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Guardian

Volume 18, Issue 2

Second Quarter 2011

training smarter, not harder: how to determine your best training option cvsa emphasizes proposed hos regulation changes must be simple, enforceable

Colorado State Patrol Awards Grant Money to Local Agencies to Improve CMV Safety

Enhancing Roadside Inspections

Enforcement Data Uniformity Anticipated to Reduce DataQs


Second Quarter 2011

Table of Contents

www.cvsa.org

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Insight President’s Message ......................................................................................................1 Executive Director’s Message ..........................................................................................2 Letters to the Editor ........................................................................................................3 The Legislative Rundown ................................................................................................5

Federal News Ask the Administrator ......................................................................................................7 Train Smarter, Not Harder: How to Determine Your Best Training Option ............................9 NTC News Briefs ............................................................................................................9 Enhancements Made to FMCSA’s Pre-Employment Screening Program ..............................9 New Guide Aims to Improve CMV Safety By Strengthening Accuracy of FMCSA Safety Performance Records ......................................................10 Smart Roadside Initiative Charts a Path for the Future ....................................................11 TSA’s Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response Teams Safeguard Traveling Public ........12

6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310 Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319 Phone: (301) 830-6143 Fax: (301) 830-6144 www.cvsa.org Dedicated to government and industry working together to promote commercial vehicle safety on North American highways.

HEADQUARTERS STAFF

CVSA News Enforcement Members, Industry Discuss HazMat Concerns at COHMED in Tampa ............13 CVSA Secretary, ME State Trooper Lt. Kelly Participates in Capitol Hill Briefing on Need for Change to Truck Weight ........................................15 CVSA Emphasizes Proposed HOS Regulation Changes Must Be Simple, Enforceable ........16 CSA and Roadside Inspection - Webinar Training Available: Delivering the BASICs to the Roadside Inspectors......................................................17 Operation Air Brake Kicks Off with Event at TMC Annual Meeting, Provides Forum for Dialogue on Technical Issues ......................................................18 “Defeating Distracted Driving” Coming Soon! ................................................................19 International Safety Team is a Commitment From Many Groups to One Common Goal: Safety ..............................................................20 Promoting CMV Safety and Security Starts With Education and Outreach ........................21

Cover Story/Feature Enhancing Roadside Inspections, Enforcement Data Uniformity Anticipated to Reduce DataQs ................................................................................22 New FMCSA “Smart Phone App” May Soon Play a Key Role as Roadside Screening Tool ......24 Driver-Traffic Enforcement Committee Takes on Full Agenda at CVSA Workshop in Chicago......................................................................................25

Inspector’s Corner Committee News

Published by: Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

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Truck Size and Weight Issues Come to a Crossroad as Congress, Public Debate Continues ..........................................................................28

Regional News Teens and Trucks Share the Road in Tennessee................................................................29 Colorado State Patrol Awards Grant Money to Local Agencies to Improve CMV Safety ........30 Region II Hosts WIPP TRUPACT-III, Conducts Level VI Refresher Training ..........................31 Nunavut Seeks to Educate, Enforce, Legislate to Improve Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety..............................................................................32 Locals Lobby for New Members with Incentive Program ..................................................32

Regional Rap ............................................................................................................34 Industry Spotlight International Road Dynamics (IRD) Inc.: Provider of ITS Solutions to Improve Safety ..........35 UPS’S Circle of Honor Program a Reflection of a Century of Commitment to CMV Safety........36 NATM Votes to Make Compliance Verification a Requirement of Membership ..................37 AAMVA, IRP Recognize Significant Highway Safety Initiatives with 2011 Highway Safety Award for Commercial Motor Vehicles ......................................37 CMV Operators Have More than Employment-Related Drug Screens to Consider When it Comes to Medical Marijuana........................................................................38 Upcoming IRP Webinar on International Non-Apportioned Commercial Vehicle Agreement ................................................................................39

RAD Inspection News ............................................................................................41

Stephen A. Keppler Executive Director Collin B. Mooney, CAE Deputy Executive Director Larry D. Stern Director, Level VI Inspection Program Richard D. Henderson Director, Government Affairs William P. Schaefer Director, Vehicle Programs Randy J. West Director, Driver Programs Laura M. Zabriskie Director, Communications and Marketing Iris R. Leonard Manager, Program Services J. Craig Defibaugh Controller Wanica L. Foreman Administrative Assistant For comments, suggestions or information, please email us at communications@cvsa.org.

About the cover: CVSA brings together the best of the best in law enforcement, government and industry at the upcoming 6th Annual FMCSA MCSAP Leadership Conference, North American Cargo Securement Harmonization Public Forum and 2011 CVSA Workshop April 11-14, 2011. Guardian is a publication of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.


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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Partnerships — Too Close for Comfort? By Capt. Steve Dowling, CVSA President

I recently received a phone call regarding CVSA’s position on a rulemaking. The intent of the caller (who represented another safety organization) was to influence CVSA’s position. When it was apparent our opinions differed, the tone of the call quickly changed. Specifically, I was told that many in the safety community are forming the opinion that CVSA is too close to industry and appears to be more concerned about industry’s needs rather than safety. This is quite a bold accusation, aimed at the core of our organization. It is also a dangerous assumption that industry is not invested in safety. As absurd as I knew the accusation was, it caused me to reflect on the partnerships that make up CVSA. Industry Partnerships As we have been reminded this past year by the Alliance’s founders, CVSA was created to benefit both enforcement and industry. The structure of CVSA represents enforcement (members) and listens to industry (associate members). Is this compromising safety? No, I say it is leadership. Our partnerships have become a way of business within CVSA because we can accomplish more together than we can working against each other. These partnerships also allow enforcement to better understand the economic impacts facing industry and to work together to streamline inspection practices, procedures and safety initiatives. Additionally, industry’s involvement in CVSA programs such as Operation Safe Driver, COHMED and the International Safety Team creates opportunities that otherwise would not exist.

Capt. Steve Dowling

The structure of CVSA represents enforcement (members) and listens to industry (associate members). Is this compromising safety? No, I say it is leadership. Federal Partnerships CVSA and FMCSA’s National Training Center (NTC) have struggled to find cooperative roles in the delivery of training to our mutual stakeholders. Knowing that the road to uniformity starts with training, CVSA and NTC have committed to addressing this issue with a renewed focus. With this in mind, CVSA and NTC met in March and agreed upon a funda-

mental shift in how we do business. Specifically, we made a mutual commitment as safety partners to develop and communicate training issues together. New roles were defined for both organizations, deliverables were determined and a joint communications plan was initiated. In the coming months, you will see the results of this vision and I am excited at the opportunity to embrace enforcement training as partners with NTC. However, the success of this partnership has a huge hurdle to overcome, pessimism. I understand it is always easier to talk about how it will not work or how it has failed in the past. But, a new training vision has been created. So, I challenge each of you to communication in a manner that is professional, constructive and solution-driven as we create the path for this vision to become our new reality. Cross Border Partnerships Cross border partnerships have a long history within CVSA and bring a unique perspective to the organization. Our Canadian partners bring a thoughtful and methodical approach to inspections and safety that is often underappreciated by the states. Regulatory inconsistencies and political realities have created unique challenges to address; however, our partnership has made those challenges into opportunities, with no finer example than the ongoing work of the North American Cargo Securement Harmonization Public Forum. The days ahead will no doubt bring additional challenges as the United States and Mexico move forward with a cross border trucking initiative. Mexico faces numerous (continued on page 6)

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www.cvsa.org

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S MESSAGE

Active Participation Between Countries Puts CVSA Front and Center on Critical Issues Affecting Motor Carrier Safety By Stephen A. Keppler, CVSA, Executive Director 2011 is shaping up to a very busy year for the triad of countries that make up CVSA. CCMTA’s Compliance and Regulatory Affairs Committee is hard at work on Human Factors issues, Electronic OnBoard Recorders (EOBRs), Data Exchange and Safety Rating Reciprocity issues with the U.S., and they are set to launch their Road Safety Strategy for 2015 at their Annual Meeting in May. Mexico is updating their commercial driver licensing system, as well as a series of their regulations and is working with the U.S. to develop the Cross-Border Trucking Program. Similarly, the U.S. is pushing out a series of significant rulemakings, rolling out the CSA Program, and not to mention working hard to enact a Transportation Authorization Bill. Our Alliance and its members are squarely in the middle of all of these activities and it is a testament to the tremendous knowledge and talent our members bring to bear on critical issues affecting motor carrier, driver and vehicle safety. In working with the CVSA staff and committee chairs in preparation for the upcoming Workshop in Chicago it is very evident a lot of important work is in store. Many critical issues hang in the balance for the future, and your active participation is needed to help inform the debate, enable progress and save lives. In Anaheim this past Fall, President Dowling and I discussed where we have come from, where we are and where we are going. In the few short months since this get together, we are making steady progress on all four pillars of our Strategic Plan: Safety and Security, Training and Certification, Outreach, and Organizational Development. One such item was our recent meeting with FMCSA’s National Training Center

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Stephen A. Keppler

(NTC) and CVSA’s International Officers, Training Committee Leadership and staff. As a result of this meeting, a number of changes will be occurring over the next several months with training programs. Some will be more visible, some not so much; however, there is a clear commitment between NTC and CVSA for a more collaborative and engaged dialogue to ensure that inspectors and instructors have all the tools necessary to deliver first-class training and are prepared to do their jobs better than ever. In preparation for this meeting we received a tremendous amount of input from the membership to help inform the dialogue, which resulted in very productive discussions with a series of outcomes and deliverables. I want to personally thank those of you who took the time to provide input. You will hear more on this in the coming months. Another recent example of our progress is the effort the Driver/Traffic Enforcement Committee is managing relating to EOBRs. In December, we sent a survey out to the membership regarding this issue and in particular, issues surrounding technology and implementation issues. Again, we received a tremendous

response with 64 percent of members responding. The information gleaned from this is being shared with FMCSA, Canada and EOBR suppliers in order to help ensure that, as we move forward on this issue throughout the continent, enforcement’s needs and issues are understood. We also are using this information in our efforts on Capitol Hill to help educate congressional leaders as they contemplate laws. Another “minor” issue the committee has worked on recently is compiling CVSA’s comments to the hours-of-service U.S. rulemaking. These are just a few of a number of issues that we have been working on actively in recent months. Clearly, your Alliance is working year-round to help promote our mission and effecting positive change for advancing safety. As you can see from the examples cited above, your input to what is going on is being heard and more importantly, acted upon. One last but very important item I wanted to report on - the results of CVSA’s 2011 Annual Sponsorship Program. This year we have more sponsors than in 2010 and have increased our revenue 50 percent over last year, as well as more than doubled the revenue generated from 2009. I would appreciate all of you taking the time to thank all of our sponsors when you see them, without their support we could not do what we do. Their generosity has a direct impact on our Mission and helps CVSA in many ways. It played no small part in our ability to recently hire on two additional technical staff members, Randy West and Will Schaefer - whom you will get to meet (if you have not already) in Chicago. Thanks again to all of you for your continued support and active engagement in the Alliance!


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

PSP - No Longer Just a Portable Video Game Acronym That’s right. I seem to have heard that acronym tossed around many times in the past when my son could not find his PSP game! Now, as most of you know, the DOT delivered to us this past year a new PSP meaning, Pre-Employment Screening Program. I’m sure some of you may be asking: “What in the world are we going to do with this thing? Do I really need it? How are we going to use it?” Although some carriers jumped right into the due diligence arena, others have yet to commit to the new program. Of course, for those who may not have seen one, the DOT’s PSP is a report that provides the motor carrier with a look into the prospective driver’s past record of roadside inspections and DOT reportable crashes. This would include only those inspections and DOT crashes that made it from the state level to the DOT’s database. The DOT crash information on the report is the same standard information that you are required to report to carriers inquiring about past drivers, which includes the carrier name and DOT number. The inspection information will give you the carrier information, driver information, plus whether it was a vehicle, HazMat or driver violation, to include the FMCSR section, short description, OOS, date, report state, report number, hazmat, level, number of violations, and a summary of all violations. The report requires a release from the driver and will most likely cost you a signup fee and then a per report charge, according to which vendor you may choose to order from. The information provided in the PSP report mirrors the information collected by FMCSA for CSA regarding drivers; however, one of the things the report does not do is provide you with is the CSA points. Some vendors are now offering, or

in the process of offering, a report that will do that. In the meantime, what would be your options? I’m sure a lot of carriers are already using some method to decipher and use this info through a form of qualifying drivers. One method would be to use requirements or policies you may already have in place, as well as using the CSA seven BASICs to help categorize the violations and crashes listed on the PSP. Let’s take a look at the CSA categories and related PSP violations: Crash Indicator: Most companies already have eligibility requirements in place concerning DOT accidents. Since the PSP does not provide preventability, then one option would be to require the driver to produce a police report, which you will be able to apply your own preventability standards, or rely on the verification from the previous employer. Drugs & Alcohol: Many companies already have a zero tolerance policy in place. On the other hand, if you don’t have a zero tolerance policy, then you will need to ensure the driver is actually qualified to return to duty, etc, if you choose to proceed. Driver Fitness: Most violations that occur within this BASIC area would most likely be due to the driver failing to comply with DOT licensing and physical laws or requirements. You may have to determine whether the driver was not qualified, or did the driver really misplace his valid medical card? Or possibly, the driver wasn’t wearing eye glasses as required by his/her CDL or physical

card. Certainly an area the driver would need to explain in detail. What will your company be willing to tolerate? Unsafe Driving: The drivers who received violations which would fall into this BASIC area were most likely observed by an enforcement officer, violating traffic laws. Most motor carriers currently have standards in place that address serious violations as well as all other violations. Keep in mind that the PSP does not provide you information as to whether the driver was given a citation or warning for the violation and certainly not all of these will make the motor vehicle record (MVR). You will need to consider the overall record and behavior of the driver in this area. Fatigued Driving; Vehicle Maintenance; & Cargo Related: For PSP violations that CSA would place into these three categories, then you must determine the tolerance for each individual area. Some carriers may have a higher tolerance level for these violations than others. You can look at the past 36 months for each area and set limits, or maybe just the past 12 months will carry the most weight. Did the carrier play a part in any of these violations, such as operating higher risk equipment? Regardless of what you are willing to accept, if the driver had any violations at all and you plan to hire the driver, it would certainly be to your advantage to retrain the driver up front, in each category where violations occurred, and place that documentation in his/her file. (continued on page 4)

CVSA’s Guardian welcomes your letters and comments. To submit a letter, send an email to communications@cvsa.org or write to CVSA, c/o Guardian, 6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310, Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319.

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Using the CSA violation weight charts will be very helpful in determining the BASIC area and points associated with the violations from the PSP report. And it may be easy to disqualify drivers with points or numbers of violations, but it will still come down to taking a look at the overall record of the driver, then making a decision on the driver’s behavior and the tolerance level your company has for the violations discovered. If you haven’t set guidelines, then consider taking the time to put some in place. Having a good internal pre-qualification system will help cut down on PSP expense. If you need help, check with your insurance carrier or network with other safety professionals or associations in the industry. The PSP question remains for some carriers, “Do I really need to use it? Can I afford not to use it?” It is currently not required, but in reviewing the PSP reports that we received, we would not have known about some of these bad records with multiple violations had we not subscribed to the report. Since I’m not a huge fan of depositions and litigation in general, I would like to ensure that I don’t have to explain why I’m not using it, should I have that experience in the future. How about you? How will you answer if asked by plaintiff ’s counsel why your company does not utilize PSP reports? The PSP has been developed to assist you in making hiring decisions. This driver information is available to you NOW. I’m sure there are a lot of additional ideas out there, as well as information, concerning PSP and how to use it. You can find information and some FAQs for PSP at www.psp.fmcsa.dot.gov. I will leave you with this quote I observed from law firm Smith Moore Leatherwood’s Transportation Newsletter* recently, “…Carriers do not have to use PSP when making hiring decisions; PSP is to be a resource for the motor carrier and will likely be a resource for the next attorney who sues your company.” Phil Daugherty, CDS, Cardinal Logistics Management Corporation

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www.cvsa.org

Is Roadcheck a Roadblock for Industry?

Motor Transport Association of Connecticut is a strong supporter of CVSA’s many programs. From the beginning of its existence, CVSA has made a real difference in the safety of the commercial vehicles that operate. We encourage the continued development of ways to improve the safety of our vehicles and the quality of our drivers. I would like to take this opportunity to raise some issues related to CVSA’s sponsored annual Roadcheck program. I believe that the publicity related to Roadcheck has a spin that is negative to the trucking industry. Delays occur because of multiple inspections of individual vehicles in one day. And, we need more positive ways of quantifying the success of all of the efforts throughout the country to improve truck safety. First, the reports from Roadcheck unfairly paint the trucking industry in a bad light. At the end of the inspection period, the press release always says that Roadcheck was a success and that something like 30 percent of the “vehicles inspected” were put out of service. We know that the universe of “vehicles inspected” is a pre-selected subset of all of the vehicles which pass through a given inspection station. Inspectors look at trucks that look like they should be looked at. They wave through the trucks from companies that they know to have a good safety record or because the truck looks like it is in good shape. This is as it should be. We want inspectors to spend their time looking at vehicles, which might have defects, not the ones that are most likely to be in good condition. However, nobody counts all of the trucks which are waved through. The vehicles used to develop the report are those presupposed to be defective in some way. Two or three of ten may be put out of service. The press release leaves the impression that 20 to 30 percent of the “trucks operating on the roadway” are in such bad condition that they have to be sidelined. It would be more fair and accurate to report the total number of vehicles looked at, along with those put out of service. This would produce a more accurate and fair indication of the condition of trucks on the road. Secondly, in New England, on the days of the Roadcheck, a truck can be inspected several times in one day, as it travels from one state to another. This is a nonproductive exercise for both enforcement and truckers. Drivers ought to be given some sort of document, sticker, electronic marker or other way of informing downstream inspectors that a given truck has already been looked at. The truck should then be waved through without delay Thirdly, one should not evaluate the success of a safety program by concentrating on how many vehicles were put out of service, and often what the fines imposed for that universe might be. A safety program should not be justified based upon the numbers of citations or fines. Using that criterion, if every single truck that went through an inspection were in perfect shape, the program would be deemed ineffective because no tickets were written and no fines were collected. We should report the number of “out-of-service” citations but we need to also report the larger number of vehicles looked at. It is all about impressions and perspective and the current way of reporting the results of Roadcheck creates an unfair negative impression of the trucking industry. Michael J. Riley, President, Motor Transport Association of Connecticut


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The Legislative Rundown By Richard D. Henderson, CVSA, Director, Government Affairs

Richard Henderson

Funding for the Rest of Fiscal Year 2011 Still Undecided As of this writing, Congress has still not passed a bill that would fund the federal government through September 30, the end of the 2011 Fiscal Year. Federal agencies including the Department of Transportation and FMCSA are funded through April 8, 2011 by a Continuing Resolution (CR) passed by Congress on March 17. Thus far, FMCSA and state safety grant programs, including MCSAP, are being funded at 2010 levels which are the maximum authorized limits under SAFETEA-LU. The CR does contain significant funding cuts for other parts of the federal government. Whether the much publicized threat of a government shutdown actually comes to pass remains to be seen. There now seems to be a generally accepted view on the part of Congress and the Administration that a series of temporary funding bills impede the ability of government to function as it should and that the recently passed CR through April 8 is the last such temporary CR to be considered. Thus, April 8 does loom as a very important date. SAFETEA-LU Extended Through September 30, 2011 In early March, Congress did pass legislation extending SAFETEA-LU through September 30, 2011. By virtue of this action, transportation programs funded by the Highway Trust Fund that included FMCSA Operations and MCSAP and other state safety grant programs should be largely unaffected under a potential government shutdown on April 8. This action also means that unless Congress can pass a long-term surface transportation reauthorization bill by

September 30, chances are that it will be 2013 before Congress takes up the matter again. Historically, legislation of this kind is difficult to pass in a Presidential election year. Should this scenario occur, it is quite possible that Congress may well pass some version of a highway and motor carrier safety bill. There are too many pressing issues such as bus safety, resources for CSA implementation, and implementation of a mandatory Electronic On-Board Recorder (EOBR) program for Congress to wait until 2013 to exercise their oversight on these issues. While it is rare for Congress to separate motor carrier safety legislation from a major surface transportation reauthorization bill, there is a precedent. In 1999, Congress passed the Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act that created FMCSA and nearly doubled the funding for MCSAP. Congressional Authorizing Committees Say They Will Act on Reauthorization by September 30, 2011 Rep. John Mica (R-FLA), Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure (T&I) Committee; Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Environment. And Public Works; along with Senator Rockefeller (D-WV), Chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, have all pledged that they will complete work on a reauthorization bill in their Committees to bring it to the floor of both House and Senate Chambers for a vote by September 30 of this year. The challenge that all of these Committees has is to plug in funding numbers from 2011 through 2017 for all of the various programs. The House T

& I Committee says it will be able to do that without enacting any new revenue raising measures such as increasing the federal fuel tax and instead focusing on streamlining existing programs, or eliminating programs that do not directly benefit national infrastructure programs including highway and highway safety programs. There are some indications that the House T & I’s total amount of reauthorized federal funding may be less than SAFETEA-LU levels. At the same time, the Department of Transportation is proposing a $556 billion, six-year reauthorization proposal. Details of the plan and new funding measures have not yet been released by the Department. Senate Commerce Committee Circulates a Draft Motor Carrier Safety Bill The Senate Commerce Committee has recently circulated a draft motor carrier safety bill, the “Commercial Vehicle Safety Act of 2011.” It has done so with the intent of soliciting as much input as possible from the various stakeholder groups including industry, enforcement, and presumably, FMCSA. It is anticipated that the Committee will hold a hearing on the draft bill at the end of March or early April and CVSA is expected to be among the witnesses testifying. Since this is only a draft bill, there is no guarantee at this point that all of the provisions will be retained in a final committee mark-up. Nevertheless, it is a good faith effort of the part of the Committee to address the concerns of all interested groups, involve them in the process, and to ultimately produce a bill that will significantly improve motor carrier safety.

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CVSA has had discussions with the Committee about the bill, particularly on the issues of more flexibility in the grant programs, MOE, the implementation of a provision mandating the use of EOBR’s, and the use of new safety technologies. The draft bill has not addressed, in full, the issues of bus safety, safety exemptions, and size and weight issues. Hopefully, there will be an opportunity for CVSA to address these issues in testimony at the upcoming hearing. As might be expected, the issue of bus safety has again become a top priority of the Committee in the wake of a serious bus crash in the Bronx Borough of New York City in early March. It is possible that this issue will consume much of the discussion at the hearing. This crash again raises the issues of crashworthiness of buses, the use of seat belts, as well as driver fatigue and roadside bus inspections. CVSA did discuss the current provision in SAFETEA-LU that prohibits roadside inspections except in the case of an imminent or obvious safety hazard and pointed out that this restriction remains an obstacle to comprehensive bus safety enforcement and submitted language to Committee to address this issue. Should a full scale reauthorization bill not be passed by Congress later this year, this draft Commerce bill may well be the basis for separate safety legislation that could possibly be enacted this year.

www.cvsa.org

DOT Releases 2012 Budget Proposal and Broad Outline of Reauthorization In February, DOT released its FY 2010 budget request to Congress. A $20 million increase was proposed For MCSAP and state safety grant programs from $310 million to $330 million. A $36 million increase was proposed for FMCSA operations and programs. On reauthorization, FMCSA has proposed rolling existing grants under three new umbrella grant programs: Compliance, Safety and Accountability (CSA); Driver Focused Grants; Data and IT Grants. Under the CSA umbrella would be MCSAP, New Entrant, High Priority, Border Enforcement, and a Training and Administration Takedown. Under Driver Focused Grants would be CDL, Driver Training, and a Training and Administration takedown. Under Data and IT Grants would be PRISM, CVISN, and a Training and Administration takedown. Flexibility under the various programs along with funding details will presumably be forthcoming. However, we did learn that the New Entrant Program would continue to be funded at 100 percent, that Border programs are proposed to be reduced to an 80/20 match, and that the matching ratio for CVISN would be increased from 50/50 to 80/20.

Size and Weight Issues May Be Seriously Considered in Reauthorization Legislation There are reports from the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee that there could be a truck productivity title in their Reauthorization bill. They have asked for language on this issue as well as other issues by March 30, after which date they will begin drafting their version of a reauthorization bill. CVSA is engaging in comprehensive discussions of all aspects of the size and weight issue with various interested parties to stress that we need more safety data and analysis with respect to the use of heavier trucks before any of the current standards are changed. There does not appear to be an easy path toward a resolution of the safety issues. However, it seems that for the first time, all of the groups recommending changes in current policy to enhance truck productivity recognize the importance of safety, safety monitoring, and safety data collection.

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE (continued from page 1) obstacles to implementing a uniformed national inspection program. CVSA must continue to embrace and support Mexico in their safety endeavors and assist the states as they prepare for the anticipated expanded authority for Mexican based motor carriers. Too close for Comfort? Absolutely! Let no one be confused, partnerships do

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not always equal agreement and each partnership has unique benefits and challenges. But partnerships make CVSA unique and better equip us to accomplish the mission of advancing highway safety. To all those who have invested in safety through CVSA, “Thank You.” We hold our partners in high esteem. For anyone reading this that may not be involved with CVSA, I

invite you to join us, share your opinions and be part of the solution. That is the response I gave the caller mentioned at the beginning of this article, but unfortunately, they declined my invitation and hung up the phone.


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Ask the FMCSA Administrator

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administrator Anne S. Ferro answers your questions. In this issue, the Administrator gives a run-down of FMCSA’s regulatory agenda for 2011, explains how FMCSA plans for future rulemaking and provides a preview of spring and summer safety strike forces for household goods operators. Question: What are FMCSA rulemaking priorities for 2011? Answer: Last year, FMCSA had its most productive period ever for rulemakings and issued several high-profile rulemakings. These include proposed revisions to the regulations for hours-of-service (HOS) for truck drivers. This proposal would revise the current HOS rule by requiring truck drivers to complete all driving within a 14hour workday and to complete all on-duty, work-related activities within 13 hours. Also, no more than 13 hours of the 14hour window may be used for on-duty time; drivers must take a break of at least 30 minutes anytime before the eighth hour of on-duty time before continuing a trip. It also leaves open for comment whether drivers should be limited to 10 or 11 hours of daily driving time. We accepted public comments until March 4. At last count, we received almost 25,000 comments.

Another proposed rulemaking published in late 2010 would ban handheld cell phone use for commercial truck and bus drivers. This proposed rule would go a long way toward keeping a driver’s full attention focused on the road. If it becomes final, banning hand-held phones will target a leading cause of distracted driving and help make our roads safer. FMCSA provided 60 days for the normal public comment period for this rulemaking, and 30 days for a “reply” comment period during which the public could provide comments about the information and data that were submitted to the docket. March 21 was the last day for making comments during the reply comment period. As of early March, we received nearly 400 comments. Earlier this year, the Agency published a proposed rule to require the use of electronic on-board recorders (EOBRs) by motor carriers to document their drivers’ hours of service. This proposal goes beyond the rule we published in April 2010 that established technical specifications for EOBRs and mandated the devices for motor carriers with patterns of serious HOS violations. The new EOBR proposal is a broader mandate than the previous rulemaking. It also clarifies the supporting documents a carrier can use to

To give greater transparency to our regulatory agenda, we are developing a five-year rulemaking plan... [that] will open up the process and give us another channel for feedback from all of our stakeholders, including CVSA members.

document record of duty status and specifies the type and number of supporting documents carriers are required to maintain. FMCSA will accept public comments until May 23, 2011. We are continuing work on rulemaking actions that address commercial driver’s license standards, entry-level driver training requirements, and standardized training and testing for all medical professionals who conduct physical examinations for interstate commercial motor vehicle drivers. Finally, later this year we plan to publish a proposal to change the way we rate carriers for safety fitness. Known as the Safety Fitness Determination proposed rulemaking, this is the third phase of our roll out for CSA - our Compliance, Safety and Accountability initiative. This rulemaking would utilize the performance data reflected in the Carrier Safety Measurement System (CSMS) you are using today in place of SafeStat to establish safety fitness ratings of motor carriers, instead of being reliant upon the traditional on-site compliance review to derive a carriers safety rating. As you can see, our near-term and long-term regulatory agenda focuses on initiatives that will raise the bar to enter the motor carrier industry; maintain high safety standards for carriers to remain in the industry and remove high risk behaviors and operators from operating, i.e. get the bad operators off the road. FMCSA is also reviewing its existing rules to determine if they are outmoded, ineffective, insufficient or excessively burdensome. Our review is in response to President Obama’s January 18 Executive Order entitled “Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review.” FMCSA is working closely with other agencies in

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the Department of Transportation on this initiative and will provide further information for public comments on our existing rules in the near future. Question: How does FMCSA plan its regulatory agenda for the long term? Answer: To give greater transparency to our regulatory agenda, we are developing a five-year rulemaking plan. This plan will open up the process and give us another channel for feedback from all of our stakeholders, including CVSA members, on changes that may affect them. The plan will also tie our rulemakings into our long-term strategic plan developed for our agency and the Department. We expect to publish a draft plan and make it open for public comment in the near future with a target to finalize the plan later this year. FMCSA plans a session to receive public input during the Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee meeting at the Mid-America Truck Show in Louisville, Kentucky on March 31 and April 1. We will hold additional listening sessions to gain your input so that together we can shape the direction of the regulatory agenda for motor carrier safety. The plan will serve as a living document - we will update it when necessary, particularly to include any new rulemakings required through the forthcoming surface transportation reauthorization legislation. Question: What safety strike forces are planned so far in 2011? Answer: So far, this year FMCSA and our state and local partners have planned

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two strike forces on household goods carriers around the country prior to the height of moving season in the spring and in the prime moving months of summer. The locations selected are based on the volume of consumer complaints. The strike forces will target noncompliant household goods carriers identified in our top 100 Household Goods Carrier List. These carriers are considered the “worst of the worst.” During previous household goods strike forces, we have typically found companies which operate without authority, engage in deceptive pricing practices, hold consumers’ property hostage, collect charges that are not in their tariff and fail to have a consumer arbitration process. During the most recent household goods strike force in May 2010, we investigated nearly 400 household goods carriers during a two-week period. More than 90 enforcement cases resulted. Your support in this effort is essential to its success. You have an important role to play to ensure the safety of house-

hold goods carriers and that consumers are being protected. Look for more details from FMCSA in the coming weeks and months on more strike forces planned for passenger carriers as well. Please check www.fmcsa.dot.gov often for frequent updates on all FMCSA initiatives. I look forward to seeing many of you in April at the FMCSA MCSAP Leadership Conference and the 2011 CVSA Workshop in Rosemont, Illinois. Safe highways are the number one priority of the U.S. Department of Transportation. Because of our outstanding partnership and your tireless dedication to commercial motor vehicle safety, lives are saved and injuries prevented every minute of the day. Let’s continue to strengthen the safety of America’s roads and highways. Americans deserve no less. Keep up the outstanding work! Have a question for FMCSA Administrator Anne Ferro? Send it to askFMCSA@dot.gov.


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NTC News Briefs Hazardous Materials Course Revision A panel comprised of federal and state Hazardous Materials (HM) experts met for four days in December to kick-off the redesign of HM course materials. The panel worked on developing course blueprints and a curriculum design guide, which were validated by the HM Subject Matter Expert (SME) team and NTC stakeholders. Presently, the materials are in the hands of instructional designers who are working closely with the SME teams to include revisions of the following courses: General Hazardous Materials; Advanced Hazardous Materials Cargo Tank Inspection and Other Bulk Packaging; Cargo Tank Facility Review, and; a new HM Specialties course, which includes modules covering HM security, transportation of Class I explosives, transportation of radioactive materials, hazardous substances and waste. The redesigned courses are on track to be piloted during the summer of 2011. Testing Program Development In October of 2010, work began on a new Testing Program Plan covering the entirety of NTC’s training catalog. The new testing program has been validated by stakeholders. It has now moved into the development stage. Panels of SMEs will review test blueprints, including newly designed test administration processes, procedures and instructions. The review panels will ensure that the tests accurately measure the intended knowledge, skills and abilities. The Testing Program Plan is important not only for CALEA certification, it supports performance management, evaluation and measures for quality and consistency of NTC course offerings.

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Train Smarter, Not Harder: How to Determine Your Best Training Option By Joe DeLorenzo, FMCSA Director, National Training Center When seeking improved performance, is more training always the answer? Appropriate training is a powerful and vital cornerstone to any organizational development plan. It is easy, therefore, to be tempted to immediately conclude that additional training is the solution to a new protocol, process, or performance challenge. One cannot lose sight, however, of the fact that there are many other options, tools and resources that are available - particularly in this time of increasingly tightened operating budgets. The utilization of “mentors,” “job aides,” or collaborative workshops can accomplish many goals traditionally achieved through formal classroom training, often at a lower cost. So how can one tell when traditional training is not the best option? First, as difficult as it may be, accept the fact that classroom training is sometimes not the best solution. This can be especially difficult for those of us who make our living through training. Secondly, never embark on any training design, development or implementation without first performing a need, task and training analysis. Time

and money must be invested up front to truly match the most effective solution to needs. Lastly, personal opinion should never replace solid analysis. This is a critical point; we must endeavor to spend every dollar in the most cost-effective manner possible. These rules will ensure that your organization achieves a more effective approach to meeting general and individual career development needs. Remember: Train smarter, not harder.

Enhancements Made to FMCSA’s Pre-Employment Screening Program FMCSA announced in March that it has enhanced its Pre-Employment Screening Program (PSP) by adding data for co-driver safety and post-crash violations to the roadside inspection and crash records previously available. The PSP report also now shows the date drivers’ safety records are updated. PSP allows commercial truck and bus companies to electronically obtain drivers’ safety records as part of the hiring process. To access PSP, go to www.psp.fmcsa.dot.gov.

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New Guide Aims to Improve CMV Safety by Strengthening Accuracy of FMCSA Safety Performance Records By Betsy Benkowski, FMCSA, Analysis Division The first edition of FMCSA’s “DataQs User Guide and Manual: Best Practices for State Agency Users; a practical guide for Federal and State data quality practitioners” is now available for download at the DataQs login page at https://dataqs.fmcsa.dot.gov/ login.asp. The DataQs Users Guide and Best Practices Manual is designed to help improve commercial motor vehicle safety through further strengthening the accuracy of FMCSA safety performance records. It does this by emphasizing uniformity and consistency in initial reporting and subsequent follow-up actions by Federal and State DataQs analysts responding to “Requests for Data Reviews” (RDRs). The DataQs Users Guide and Best Practices Manual was developed through the collaborative efforts of State agency analysts, DataQs system developers and trainers, FMCSA field staff, FMCSA program office representatives, and data quality managers. DataQs is a convenient online system for commercial drivers, motor carriers, government entities and others to file concerns about safety performance data maintained in FMCSA’s central database and made available to the public through the Compliance - Safety - Accountability (CSA) Web site http://csa.fmcsa.dot.gov. Adherence by the States to the DataQs Users Guide and Best Practices Manual is an element included in the Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP) planning memo. With the implementation of the CSA program-and the increase in RDRs already being experienced by the Statesis it paramount that DataQ analysts refer to the DataQs Users Guide and Best Practices Manual as they review and research RDRs directed to them.

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Number of DataQs RDRs by Year and by Month (2004–2011)

The graph above depicts the number of RDRs submitted to the DataQs online system since its implementation in 2004. DataQs activity has risen each year due to the increased scrutiny of the data. The period leading up to the launch of CSA saw a dramatic increase in user activity. The best way a carrier or driver could assist in the resolution of an RDR is to: • Be explicit in providing a detailed description of the situation being questioned. In this way the DataQs analyst will understand exactly what to look for. • Be responsive to the DataQs analysts requesting additional supporting documentation -provide it as soon as possible. The RDR will remain open pending carrier or driver’s response for 60 days until the request is satisfied. After 60 days, the RDR will be closed with no action taken. • Be sure the responsible motor carrier and USDOT number are identified

correctly during an inspection or crash investigation. Fifty seven percent of all corrections to state reported data are in response to RDR type “Assigned to Wrong Carrier.” • Be familiar with the FMCSA criteria for reporting accidents and inspections. Many RDRs are filed and closed with no action taken because there is uncertainty with what should be reported. In general, the inspection file contains observations from roadside inspections. The inspection file does not contain information about adjudicated citations. The FMCSA accident file contains information about large trucks and buses involved in fatal, injury, and tow-due-to-disabling-damage cases. For questions or comments about the DataQs Users Guide and Best Practices Manual or the DataQs system in general, contact Betsy Benkowski at betsy.benkowski@dot.gov.


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Smart Roadside Initiative Charts a Path for the Future By Chris Flanigan, FMCSA, Technology Division

In 2008, FMCSA, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) brought together representatives from industry, government and safety for a workshop addressing “smart” roadside technologies. The attendees of the workshop agreed that commercial vehicle safety, security and mobility systems should be linked into a coordinated and comprehensive roadside program. They identified goals and objectives, along with individual projects, that should comprise the program. Soon thereafter, the Smart Roadside Initiative (SRI) was formally inaugurated. The vision for a “smart” roadside encompasses commercial vehicles, motor carriers, enforcement resources, highway facilities, intermodal facilities, toll facilities, and other nodes on the transportation system collecting data for their own purposes and seamlessly sharing information with the relevant parties to improve safety, security, operational efficiency, and freight mobility. This vision will be achieved through the application of interoperable technologies and information sharing between in-vehicle, onthe-road, and freight facility systems. Whenever possible, the Smart Roadside will leverage stakeholders’ current technology investments in order to augment existing programs and support new activities. The goals for SRI include: • Enhance roadside enforcement operations through improved screening and automation of inspection/compliance checks; • Provide enhanced road condition and traffic information to support commercial vehicle route planning and to support improved access to inter-

modal ports, urban pick-up, and delivery locations; • Identify key components (e.g., motor carrier, commercial vehicle, commercial driver, cargo) and communicate with commercial vehicles in realtime at highway speeds; and, • Ensure that the necessary standards, protocols and architecture are developed to support both interoperable operations across the country and appropriate data privacy requirements. Today, in 2011, SRI has evolved into a multi-modal initiative that now includes as partners the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and the Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA). The SRI plan is undergoing refinement in consideration of new technologies and intelligent transportation systems that have come onto the scene since the 2008 workshop. To that end, in November 2010, a review was launched to: • Investigate and identify successful deployments of truck related road-

…the Smart Roadside will leverage stakeholders’ current technology investments in order to augment existing programs and support new activities.

side technologies (for example, Commercial Vehicle Information Systems and Networks (CVISN)) that are currently in use to understand their potential of contributing to SRI goals and objectives and the possibility of their inclusion in the SRI framework; Review Smart Roadside research that is complete or underway to validate the candidate applications for SRI, identify possible enhancements to these applications, and understand how they may be brought together under a common operating framework; Conduct analysis to determine the applications that will be initially addressed for deployment; Assess stakeholder needs, goals, expectations, operational environment, processes, and characteristics of an SRI prototype; and, Apply systems engineering principles to develop and validate prototypes of these applications.

The current commercial vehicle environment consists of numerous federal, state, regional and private-sector programs that use a combination of manual, semi-automatic, and advanced technologies. The overall effectiveness and efficiencies of these efforts can be greatly improved by SRI once fully implemented. It is critical that new ideas and new technologies are brought to the discussion table to achieve the long-standing vision of achieving gains in safety, mobility and security. For questions or comments about the Smart Roadside Initiative, contact Chris Flanigan of FMCSA at chris.flanigan@dot.gov or Tom Kearney of FHWA at tom.kearney@dot.gov.

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TSA’s Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response (VIPR) Teams Safeguard Traveling Public By Kenneth Ward, TSA, Transportation Security Specialist, Highway and Motor Carrier Division

TSA’s Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response (VIPR) teams provide enhanced law enforcement and security presence to safeguard the traveling public in all modes of transportation. VIPR teams are deployed in coordination with local law enforcement and security personnel to detect, deter, and defeat criminal or terrorist activities. VIPR teams can be configured to offer a wide range of law enforcement and security capabilities, including behavior observation, security screening, explosive detection and traditional law enforcement skills. Team composition varies based on the local security needs but can include, federal air marshals, explosive detection canine teams, behavior detection officers, transportation security officers, transportation security inspectors, and bomb appraisal officers deployed in coordination with local law enforcement and security personnel. The diverse range of capabilities brought to bear by these professionals enable VIPR teams to provide a visible deterrent force either proactively or in response to elevated security alerts. VIPR teams are deployed in all modes of transportation, including commercial and general aviation, highway transportation and critical infrastructure, freight rail, maritime, mass transit, passenger rail, and pipeline. VIPR Activities involving Highway and Critical Infrastructure

Through a coordinated planning process between local law enforcement officials and TSA, VIPR teams augment existing law enforcement or security resources, provide detection capabilities and act as visible deterrents to protect critical infrastructure and highway transportation.

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TSA VIPR teams can perform a variety of law enforcement and security functions in surface transportation and critical infrastructure protection, including: • Roads, Bridges and Tunnels - VIPR teams can monitor roadways for unusual traffic, inspect vehicles, and provide a visible presence to deter criminal or terrorist activity. VIPR teams are routinely deployed nationwide to protect vital highway infrastructure such as bridges and tunnels. • Bus Terminals and Tourist Stops - In coordination with private bus or motor coach companies, VIPR teams can screen baggage and passengers, inspect buses, and detect suspicious behaviors or materials. • Monitor Truck Stops, Weigh Stations and Rest Areas - Trucks, especially those carrying valuable or hazardous materials, are most at risk when at a stop. VIPR teams can be deployed at truck stops, weigh stations, or rest areas to deter criminal and terrorist activity or in response to a specific threat. VIPR teams are a no-cost resource for expanding and enhancing local security

as part of normal security operations, during periods of heightened alert, or as a random deterrent force. VIPR teams provide equipment, expertise and a visible presence to help detect, deter, and defeat potential incidents. TSA’s Highway and Motor Carrier (HMC) Division utilizes the most effective, risk-based methodologies to assist VIPR teams to maximize the effectiveness of VIPR deployments nationwide. HMC continues to develop criteria to assist VIPR teams in identifying locations best suited to produce effective deterrence and detection results. Transportation stakeholders interested in having a VIPR operation scheduled at their location should contact their local TSA Federal Security Director (FSD) or local Federal Air Marshal Special Agent (FAMSAC). Local contact information can be obtained through the TSA website at www.TSA.gov or by calling 703-5633345. VIPR teams can be assembled on short notice in an emergency; however, to assist in scheduling and providing the optimal VIPR team makeup, please request VIPR team assistance at least two weeks in advance.


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Enforcement Members, Industry Discuss HazMat Concerns at COHMED in Tampa By Reggie Bunner, Public Service Commission of West Virginia, COHMED Region II Chairman and Keith Herring, North Carolina State Highway Patrol, COHMED Region II Assistant-Chairman The COHMED 2011 conference was held in Tampa, Florida where the weather was warm and very suitable for our outdoor activities. Attendees enjoyed many training sessions involving expert instruction on topics such as motorcoaches and hazardous materials, Class 7 Packaging Standards, and Anhydrous Ammonia nurse tanks. One training session included a practical exercise dealing with enforcement of non-bulk DOT specification cylinders and the transport vehicle. The Region meetings were a great benefit as enforcement members and industry discussed concerns with various hazardous material issues in their respective parts of the United States and Canada. The new CSA implementation and current progress was covered in detail by FMCSA, and was a large topic for discussion throughout the week among attendees. On behalf of the COHMED Program we would like to thank CVSA and all of our sponsors for making this year’s conference a success. We look forward to COHMED 2012 in a location to be announced. If you have never attended we encourage you to register and enjoy some of the best enforcement/industry interaction available! If you have an idea for the COHMED 2012 training agenda, we welcome your suggestions! You can contact COHMED leadership at: http://www.cvsa.org/programs/ cohmed_leadership.aspx directly from the CVSA website. Have a safe 2011 and we look forward to seeing you in 2012! HM 245 was published in the Federal Register Vol. 76, No. 21 / Tuesday, February 1, 2011. A summary of the final rule follows. Purpose: To incorporate provisions contained in certain widely used or

longstanding cargo tank special permits that are granted to multiple parties and have established safety records, by adding to regulations and eliminating renewal requests and reducing paperwork. Special Permits allow a company or individual to package or ship Hazardous Materials in a manner that varies from the regulations, provided an equivalent level of safety is maintained. The effective date of this final rule is 3-3-2011. The changes dealt with in this Federal Register are six special permits: 1. Special permit 11209. Authorizing the transport of LPG in non-DOT Specification Cargo tank motor vehicles known as moveable fuel storage tenders that are used exclusively for Agricultural purposes. 2. Special permit 13113. Authorizing the transport of Division 6.1 liquid soil pesticide fumigants in DOT specification MC 306, DOT 406 Cargo tank motor vehicles and DOT 57 portable tanks used exclusively for agricultural purposes. 3. Special permit12284. Authorizing the transport of certain Hazardous Materials used for roadway striping in non-DOT specification Cargo tanks. 4. Special permit13341. Authorizing private motor carriers to transport LPG in consumer storage containers filled to greater than five percent of the containers water capacity. 5. Special permit10950. Authorizing the transport of Nurse Tanks securely mounted on field trucks. 6. Special permit 13554. Authorizing for nurse tanks with missing or illegible ASME plates to continue to be used in anhydrous ammonia service under specified conditions.

Adoption of Special permits as rules of general applicability provides wider access to the benefits and regulatory flexibility of the provisions granted in the special permits. It also is a benefit to both industry and for regulatory agencies. These six special permits addressed in the final rule that authorize cargo tank transportation operations not specifically permitted under Hazardous Materials Regulations were initially issued to members of industry associations or similar organizations. They have well established safety records and therefore PHMSA has determined that they are excellent candidates for incorporation into the Hazardous Materials Regulations. Incorporating these special permits into the Hazardous Materials Regulations will eliminate the need for over 10,000 current grantee’s to reapply for the renewal of the six permits every four years, and for PHMSA to process the renewal applications, thereby eliminating a significant paperwork burden both on industry and the government. Moveable Fuel Storage Tenders (SP 11209) This permit allows the transportation of LPG in non-DOT specification cargo tank motor vehicle in agricultural application. Examples are farmers using these configurations for crop drying, crop irrigation, flame weeding, plant defoliation prior to harvest, and other agricultural operations. This special permit has been in effect since 1994 and has been utilized by over 3,400 grantees. A review of the Hazardous Material Incident data library did not reveal any incidents related to this special permit over the past ten years.

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Liquid Soil Pesticide Fumigants (SP 13113) This permit allows the transportation of Division 6.1 liquid soil pesticide fumigants in MC 306, and DOT 406 cargo tank motor vehicles and DOT 57 portable tanks used exclusively for agricultural use of methyl bromide to ensure the adequate protection of crops from pest infestation and to preserve agricultural productivity. Transportation of these materials is limited to private motor carriage and must be between a bulk loading facility and farms (including between farms) not exceeding 150 miles from one another. This special permit has been utilized by hundreds of grantees. A review of the Hazardous Material Incident data library did not reveal any incidents related to this special permit since the date of its issuance. Non-DOT Specification Cargo Tanks Used for Roadway Striping (SP 12284) This permit allows the transportation in commerce of certain Hazardous Materials used for roadway striping in non-DOT specification cargo tanks.

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These non-DOT specification cargo tanks are used for the low hazard job of applying roadway striping to paved roads throughout the United States. This special permit has been utilized by over 100 grantees. A review of the Hazardous Material Incident data library did not reveal any incidents related to this special permit since the date of its issuance. LPG Storage Containers (SP 13341) This permit authorizes the transportation by private motor carrier of LPG in consumer storage containers in quantities greater than five percent of the containers water capacity. The storage containers designated in the special permit are designed for permanent installation on consumer premises. The special permit authorizes one-way transportation only, from the consumer location to the container owner’s nearest LPG plant. This special permit has been in effect since 2004 and has been utilized by several thousand grantees. A review of the Hazardous Material Incident data library did not reveal any incidents related to this special permit since the date of its issuance. Further the new regulation states the storage container must have a water

capacity not exceeding 500 gallons and be ASME “U” stamped which indicates tank was designed and constructed in accordance with ASME code. In addition the container must be inspected for leaks, corroded or abraded areas, dents, weld distortions, or any other condition that could make the container unsafe for transportation. PHMSA is also requiring that (1.) Only one storage container be transported at one time on a motor vehicle; (2.) the storage container be lifted by slings, not by lifting lugs; and (3.) the storage container be loaded and secured on the motor vehicle so that the container is well-secured against movement and completely within the envelope of the vehicle. Finally, transportation is limited to one-way movement from the consumers premises to the container owner’s nearest facility. Nurse tanks Mounted on field trucks (SP 10950) This permit authorizes the use of a nurse tank securely mounted on a field truck. Field trucks are specifically designed and equipped to improve safety and efficiency by being more maneuverable and more stable than a farm wagon when moving over hilly terrain. A definition for field truck is specified in 173.315 as new paragraph (m) (3) (iv). These trucks are operated in remote rural areas in eastern Washington, Oregon, and northern Idaho within a short distance of the fertilizer distribution point. This special permit has been in effect since 1993 and has been utilized by over one hundred grantees. A review of the Hazardous Material Incident data library did not reveal any incidents related to this special permit since the date of its issuance. Also tanks operated under this special permit are subject to the periodic testing requirements under subpart E of part 180. Nurse tanks with missing or illegible ASME plates (SP 13554) This permit allows the continued use in anhydrous ammonia service of nurse

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tanks with missing or illegible ASME plates provided the tanks are inspected and tested. Nurse tanks must be manufactured in accordance with the applicable ASME code requirements in effect at the time of manufacture. The ASME code requires tanks built to its specifications to have an attached plate that lists the manufacturer, maximum allowable working pressure, minimum design metal temperature, and the year of manufacture. However, many tanks are missing the plate. The special permit allows continued use of tanks provided the tanks are inspected and tested. Specifically, the tanks must undergo an external visual inspection and testing using the procedures specified in 180.407(d), and a thickness test using the procedures specified in 180.407 (i), and a pressure test using the procedures specified in 180.407 (g). The special permit also establishes minimum head and shell thickness, and nurse tanks not meeting those levels must be removed from service. Nurse tanks that pass the above-described tests must be marked with a unique owner’s identification number and must pass the same test at least every five years to remain in service. This special permit has been utilized by thousands of grantees. A review of the Hazardous Material Incident data library did not reveal any incidents related to this special permit since the date of its issuance. Also in 173.23 PHMSA is re-designating current paragraph (h) as new paragraph (i) and adding a provision to new paragraph (h) that authorizes packagings permanently marked with a special permit number for which the provisions of the special permit were incorporated into the Hazardous Materials Regulations to continue to be used for the life of the packagings without removing or obliterating the special permit markings. This provision will serve to avoid imposing the burden of requiring the removal from service of such packagings while the markings are removed or obliterated.

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CVSA Secretary/Treasurer, ME State Trooper Lt. Kelly Participates in Capitol Hill Briefing on Need for Change to Truck Weight

Lt. Thomas Kelly (shown at left), the commander of commercial vehicle enforcement for the Maine State Police, joined Rep. Mike Michaud (D-ME) (shown at right) recently in Washington, D.C. to press the need for changes to truck weight limits in Maine. Michaud and Kelly spoke before a briefing organized on Capitol Hill to educate members of Congress and their staff on the issue. “An important part of advancing a permanent truck weight change for Maine is educating members of Congress and their staff on the issue,” said Michaud. “I was pleased that Lt. Kelly was able to make it to Washington to provide his valuable firsthand perspective on the need for this change.” Last month, Michaud, a member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, introduced the “Safe and Efficient Transportation Act.” The bill, which is cosponsored by Rep. Jean Schmidt (R-OH), would allow Maine and other states to increase the weight of trucks allowed on their Interstate systems. The reintroduction of the legislation comes as Congress prepares to consider the first bill to reauthorize surface transportation programs in more than six years. In addition to Michaud and Kelly, other presenters included John Woodrooffe, Head of Vehicle Safety Analytics, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute; Harry Haney, Associate Director of Transportation Planning, Kraft Foods; and Richard Lewis, President, Agriculture and Forestry Transportation Reform Coalition.

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CVSA Emphasizes Proposed HOS Regulation Changes Must be Simple, Enforceable Proposed Changes are Overly Complex, Opens Door to Falsification, Enforcement Challenges In recently submitted comments on FMCSA’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on hours of service (HOS) for commercial drivers, CVSA indicated if implemented the proposed rules could have the unintended consequence of reducing overall CMV and motorist safety. According to CVSA, the changes could make roadside enforcement more complex and open the door toward more drivers falsifying their records. “Each year, CVSA-certified inspectors conduct nearly four-million inspections all across North America which provides CVSA with an unmatched level of real-world experience in commercial driver and vehicle safety,” said CVSA’s Executive Director Stephen A. Keppler. “The consensus from our state and jurisdictional enforcement members regarding these proposed rules is that they are confusing and not easily understood. The proposed rules, in our view, will be

more difficult to enforce roadside than the rules in place today.” As CMV crash rates have declined significantly while the current HOS rules have been in effect, CVSA contends the Agency’s proposal does not appear to substantiate the need for the proposed regulatory changes. Instead, CVSA encourages enabling more tools for enhancing enforcement and additional exploration of the effect between HOS, fatigue and performance before considering any drastic changes to the current rules. CVSA cited enforceability as the most challenging portion of these proposed changes. With no current regulation requiring supporting documents for drivers to maintain on the vehicle, inspectors will have a more difficult time checking the validity of record of duty status (RODS) entries. Additionally, falsification is a major concern as in some cases fueling,

loading, unloading, and other forms of onduty time will be listed on the RODS as resting in, or upon, a parked vehicle. The NPRMs for both HOS and Electronic On-Board Recorders (EOBRs) also provide no funding provisions for the training of enforcement personnel and technology upgrades that will be necessary. With no additional funding provided to enforcement entities already stretched thin by limited resources, further enforcement needs could go unmet. As a result, uniformity may degrade under the proposal as compared to the current set of rules. CVSA also recommended that FMCSA facilitate and promote the implementation of Fatigue Management Programs and Driver Health and Wellness Programs in the industry. To read CVSA’s submitted comments go to http://www.cvsa.org/committees/ documents/driver/2011CVSAHOS Comments_%20Final.pdf

NEW CVSA ASSOCIATE AND LOCAL ENFORCEMENT MEMBERS Ace Truck Repair, Inc.

HB Contractors

North Carolina Trucking Association

Amtrak

IESI Corporation

Optima Associates

Asociacion Nacional de Transporte Privado

KEYTROLLER, LLC

SGS North America, Inc.

LITE-CHECK, LLC

Specialty Rental

Barnhart Crane and Rigging Co.

LJ Transportation, LLC

SpeedGauge, Inc

ChemTel, Inc.

Mansfield Police Department

Tennessee Steel Haulers, Inc.

Clean Harbors Env. Services, Inc.

Metrostar Distribution, Inc.

Clifton Gunderson, LLP

Michigan Auto Law

Tennessee Trucking Association and Foundation

Fort Worth Police Department

Mr. Safety-Check Systems, Inc.

UAP Heavy Vehlele Parts Divlslon

Galfab, Inc.

National Interstate Insurance Company

Weatherford International, Inc.

Halsey King and Associates, Inc. HazMat Resources, Inc.

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CSA and Roadside Inspection — Webinar Training Available: Delivering the BASICs to the Roadside Inspectors By Maj. Mark Savage, Colorado State Patrol In December 2010, FMCSA replaced the Safety Status Measurement System (SafeStat) with an improved Carrier Safety Measurement System (CSMS) as part of the national rollout of the Compliance, Safety and Accountability (CSA) Program. This action was the first of many steps in the national rollout of CSA. This initial step is worthy of significant attention from roadside inspectors. This is because the change from SafeStat to the Safety Measurement System (SMS) has and will continue to impact roadside inspectors as they conduct safety inspections on commercial motor vehicles. During these and other contacts with truck drivers and their employers, trucking companies, inspectors are likely to receive questions about CSA from these critical stakeholders. Additionally, inspectors began using an updated version of the Inspection Selection System (ISS) to prioritize and select vehicles for inspection. The new ISS allows the roadside inspector to view a carrier’s safety performance data through the seven Behavior Analysis and Safety Improvement Categories (BASICs) as opposed to the previously used and displayed Safety Evaluation Area (SEA) assessments. The ISS interface change was accomplished in December, with the change from SafeStat to CSMS. Also beginning in December of 2010, the new ISS transmitted the identities and percentiles of motor carriers with BASICs above the intervention thresholds to States. The new ISS bases its inspection recommendations (Pass, Optional, Inspect), in part, on BASICs above the intervention thresholds from the CSMS rather than SEAs from SafeStat. Data sufficiency and serious violations from investigations conducted

and starts the process to improve commercial vehicle safety.” The webinar provided attendees with an increased awareness of CSA rollout by: • Offering an overview of CSA and the BASIC assessment categories; • Highlighting the increased importance of roadside data in CSA; • Re-emphasizing the importance of roadside data quality and uniformity; and, • Presenting changes to ISS and its user interface CSA-ISS.

within the previous 12 months also influence inspection prioritization. To familiarize inspectors with CSA and the changes to the roadside inspection systems such as ISS, FMCSA’s National Training Center in conjunction with CVSA recently conducted two webinar training opportunities on CSA and the Roadside Inspection Program. Sgt. Rocco Domenico of the Colorado State Patrol taught the 30-minute training entitled, “Delivering the BASICs to the Roadside Inspectors.” Sergeant Domenico is the Colorado State Patrol’s Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP) Training Coordinator and a long-time member of CVSA’s Training Committee. When asked what the take-home message for this training is, Sgt. Domenico said “What we want the roadside inspector to understand is that every inspection you complete, whether violations were discovered or the inspection was clean, drives CSA

The target audience for the two webinars in March was all FMCSA Division Administrators, FMCSA State Program Managers, and State MCSAP program managers and training coordinators. After the presentation, attendees were asked to take the training that was provided and deliver it to all inspectors in their respective State. The training was recorded and is now available online at http://csa.fmcsa.dot.gov/ yourrole/fmcsa.aspx (login required) for all agencies to incorporate into their commercial motor vehicle safety inspector training. Agencies have the option of allowing inspectors to access the training at their convenience or presenting the PowerPoint themselves to all of their inspectors at a future training opportunity. The intent of this training is to raise Federal, State, and local inspectors’ awareness of CSA and enhance roadside uniformity through consistent training opportunities. In order to increase uniformity and awareness of CSA, FMCSA has also asked that each lead agency receiving MCSAP funds require every inspector conducting inspections for the lead agency to attend this training.

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Operation Air Brake Kicks Off with Event at TMC Annual Meeting, Provides Forum for Dialogue on Technical Issues The American Trucking Associations’ (ATA) 2011 Technology and Maintenance Council Annual Meeting and Transportation Technology Exhibition was held February 8 - 11, 2011 in Tampa, FL. Highlights of the meeting included over 80 task force sessions in which TMC recommended practices applicable to a wide variety of technologies and procedures are proposed, developed, and updated. At least eleven study group sessions were held, providing a forum for dialogue about various technical issues, including: S.1 Study Group discussions about the supply of adequate voltage throughout

vehicle circuits; the S.3 Study Group issues with dissipating under hood heat in 2010 EPA engine equipped vehicles; S.6 Study Group session providing an overview of the new heavy truck stopping distance regulations; and the S.2 Study Group on tire inflation pressure technologies, among others. ATA President Gov. Bill Graves spoke at the kickoff breakfast. He provided a snapshot of key political and regulatory issues facing truck transportation at the federal level. He mentioned the recent changes to the hours of service regulations, which he mentioned seemed to make the rule more complex than nec-

CVSA Academic Scholarship

Since its inception in 1982, CVSA has been a safety advocate of commercial vehicles. CVSA represents the individuals who dedicate their work to promoting an environment free of commercial vehicle accidents and incidents. As North America’s leading commercial vehicle safety organization, the CVSA Academic Scholarship is the centerpiece of the Alliance’s educational outreach initiative. The Scholarship provides two $1000 grants to graduating high school seniors whose parent or legal guardian is a good standing member of CVSA. This grant program is competitive in its selection criteria, uniquely tailored to recognize outstanding high school seniors. Scholarship recipients are selected by weighing academic performance and extracurricular activities.

Application Deadline: April 30, 2011 For more information, please visit: www.cvsa.org/about/cvsa_academicscholarships.aspx

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essary. He also highlighted the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s new Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) program that tracks trucking fleet regulatory compliance, and the new fuel efficiency regulations promulgated by the U.S. EPA and U.S. DOT, to be phased in starting in 2014. He noted that ATA supports a fuel tax increase in order to help pay for improvements to the highway infrastructure. Finally, Gov. Graves cited results from a survey, conducted by the American Transportation Research Institute, which identified principle concerns of the trucking industry for this year. They are: (1) Concern about economy; (2) Compliance, Safety, Accountability program; (3) Government regulations; (4) Hours of Service; (5) Driver shortage; (6) Fuel issues; (7) Transportation funding and infrastructure; (8) Onboard truck technologies; (9) Fuel economy standards; and (10) Truck size and weight. Finally, CVSA Operation Airbrake also took advantage of the TMC Transportation Technology Exhibition as an opportunity to educate fleet maintenance and supplier personnel in attendance by featuring our traveling brake display. Dr. Steve Shaffer and Kurt Bosworth, of Battelle Memorial Institute, demonstrated with the models the importance of keeping brakes in adjustment and properly diagnosing the causes of out-of-stroke conditions in brake system components. They also solicited possible interest by fleets and others in using the brake models for training and educational purposes. Dozens of attendees were able to see the demonstrations, making for a very successful Operation Airbrake outreach event.


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“Defeating Distracted Driving”: Coming Soon! By Karen Rasmussen, President & CEO, Arizona Trucking Association

As the federal government and a number of states have moved to ban texting and hand-held cell phone use, they are motivated in part by studies that show that 20 percent of crashes involve some form of distracted driving. According to U.S. Department of Transportation, distracted driving resulted in nearly 6,000 deaths and more than half a million injuries in 2008. A 2010 Governors Highway Safety Association report entitled “Curbing Distracted Driving” says that fatalities arising out of distractions increased over 20 percent from 2004 to 2008. However, virtually all the media attention, legislation and rulemaking are focused on the dangers of texting and using cell phones in moving vehicles. It’s easy to understand why. Even though widespread cell phone ownership and use is a fairly new phenomenon, cell phone ownership now surpasses land-line subscriptions, and a number of studies show that half the U.S. population has no landline in their homes! The use of these devices for communicating through texting is an even newer trend, and the growing practice of texting while driving creates new challenges for traffic safety organizations. Until quite recently, few commercial truck and bus companies had written policies in place to govern cell phone use by their drivers and employees. They may have believed such policies were unnecessary. After all, their drivers are arguably better trained, have greater safety awareness on the highway and are more capable than the average motorist of managing distractions when they occur. Moreover, even some of the “cell phone” policies in place today may overlook the many other distractions-in the external driving environment, inside the vehicle and inside the driver-that play a role in traffic crashes.

In mid-2010, CVSA, Arizona Trucking Association and Arizona Department of Public Safety launched a partnership to develop a commercial driver training curriculum to combat distracted driving. “Defeating Distracted Driving” will feature a 15-minute DVD, written handouts, model company policies governing distracted driving and a PowerPoint, and will be made available by CVSA for driver safety meetings, truck driver training schools and other entities that regularly interface with commercial truck and bus drivers. CVSA, ATA’s non-profit educational foundation (ATEF) and AZDPS listened to ideas from an advisory committee of government entities, associations and commercial truck and bus companies to determine the approach and scope of the materials. The partners and the advisory committee operated from the premise that laws and rules banning texting and cell phone use will be difficult to enforce, and that much can be gained by educating and properly training commercial drivers how to eliminate or minimize distractions. Nearly 20 trucking and bus companies participated in filming for the DVD and in photography sessions for the handouts. “Defeating Distracted Driving” iden-

tifies, describes and offers techniques for limiting the three principal types of distractions truck and bus drivers encounter on the highway: • Visual distractions that cause the driver to look away from the road and view something unrelated to driving (billboards, accident scenes, street signs, etc.) • Manual distractions, including tasks in which the driver removes one or both hands from the steering wheel or other driving control to perform a nondriving task (eating, drinking, adjusting mirrors, tuning the radio, etc.) • Cognitive distractions, the mental thoughts and feelings (anger, anxiety, worry, etc.) that distract and divert the driver’s attention from the road Research has shown that nearly all distractions involve a combination of two or even all three types of distractions. The materials and model policies discourage any cell phone use or texting while the truck or bus is moving, suggesting that cell phones, iPhones, iPads and other devices be turned off or placed in “silent” mode, and phone calls be sent to voice mail until the driver can safely pull off the road to respond. The draft curriculum materials were reviewed and evaluated by 368 commercial truck and bus drivers and their safety supervisors throughout December 2010 and January 2011. Based on their recommendations, ATA, AZDPS and CVSA are making final changes to the materials, with the goal of having them ready for release in time for the Chicago meeting. For more information on “Defeating Distracted Driving,” contact Karen Rasmussen at krasmussen@aztrucking.com or 602.850.6000, or Randy West at randyw@cvsa.org

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International Safety Team is a Commitment From Many Groups to One Common Goal: Safety By Senior Trooper Rick Oaks, Utah Highway Patrol

As a member of CVSA’s first International Safety Team I have learned that safety is everyone’s responsibility. It requires a commitment from many groups and organizations joining together with specific goals and programs focused on making our highways and roadways safer for all. As a member of the CVSA Interna-

tional Safety Team, I have taken the opportunity during educational outreach presentations within my state and as an instructor for the FMCSA and the National Training Center to explain the mission statement of CVSA which is: “To promote commercial motor vehicle safety and security by providing leadership to

CVSA International Safety Team Recognizes the Best of the Best In CMV Safety

2012 NOMINATIONS NOW OPEN The CVSA International Safety Team award recognizes the efforts of these dedicated government and law enforcement personnel from across North America, who go above and beyond the call of duty of their normal responsibilities and have such a significant impact on CMV safety, highway safety, and an overall reduction in crashes and deaths. For more information about the program, how to apply for the award, guidelines, and the selection criteria please visit http://www.cvsa.org/programs/ist.aspx.

To become a CVSA International Safety Team Sponsor, please contact us at cvsahq@cvsa.org.

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enforcement, industry and policy makers.” I have also taken the opportunity to stress the goals of CVSA which include: 1. Ensure uniform and reciprocal application of North American inspection procedures and out-of-service criteria 2. Ensure effective roadside inspections 3. Ensure that technology supports enforcement’s needs for focusing on high-risk carriers, vehicles, drivers and cargoes An example of CVSA’s commitment to safety is the CVSA Work Shops which they host which provides a forum for industry, drivers, suppliers, law enforcement and regulatory agencies to come together to discuss common issues and concerns which affect the safe operation of commercial motor vehicles on our roadways. The North American Cargo Securement Harmonization Forum is also held at this event and is open to all interested parties. Other examples of CVSA’s commitment to safety are: 1. Road Check June 7-9, 2011 2. NAIC August 8-13, 2011 3. Brake Safety Week September 11-17, 2011 4. Operation Safe Driver October 16-22-2011 Take the opportunity to get involved in programs like those listed above. Each of us has an opportunity to make a difference. It was once said: “In the search for perfection you will find excellence”. As a member of the CVSA International Safety Team I am committed to do my part in promoting safety. Together, we can make a difference!


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Promoting CMV Safety and Security Starts With Education and Outreach

When it comes to promoting commercial motor vehicle safety and security, no one does it better than CVSA Members and Associate Members that are actively involved in providing leadership to enforcement, industry and policy makers. In order to inspire, influence, and support our members and partners in the pursuit of our mission, CVSA has developed a set of tools to use in promoting the Alliance to outside organizations as well as to prospective members. Finding the Right Fit is an overview of CVSA that outlines our programs, committees, and products as well as

identifying who are Members and Associate Members, the benefits to membership and sponsorship. While we have printed many kits for distribution, we have also developed a powerpoint presentation that can be used as a stand-alone presentation or used in combination with the kit. To order printed hardcopies, please email communications@cvsa.org. To complement our outreach efforts, CVSA is utilizing several of the popular social media tools such as LinkedIn, Facebook, and to some extent Twitter. CVSA has a LinkedIn group page which

is for Members only and will be used to communicate information about upcoming programs, conferences and issues. CVSA also maintains a Facebook page that is completely open to the public and is used to promote CVSA’s many programs and positions to both stakeholders as well as the general public. In addition to the main CVSA page, we have created program specific Facebook pages to help us extend our education and outreach efforts for the Operation Safe Driver and Teens & Trucks programs. We will roll out other pages as it becomes necessary.

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Enhancing Roadside Inspections, Enforcement Data Uniformity Anticipated to Reduce DataQs By Capt. Jake Elovirta, Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles, CVSA Information Systems Committee Chair

Developing CVSA’s Operational Policy 14 on Enhancing Roadside Inspections and Enforcement Data Uniformity, a multiyear project driven by the Vehicle, Driver and HazMat Committees, was recently approved by the Executive Committee. The Information Systems Committee is now moving toward implementing the policy by making recommendations to FMCSA. This policy is a work in progress since it receives regular updates from the committees and also will be an area of focus during the CVSA Workshop and FMCSA’s Annual MCSAP Leadership Conference in Chicago this April. For those not familiar, the Information Systems Committee continually assesses the collection of CMV data and information necessary to support CMV safety enforcement and meet future information demands. In addition, the committee: reviews new information technology adaptable to CMV safety practices and the improved collection and use of information; Reviews and shares best practices for improving results-oriented safety information analysis and research; Continually works to improve informa-

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tion quality, accuracy, and timeliness; Participates in ongoing efforts seeking improved access to CMV safety information and more effective means for providing and presenting information with FMCSA; and Encourages commitment of FMCSA to support state managers by providing adequate funds and safety information resources. DataQs One of the biggest issues the Information Systems Committee is focusing on is CSA and its impact on the number of DataQ challenges. The DataQs system is an electronic means for filing concerns about Federal and State data released to the public by the FMCSA. Through this system, data concerns are automatically forwarded to the appropriate office for resolution. The system also allows filers to monitor the status of each filing. CSA requires data collected from police crash reports and roadside inspections to be included in the carriers’ and commercial drivers’ safety profiles. With CSA, every aspect of every inspection counts - not just the out-of-service violations. FMCSA’s online “DataQs” system has served as the primary mechanism whereby carriers and commercial drivers can challenge the accuracy of data that is

used to determine safety fitness ratings. The DataQs system is an online portal for filing concerns about data released to the public by FMCSA. It allows users to monitor the status of a challenge from submission to resolution. The DataQs system is comprised of a network of federal and state analysts who review and evaluate the data, the challenge and the corresponding evidence or supporting information that has been supplied. Each data challenge or request for review submitted by a carrier or driver is routed to the appropriate federal or state office for resolution. Since 2004, when the DataQs program was established, slightly more than 100,000 “Requests for Data Reviews” (RDRs) have been lodged, according to FMCSA records. Of that number, approximately 63 percent are logged as “Closed with action taken.” Relative to the total number of inspection and accident records that have been reported to FMCSA over that same time period this represents approximately three-tenths of one percent of the records being amended as a result of a Request for Data Review. The average time to resolve an RDR has been 20 days. (See related story on page 10.) From 2009 to 2010 many states have seen a triple-digit increase in the challenges to data that are reported through SAFETYNET. It is important for industry members to review their CSA


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safety measurements system scores. Industry’s heightened scrutiny of its CSA SMS ratings is a big concern, not only for industry but from enforcement’s prospective since the increase in requests for RDRs are taxing many states resources and personnel. By reviewing SMS scores it can help carriers anticipate where they need to improve and ultimately reduce the need to file a DataQ RDR. There are however, cases of a lack of understanding by some industry members that filing a RDR will remove a violation. State members are committed to the accuracy of all data collected and screen RDRs to guarantee the accuracy of data reported. IT System Deployment/Changes Another topic of discussion the Information System Committee is addressing surrounds the lead time needed by state partners for system changes and updates. Many state members voice their concerns when FMCSA issues software release changes for the various federal/state programs and there has not been enough time to ensure that every system user receives the software updates. In addition, some states have

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developed their own systems that require software development changes. The Information Systems Committee has raised the question of whether there is a need for a more uniform set schedule, and to improve field vetting of the software prior to implementation. Additionally, at what point must the line be set in the sand as to when new changes be in place? This is also a concern for carriers who want the new coding reflected in their inspection report and used towards there SMS ratings. State members have expressed interest in twice yearly updates that will help improve the scheduling of updates to all enforcement users in member jurisdictions. This is a discussion that will continue in Chicago. Lastly, the Information Systems Committee, in a effort to be timely and responsive to member issues, has over the last year begun to hold monthly conference calls that are open to state, federal, and industry membership. The normally one hour conference calls are designed to provide updates from FMCSA as well as facilitate membership discussion on information system related items To view the Information Systems Committee’s Agenda for the CVSA Workshop in Chicago, please go to http://www.cvsa.org/committees/info_ systems.aspx.

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New FMCSA “Smart Phone App” May Soon Play a Key Role as Roadside Screening Tool By Jonathan Mueller, FMCSA, ART Technology Division

Know someone who can’t seem to put their smart phone down? Perhaps that’s you? The simple reason smart phones are becoming more popular is that many users find them extremely handy. They can provide instant access to just about anything and are a convenient tool to help manage your work and social life. A conversation along those lines occurred at a recent meeting of the FMCSA Field Information Technology (IT) Steering Group. The discussion soon developed into a recommendation to develop, test and evaluate a “proof-of-concept” application for the Apple iPad/iPhone operating system (iOS) that would provide “safety, cost and productivity benefits” to FMCSA and its state partners. This is not the first time that FMCSA has sought to leverage new technology to gain improvements to its processes or procedures. In 2004, the Agency investigated the merger of portable hand-held computers with the new “Inspection Selection System with Driver data,” otherwise known as ISS-D software. The project involved putting Hewlett Packard iPAQ personal digital assistants (PDAs) that were running an ISS application that included driver conviction data into the hands of safety inspec-

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tors. The ISS-D project, with its use of highly-portable devices, proved to be a more efficient means of making inspection decisions at the roadside. The wireless connectivity allowed officers to retrieve information more easily. Without a direct connection to the Internet via the hand-held device, however, its utility was limited. The ISS-D software was later incorporated into desktop and laptop computers used by roadside inspectors. Fast forward to 2011: Smart phone applications, or “apps,” are everywhere. Various agencies of the U.S. Government have developed specialized apps for their particular duty functions. The Internal Revenue Service, for example, has an app to check the status of income tax returns, while the Federal Bureau

of Investigation has a “Most Wanted” app. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed an app for the Transportation Security Agency. Within the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Federal Aviation Administration has created an “e-reader” app for their 689-page long 2010 Aeronautical Information Manual. Introducing the FMCSA iPhone/iPad Roadside Screening app With development support from the Volpe Center, the FMCSA iPhone/iPad Roadside Screening app is designed to provide “realtime” information to commercial vehicle safety inspectors. This will expedite the “inspect/pass” decision by providing safety data to the inspector as the vehicle is approaching an inspection bay. By entering the USDOT number into a simple user interface on the touch screen of the iPad/iPhone, the application will return


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values for the Inspection Selection System (ISS) score, Performance Registration Information System Management (PRISM) Out-of-Service hits, and USDOT License and Insurance (L&I) status. The app will process both the originating request for safety information and the in-coming return data through a secure encrypted connection. The requested data will be retrieved from multiple sources, including the Motor Carrier Management Information System (MCMIS), Safety and Fitness Electronic Records (SAFER), L&I, PRISM, as well as others. The information will then be streamlined and summarized before being displayed on the application interface. Depending on the returned value, the roadside inspection officer will be able to touch the indicator to see expanded details and then decide to stop the truck or bus for further inspection while obtaining a more detailed report through the FMCSA Portal on his/her laptop computer. The application development for the FMCSA iPhone/iPad Roadside Screening app is scheduled for March while the deployment to field locations is slated to begin in early April. The proof-of-concept for this project will be to evaluate the application and the devices for usability, application browsing, usefulness of search applications, multitouch screen functionality, battery life, and speed and connectivity. The evaluation period is expected to last several months. Updates will be provided in coming issues of Guardian. Meanwhile, for questions or comments on this project, contact Jonathan Mueller at jon.mueller@dot.gov

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Driver-Traffic Enforcement Committee Takes on Full Agenda at CVSA Workshop in Chicago By Capt. Dan Meyer, Kansas Highway Patrol, CVSA Driver Traffic Enforcement Committee Chair

The Driver Traffic Enforcement Committee is tasked with providing leadership through uniformity and conformity of driver-related safety issues and promoting effective traffic enforcement strategies to reduce commercial motor vehicle (CMV) crashes. This has been a very busy year and we have a full agenda at the CVSA Workshop in Chicago in April 2011. Some of the areas that we will focus on include: CSA and DataQ issues, Electronic On-Board Recorders (EOBR’s), Hours-ofService (HOS), Distracted Driving, and speed warnings and citations to name just a few.

Manual). In an effort to constantly improve, FMCSA’s National Training Center desires to develop a new driver interview education course to address this and other issues. Another good resource coming up is the BASICS to the Roadside (B2R) CSA Training Webinars and Training material available on the web. Again, see Maj. Mark Savage’s story on CSA and Roadside Inspection - Webinar Training Available: Delivering the BASICs to the Roadside Inspectors for more information on what’s being offered on page 17.

DataQs — Review of State Processes Asking the right questions can always prove beneficial, especially when it comes to conducting a detailed inspection that includes a good driver interview. Experience has taught us that taking the time to ask a couple of basic questions can prevent a DataQ. The objective of the driver interview is to gather information about the trip and load, prior to checking driver documentation. It is important to remember that the interview continues throughout the entire inspection process. During this process ensure the responsible motor carrier and USDOT number are identified correctly. Fifty-seven percent of all corrections to state reported data are in response to RDR type “Assigned to Wrong Carrier.” (See the related story on DataQs Users Guide and Best Practices

Electronic On-Board Recorders (EOBRs) Consideration of EOBR’s seems to have risen to the top of everyone’s list — enforcement, industry, manufacturers, Congress and FMCSA. In April 2010, FMCSA issued a final rule that mandates EOBRs for interstate carriers with serious patterns of HOS violations. In the Fall of 2010, FMCSA issued a proposed rule that would extend the first EOBR rule to require all interstate commercial truck and bus companies to install EOBRs to monitor their drivers’ HOS compliance. Carriers that violate this EOBR requirement would face civil penalties of up to $11,000 for each offense. Noncompliance would also negatively impact a carrier’s safety fitness rating and DOT operating authority. At CVSA’s request, FMCSA extended the comment period from April 4, 2011 to (continued on page 26) May 23, 2011.

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INSPECTOR’S CORNER

Jurisdictions Gear Up For NAIC By Choosing Their Best CMV Inspectors By Richard Robinson, Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Transportation Enforcement Officer, NAIC 2010 Grand Champion Richard Robinson

Well it is getting to be that time of year again. Many jurisdictions are getting ready to decide who their representative will be in Orlando, FL at this year’s North American Inspector’s Championship (NAIC). Commercial vehicle inspectors will be pushed to the edge through endurance and concentration tests that haven’t been experienced since medieval times. Once the best of the best are found, they will be locked in a room for months on end with the only things to read being the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria (NASOOSC) and their respective safety regulations. All kidding aside, let us discuss Ontario’s process of choosing a representative. First of all, we abide by the old saying “timing is everything.” Our preliminary testing is not done until the end of May. This conveniently falls shortly after

everyone has had their yearly CVSA refresher training. This allows an opportunity for officers to receive updates on any changes that have taken affect and also get clarification on particulars they, or fellow officers may be having problems with. There is no sense going in to write a test with outdated information. Come the end of May, officers across the province volunteer to write the test in their respective region. Ontario has their enforcement program divided into five regions. The test is made up of three sections: a general knowledge test comprised mainly of questions taken from the CVSA NASOOSC with a few questions mixed in on our applicable legislation; a daily log consisting of 15 days worth of logs to pick apart; and, a dangerous goods scenario. In the past, these tests have been comprised of quite a few wild sce-

narios and obscure questions, making them harder and harder. Over the last few years, the National Safety Code (NSC) Challenge, our version of NAIC, has changed paths and taken on more of a training opportunity for officers. Questions are being designed to cover more day-to-day events. After all, when the “winner” is announced and only has a score of 42 percent it does not give a lot of confidence to the participants. Ten participants are chosen to compete at the Provincial competition which is usually held the second week of July. These are selected as follows: top overall score from each region (five people), top score of remaining competitors in each of the three categories, and then the next two highest overall scores. Our Provincial NSC Challenge mirrors NAIC pretty well.

DRIVER-TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT COMMITTEE (Continued from page 25) CVSA created a task force, working with the Technology and Maintenance Council, to get a better understanding of what the implementation issues are with EOBRs. We will be getting updates of this task force in Chicago. In order for enforcement to effectively enforce EOBR compliance, several hurdles need to be cleared before uniform implementation can occur. According to a recent CVSA survey of its members, there are several areas of concern including support of technology, data accessibility, management and transfer, as well as enforcement safety. Many enforcement jurisdictions IT systems are simply not ready or capable at

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this time to support wireless transfer of data or UBS transfer of information mainly due to security measures for their computer networks. Currently, the average enforcement officer can do log book enforcement effectively and safely. Gaining data from an in-cab EOBR by an inspector may cause safety issues for the inspector roadside and safety issues of the data that has the potential to harm computers. Simply put, there are too many different types of EOBRs on the market and enforcement seeks a common, uniform standard that all manufacturers must follow to make data management and enforcement more manageable. Therefore,

enforcement is awaiting FMCSA policies to determine options and any issues associated with proprietary software/hardware used by carriers. There will be an Ad hoc meeting at the CVSA Workshop in Chicago on April 12 to discuss the results of the CVSA survey and other issues including: FMCSA’s NPRM on Supporting Documents, Electronic Logging Partnership Update, TMC Task Force, and development of EOBR Training. Speed — Warning & Citation and CSA Applicability FMCSA recently made modifications to the CSA algorithm and ASPEN


Guardian Contestants are tested on the same seven categories as in NAIC: • North American Standard Level I inspection (including 15 days worth of daily logs); • North American Level I inspection procedures; • North American Standard dangerous goods inspection; • North American Standard cargo tank inspection; • North American Standard Level V passenger vehicle (motorcoach) inspection; • North American Standard personal interview; and, • North American Standard Out-ofService Criteria exam. Competitors use identical score sheets as used at NAIC (which can be found in the “Development Toolbox” at www.cvsa.org). Scoring is also kept the same. This is done under the pressure of the stopwatch to create the same atmosphere as what will be experienced at NAIC. We even have a photographer/ videographer getting in your face to complete the ambience.

Inspection Program, to allow enforcement officers to more accurately document the speed of the vehicle. This change was made to apply appropriate CSA point values to a carrier’s profile, relevant to the severity of the speeding violation. This was an issue which industry had requested to assist with differentiating between serious speeding violations and “probable cause” speed warnings for the purpose of conducting an inspection. Since the modification was made it has become clear that there needs to be a consensus on what is the best approach to document speed and create a uniform policy on this.

Once the Grand Champion has been awarded, the real work begins. With Ontario holding its competition so late, it does not leave much time for the officer to prepare. The Ontario representative is encouraged to contact previous participants and absorb as much information as they can. When I won our Provincial competition last year, I spent a morning with Alex Bugeya (Ontario and NAIC Grand Champion 2009) going over my tests to see where I made my errors. Alex also went over his experiences at NAIC to help lessen any surprises I may encounter. He covered everything from the competition itself, what worked for him, what did not, what the “patch exchange” was all about, to what type of dress code was expected throughout the week. Some of the other past Ontario competitors were also able to provide some great advice. I also got to spend some time with a couple of our instructors to fine tune procedures and clarify different aspects of applicable legislations (unfortunately but understandably, one of Ontario’s main resources, Kerri Wirachowsky, makes herself unavailable to the Ontario competitor

only after the competition is over at NAIC to avoid any potential conflicts of interest). Knowing ahead of time what I was facing in Columbus, Ohio helped to reduce my stress level and made it a much more enjoyable experience. So, if your jurisdiction has not decided who will be their representative, I strongly suggest you run a competition in the same manner as NAIC. This will better prepare you for what you will experience in competition and will allow you to be much more comfortable with everything. If you understand and have familiarity of the defect recording sheets, you won’t miss out on marks lost due to a simple error. If you are fortunate enough to compete at this year’s North American Inspector’s Championship, be sure to contact past competitors to get their take on the whole event. Feel free to shoot me an email at Richard.robinson@ontario.ca. I would be more than happy to share my experiences. If I had to give one piece of advice, I think it would have to be, relax, have fun, and take it all in! There is nowhere else you can come into contact with the caliber of people you will meet at NAIC.

Hours of Service (HOS) As referenced in another Guardian story, CVSA is endorsing retention of current rules. The Driver-Traffic Enforcement Committee will obviously take this issue up for discussion at the Workshop.

Rural Roads Working Group Funded by FMCSA, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA), in partnership with CVSA and other groups, is developing a new script for a roll call training video designed to assist in educating local agencies and non-funded MCSAP agencies to both encourage and educate law enforcement on the need to safely stop commercial vehicles for traffic enforcement. Currently, the group is developing a new script and story board for the training video as well as a few public service announcements to go with it.

Distracted Driving As part of the Operation Safe Driver program, CVSA, in collaboration with FMCSA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, is working on developing a best practices guide for enforcement to use for distracted driving outreach efforts. In addition, we will review the cellphone and other wireless devices rule.

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COMMITTEE NEWS

Truck Size and Weight Issues Come to a Crossroad as Congress, Public Debate Continues

The public dialogue on truck size and weight in the United States is arriving at a new crossroads. The U.S. Congress authorizes federal programs for highways, highway safety and transit generally every five to six years, although the current authorization bill (SAFETEA-LU) expired in September of 2009 and has been extended multiple times. This year it is hoped we will have a new authorization and there is a good possibility truck size and weight (TS&W) provisions will be part of the Bill. Meanwhile, the changing faces of modern freight movement, traffic congestion, aging highway infrastructure, available advanced safety technologies, and public energy policy are lending increased momentum and interest in TS&W on U.S. highways. For example, Congress passed the 2010 Appropriations Bill that gave Maine and Vermont the go ahead to conduct a pilot project to permit vehicles up to 100,000 pounds on the interstates in those two states. Although the 100,000 pound allowance in that pilot program turned out to last essentially 12 months, there was and continues to be talk of making it permanent. And public discussion is ongoing on ways to increase productivity and efficiency of truck transportation. Furthermore, the programs in states nationwide that provide permitting and enforcement for oversize and overweight vehicles, as well as routing, escorting, and enforcement, are ripe with opportunity for increased coordination between and among states. There are often differences from state to state in the number of escort vehicles, emergency equipment, lighting, flagging, and personnel required, making interstate transport more complicated for both carriers and enforcement than perhaps is necessary.

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CVSA and its Size and Weight Committee is working to better understand the lay of the land for transport of oversize/overweight vehicles, and also whether there are safety impacts or trends within these vehicles that need further investigation. This aspect of the size and weight equation is also impacted by the federally determined limits. There are several coalitions and other initiatives working to deter any changes as well as to advocate for increases in federally allowable length or weight regulations. In May 2008, the American Trucking Associations announced its sustainability initiative “Trucks Deliver a Cleaner Tomorrow� in which it supports an increase of allowable combination tractor trailer weights to 97,000 pounds and lengths of double trailers to 33 feet. Separately, an alliance of major industry associations and companies comprising the Coalition for Transportation Productivity (CTP) are advocating their proposed Safe & Efficient Transportation Act (SETA), which would allow states the option to safely raise interstate vehicle weight limits to 97,000 pounds, but without any increase in length. CVSA is aware of at least one other coalition planning to propose changes to give states more flexi-

bility under the federal vehicle length limits as well. CVSA’s size and weight policy relative to highway reauthorization strongly supports ensuring that safety is of paramount importance if any changes are to be pursued with respect to size or weight, and it advocates for uniformity of regulations across states. CVSA acknowledges and supports the role of size and weight regulation in protecting the roadway infrastructure as well, but we need to further investigate safety related issues. CVSA acknowledges that pilot programs could be in the offing and if they are considered they must be carefully planned and conducted in order to achieve a better understanding of the safety effects of larger or heavier trucks. Furthermore, CVSA believes there is a need for a better understanding and the provision of resources for strong and effective enforcement of size and weight regulations. The current patchwork of regulations and permitting programs and the data (or lack thereof ) does not provide the necessary understanding for more informed policy decisions at a national level, and any changes need a comprehensive approach whereby all stakeholder needs are adequately addressed.


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Teens and Trucks Share the Road in Tennessee By Dave Huneryager, President and CEO, Tennessee Trucking Association and Foundation

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REGION I Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, US Virgin Islands, and Vermont.

REGION II Alabama, American Samoa, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

REGION III Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Northern Mariana Islands, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

REGION IV Alaska, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Mexico, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

REGION V Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, and Yukon.

The Tennessee Trucking Foundation (TTF) wants to do more to educate teens about driving safely around large trucks. Motor vehicle crashes are the single biggest killer of teenagers - more than AIDS, street violence, and drug use combined, according to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. That’s when the TTF Program Coordinator Mandee Johnson discovered CVSA’s nationally known curriculum “Teens & Trucks Share the Road.” The “Teens & Trucks Share the Road” program was created through a grant from FMCSA by CVSA, Arizona Trucking Association, Arizona Department of Public Safety and American Trucking Associations in 2009. This is an excellent resource complete with instructor lesson plans, student workbooks, DVDs and pre and post test evaluations. Large trucks are a dominant part of the traffic stream and represent every 4th vehicle on the road. Over 91 percent of Tennessee’s communities depend exclusively on large trucks to move their goods. The Tennessee Department of Transportation recently posted the findings from INRIX, a leading provider of highly accurate traffic information and driver services, on their website. Findings show that Tennessee is at the top of the list of states with key corridors and one or more crossroads. Trucks bring the good stuff and we are on a mission in Tennessee to educate our teens and all motorists on our highways about safely sharing the road with large trucks and other large commercial vehicles. Currently the TTF is reaching out to introduce the “Teens & Trucks Share the Road” program to all public high schools, private high schools, commercial companies that teach driver’s education, and the Tennessee Highway

Patrol Special Program Officers that teach safety education across the state. Driver’s education in the State of Tennessee does not have a state standard of curriculum; therefore schools may select whichever program they like best. Private companies of course may choose their own curriculum and all programs are monitored by the Tennessee Department of Safety. The consensus from all groups surveyed has been that there is not enough emphasis on the importance of understanding how to drive safely around large trucks and commercial vehicles. This curriculum is well structured, effective and can easily be incorporated into any existing driver’s education program. Materials are free from CVSA and with their permission the TTF will be able to add its logo to all printed materials for distribution in the State of Tennessee. Grant funding is being sought to pay for the printing of the lesson plans and student workbooks and the distribution of all materials. This will make all of the curriculum materials available to all who want it at no charge. One of the key missions of the Tennessee Trucking Foundation is to advance highway safety by educating the public on how to safely share the road with large trucks. The “Teens & Trucks Share the Road” program helps TTF in meeting its mission in a huge way. “Never before have we been able to reach so many students with such an effective program,” says Dave Huneryager, Executive Director of TTF. “This education program will help reduce the number of motor vehicle accidents involving teens and large trucks. The positive impact on the communities in Tennessee will be to save lives.”

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Colorado State Patrol Awards Grant Money to Local Agencies to Improve CMV Safety Maj. Mark Savage-Colorado State Patrol, Michelle Lopez-Colorado State Patrol

The Colorado State Patrol Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program’s (MCSAP) primary goal is to reduce the number and severity of commercial vehicle related crashes on our state’s roads. Between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2007 there were 8,056 commercial motor vehicle (CMV) involved crashes in the State of Colorado. As illustrated in the graph below, 48 percent of these crashes (3,830) happened within municipal boundaries and 54 percent of these occurred in one of five metropolitan municipalities. However, due to our own staffing and budget limits, the Colorado State Patrol cannot effectively target all crashes within the state. The same can be said about the municipalities where these truck involved crashes are occurring. Many are under the same tight budget constraints that effectively restrict the amount of time and resources we can dedicate to address commercial motor vehicle safety. In an effort to further reduce these crashes; in 2008 the Colorado State

Patrol MCSAP requested a high-priority grant to serve as a force multiplier for our agency in our efforts to improve traffic safety. Our intent was to then subgrant to local agencies so they could use the money for commercial motor vehicle crash reduction activities or initiatives. FMCSA awarded our agency the grant money to fund the program in the summer of 2009. To ensure that all FMCSA grant obligations and regulations were met the Colorado State Patrol developed a subaward process based on the criteria and process utilized by FMCSA for the awarding MCSAP money. In spring of 2010, the Colorado State Patrol announced the availability of funds for this project to all local agencies that had previously signed an agreement or memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Colorado State Patrol as the lead agency for CMV safety in Colorado. The Colorado State Patrol also hosted several informational meetings that were held throughout the state to further increase

CMV Crash Data – State of Colorado January 1, 2005 – December 31, 2007 10,000 8,056

6,000 3,830

2,000 Total No. of Crashes

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Total No. of Crashes Within Municipality

awareness about the goals of the inspection program, explain the purpose of the project and describe the grant requirements. As a part of the process, we developed a sample application, including the requirements necessary to produce a performance-based application. To promote the uniformity and consistency of enforcement data, all grantees attending the meetings were encouraged to join CVSA. To further reinforce this point, we invited Local Region President Tom Jacques of the Pittsburgh Police Department to come speak to our local agencies at our informational meetings. President Jacques was able to attend several of the meetings and presented a great pitch to attendees on the importance of being involved in CMV enforcement and in CVSA. After the meetings, all grant applicants were required to develop performance-based grant proposals that justified the allocation of MCSAP High Priority funds. Grants applicants were also required to support their application with a clearly identified CMV crash problem. To assist local law enforcement agencies with preparing the grant application we provided them with detailed information about the severity and number of reportable CMV crashes occurring within their city or county boundaries. As previously stated, only agencies that had a current memorandum of understanding or agreement with the Colorado State Patrol, the lead agency for commercial vehicle safety in Colorado, were allowed to apply. Of the almost 40 agencies that responded to the announcement and attended the informational meetings, the state received six applications for funding. Applications were received from the Colorado Springs


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Region II Hosts WIPP TRUPACT-III, Conducts Level VI Refresher Training By Capt. Bruce Bugg, Georgia Department of Public Safety

Police Department, Denver Police Department, Dillon Police Department, Rangely Police Department, Moffat County Sheriff ’s Office and Rio Blanco County Sheriff ’s Office. A review panel, including numerous subject matter experts and grant personnel from the Colorado State Patrol, as well as a representative from FMCSA was assembled in May of 2010 to review the six applications received. Each application was evaluated utilizing 21 separate scoring factors. Ultimately, the state awarded a total of $130,234.58 and each agency was also required to provide a 20 percent in-kind or cash match. The grant money that was allocated was used for various enforcement activities including inspections, traffic enforcement and to purchase CMV enforcement equipment. For example, Colorado Springs Police Department used their grant money to conduct enforcement activities and purchase computers so they could use ASPEN. It should also be noted that the grant money allowed the Colorado Springs Police Department to conduct several CMV enforcement team operations that had a significant impact on traffic safety. In fact, the Colorado Springs Police Department indicated that during the grant period they saw a 15 percent reduction in the number of CMV involved crashes in their city when compared to the same time period from a year before. Denver Police Department used the money to conduct several team operations and team enforcement operations focused not only on CMVs but the passenger vehicles operating unsafely around CMVs. Denver even conducted one operation during the graveyard shift to

In February, Region II hosted the WIPP TRUPACT-III Roadshow. The

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approved by the NRC for the transportation of large boxes of transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) outside Carlsbad, NM. The first shipper to use the TRUPACT-III will be the Savannah River Site. The TRUPACT-III made stops in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina. Georgia DPS took the opportunity to conduct Level VI refresher training, which included classroom training, a radiation survey practical exercise at the Columbia County Inspection Station, and a tour of the Savannah River Site to see the WIPP loading and inspection facilities.

focus on potentially drunk or drugged truck and car operators. During this particular operation 32 Drug Recognition Expert evaluations were conducted and one arrest was made. Other agencies used the money to purchased inspection equipment such as cones, signs and printers for inspectors and three agencies used part of their grant money to join the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance. Finally, the grant produced an additional 1874 CMV inspections. From a lessons learned perspective,

SFC John Cook of the Georgia Motor Carrier Compliance Division exercises with a Survey Meter as part of the WIPP TRUPACT-III February Roadshow.

we would have liked to have awarded the money sooner to allow the grantees to have more time to spend the money. This would have allowed both the grantee and grantor more time to more effectively evaluate the success of the grant program. Regardless, the Colorado State Patrol feels that the grant was a success, as it facilitated an improvement in relations between enforcement partner organizations and helped to reduce the number of commercial motor vehicle crashes in the State of Colorado.

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Nunavut Seeks to Educate, Enforce and Pass Legislation to Improve Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety in Canada’s Newest Territory By James Demcheson, Manager, Motor Vehicle Safety & Inspections. Motor Vehicles Division, Economic Development & Transportation, Government of Nunavut

Every jurisdiction faces challenges when it comes to commercial motor vehicle safety. However, Nunavut, Canada’s newest territory, faces many unique challenges when it comes to regulating commercial vehicle and driver safety. Nunavut is somewhat unique in that regard from all other jurisdictions in North America. From an international standpoint, I think we have similar challenges like our neighboring country, Greenland (Kalaallit Nunaat, pronounced as “kah-lasthl-sthleet noo-naat”), located geographically west of Nunavut. Every community in Nunavut, like in Greenland, is coastal, and none are situated deep inland. Nunavut does not have any highway/freeway infrastructure connecting its respective communities to one another, or to any neighboring provincial/territorial jurisdiction. Nunavut neighbors the Northwest Territories and Manitoba. Nunavut is 1/3 land mass of Canada and separated into three regions: Kitikmeot (kee-tick-mee-oot) Region western portion of Nunavut - comprised of 6 communities; Kivalliq (kee-val-likh) Region - central portion of Nunavut comprised of seven communities; and, Qikiqtaaluk (khee-kikh-taa-look) Region - eastern portion of Nunavut - comprised of 13 communities. (** Qikiqtaaluk

Region includes Belcher Islands found in body of water known as Hudson Bay. A community known as Sanikiluaq (Saanee-kee-loo-akh) is located on Belcher Islands.) Nunavut is comprised of 26 communities, at which Iqaluit (ee-kha-loo-eet) is the capital city (approximate population: 7,000), located in southern part of Baffin Island. Our Motor Vehicles Division headquarters is located in Gjoa Haven, a community found in western portion of Nunavut. Though Nunavut’s population is under 30,000, we cover a large area of Canada’s Arctic Region. Since November 16th, 2009, I initially took on this management position as casual term, after having been a

driver examiner with 14 years of experience. It was on March 1st, 2010 that I signed a three-year transfer assignment as Manager, Motor Vehicle Safety & Inspections. In September, 2010, three Motor Vehicle Officers from Nunavut passed the CVSA Level I (Part B) training in Winnipeg, MB. We appreciate Reg Wightman from Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation (MIT) for facilitating the course. The following month (October, 2010), the same three Motor Vehicle Officers had also passed the Transport Canada TDG (Transportation of Dangerous Goods) Regulation training held here at our office in Iqaluit, NU. We are

Locals Lobby for New Members with Incentive Program By Tom Jacques, Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, CVSA Locals President The Local Member Committee has a membership drive on now. If a local department joins as a CVSA member they are able to attend a conference free (no registration fee, a savings of $400 to $450 dollars). In addition, we have a member get a member campaign which allows new members a $100 dollar credit for recruiting new members (up to $300 dollars).

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currently formulating our own CVSA inspection sheets with some assistance from our neighboring Canadian jurisdictions, Northwest Territories (NT) and Manitoba (MB). A part from the start of formally enforcing CVSA inspections in Nunavut, we do have the School Bus Regulations, adopted from Northwest Territories (NT) upon Nunavut’s inception (April 1st, 1999). My predecessor did not seem to have the two appropriate school bus inspection forms (one used by Motor Vehicle Officers and the other used by certified mechanics to complete, twice in a calendar year). Recently, I was able to receive electronic copies of these two school bus inspection forms from my Northwest Territories counterpart, Harris Beaulieau. Seeing as our regulations are identical, it only seemed logical. Hopefully, we will have these forms generated and in use before this coming August. The other aim in regards to vehicle inspections is possible future implementation of an annual PMVI requirement for all large commercial vehicles and a separate requirement for all private vehicles. We currently do not have legislation/regulation for PMVI requirement. In essence, Nunavut has some catching up to in regards to vehicle inspection program. In terms of driver education programs, Nunavut also lacks in that However, the MTO regard. (Municipal Training Organization) who is funded by the Department of Community Government & Services (CGS) does offer Class 3 driver’s license and air brake, also Class 2 School Bus driver’s license training courses upon demand at any of the 26

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communities in Nunavut. This training program has been in effect since 1999. Depending on the number of students, these courses can be from two to four weeks in length. Since Nunavut does not have a driving instructor certification program, the MTO relies on experienced and reliable licensed truck/ school bus operators to teach these courses. As for basic driver education, there are no commercially run basic driver education schools/courses. However, there are some high schools in various communities who have a teacher(s) that are certified driving instructors (received certification outside of Nunavut). Lastly, we hope to have our Motor Vehicles Act and Regulations revamped. A proposal was completed in 2008, now it sits waiting to go through legislative review. This proposal includes such items as implementation of a formal Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) program/regulation, tougher impaired driving law, legislation that oversees certification/licensing of driving instructors and driving schools/programs, etc. Ambitious, but necessary new implementation to meet today’s Canadian National Standards in driver and vehicle licensing. We may be behind the times, but our advantage is the extensive resources and experience that our fellow Canadian jurisdictions have at hand, this includes our U.S. counterparts. The approach to our vehicle inspection program is firstly to educate Nunavummiut (people who reside in Nunavut) and then enforce what has been taught and put into legislation. Looking forward to meeting other CVSA membership in Chicago this coming April.

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PA PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION, CVSA MOURN PASSING OF GERALD CLARK On February 19, 2011 Gerard L. Clark, 56 of Lebanon, PA, passed away at his residence after a long battle with cancer. He was the husband of Carolyn M. “Lyn” Cullinan Clark. Gerry worked for the PA Public Utility Commission Bureau of Transportation and Safety. He started his career as a Motor Gerald Clark Carrier Enforcement Officer in 1983. In 1993 he was named Officer of the Year by the PUC. In 1994 he was promoted to Enforcement Officer Supervisor of the Scranton District Office where he served for 11 years. In 2005 he was again promoted to Safety Coordinator and worked out of the PUC’s Harrisburg office. Gerry spent most of his life in some type of public service. He served in the US Army during the Vietnam Era where he held the position of Criminal Investigator. He worked for the Wayne County Sheriff ’s Department as a Deputy Sheriff and was an EMT with the Honesdale Volunteer Ambulance. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus and belonged to the Church of St. Cecilia in Lebanon, PA. He had been involved with CVSA for many years and enjoyed every minute of that time. Gerry was extremely dedicated to his family, friends, co-workers and his carrier. He took pride in everything that he did and devoted most of his time to helping others. He had the special ability to be not only a Supervisor but also a friend. “Gerry’s dedication to his job was extraordinary. Carrying out the responsibilities and duties of his position was not just a commitment, it was his passion,” said Mike Hoffman, Director of Transportation and Safety for the PA PUC. “Gerry was greatly respected by his peers. Many people respected him and thought so highly of him,” added Hoffman. “I would constantly hear people telling me that ‘Gerry is special’ and he was.” Gerard L. “Clarky” Clark was loved by many but will be missed by all. Memorial contributions may be made to the Penn State Hershey Medical Center Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 852, Hershey, PA 17033.

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COLORADO MCSAP UNIT INTERCEPTS MURDER SUSPECT On October 5th, 2010 at approximately 2:22PM Colorado State Patrol MCSAP officers were notified of a suspect wanted for murder was on Interstate 70 just west of Vail, Colorado. East Moline Police Department from Illinois were able to track the suspect’s cell phone as he was traveling through Colorado. Trooper Cody Abernathy, Trooper Don Kettle, and Sergeant Kucera of the MCSAP unit were updated on the location of the suspect’s vehicle by another Sergeant of the Colorado State Patrol from the East Moline Police Department. During the updates Trooper Don Kettle prepared to do a rolling road block ‘California Weave’ to slow down the traffic behind the suspect’s vehicle as Trooper Abernathy and several other Colorado State Patrol Troopers prepared to make the traffic stop. Sergeant Kucera and another officer prepared stop sticks approximately 2 miles in front of the suspect’s vehicle. Trooper Abernathy was able to make a positive identification of the suspect through a picture that was sent to his computer while stationary in the center median of Interstate 70. Trooper Abernathy and several other State Patrol officers were able to make the traffic stop on I-70 approximately 20 miles west of Vail. All of westbound Interstate 70 was shut down as the suspect was placed into custody without incident. The suspect had a warrant for his arrest out of East Moline Police Department for 1st degree murder. The suspect was 21 year old Ryan Moore of Milan, Illinois. Moore was the suspect of murdering a 28 year old East Moline man shot several times in the chest on October 1st. Moore was held on a one million dollar bond out of the Eagle County detention facility. Another passenger Pedro Payan was also arrested for felony drug possession.

COLORADO STATE POLICE WELCOME NEW MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY COMMANDER The Colorado State Patrol would like to welcome Capt. Tim Keeton as the new commander of the agency’s Motor Carrier Safety Unit. Capt. Tim Keeton was promoted on February 1, 2011. Capt. Keeton came to the unit form the Patrol’s Internal Affairs Unit where he was an investigator for three years. Prior to that Capt. Keeton was in charge of the agency’s Motorcycle Team. Capt. Keeton has been with the Colorado State Patrol since July of 1998. Capt. Keeton will be in attendance at the next CVSA Meeting in Chicago and is looking forward to meeting everyone.


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INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT

International Road Dynamics (IRD) Inc.: Provider of ITS Solutions to Improve Safety

International Road Dynamics Inc. (IRD), a world leader in ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) and Weigh-inMotion (WIM) solutions, understands the importance of commercial vehicle compliance and highway safety. Improving safety through ITS not only benefits the trucking industry, but also the traveling public and roadways. IRD works with many state and provincial agencies to expand their commercial vehicle enforcement programs to achieve pavement protection, improved safety, and reduced vehicle emissions. IRD’s ITS solutions include systems such as the Mainline and Ramp WIM Sorters, Remote Control Weigh Stations (RCWS), Virtual Weigh Stations (VWS), Automatic Vehicle Identification (AVI) and temporary portable sites. These solutions provide a way of efficiently enforcing commercial vehicles on weights, dimensions, and credentials. (See image 1.) A non-conforming commercial vehicle is a safety hazard due to reduced operational performance. Both the mainline and ramp WIM sorters help alleviate safety issues by sorting the compliant from the non-complaint vehicles. When only suspected non-compliant vehicles report to the inspection station, operators have more time to perform a thorough inspection. These inspections not only include weight, but also a complete safety inspection.

A corresponding reduction in pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) is achieved when compliant commercial vehicles bypass the weigh station. Tests indicate that when a commercial vehicle is sorted on the mainline using WIM, there is a 36% to 67% reduction in pollutants.1 AVI (Automatic Vehicle Identification) solutions are able to assist in reducing GHG by signaling commercial vehicles in-cab prior to the weigh station allowing them to bypass if compliant. (See image 2.) Another safety concern that arises from overloaded commercial vehicles is rollovers and runaways. The heavier a vehicle, the more difficult it is to turn and slow down or stop. The Truck Safety Coalition (2007) states that, “a 100,000 lb. truck takes 25% longer to stop than an 80,000 lb. truck and a 120,000 lb. truck can take as much as 50% further before stopping than an 80,000 lb. truck.”2 IRD provides both the truck rollover and downhill truck speed advisory systems to help decrease the probability of these situations occurring. Both systems capture the truck’s speed, weight, height and type to calculate an appropriate speed and to display a warning message to the driver prior to the danger. Overweight commercial vehicles also cause damage to pavement infrastructure. A 10% increase in axle overload can result in

up to a 45% increase in pavement damage.3 Pavement will become deteriorated and ruts and potholes will form, increasing the chance of an accident. By enforcing vehicle compliance, roadways will last longer and the cost to maintain the roadway will be reduced. Both the Remote Control Weigh Station and the Virtual Weigh Station can be implemented in remote locations and bypass routes to enforce vehicle compliance where pavement performance has become an issue. Both systems may incorporate Weigh-in-Motion, imaging cameras, license plate readers, and USDOT Readers. (See image 3.) The IRD multi-disciplinary engineering team has provided advanced integrated systems and traffic technologies for over 30 years. IRD’s team has designed and installed traffic planning, safety, and commercial vehicle enforcement systems throughout the world. IRD has engineering, project management and installation expertise to see projects through from planning to commissioning, and has the field service and maintenance teams to ensure that systems continue to operate effectively through their operational life. If you would like more information regarding IRD or any of its systems, please visit IRD’s website: www.irdinc.com or contact Roy Czinku at 306-653-6600.

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NOTES 1. Oregon Department of Transportation “Green Light” Emission Testing Project, 2008: http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/MCT/docs/ GreenLightEmissionTest.pdf 2. A Synthesis of Safety Implications of Oversize/Overweight Commercial Vehicles, December 2009, American Association of State Highway and

Transportation Officials. ISBN 978-1-56051-466-4 3. AASHTO 2002 Guide for the Design of New and Rehabilitated Pavement Structures: http://pavementinteractive.org/index.php?title=ESAL

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UPS’s Circle of Honor Program Not Only an Award, but a Reflection of Century-Long Safety Commitment UPS recently inducted 1,122 drivers into its elite “Circle of Honor,” raising the number of active drivers who have steered clear of accidents for 25 years or more to 5,248. The number of new inductees is the largest for any single year in the company’s history — up 21 percent from last year — and includes the first three from Puerto Rico. UPS began service in that U.S. territory in 1985. In addition, 11 inductees from Germany and seven from Canada make this year’s international class the largest to date. Collectively, the 5,248 drivers have logged more than 5 billion miles and more than 147,244 years of safe driving through their careers. That ’s enough miles to circle the earth 188,000 times. “I congratulate the 5,248 UPS drivers who have achieved such an exemplary safety record over the course of 25 years,” said U.S. Rep. John L. Mica, R-Fla., chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. “I also want to commend UPS for placing such a high priority on public safety and the safety of its employees.” Of the Circle of Honor members, 283 have been accident-free for 35 or more years, with 27 of those having driven more than 40 years without an accident. UPS’s top safe driver in 2010 is Ohio Valley District tractor-trailer driver Ron “Big Dog” Sowder, who has achieved 49 years and four million miles of driving without an accident. “It’s an honor to lead this remarkable group of seasoned safe drivers,” said Sowder. “I’m not ready to stop just yet – 50 years without an accident has a nice ring to it.”

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Last year, UPS implemented a ban within its organization on text and email messaging while behind the wheel, a proven cause of traffic crashes. “Our training and our drivers’ attention to details such as avoiding distractions while driving all play a part in their remarkable record,” said Debbie Gehricke, UPS’s corporate health and safety manager. “The Circle of Honor is a testament to the daily dedication that our drivers display in keeping the roads a safe place for everyone.” However, the Circle of Honor program is just one of many safety initiatives at UPS. Rather than being a stand-alone piece of the puzzle, it’s something that is part of the company’s fabric — a commitment to safety dating back nearly 100 years, according to UPS. For example: In 2009, the company launched UPS Road Code, a safe-driving program for teenagers through a partnership with the Boys & Girls Clubs of America; There are more than 3,900 Comprehensive Health and Safety Process (CHSP) committees worldwide working to improve the health and safety of UPS employees. (More than 30,000 CHSP members); In 2009, UPS allocated $83 million for formal safety training courses in more than 1,800 facilities, and employees logged approximately two million hours in safety training. Another feature of UPS’s safety program is the innovative “Integrad” facility, which seeks to take into account changing driver learning styles and puts an emphasis on realworld strategies to avoid injuries and accidents. Approximately 82 percent of UPS employees are involved in

freight and package handling, driving motor vehicles, or both. To perform these jobs safely, people need specific skills and abilities that maximize their performance while minimizing their exposure to injury. Currently, there are two Integrad facilities — one in Maryland and one in Chicago. Drivers are required to pass a rigorous week-long class. Circle of Honor, then, isn’t so much a singular award, but more a reflection of UPS’s culture. From the company’s founder Jim Casey to the current CEO Scott Davis, all managers at UPS place an emphasis on people building, and safety is an obvious dimension to that. Unsafe roads and hazardous conditions, in addition to endangering the driving public, also put the company’s people at risk. UPS accident rates continue to improve, and technologies that improve fuel/savings performance (for example: the elimination of left turns and route guidance technology) have the simultaneous benefit of increasing driver safety as well. All UPS drivers are taught safe driving methods beginning on the first day of classroom training, including the company’s comprehensive safety course, “Space and Visibility.” The training continues throughout their careers. More information on UPS’s commitment to safety is available at http://www. pressroom.ups.com/safety. Video b-roll and a complete list by state of new Circle of Honor inductees can be found at the following link: www.upsprmedia.com/ circleofhonor.zip


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NATM Votes to Make Compliance Verification a Requirement of Membership

AAMVA, IRP Recognize Significant Highway Safety Initiatives with 2011 Highway Safety Award for Commercial Motor Vehicles

The membership of the National Association of Trailer Manufacturers (NATM) has unanimously approved a bylaws amendment making participation in NATM’s compliance verification program a requirement of membership for trailer manufacturers. “This historic vote will change the face of our association, and our industry,” said incoming NATM President Gary Potter, EZ Loader Boat Trailers, Midway, Ark. “This new membership requirement further demonstrates our industry’s dedication and commitment to improving trailer safety.” The NATM compliance program evaluates the manufacturing processes of members to verify that those processes are designed to build trailers in accordance with applicable federal safety standards and regulations, as well as accepted industry practices. The compliance verification program, which is currently voluntary, is one of the benefits of membership in NATM. The cornerstone of the compliance program has been the education of trailer manufacturers and the publication of the Guidelines for Recommended Minimum Manufacturing Practices for Light- and Medium-Duty Trailers (Guidelines). The Guidelines, which are regularly updated, is a compilation of mandatory Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards and state and federal regulations, as well as voluntary industry standards and best-practices, collected into one document to provide the membership with a “guide” to properly manufacture trailers. It has become the primary resource for the compliance verification program. A key focus of the compliance verification program is on the safety related items and components found on trailers, and the standards and regulations that govern them. The membership adopted the change to its bylaws on February 24, 2011, at its 23rd Annual Convention and Trade Show in Albuquerque, NM, and it becomes effective January 1, 2012, when trailer manufacturers must participate in the program to be eligible for NATM membership. “Our voluntary compliance program has grown to more than 80 percent of our membership” said Clint Lancaster, NATM Technical Director, “and now that the membership has voted to make compliance verification mandatory, it reinforces NATM’s commitment to safety in our industry.” For more information contact NATM at (785) 272-4433 or visit www.natm.com.

AAMVA and IRP, Inc. in cooperation with FMCSA are seeking nominations for the 2011 Distinguished Service Award for Commercial Vehicle Safety to recognize jurisdictions, jurisdictional agencies or individuals that have made significant contributions to improving highway safety involving commercial motor vehicles and their drivers. The intent of the award is to recognize those who have: • Significantly contributed to the reduction of commercial motor vehicle fatalities or crashes • Significantly contributed to driver improvement in the commercial motor vehicle arena • Improved data collection that allows for more accurate monitoring of unqualified drivers, equipment and companies • Reduced fraud in the testing and/or licensing of drivers • Reduced fraud in third party testing organizations Nominations for this award may be made on behalf of an individual, agency or jurisdiction. Nominees might include CDL testers, law enforcement officers or agencies, motor vehicle administration personnel or agencies responsible for developing and implementing programs geared at improving highway safety in the commercial motor vehicle arena. For additional information and an electronic version of the nomination from visit the AAMVA website at www.aamva.org/ About/Awards/CommVehSafetyAwardWinners.htm, or contact Tim Adams by email at tadams@irpinc.org or by phone at (502) 845-0398. Nominations for the 2011 Award are due by July 22, 2011.

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Second Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

CMV Operators Have More than EmploymentRelated Drug Screens to Consider When it Comes to Medical Marijuana By Kristen K. Shea, National District Attorneys Association, National Traffic Law Center, Senior Attorney Fifteen states and the District of Columbia currently allow some use of medical marijuana.1 Most of those states also provide for the cultivation of marijuana plants under limited circumstances. While states that have legalized medical marijuana require proof of residency prior to the issuance of a marijuana card, at least two states will issue cards to out-of-state residents. Thus far, the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) has presented no impediment to states opting to allow marijuana use or possession for medical purposes. On March 19, 2009, United States Attorney General Eric Holder issued a press release indicating that it would no longer be the policy of federal prosecutors to “prosecute patients.”2 With 30% of states and the DOJ shifting their view of marijuana from an illegal drug to a medication, many employers are now being forced to reconsider their internal policies on drug use in the work place. To further complicate the issue, marijuana remains listed as a Schedule 1 illegal narcotic.3 In other words, the DOJ decision not to prosecute individuals for growing or possessing marijuana for purported medical use is an act of discretion and not a dictate of law. Employers must find the best way to allow their employees to take medication as prescribed or recommended while maintaining a safe work environment through the prohibition of drug use. This is a challenge for businesses across the country attempting to follow both state and federal laws. It may take years for the courts to determine exactly what is and what is not permissible as workplace policy. For one group of employers, however, the path seems clearer. Motor carriers have another federal policy to consider. Following the DOJ policy announcement, the United States Department of

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Transportation (DOT) issued its own statement. DOT sought to clarify the impact that the DOJ policy regarding criminal prosecution of medical marijuana would have on DOT’s mandated drug testing of “safety-sensitive transportation employees.” The statement indicated the DOT’s desire to “make it perfectly clear that the DOJ guidelines will have no bearing on the Department of Transportation’s regulated drug testing program. We will not change our regulated drug testing program based upon these guidelines to Federal prosecutors.”4 The policy statement noted that marijuana remained a Schedule 1 narcotic under federal law. It went on to warn Medical Review Officers performing federally regulated drug testing that they should “not verify a drug test as negative based upon information that a physician recommended that the employee use ‘medical marijuana’.” The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) position on medical marijuana is consistent with the DOT policy prohibiting marijuana use by any safety-sensitive employee and the federal governmental drug-free work place policy.5 The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, through the Federal

Motor Carrier Safety Regulations published in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), promulgates regulations aimed at ensuring the safest possible operation of commercial motor vehicles. Some regulations in Title 49 of the CFR address the qualifications states should require before licensing a commercial driver. Regulations for physical qualification to receive a commercial driver’s license (CDL) are established in 49 CFR 391.41. This section provides guidelines establishing who is and who is not medically qualified to hold a CDL. For instance, someone with epilepsy, severe heart disease, hearing or vision loss, or other physical limitations would be unable to qualify for a CDL. Within the context of 49 CFR 391.41, the use of a controlled substance identified in 21 CFR 1308.11, Schedule 1 (2010) would similarly prevent a driver from being considered physically qualified.6 A narrow exception exists which would allow a driver taking a controlled substance prescribed by a doctor to hold a CDL. This exception would only apply if the doctor is familiar with the duties of a CMV driver and has advised the driver that the medication will not affect his ability to operate a CMV.7 In accordance with 49 CFR 392.4, drivers shall not “be on duty and possess, be under the influence of…(a)ny 21 CFR 1308.11 Schedule 1 substance.” The combined interpretation of these two CFR sections makes it clear that marijuana use, medically authorized or otherwise, would not be permissible for an active CDL holding driver. The FMCSA’s website also addresses the question of medical marijuana for commercial drivers. In the section of the site that addresses “Frequently Asked Questions” about medical qualification, the FMSCA answers the question of whether or not a driver taking medically recom-


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mended marijuana is physically qualified to hold a CDL. The FMCSA response states unequivocally, “No. Drivers taking medical marijuana cannot be certified.”8 Medical marijuana seems to receive the same treatment as methadone. Regardless of whether either substance is medically recommended or prescribed, it will prevent a driver from qualifying for a CDL.9 Commercial motor vehicle operators have more than employment related drug screens to consider. In addition to the federal regulations, most states prohibit drugged driving by any driver. Drivers may be considered impaired by illegal or prescription drugs. CDL holders convicted of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol or for refusing to submit to a law enforcement officer’s request to submit to drug testing can be disqualified from operating a commercial motor vehicle. The disqualification can run for a year up to life.10 This disqualification would occur whether the impaired driving occurred in a CMV or the driver’s personally owned vehicle. Commercial motor vehicle drivers, operators and the public have an interest in keeping drivers impaired by marijuana from getting behind the wheel of large trucks and buses. A 1990 National Transportation Board survey on “Fatigue, Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Medical Factors in Fatal-ToThe-Driver Heavy Truck Crashes” determined that just as many crashes were caused by marijuana impairment as alcohol impairment. NTSB Chairman, James Hall offered his analysis of that study stating that 33% of drivers tested had some form of commonly abused drug in their blood with alcohol and marijuana both reflecting a 13% positive result.11 Although there is little recent independent research to determine how many commercial motor vehicle drivers are using drugs while on duty, a study some years ago found that the most commonly detected illegal substance was marijuana.12 The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) indicates that “long-term marijuana abuse can lead to addiction” and that as many as 9% of casual users and 25% of daily users can become addicted. NIDA also reports

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scription medication nearly doubled from 2004 to 2008. The bottom line for employers, including motor carriers, is that they must reassess their policies concerning marijuana use in the workplace. For employers of commercial motor vehicle drivers, the guidance from the Department of Transportation will help make those policy choices clear.

NOTES 1. The National Conference of State Legislatures provides a complete list of state statutes authorizing medical marijuana use at its website, www.NCSL.org. 2. The entirety of the press release can be viewed at the Department of Justice Public Affairs website; www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2009/October/09-ag-1119.html. 3. 21 CFR 1308.11, Schedule 1 (2010). 4. The entirety of the policy statement can be viewed at the Department of Transportation’s website; www.dot.gov/ost/dapc/NEW_DOCS/ODAPC%20Medical%20Marijuana%20Notice.pdf. 5. The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 imposes the requirement of a drug-free workplace policy on entities awarded large contract of any grant from the federal government. The drug-free workplace rule discourages the use any illegal narcotic or alcohol at the workplace. 6. 49 CFR 391.41(12)(i)(2010). 7. 49 CFR 391.41(12)(ii)(2010). 8. http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/topics/medical/faqs.aspx#question88. 9. Within the 49 CFR 391.43, DOT Interpretations section, Question 4 indicates that prescription methadone use is prohibited as a habit-forming narcotic that is not allowable for CMV drivers. 49 CFR 391.43 (2010). 10. 49 CFR 383.51 (2010). 11. “Alcohol and Other Drug Use in Commercial Transportation”, National Transportation Safety Board Chairman James Hall. 12. In his report, “Alcohol and Other Drug Use in Commercial Transportation”, National Transportation Safety Board Chairman James Hall sighted an Insurance Institute of Highway Safety roadside survey that found close to 30% of drivers tested positive for drugs in their blood or urine. Of those, the marijuana, at 15%, was the most commonly detected substance, followed by stimulants at 12%. 13. “NIDA Info Facts” marijuana fact sheet issued by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Additional information regarding the use and abuse of marijuana can be found at the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Drug Abuses website at www.nida.nih.gov.

Upcoming IRP Webinar on International NonApportioned Commercial Vehicle Agreement On Tuesday March 29, 2011 at 2:00 pm eastern time IRP will provide a Webinar to inform the IRP and motor vehicle communities about the potential need for and the ongoing development of a draft inter-jurisdictional agreement for those vehicles that are not eligible for apportioned registration under IRP or for those that registration with IRP is optional. After completion of this webinar, participants will be able to: 1) Recognize challenges faced by industry to meet registration requirements for non-IRP vehicles. 2) Explain the need for a modern agreement to address light commercial vehicles that operate outside of their base jurisdiction. 3) Describe the key reasons the IRP Community is involved in the development of a proposed agreement. 4) Understand the key principles that would form the basis of a new agreement. This webinar is aimed at jurisdictions, industry and the IRP community as a whole. It offers an opportunity to learn about the need for and principles of proposed agreement, ask questions and provide feedback. The webinar will also prepare participants for planned discussion of a draft of the proposed agreement at the upcoming IRP Annual Meeting in May. To sign up for this and other IRP Webinars, visit the IRP, Inc. website at http://www.irponline.org/Education/Webinars/ to register.

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CVSA Executive Committee, Committee & Program Chairs PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

SECRETARY/TREASURER

Capt. Steve Dowling California Highway Patrol

Maj. David Palmer Texas Department of Public Safety

Lt. Thomas Kelly Maine State Police

REGION PRESIDENTS

REGION VICE PRESIDENTS (Non-Voting)

PAST PRESIDENTS

Region I Sgt. David Medeiros Rhode Island State Police

Region I Sgt. Raymond Weiss New York State Police

Region II Capt. Bruce Bugg Georgia Department of Public Safety

Region II Capt. Craig Medcalf Oklahoma Highway Patrol

Francis (Buzzy) France, Maryland State Police Darren E. Christle, Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation Capt. John E. Harrison, Georgia Department of Public Safety

Region III Maj. Mark Savage Colorado State Patrol

Region III Alan Martin Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

Region IV Lt. Bruce Pollei Utah Highway Patrol

Region IV Capt. Chris Mayrant New Mexico Department of Public Safety

Region V Steve Callahan Alberta Transportation, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement

Region V Reg Wightman Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation

LOCAL PRESIDENT

LOCAL VICE PRESIDENT

ASSOCIATE NON-VOTING MEMBER

Tom Jacques Pittsburgh Bureau of Police

Robert Mills Fort Worth Police Department

Larry Bizzell, Chair Associate Advisory Committee, FedEx Express

COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Associate Advisory Committee Driver-Traffic Enforcement Committee Hazardous Materials Committee Information Systems Committee Passenger Carrier Committee Program Initiatives Committee Size and Weight Committee Training Committee Vehicle Committee

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GOVERNMENT NON-VOTING MEMBERS

William (Bill) Quade, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) William (Bill) Arrington, Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Peter Hurst, Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA), CRA Chair Mauricio Hinojosa, Secretaria de Comunicaciones y Transportes (SCT) Adolfo Spinola, Secretarìa de Seguridad Publica, Policìa Federal Preventiva

PROGRAM CHAIRS

Larry Bizzell FedEx Express Capt. Dan Meyer Kansas Highway Patrol Capt. Bruce Bugg Georgia Department of Public Safety Capt. William ( Jake) Elovirta Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles Vacant

Level VI Inspection COHMED International Safety Team Saved by the Belt Operation Safe Driver

Sgt. William (Don) Rhodes South Carolina State Transport Police Capt. Jay Thompson Arkansas Highway Police Capt. Craig Medcalf Oklahoma Highway Patrol Kerri Wirachowsky Ontario Ministry of Transportation

Carlisle Smith Public Utilites Commission of Ohio Capt. William (Bill) Reese Idaho State Police Capt. Bill Dofflemyer Maryland State Police Sgt. David Medeiros Rhode Island State Police Lt. Col. Jack Hegarty Arizona Department of Public Safety

Operation Airbrake John Meed Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure Roadcheck

North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC)

Lt. Mike Junkin Alabama Depatrment of Public Safety

Paul Tamburelli Checkmark Vehicle Safety Services Inc.


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Level VI Classes Scheduled for 2011/12

Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. DOE, CVSA has scheduled the Level VI Classes for 2011 to certify inspectors to conduct Level VI inspections on all transuranic waste and Highway Route Controlled Quantities (HRCQ) of radioactive materials. CVSA provides Level VI training to inspectors who meet the prerequisite of being Level I and HazMat certified. The following are the remaining classes scheduled for 2011: ■ Salinas, KS–July 11-14

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Prospective Shipping Report

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manual 460.2A encourages DOE programs to use the Prospective Shipping Report (PSR) as a tool for providing affected states and tribes with information to help them determine resources needed for inspections, emergency response, and other activities. Under the National Transportation Stakeholders forum, an ad hoc working group was established to develop recommendations for improving the PSR. The working group’s discussions have led to plans for substantive improvements to future issues of the PSR, including a list of acronyms; maps of actual routes for transuranic waste shipments and representative routes for other shipments; and detailed information about the purpose of the PSR and the steps states and tribes can take to obtain answers to questions they might have. In addition, the new format will allow users to sort information according to start and end dates, as well as origin and destination. Hyperlinks will be added to assist state and tribal personnel that wish to learn more about various shipping activities. For additional information, please contact Julia Donkin at Julia.donkin@hq.doe.gov or 301-903-5283.

■ Las Vegas, NV–August 22-25 ■ Sacramento, CA–October 17-20 ■ Austin, TX–November 7-10 ■ Phoenix, AZ–February 15-16, 2012

Level VI “Train the Trainer” Course Any state interested in hosting a class or needs inspectors trained is asked to contact Larry D. Stern, Director Level VI Program, at larrys@cvsa.org or 301830-6147.

RAD Inspection News is made possible under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy.

Argonne Completes Shipment of Irradiated Test Specimens Argonne National Laboratory completed a single shipment of Irradiated Test Specimens (ITS) to the DOE Idaho National Laboratory in late fall of 2010. The ITS were originally from fuel used in the reactors at the National Reactor Test Bed, the forerunner of the Idaho National Laboratory and Argonne West. The ITS were brought to Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois decades ago to allow for examination and research so scientists and engineers could design more efficient reactor fuel. The Work was performed at Argonne’s Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility where the ITS were accumulated and stored. Argonne made the Highway Route Controlled Quantity shipment in late fall 2010 using an NAC International, Legal Weight Truck, steel-encased, lead-shielded Type B shipping cask. The radioactive material was packaged in three 6-inch containment vessels which are designed to be a leak-tight, hermetically-sealed inner containment for the payload.

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Second Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments

CVSA’s Level VI Program, Ad Hoc RAM/Security/ITS Committee, published a report titled “Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments” for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in April 2011. The committee was chaired by Capt. Bill Reese, Idaho State Police, other committee members were: Carlisle Smith, Ohio PUC; Tom Fuller, New York State Police; Rion Stann, Pennsylvania State Police; Kelly Horn, Illinois Emergency Management Agency/ Division of Nuclear Safety; Larry Stern, Director Level VI Program; and Toni Slavich, Battelle Seattle Research Center. In 2009, DOE approached CVSA Level VI Program Committee and asked the committee to conduct a study on technologies that would benefit the safety, security, inspections, and tracking of DOE radioactive material shipments. The committee made several site visits to look at current and emerging technologies and worked with Battelle on the HM-04 project report titled “Emerging Technologies Applicable to Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety and Security.” The Ad Hoc Committee members reviewed the following current technologies that they considered important to the safety and security of radioactive material shipments:

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• Detection Technologies • Authentication and Vehicle Disabling • Tracking and Communications Technologies • Electronic Vehicle Information Technologies The Ad Hoc Committee members reviewed nine emerging technologies of the HM-04 project report with respect to the five technology applications areas important to the safety and security of radioactive material shipments. Besides applicability to radioactive material shipments they also considered the state of technology development, availability, reliability, and cost. The results of their evaluation by emerging technology category are: • Networked RFID/ubiquitous sensors and cargo monitoring • Pressure gauges and chemical detection sensors • Fiber-optic/photonic sensors & optical scanners • Advanced locks and seals • Intelligent video tracking & surveillance • Wireless power • Nanopiezoelectronics • Plastic thin-film organic solar cells • Container integrity

Conclusions The Ad Hoc Committee examined several current and emerging technologies that have potential to benefit the safety and security of DOE radioactive material shipments. The technologies were evaluated for relevance to one or more of five application areas considered by the Committee to have importance to the safety and security of radioactive material shipments. The conclusions of the Committee with respect to the five application areas are as follows: • Inspection Technologies • Security Technologies - Driver - Power Unit - Trailer - Shipping Casks • Radioactive Material Dose Rate Measurement and Isotope Quantification Technologies • Shipment and Tracking Technologies (tractor, trailer, and individual casks) • Electronic shipping Paper Technologies Recommendations The material reviewed to complete this report was vast. The technologies that were examined during this study are changing on a constant basis. Specific technologies that are currently available and that the Ad Hoc


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CVSA’s Director, Chairman Level VI Program Served on ANSI N14.36 Subcommittee’s Four Year Project

Committee recommends for the safety and security of radioactive material shipments are RFID, GPS, biometrics, seals and locks. These technologies have been tested, in operation for some time, and have good performance records. For future use, DOE needs to choose the most reliable and promising technologies. To make this process beneficial to all interested parties DOE needs to: • Involve the four regional state government groups in the overall process; • Address all five technology application areas presented in the report; • Pay special attention to shipment security and tracking. Stakeholders are especially interested in tracking not just the tractors, but the trailers and shipping casks as well; • Make a special effort to involve stakeholders from states who currently do en route inspections due to state laws or policies. If these stakeholders are involved up front it my pay DOE dividends in the end by reducing and/or eliminating en route inspections due to the technologies used and accessibility by these stakeholders; • Upgrade TRANSCOM to report in real time dose rate measurements of the package; and, • Follow the progress of the HMCRP Project HM-05 studying electronic shipping papers and obtain a copy of the final report for review and possible implementation. The complete report can be obtained on CVSA’s website www.cvsa.org click on Programs, then click on the Level VI radiation symbol and then you in the Level VI website, look under reports updates.

The American National Standard Institute N14.36 Standard subcommittee submitted a draft of new American National Standard for Radioactive MaterialsMeasurement of Radiation Level and Surface Contamination for Packages and Conveyances to the N14 Standards Committee on January 31, 2011 for balloting. The purpose of this Standard is to minimize variability in radiation and contamination measurement processes, equipment use, training and qualifying operators, and documenting and communicating results. N14.36 defines and standardizes uniform and consistent measurements and how they are documented. This Standard sets forth methods for radiation and contamination measurement for packaging and transportation of radioactive material by all transportation modes and during all phases of transportation activities; however, the Standard emphasizes he use of riskinformed graded approach in designing survey plans. The N14.36 Subcommittee consists of 33 experts from industry, non-governmental organizations, and Federal and state regulatory and government agencies. DOE national laboratories, site offices, and the Headquarters Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy and the Office of Packaging and Transportation are also represented.

The Subcommittee has worked for the last four years through meetings, conference calls, e-mails, and site visits to develop this Standard. It has also conducted a survey of current industry practices and received data from 21 organizations. The Subcommittee considered existing operating and administrative procedures, methods, instruments, and industry and government processes. Certain basic general requirements in the Standard are applicable to all radioactive material packages. The Standard used a graded approach to design an optimum survey plan to verify potential radiation or contamination levels, and meet prescribed regulatory limits for all transportation operations. It provides the elements of a survey program specific to transportation (including survey design elements), instrument selection and use, personnel qualification and training, survey optimization, and roles and responsibilities. It also includes processes, procedures, equipment, and training required for consistent, reliable, and reproducible measurements of radiation levels and surface contamination on and near radioactive material packages and conveyances. On February 11, 2011, the N14 Secretariat sent the draft Standard and ballot to its members and requested ballots be returned by March 25, 2011.

Visit CVSA’s Level VI Website for Latest Reports and Program Information for the most up-to-date information on CVSA’s Level VI Inspection Program, latest reports, training schedule, public outreach schedules, and other information. Also, you can ask questions concerning the Level VI Inspection Program on the Level VI Online Forum (blog). Visit www.cvsa.org, click on Programs, and click on the Level VI radiation symbol, and you are in the Level VI website.

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Second Quarter 2011

www.cvsa.org

TRUPACT-III Quick Facts

Cask: TRUPACT-III Manufacturer: ABW Certification: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Certificate Number 9305 General Description: A rectangular container used to transport transuranic waste in a Standard Large Box 2 (SLB2) by highway trucks. The packaging is single-contained and comprised of inner and outer stainless steel plates and polyurethane foam to protect against potential punctures and fire danger. An overpack cover is designed to protect the closure lid. Package Type: B Gross Weight: Package (maximum allowable loaded with contents): 55,116 lbs. Expected weight: 49,000 lbs. Approximate Empty Package: 43,630 lbs. Maximum Payload Weight: 11,486 lbs. Overall Dimensions: Outer width of container: 8.2 feet Height of container: 8.7 feet Length of container: 14 feet Mode of Transport: One TRUPACT-III is transported on a custom designed trailer for truck transport to WIPP. All shipments are tracked using the DOE TRANSCOM satellite-based tracking and communication system. TRANSCOM users have access to shipping schedules, bills of lading, emergency response information, as well as real-time positioning for each shipment. Loading: Front loaded in a horizontal position Owner: U.S. Department of Energy Certificate Holder: Areva Federal Services

TRU Waste Transportation Weight Summary Information TRACTOR 18,400 - 19,800 lbs. TRAILER 9,180 lbs. LOADING 1 Container per trailer CASK Normal Weight 49,000 lbs. Empty Weight 43,630 lbs. TOTALS Empty: 72,610 lbs. Loaded: 77,980 lbs. Note: The maximum allowable weight of a TRUPACT-III container is 55,116 lbs, making a fully loaded TRUPACT-III shipment 84,096 lbs. A TRUPACT-III shipment is non-divisible, meaning parts of the shipment cannot be removed to lessen the weight. Therefore, overweight shipping permits can be obtained and shipments made to WIPP.

DOT Final Rule, Hazardous Materials Regulation Harmonization with International Regulations: The Pipeline and Hazardous

these revisions necessary to harmonize HMR with recent changes made to

Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) published a final rule in the

the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code, the International Civil

Federal Register on January 19, 2011 harmonizing Hazardous Materials

Aviation Organization’s Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of

Regulations (HMR) with International regulations. PHMSA has amended

Dangerous Goods by Air, and the United Nations Recommendations on the

HMR to maintain alignment with International Standards, and incorporate

Transport of Dangerous Goods-Model Regulations. The final rule does not

amendments, including changes to proper shipping names, hazard classes,

impact hazard Class 7 Radioactive shipments. However, it may have some

packing groups, special provisions, packaging authorizations, air transport

impact on other hazardous materials shipments. The voluntary compliance

limited quantities, and vessel stowage requirements.

date with the final rule is January 1, 2011.

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PHMSA considers


2011 CVSA SPONSORS DIAMOND

PLATINUM

A & R Transport, Inc. CheckMark Vehicle Safety Services, Inc. International Road Dynamics, Inc. James Burg Trucking Company

J.J. Keller & Associates, Inc. RSC Equipment Rental U-Haul International

GOLD Applus+ Technologies Arizona Trucking Association Austin Powder Company Continental Corporation DEKRA America, Inc. Great West Casualty Company Groendyke Transport, Inc. HELP, Inc. May Trucking Company

Mercer Transportation Company R+L Carriers, Inc. Schlumberger Technology Corporation Specialized Carriers & Rigging Association STEMCO TML Information Services, Inc. Tyson Foods, Inc. Vehicle Inspection Systems, Inc.

SILVER ABF Freight System, Inc. AMBEST, Inc. Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Chesapeake Energy Corporation Coach USA Code Corporation Compliance Safety Systems, LLC DATTCO, Inc.

DiSilva Companies Greyhound Canada Transportation Corporation Greyhound Lines, Inc. Intermodal Association of North America JB Hunt Transport, Inc. Landstar Transportation Logistics National Truck Tank Carriers, Inc. New York State Motor Truck Association

Ohio Trucking Association Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. Prevost SYSCO Corporation Tennessee Steel Haulers, Inc. United Motorcoach Association Wal-Mart Transportation, LLC YRC Worldwide, Inc.

BRONZE Academy Express, LLC Ace Doran Hauling & Rigging, Inc. Boyle Transportation Brown Line, LLC ContainerPort Group, Inc. Daecher Consulting Group, Inc. Dibble Trucking, Inc.

East Penn Mfg. Co., Inc. Hoffman Transportation, LLC H.R. Ewell, Inc. Illinois Portable Truck Inspection, Inc. Intercomp Company James A. Turner, Inc. Lynden, Inc.

Mid-West Truckers Association Mr. Safety-Check Systems, Inc. New Jersey Motor Truck Association Pitt Ohio Express, LLC RegScan, Inc. The Besl Transfer Co. Warren Transport, Inc.


Presorted Standard US POSTAGE

PAID BALTIMORE, MD

6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310 Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319

PERMIT # 3361

CALENDAR OF EVENTS BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING April 10, 2011 Chicago, IL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING April 10, 2011 Chicago, IL 6TH ANNUAL FMCSA MCSAP LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE April 11, 2011 Chicago, IL NORTH AMERICAN CARGO SECUREMENT HARMONIZATION PUBLIC FORUM April 11, 2011 Chicago, IL 2011 CVSA WORKSHOP April 12 – 14, 2011 Chicago, IL ROADCHECK 2011 June 7 – 9, 2011 SUMMER EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING August 8, 2011 Orlando, FL NAIC 2011 August 8 – 13, 2011 Orlando, FL BRAKE SAFETY WEEK 2011 September 11-17, 2011 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING September 25, 2011 Chicago, IL 2011 CVSA ANNUAL CONFERENCE September 26 – 29, 2011 Austin, TX

RECOGNIZING THE BEST UNDERSCORING THE IMPORTANCE OF COMMERCIAL VEHICLE SAFETY INSPECTIONS

S AV E T H E D AT E

AUGUST 8–13, 2011

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CVSA Guardian 2nd Quarter 2011  

CVSA's Quarterly Publication

CVSA Guardian 2nd Quarter 2011  

CVSA's Quarterly Publication

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