGHWAY PATROL COMMERCIAL VEHICLE SAFETY INSPECTOR RECEIVES MERITORIOUS SERVICE AWARD

MARYLAND STATE POLICE COMMERCIAL VEHICLE ENFORCEMENT TROOPER RECOGNIZED AS TROOPER OF THE YEAR

Last month, Gary Foster, a Commercial Vehicle Safety Inspector for the Nevada Highway Patrol, was presented with the Meritorious Service Award by Nevada Highway Patrol Capt. Tom Jackson and Department Chief Tony Almaraz. In August 2008, Inspector Foster responded to a passenger bus crash on Interstate 15, south of Las Vegas. During the post crash inspection it was noted that the apparent cause of the crash was the failure of the left steer tire. Inspector Foster, having concerns about the failure of a relatively new tire and the inability of an experienced driver to control the vehicle, took it upon himself to gather axle weight specifications for passenger buses. His research revealed that the make and model year of this particular bus had a suspension design defect that would cause overstressing of the steer tires. This information was forwarded by the Nevada State Patrol to the National Traffic Safety Board and ultimately led to a nationwide repair recall of this particular bus model. Inspector Foster’s initiative and dedication not only unraveled the cause of the mysterious crash, but as a result of the repair recall, he has prevented similar, potentially life-threatening, crashes of this bus model.

The first Maryland State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Trooper was recently recognized as the State Police Trooper of the Year in addition to being selected by the State Police Alumni as their Trooper of the Year. In the history of these prestigious awards, only five troopers have been awarded the Agency Trooper of the Year and the Alumni Trooper of the Year in the same year. Trooper First Class Robert G. Iman is the first trooper from CVED to be awarded either award and he was selected for both. On June 4th, TFC Iman also won the Maryland Inspectors Competition and will be competing in the upcoming NAIC event in August. Iman was nominated by his peers, coworkers and supervisors in recognition of his effective investigative and communication skills, sustained superior performance and selfless dedication to duty. In 2010, TFC Iman issued 804 citations and $253,980 in enforcement related fines, including 20 alcohol violations and drunk driving arrests and 15 suspended or revoked drivers. He conducted more than 400 commercial vehicle inspections and placed 331 of those vehicles and drivers, or 81 percent of the vehicles he inspected, out of service. He also made 32 criminal arrests that included a wide variety of fugitives and felons. One investigation was the result of his curiosity and systematic follow up of what started as a routine traffic stop and safety inspection. His investigation uncovered stolen items being sold as scrap for cash. He organized a covert surveillance, studied jailhouse interviews, reviewed video surveillance tape, used GPS tracking and authored and served search warrants. TFC Iman’s work resulted in the arrests and convictions of several members of the same family who were involved in a longrunning theft ring that operated in three counties and Baltimore City. In another investigation, TFC Iman found four stolen motorcycles in an unoccupied RV. He worked diligently to identify the RV driver and ultimately developed an informant who helped him uncover the identity of a number of suspects involved in an organized sport bike theft ring. TFC Iman accepted the challenge of competing as the CVED representative in the 2010 Maryland Commercial Vehicle Inspector’s Competition, in which inspectors from all law enforcement agencies compete. He won that competition easily and then placed in the top ten in the North American Inspectors Competition competing against the best inspectors from the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. He was also named the Maryland Motor Truck Association Inspector of the Year for 2010. According to Sgt. Duane Pearce, “The value of TFC Iman as a state trooper when considering reliability, competence, thoroughness, dependability, leadership, unwavering motivation, and his continued practice of placing the needs of the Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division and the State Police ahead of his own can only be described as immeasurable.”

ARKANSAS HIGHWAY POLICE PARTICIPATE IN CLICK IT OR TICKET CAMPAIGN

The Arkansas Highway Police participated in the national Click It or Ticket Campaign in June. Pictured left to right are Patrol Officer First-Class Sharlote Mixon, SGT Vicky Lee and Patrol Officer First-Class Daniel Morales standing in front of a CIOT banner at AHP headquarters.

34


R

E

Guardian

G

I

O

N

A

L

N

E

W

S

MICHIGAN STATE POLICE RECOGNIZED BY FMCSA WITH MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY LEADERSHIP AWARDS MISSING REFLECTIVE TAPE ON CMV TRIGGERS CLOSER INSPECTION BY COLORADO STATE PATROL TROOPER, LEADS TO FINDING DRIVER WANTED FOR FELONY WARRANT FOR MURDER On May 20, 2011, Trp. Monty Kinder of the Colorado State Patrol was patrolling Interstate 70 near Limon, CO when he contacted a semi tractor-trailer headed eastbound that had an inoperative identification light and was missing the upper rear reflective tape. While explaining the violation to the driver, Trp. Kinder noticed that he seemed extremely nervous. This level of nervousness was not consistent with the violation he had been stopped for. Upon clearing the driver through dispatch, Trp. Kinder was informed the driver had an active felony warrant out of Alabama for murder with a gun. Trp. Kinder had backup en route from a local Sheriff’s Deputy but he was concerned that if the driver knew he was about to be arrested on a murder warrant it could potentially initiate a pursuit with an 80,000 lb. truck. Wanting to avoid this, Trp. Kinder waited until the deputy was close and then approached the suspect’s vehicle on the passenger side. The driver exited the passenger door before Trp. Kinder could reach the tractor. Trp. Kinder immediately placed the driver into custody for the murder warrant. As the suspect was getting booked into jail, Trp. Kinder explained each of the violations that were noted during the truck inspection. Some of these included a false log book as well as having beer in the cab of the tractor. The driver’s main concern was what would ultimately happen to his beer!

WASHINGTON STATE PATROL COMMERCIAL VEHICLE DIVISION ATTENDS GORDON TRUCKING’S SAFETY AWARDS In April, the Washington State Commercial Vehicle Division attended the safety award banquet for the first ever five-million mile driver team of Jim and Jo Bailey. The couple has achieved five-million driving miles without any accidents. The couple received a check for 20,000 from Gordon. WSP also gave a certificate from the CVD Division. In addition to the Baileys, Gordon Trucking proudly honor 636 driving associates in 2011 with awards of 100,000 to five-million accident and incident free miles. Of the 636 drivers being recognized, 42 were honored for one million or more. In all, GTI currently has 117 drivers Trooper Renee Padgett and on the road who have driven more her son attend the Gordon than one million accident free miles. Safety Awards.

The Michigan State Police (MSP) received two U.S. DOT Motor Carrier Safety Leadership Awards at the National FMCSA Leadership Conference held in Chicago, IL on April 11, 2011. This is the fourth time in the past five years that the MSP has been recognized for its commercial vehicle enforcement initiatives at this annual convention. The 2011 Leadership Award was presented to the Traffic Safety Division in recognition of Michigan’s exceptionally low commercial vehicle fatality rate from 2007 to 2009, the latest data available. The number of truck-involved fatalities occurring on Michigan roadways continues to be below the national average. From 2007 through 2009, Michigan had a truck-involved fatality rate of 0.10 per 100 million total vehicle miles traveled - the lowest in the Midwest and one of the lowest in the nation. The national average for the same time period was 0.18 per 100 million total vehicle miles traveled. The Michigan State Police also received the 2011 Leadership Award for data quality. This award is in recognition of Michigan’s timeliness and accuracy of commercial vehicle inspection and crash reports. Capt. Harold J. Love., commanding officer of the MSP Traffic Safety Division, accepted the award on behalf of the MSP. Love credited the state’s success in achieving a high level of commercial motor vehicle safety to the commitment to traffic safety by Michigan’s law enforcement community, including motor carrier officers assigned to the Traffic Safety Division, the Michigan Department of Transportation, the Michigan Center for Truck Safety, and the Office of Highway and Safety Planning. Special recognition also went to members of the MSP Criminal Justice Information Center, who ensure crash reports are processed in a timely and accurate manner. The annual conference is attended by representatives of state commercial vehicle enforcement agencies from all 50 states.

DOING MORE: ALBERTA’S SLAVE LAKE DISTRICT CMV ENFORCEMENT PITCHES IN TO HELP EVACUATION By Sgt. Rob Livingston 6338, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement, Slave Lake District The Slave Lake Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) proved that commercial vehicle inspectors go above and beyond when serving their local jurisdictions. On May 15, 2011, the Slave Lake RCMP was called upon to assist at roadblocks for the mandatory evacuation of Widewater and Canyon Creek, about 20 km. west of Slave Lake to help prevent citizens from returning to their homes during the evacuation. Slave Lake RCMP maintained the roadblocks and used Carillion work trucks to escort people through the fire and smoke affected areas to safety.

35


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Operation Lifesaver Unveils Rail Safety Challenge: A “Virtual” Learning Program for Professional Truck Drivers

Statistics show that approximately one out of four railroad crossing crashes involve vehicles whose drivers are required to carry a Commercial Driver License (CDL). To provide truck drivers with information they need to safely navigate over a highway-rail grade crossing, Operation Lifesaver, Inc. (OLI) on June 9 unveiled the Rail Safety Challenge, a new videogame-style online experience that puts drivers behind the wheel of a truck for a ‘virtual’ road trip. Operation Lifesaver released the interactive online learning program at press conferences in Harrisburg, PA and five other states across the U.S. Safety partners from CVSA attended the Harrisburg event. Operation Lifesaver is a national, non-profit safety education group whose goal is to eliminate deaths and injuries at railroad crossings and along railroad rights of way. It has programs in all 50 states with trained and certified presenters who provide free safety talks to raise awareness around tracks and trains. “Total highway-rail vehicle incidents and crashes involving CDL vehicles increased in 2010 from 2009,” said Operation Lifesaver Inc. President

Safety partners launch Operation Lifesaver's ProDriver Safety Challenge at the PA Highway State Patrol. PA Road Team Member Robert Dolan (in the cab), Professional Driver for Conway. Left to right: Jim Runk, President/CEO, PA Motor Truck Association; Helen Sramek, President, Operation Lifesaver; Maj. Harvey Cole, Director, Bureau of Patrol; Tim Cotler, Administrator, PA Commercial Vehicle Safety Administration and Don Lubinsky, Operation Lifesaver PA Coordinator.

36

Helen M. Sramek. “As the leader in highway-rail grade crossing safety education, OLI is pleased to offer trucking companies, independent drivers and other safety organizations the opportunity to use this state of the art safety program designed specifically for professional truck drivers,” Sramek said. In addition to the launch in Pennsylvania, trucking industry representatives, law enforcement organizations, and railroad companies joined Operation Lifesaver officials at events to launch the Rail Safety Challenge program in Alabama, California, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas, Sramek noted. A preview of the Rail Safety for Professional Drivers e-Learning program is available at http://bit.ly/kcFLL5. The e-Learning program was made possible by a grant from the Federal Railroad Administration. In her remarks at the Harrisburg launch of the Rail Safety Challenge, Sramek noted that the fatality and injury rates for commercial motor vehicles overall are well below those of other motor vehicles. “However,” she said, “an incident involving a large truck and a train at a railroad crossing has the potential for greater consequences. There are the personal costs faced by family and friends - potential death or severe injuries to drivers and train crew members. These incidents also incur costs for damaged equipment, lost time and productivity for trucking companies and railroad companies; inconvenience and lost productivity for motorists forced to find alternative routes around a closed crossing; and the impact on the communities that provide law enforcement and emergency responder resources.” Sramek also noted that vehicle-train collisions are largely preventable, if driv-

ers adhere to the warning signs, watch and listen for the train, and resist any temptation to beat the train. “For truck drivers, good training and experience can truly make the difference between life and death,” she stated. The e-Learning program’s simulated driving environment allows drivers to work independently and exposes them to worst-case scenarios that require quick thinking and critical decision-making. “Our goal as we launch this new safety program is to ensure that every CDL driver has the information they need to safely cross a highway-rail grade crossing, every single time,” concluded Sramek. Individual drivers can go online to take the Rail Safety Challenge at www.oli.org. (Under Quick Links in the top left corner, click on “Pro Driver eLearning.”) There is no charge for individual professional drivers to participate. The course does not capture scores, names or email addresses, only the number of people who complete the Challenge. Large companies who wish to incorporate this program into their training should contact Operation Lifesaver at 1-800-537-6224.


A

S

S

O

C

I

A

T

E

Guardian

M

E

M

B

E

R

N

E

W

S

ATRI Releases Updated Operational Costs of Trucking Report

The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI), the trucking industry’s not-for-profit research organization, recently released the findings of its 2011 update to An Analysis of the Operational Costs of Trucking. The research, which identified trucking costs from 2009 and the first quarter of 2010 derived directly from fleet operations, will provide carriers with an important high-level benchmarking tool and government agencies with an accurate dataset for future infrastructure improvement analyses. “Given the essential role that trucking plays in freight transportation, quantifying the value of proposed infrastructure improvements depends on real-world industry data. As a result, ATRI’s operational costs data will be a critical input to the transportation planning process,” said Ted Dahlburg, Manager of Freight Planning for

the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, the Metropolitan Planning Organization for the PhiladelphiaCamden-Trenton region. ATRI identified 2008, 2009 and first quarter 2010 cost per mile and cost per hour figures stratified by fleet size, sector and region of the country. Based on feedback from the 2008 study, the pertruck speed calculation methodology was revised to better reflect the range of speeds at which trucks operate. The average marginal cost per mile was $1.45 in 2009 and $1.49 in the first quarter of 2010 for the for-hire segment of the industry. These figures were lower than the average marginal cost per mile of $1.65 found in the revised 2008 analysis. Fuel and driver wages (excluding benefits) continued to be the largest cost centers for carriers, constituting 58 per-

cent of the average operating costs in the first quarter of 2010. “Fleets are extremely sensitive to even the smallest change in operating costs given the razor thin margins under which we operate and we need to manage our costs more effectively than ever,” commented Terry Croslow, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer of Bestway Express, Inc. “ATRI’s study provides an important tool for monitoring and benchmarking our expenses.” A copy of this report is available from ATRI at www.ATRI-online.org. ATRI is the trucking industry’s 501(c)(3) not-for-profit research organization. It is engaged in critical research relating to freight transportation’s essential role in maintaining a safe, secure and efficient transportation system.

CVSA Thanks Our Annual Sponsors CVSA would like to thank all our annual sponsors who are committed to helping the Alliance achieve its goals throughout North America. These companies make the investment in safety and underscore the old adage that it pays to be safe.

37


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Comments on Crash Data Guidelines Sought Traffic Records Forum Meeting Date and Location Set

Newly-Developed Load Binders Used With Chain Tie Downs Standard Released

A yearlong process for reviewing and revising the guideline on crash data collection has begun, and comments on the guideline can be submitted online and at a meeting later this year. The Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) is managing the update process with funding from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. MMUCC - the Model Minimum Uniform Crash Criteria - is a voluntary Guideline that helps states determine what crash data to collect for a wide range of traffic safety planning applications. The 3rd Edition of MMUCC, adopted in 2008, is available at www.mmucc.us. “States that incorporate MMUCC data elements into their crash reporting forms and data systems are surprised at how easy the Guideline is to use and how consistent the recommended data elements are with crash data they are already collecting,” said Barbara Harsha, GHSA Executive Director. A MMUCC Expert Panel consisting of state and local law enforcement officials, state traffic records coordinators, state department of transportation representatives, state health officials, members of the research community and officials from five federal agencies has been organized to oversee the update effort. The Expert Panel is particularly interested in capturing data for emerging issues (such as distracted driving crashes, crashes involving unconventional vehicles, not-ontraffic way incidents) and better defining serious injury crashes and speeding-related crashes. The Panel is seeking comments to help them with the goal of producing an improved 4th Edition of MMUCC early next year and is asking stakeholders to log on to the Forum section of the website and submit comments to help make this resource the best it can be for safety stakeholders across the country. A MMUCC meeting will also be held in conjunction with the 2011 Traffic Records Forum which is being held July 31 to August 3 in Charlotte, NC. At the meeting Wednesday afternoon, August 3, stakeholders will have an opportunity to provide input into the next edition of MMUCC. For additional information on the Forum please visit http://www.trafficrecordsforum.org.

The Web Sling & Tie Down Association (WSTDA) is pleased to announce the recent publication of its newlydeveloped Recommended Standard Specification for Load Binders Used With Chain Tie Downs (WSTDA-T-6). The standard applies to load binders designed to accommodate chain tie downs for the purpose of securing cargo. This standard recommends construction as well as identification and marking of these load binders. In addition, it gives important practical advice on use, maintenance and inspection of these binders. WSTDA is a non-profit, technical association dedicated to the development and promotion of voluntary recommended standards and associated reference materials. Members of the WSTDA include manufacturers and suppliers of synthetic web slings and tie downs, polyester roundslings, synthetic webbing, fibers, thread and related components. For more information, contact WSTDA at (443) 640-1070 or www.wstda.com. To order a copy of the T-6 Standard, go to http://www.wstda.com/ products/index.cfm. WSTDA’s Legal Resource Committee has completed its development of a uniform/defensible product warning message. Committee members worked with Dr. Stephen Young, Applied Safety and Ergonomics, Inc. (ASE), a human factors expert, on this important initiative. The WSTDA is pleased to offer a completely new set of warnings products available in English, Spanish and French. The new warnings include fabric warning labels for web slings, roundslings and tie downs; and folded paper safety bulletins for web slings, roundslings and tie downs.

38


R

Level VI Classes Scheduled for 2011/12

Under a cooperative agreement with U.S. DOE, CVSA has scheduled the Level VI classes for the first part of 2012 to certify inspectors to conduct Level VI inspections on all transuranic waste and Highway Route Controlled Quantities (HRCQ) of radioactive materials. CVSA provides Level VI training to inspectors who meet the prerequisite of being Level I and HazMat certified. The following are the remaining classes scheduled:

A

D

I

N

S

P

Guardian

E

C

T

I

O

N

N

E

W

S

CVSA Scheduling 2012 Level VI Classes

CVSA is planning the 2012 Level VI Basic Classes for radioactive shipments inspection program. Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, CVSA will schedule eight class for inspecting motor carriers and their driver transporting transuranic waste and Highway Route Controlled Quantities (HRCQ) shipments of radioactive material. Under the cooperative agreement, CVSA will provide the Level VI training to jurisdictional inspectors who meet the prerequisite (CVSA Level I and HazMat certified). Any jurisdiction that needs inspectors trained and/or can host a Level VI Class in 2012 is asked to contact Larry D. Stern at larrys@cvsa.org or at 301-830-6147.

THEODORE W. FRITSCH CARLSBAD, NEW MEXICO

■ Las Vegas, NV–August 22-25 ■ Sacramento, CA–October 17-20 ■ Austin, TX–November 7-10 ■ Phoenix, AZ–February 15-16, 2012

Level VI “Train the Trainer” Course Any state interested hosting a class or needs inspectors trained is asked to contact Larry D. Stern, Director, Level VI Program, at larrys@cvsa.org or 301830-6147.

RAD Inspection News is made possible under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy.

Dear Mr. Stern:

ss and CVSA Level VI industry awareness cla I recently attended the chusetts, as a driver for ssa Ma Pennsylvania and in rch Ma s thi m gra pro . Visionary Solutions LLC ructors. the class structure and inst my thoughts regarding I'd like to share some of appreciation as to the provided me with a new The materials presented . ms e of the CVSA progra mission and importanc ame a better represent by these classes make d ine o ga als I it its , nef yed be plo I feel the which I'm em well as the industry in . ver dri nal sio tive of my employer as profes nce in my duties as a raises the bar of excelle omplished without the uld not have been acc s. One However I know this wo we had at those classe rs dedicated instructo en a and wh ied se alif sen qu to ely ility rem ext Mr. Rion Stann. His ab is d min to es the in com t that especially was completely los grasping a concept, or ardstudent was not quite His genuine concern reg r. cto tru ins of an inspired the time ing tak le, tab "Regs" is a true mark for com l ions and making us fee eone who ing some of our quest n was refreshing to som ctio isfa sat ual ivid ind r w. no e tim e to and them to ou som ssroom environment for has not attended a cla viding enough time for time management, pro ss cla his t class. ou int po I'd like to d on the content of the still keeping us focuse t bu s" rie sto er uck "tr g you fessionalism and wishin your staff for your pro and you nk . rch tha to Ma s like I'd erienced thi l presentations as I exp many more successfu Sincerely, Theodore W. Fritsch

39


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

United States Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Successfully Ships Spent Nuclear Fuel for More Than 50 Years Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments Since 1957, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program has made over 800 container shipments of naval spent fuel to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These shipments have all been done safely with no release of radioactivity and no injury to workers or the public. Upon refueling/defueling of reactors, all naval spent nuclear fuel is transported to the Naval Reactors Facility (located at INL) for examination to confirm performance of current fuel and to improve the design of fuel for future ships. For example, the first nuclear-powered submarine, USS Nautilus (SSN 571), was refueled after her first two years of operation steaming about 62,000 miles. Today’s nuclear-powered attack submarine will not require refueling during its 33-year life as it steams more than one million miles. These spent nuclear fuel shipments are essential to maintaining and improving the U.S. Navy’s nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and submarines include high-speed, independence from underway refueling, strategic and tactical flexibility, higher state of readiness upon arrival at destination, and submarine stealth at any speed. • 11 aircraft carriers (one more under construction).

40

• 71 submarines (four more under construction). • Over forty-five percent of the U.S. Navy’s warships are nuclear powered. The U.S. Navy operates these ships with a strong commitment to safety and environmental protection. As a matter of public record, the U.S. Navy’s nuclearpowered ships have collectively steamed more than 145 million miles and accumulated over 6,300 reactor-years of operating experience without a reactor accident or adverse impact on the public or the environment. Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipping Containers Naval spent nuclear fuel is packaged for shipment in formidable containers which meet or exceed all requirements of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Department of Transportation. Conservative engineering analysis, detailed calculations, scale model testing, and computer modeling demonstrate that the containers are designed to withstand severe real world accidents and remain safe. The regulatory accident performance standards that the container must withstand are:

• A 30-foot drop onto an unyielding surface; • A 1475-degree Fahrenheit fully engulfing fire for at least 30 minutes; • Immersion in 50 feet of water; • A drop onto a 6-inch diameter vertical metal rod; and, • Combinations of these events. Radiation levels outside of the shipping container are extremely low and are no threat to human health. Typical radiation levels on the outside of shipping containers with naval spent nuclear fuel inside are about 100 times less than the Department of Transportation strict safety limits. Collectively, these robust containers have travelled safely over 1.5 million miles throughout the U.S. with spent nuclear fuel sealed inside of them. Naval Spent Fuel Characteristics In addition to the robust nature of the shipping containers, the contents (naval spent nuclear fuel) are also extremely rugged. • Naval fuel is solid, metal material. • Naval fuel contains no flammable, explosive, or corrosive materials. • Naval fuel is designed to protect the warship’s crew by fully containing the uranium fuel and all of its


R

A

D

I

N

S

P

Guardian

E

C

T

I

O

N

N

E

W

S

On the Road with WIPP’s External Emergency Management Program

radioactive fission products produced during operation. • Naval fuel is built to withstand combat battle shock-forces well in excess of 50 times the force of gravity; more than 100 times the force of a severe earthquake. These are the same characteristics of naval nuclear fuel that make reactor operations safe for shipment in robust transportation container. Naval Spent Fuel Shipping Practices The following shipping practices are used for naval spent fuel shipments: • Shipments are escorted by specially-trained and armed Navy couriers who maintain constant surveillance of the shipments and communication with the same tracking center used for nuclear weapons shipments. These couriers would act as on-board first responders in the event of a transportation incident. • Dry shipments have no water in containers during shipment. • Shipment location and status are monitored constantly. • Government-owned railcars are strictly inspected and regularly maintained. • Shipments are coordinated in advance with railroad police and operations personnel. Periodic shipment accident exercises since 1996 have taken place in Bremerton, WA; Norfolk, VA; Idaho Falls, ID; Portsmouth, NH; Topeka, KS; Kenova, WV; and, Denver CO:

First responders near Bossier City, LA underwent a mock training scenario last month designed to test their response skills related to any potential incident involving transuranic (TRU) waste shipments through the area to WIPP. The scenario was part of a WIPP transportation exercise. Area first responder agencies involved had taken Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) provided by WIPP instructors along routes used for shipping TRU waste to the underground repository near Carlsbad, NM. An accident scenario is usually the final component of the training, which is held once every two years in a WIPP transportation region. First responders include EMT’s, firefighter and police officers. “WIPP’s transportation system has been repeatedly called the safest in the industry,” said Bill Mackie, Institutional Affairs Manager for the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Carlsbad Field Office. “This training is an important component of that designation. Our goal is to have first responders along our transportation routes prepared for even the most unlikely worst-case scenarios.”

• Regional outreach exercise with host State in that region. • Opportunity for civilian emergency services personnel and interested political leaders to learn about naval spent fuel shipments. • Opportunity for civilian emergency personnel to interact with shipment escorts. • Opportunity to train personnel on and practice emergency actions for response to an accident scenario, including communications and public affairs. • Lesson-learned: Coordinated, collaborative response of shipper (NNPP), carrier (railroad) and civilian authorities (State, Tribe, local) is crucial.

Conclusion The formidable construction of naval spent fuel shipping containers and the rugged fuel, along with the precautions taken during shipment of naval fuel, have been successful in ensuring every shipment conducted over the last 50 years has been done so safely. Typical Naval Spent Fuel Shipping Routes are through the following states: Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, Oregon, Washington Naval spent fuel shipments are safe. 24/7 shipment emergency number 412-476-5000 (Bettis Laboratory). Questions 412-476-7265 (Naval spent fuel Transportation Office).

41


Third Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Blue Ribbon Commission Subcommittee Publishes Draft Report

The Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on American’s Nuclear Future has published a draft report from its Subcommittee on Transportation and Storage. The report recommends that the nation “establish one or more consolidated interim storage facilities as part of an integrated, comprehensive plan for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle.” The commissioners noted that this “central and most important” recommendation is not a new one, having been made by “numerous expert panels going back over 30 years.” If the subcommittee’s third recommendation is followed, first in line for receipt at such a consolidated storage facility would be the spent fuel currently in storage at decommissioned reactor sites. The subcommittee members observed that to make consolidated storage a reality, DOE and the utilities would have to modify the

standard disposal contracts that establish the order in which spent fuel will be accepted. In yet another storage-related recommendation, any new storage facilities would be managed by “a new organization that would assume primary responsibility for the nation’s spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste program.” The subcommittee deferred to the BRC’s Disposal Subcommittee to recommend what that new organization should look like. Despite the significant focus on storage, the report does cover a good deal of ground related to transportation-which the subcommittee describes as “a crucial link in the overall storage and disposal system.” Recommendation # 5 gives a nod to the role of states in transportation planning: “The Subcommittee believes that state, tribal and local offi-

cials should be extensively involved in transportation planning and should be given the resources necessary to discharge their roles and obligations in this arena.” Interestingly, the report recommends that DOE should not only finalize the policy and procedures for implementing Section 180 (c) financial assistance, but actually “begin to provide such funding, independent from progress on facility sitting.” Section 180 (c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) requires the Secretary of Energy to provide funding and technical assistance to states and tribes affected by shipments conducted as a result of the NWPA. Acknowledging that “it would be premature to fully fund a technical assistance program before knowing with some certainty where the destination sites for spent fuel are going to be,” the subcommittee believes there would be “benefits from a “modest early investment.” The BRC accepted comments on the draft report until July 1, 2011. According to BRC co-chairs Brent Scowcroft and Lee Hamilton, after the BRC releases its draft report compiling all findings and recommendations, the commission will host additional public meetings and give the public other opportunities to review and comment on the draft report. Watch the BRC’s website for more details. BRC’s website is on the DOE’s site.

Visit CVSA's Level VI Website for the Minutes of the Level VI Program in Chicago The most up-to-date information on the CVSA’s Level VI Inspection Program is located on CVSA’s website, including the minutes of the Level VI Program Committee, Level VI training and public out-reach schedules and other information. Also, you can ask questions concerning the Level VI Inspection Program on the Level VI Online Forum (blog). Visit www.cvsa.org – click on Programs, then click on the Level VI radiation symbol and you are in the Level VI website.

42


R

A

D

I

N

S

P

Guardian

E

C

T

I

O

N

N

E

W

S

DOE Holds Public Hearings on Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held public hearings in April, 2011 on a draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE/EIS-0375D, Draft EIS) as required under the National Environmental Policy Act. The Public hearings were held in several locations New Mexico in April. GTCC LLRW consists of a small volume of low-level, radioactive waste generated throughout the U.S. as the result of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Agreement State licensed activities, including production of electricity from nuclear power plants; the production and use of radioisotopes for diagnostics and treatment of cancer and other illnesses; oil and gas exploration; and other industrial uses. “GTCC-like” waste consists of DOE owned or generated LLRW and potential non-defense transuranic waste which is similar to GTCC LLRW and for which there is currently no available disposal capability. The DOE’s draft EIS, put together after public scoping meetings were held in 2007, evaluates potential alternatives for disposal at six, federally-owned sites and generic commercial sites. The draft EIS analyzes methods (geologic repository, above grade vault, enhanced near surface trench, and intermediate depth borehole) for disposal at locations including the Hanford Site, ID National

Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nevada National Security Site, Savannah River Site, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the WIPP vicinity. In addition, the draft EIS evaluates generic commercial disposal sites in four regions of the U.S. The DOE is also examining a no action alternative. GTCC LLRW and GTCC-like waste does not include spent nuclear fuel or high-level waste. The total volume of GTCC LLRW and GTCC-like waste currently in storage is approximately 1,100 cubic meters. Over the next 60 years, the draft EIS estimates that on average, an additional 175 cubic meters will be generated each year from commercial and DOE activities, primarily from cleanup operations.

DOE does not have, and does not identify, a “preferred alternative” for their disposal of GTCC and GTCClike waste. DOE will include a preferred alternative in the final EIS based on the analysis in the draft EIS and public comments received. The preferred alternative could be a combination of two or more alternatives, based on the characteristics of the waste and other key factors. Before DOE makes a final decision on a disposal method or locations, DOE must submit a report to Congress that includes a description of the alternatives under consideration and await action by Congress. Public comments were gathered before June 27, 2011. The draft EIS and related information are available at the GTCC EIS website at http://www.gtcceis.anl.gov.

WIPP SHIPMENTS & DISPOSAL INFORMATION Shipments Received as of May 23, 2011 Site Argonne National Laboratory GE Vallecitos Nuclear Center

Shipments 95 32

Loaded Miles 162,773 44,800

Idaho National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Nevada Test Site Oak Ridge National Laboratory Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

4,695 789 18 48 112 2,045

6,532,656 269,838 24,804 57,312 150,416 1,446,444

Hanford Site Savannah River Site

541 1,214 9,589

978,128 1,844,480 11,511,651

Total to WIPP

43


Second Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

CVSA Executive Committee, Committee & Program Chairs PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

SECRETARY/TREASURER

Capt. Steve Dowling California Highway Patrol

Maj. David Palmer Texas Department of Public Safety

Lt. Thomas Kelly Maine State Police

REGION PRESIDENTS

REGION VICE PRESIDENTS (Non-Voting)

PAST PRESIDENTS

Region I Sgt. David Medeiros Rhode Island State Police

Region I Sgt. Raymond Weiss New York State Police

Region II Capt. Craig Medcalf Oklahoma Highway Patrol

Region II Vacant

Francis (Buzzy) France, Maryland State Police Darren E. Christle, Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation Capt. John E. Harrison, Georgia Department of Public Safety

Region III Maj. Mark Savage Colorado State Patrol

Region III Alan Martin Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

Region IV Lt. Bruce Pollei Utah Highway Patrol

Region IV Capt. Chris Mayrant New Mexico Department of Public Safety

Region V Steve Callahan Alberta Transportation, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement

Region V Reg Wightman Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation

LOCAL PRESIDENT

LOCAL VICE PRESIDENT

ASSOCIATE NON-VOTING MEMBER

Tom Jacques Pittsburgh Bureau of Police

Robert Mills Fort Worth Police Department

Larry Bizzell, Chair Associate Advisory Committee, FedEx Express

GOVERNMENT NON-VOTING MEMBERS

COMMITTEE CHAIRS

PROGRAM CHAIRS

Associate Advisory Larry Bizzell Committee FedEx Express Driver-Traffic Enforcement Lt. Thomas Fitzgerald Committee Massachusetts State Police Hazardous Materials Sgt. Thomas Fuller Committee New York State Police Information Systems Capt. William ( Jake) Elovirta Committee Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles Passenger Carrier Lt. Donald Bridge, Jr. Committee Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles Program Initiatives Sgt. William (Don) Rhodes Committee South Carolina State Transport Police Size and Weight Capt. Jay Thompson Committee Arkansas Highway Police Training Committee Capt. Craig Medcalf Oklahoma Highway Patrol Vehicle Committee Kerri Wirachowsky Ontario Ministry of Transportation

Level VI Inspection

44

William (Bill) Quade, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) William (Bill) Arrington, Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Doug MacEwen, Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA), CRA Chair Mauricio Hinojosa, Secretaria de Comunicaciones y Transportes (SCT) Adolfo Spinola, Secretarìa de Seguridad Publica, Policìa Federal Preventiva

COHMED International Safety Team Saved by the Belt Operation Safe Driver

Carlisle Smith Public Utilites Commission of Ohio Capt. William (Bill) Reese Idaho State Police Capt. Bill Dofflemyer Maryland State Police Sgt. David Medeiros Rhode Island State Police Lt. Col. Jack Hegarty Arizona Department of Public Safety

Operation Airbrake John Meed Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure Roadcheck

North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC)

Lt. Mike Junkin Alabama Depatrment of Public Safety

Paul Tamburelli Checkmark Vehicle Safety Services Inc.


2011 CVSA SPONSORS DIAMOND

PLATINUM

A & R Transport, Inc. CheckMark Vehicle Safety Services, Inc. International Road Dynamics, Inc. James Burg Trucking Company

J.J. Keller & Associates, Inc. RSC Equipment Rental U-Haul International

GOLD Applus+ Technologies Arizona Trucking Association Austin Powder Company Continental Corporation DEKRA America, Inc. Great West Casualty Company Groendyke Transport, Inc. HELP, Inc. May Trucking Company

Mercer Transportation Company R+L Carriers, Inc. Schlumberger Technology Corporation Specialized Carriers & Rigging Association STEMCO TML Information Services, Inc. Tyson Foods, Inc. Vehicle Inspection Systems, Inc.

SILVER ABF Freight System, Inc. AMBEST, Inc. Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Chesapeake Energy Corporation Coach USA Code Corporation Compliance Safety Systems, LLC DATTCO, Inc.

DiSilva Companies Greyhound Canada Transportation Corporation Greyhound Lines, Inc. Intermodal Association of North America JB Hunt Transport, Inc. Landstar Transportation Logistics National Truck Tank Carriers, Inc. New York State Motor Truck Association

Ohio Trucking Association Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. Prevost SYSCO Corporation Tennessee Steel Haulers, Inc. United Motorcoach Association Wal-Mart Transportation, LLC YRC Worldwide, Inc.

BRONZE Academy Express, LLC Ace Doran Hauling & Rigging, Inc. Boyle Transportation Brown Line, LLC ContainerPort Group, Inc. Daecher Consulting Group, Inc. Dibble Trucking, Inc. East Penn Mfg. Co., Inc.

Greatwide Truckload Management Hoffman Transportation, LLC H.R. Ewell, Inc. Illinois Portable Truck Inspection, Inc. Intercomp Company James A. Turner, Inc. Lynden, Inc.

Mid-West Truckers Association Mr. Safety-Check Systems, Inc. New Jersey Motor Truck Association Pitt Ohio Express, LLC RegScan, Inc. The Besl Transfer Co. Warren Transport, Inc. Zonar Systems


Presorted Standard US POSTAGE

PAID BALTIMORE, MD

6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310 Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319

PERMIT # 3361

CALENDAR OF EVENTS SUMMER EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING August 8, 2011 Orlando, FL

NAIC 2011 August 8 – 13, 2011 Orlando, FL

BRAKE SAFETY WEEK 2011 September 11 – 17, 2011

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING September 25, 2011 Austin, TX

2011 CVSA ANNUAL CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION September 26 – 29, 2011 Austin, TX New This Year! OPERATION SAFE DRIVER 2011 October 16 – 22, 2011

NORTH AMERICAN CARGO SECUREMENT HARMONIZATION PUBLIC FORUM November 29, 2011 Montreal, QC, Canada

2012 COHMED CONFERENCE January 30 – February 3, 2012 Newport Beach, CA

CMV SAFETY SHOWCASE September 26 & 27, Noon–1:30 P.M. Located directly across the street and in front of the Hilton Austin, the CMV Safety Showcase will be the site of live demonstrations of active safety technologies and products that are enhancing the safety of commercial vehicles. Attendees are also invited to participate in our Texas cookout which will be held at the CMV Safety Showcase on both days!


CVSA Gaurdian 3rd Quarter 2011