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Volume 17, Issue 3

Third Quarter 2010

Guardian

The New Carrier Safety Measurement System New Interventions Process and Warning Letters Explained Introducing the New Inspection Selection System


Third Quarter 2010

www.cvsa.org

Table of Contents

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Insight President’s Message ........................................................................................................1 Letter to the Editor..........................................................................................................3 The Legislative Rundown ................................................................................................4 Knowledge Matters ........................................................................................................6

Published by: Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance 6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310 Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319

Federal News Ask the Administrator ......................................................................................................7 FMCSA Streamlines the Process for Requesting Changes to Its Information Technology Systems ................................................................................8

Phone: (301) 830-6143 Fax: (301) 830-6144 www.cvsa.org

FMCSA Recognizes States at 5th Annual MCSAP Leadership Conference ..........................9 Innovation and Modernization Charts the Path for FMCSA’s National Training Center ........10 NTC News Briefs ..........................................................................................................10 FMCSA Launches Pre-Employment Screening Program....................................................11 TSA Highway & Motor Carrier Division Trains HazMat Shippers, Drivers, Carriers on New Security Demands ..............................................................12 Transport Canada, FMCSA Agreement Allows Recognition of HazMat Endorsement ..............................................................................................13

Dedicated to government and industry working together to promote commercial vehicle safety on North American highways. HEADQUARTERS STAFF Stephen A. Keppler Interim Executive Director

PHMSA Streamlines, Improves Procedures; Cross-Shares Critical Data; Strengthens Emergency Response Capabilities ..........................................................14

CVSA News CVSA Urges Congress to Pass Long-Term Transportation Bill to Ensure Highway Safety ....16 Expanded MCSAC Tackles Distracted Driving ................................................................17

Collin B. Mooney, CAE Deputy Executive Director Larry D. Stern Director, Level VI Inspection Program

CVSA Members Selected to FMCSA’s Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee ..............17 Brake Safety Model Prototypes Developed for Operation Air Brake ................................18 COHMED Not Just For HazMat Geeks ..........................................................................19 International Safety Team Award to Recognize CMV Safety Personnel ..............................20

Cover Story/Feature

Richard D. Henderson Director, Government Affairs Francisco J. Gomez Director, Member Services and Technology

Roadcheck Message Resonates That Maintaining Safe Vehicles and Drivers Is Worth the Effort....................................................................................................21

Inspector’s Corner

Laura M. Zabriskie Director, Communications and Marketing

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Committee News State Enforcement, Industry Work Together to Make Motorcoach Destination Inspections a Win-Win for Everyone ........................................................25 Intermodal Equipment — What Inspectors Should Know About

Iris R. Leonard Program Manager J. Craig Defibaugh Controller

Upcoming Marking Requirements ............................................................................26

Regional News Increased Interaction Between South Carolina State Transport Police,

For comments, suggestions or information, please email us at communications@cvsa.org.

State Trucking Association Shows How Cooperation Counts ......................................27 New Mexico's Motor Transport Police Division Recognized for Revolutionizing Highway Safety ................................................................................28 "Tragedy Averted - Why We Do What We Do" ..............................................................29 New York State Police Combine Partnerships with Education to Net Comprehensive Highway Safety Effort ................................................................30 Maryland State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division Assists with Nuclear Summit Security Operations ......................................................31

Regional Rap ............................................................................................................31 Industry Spotlight

About the cover: CVSA members come together when it comes to helping the Alliance achieve its goals of uniformity, compatibility and reciprocity of CMV inspections.

PrePass and CVSA: Partners for Safety Progress ..............................................................33

Executive Director’s Message ............................................................................35 RAD Inspection News ............................................................................................37

Guardian is a publication of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.


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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Partnerships Fuel CVSA’s Success Towards One Day Achieving Zero Deaths By Buzzy France, CVSA President

We represent many different groups: truck and bus safety specialists, law enforcement, federal, state, provincial and local government, and industry. Each group has different perspectives but we convene at many times throughout the year through our events, programs, conferences and workshops from across North America. We all come together as friends and colleagues all dedicated to assessing the processes, procedures and activities that will improve commercial motor vehicle and overall highway transportation safety. We come together united under CVSA to work toward a common goal: Preventing crashes and improving safety involving large commercial trucks and interstate buses takes a concerted effort on the part of many stakeholders. It may seem like a monumental task at times but it need not be as long as we work with our partners to accomplish our task. We need to continue to seek out and expand our horizons by including partners who will share their expertise, opinions and unique insights to help inform our path in creating safer roads for all. We are the conduit that brings together many groups and we are always reaching out and expanding that circle. But ultimately, the process starts with each one of us. As you will see from this issue of the Guardian we have focused our attention on partnerships — The importance of which cannot be underscored enough. Not only do we need to work with each other but we need to be reaching out to other associations, coalitions and industry to ensure that safety stays in the forefront since decisions that are being made today will affect us many years from now through legislation and other fronts. In this regard, CVSA is working hard for you.

Buzzy France

Our recent Roadcheck 2010 kickoff event underscores how serious and important our task is – making sure we have the optimum environment for operating safely on our highways. For law enforcement, we are focusing on removing unsafe commercial vehicle drivers and vehicles from the highways. However, there is no one person, agency or organization that feels we can solve this alone. We need partners and the unique perspectives each one brings to the table to solve this complex problem. All of us have an important role to play. The team we assemble gives us the ability to work together toward a common vision. It is the fuel that allows us to attain uncommon results. We are here to convince others to join this cause. Crashes still occur because of faulty or ill-maintained equipment. People still die because of fatigued and unsafe drivers. We need to convince others that they can make a difference in making the roads safer for all. I want to especially thank our industry partners as they are a critical part in helping us on our journey towards zero deaths on our roadways.

Roadcheck is a key step in ensuring highway safety and is a clear example of how partnerships work. The CVSA-certified inspectors all over North America every June focus on conducting the North American Standard inspection during this 72-hour event. They have a huge responsibility in ensuring that the commercial vehicles that travel down roads alongside passenger vehicles here are doing so safely and are sharing the road responsibly. They know that crashes are preventable. Every time an inspector checks the brakes, tires, tie downs, a driver or other items while conducting an inspection what’s in the back of their minds — is this — what I’m doing will save a life. The people who we read about in the news are “our” family members and we are here to protect them. Through the North American Roadside Inspection Program CVSA established — and continuously reinforces — a standard and uniform process for conducting these inspections across the continent. The fact that more than 10,000 people are doing these inspections the exact same way every time attests to a unified commitment to safety. These roadside inspections do not just occur over that 72-hour timeframe — they are being done each and every day — nearly four million times a year. So if there is one thing you take away from this article, it should be this: Accountability starts with you. Everyone has a role, no matter who you are or where you stand, Each of us can educate others — whether they are commercial vehicle drivers or passenger car drivers — about the importance of safe driving, buckling up and maintaining safe vehicles, as well as the proper preparations to enhance security.

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Third Quarter 2010

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE (continued from page 1)

Another event that underscores CVSA’s partnerships is the North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC). Throughout this issue of Guardian, you will read how CVSA members in many jurisdictions both reach out to and are sought by industry partners to collaborate on improving safety. But I cannot put it in better words than our NAIC 2009 Grand Champion Alex Bugeya, an inspector from Ontario, who said that participating in NAIC provided him with a greater understanding of the partnerships and community that is CVSA. We are focused on a number of fronts to advance the membership’s priorities in the forthcoming DOT Reauthorization Bill in the U.S. We have 12 major priority areas that were established by the membership. Several of these initiatives will have benefits beyond the borders in the U.S. to our friends to the north and south on such items as Safety Exemptions, Electronic On Board Recorders, Safety Rating Reciprocity and Data Quality. I must say some of these priority issues are bold steps forward and are not an easy task. However, we remain diligent in working for you. We are collaborating with key partner government organizations such as AASHTO, GHSA, AAMVA and IACP, as well as key industry organizations such as ATA, ABA, UMA and OOIDA to help in advocating our positions on various issues. We continue to push for legislation in the U.S. Congress that would provide tax incentives for truck and bus companies to purchase various types of safety technologies. This is good public policy — it gives incentives to private investment in proven safety technologies. With CSA 2010 and a number of other technology research and demonstration programs in process at the federal level in the U.S., Canada and Mexico the future likely will look much

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CVSA President Buzzy France with FMCSA Administrator Anne Ferro.

different than it is today. There are more than 20 different organizations that are part of a coalition effort on this issue. CVSA signed a Memorandum of Understanding with CITA, an international not-for profit organization recognized by the European Union that, much like CVSA, represents all types of organizations and stakeholders who share a common interest in exchanging information, developing best practices and draft international standards in the field of road vehicle inspection to enhance road safety and the environment. CITA has a membership that represents over 50 countries and covering more than 250 million vehicle inspections a year. So as you can see from just these few examples, your Alliance is carrying out a key tenet of our mission – Leadership. We are expanding our efforts to collaborate with others to share and bring to bear the best thinking on the planet in the realm of commercial vehicle safety.

I will say that in all my years of being involved in CVSA I have never seen your leadership more focused and engaged. The Executive Committee and Committee Chairs are taking on major policy issues while at the same time focusing on advancing the organization to be more nimble, effective and fiscally sound for the future. We are at a critical juncture. It is important now more than ever to continue to share what we know with others and bring them into our circle, nurture and educate, as well as learn from them so we can continue our legacy to come up with innovative solutions that will benefit society. It has been my great honor and pleasure serving you as President. So, with that, it’s my hope that during the next few months we all get out of our comfort zones, and put our best minds at work to solve these problems. Nothing is impossible. As Henry Ford once said, “Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.”


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LETTER TO THE EDITOR

CVSA – The Ultimate Partnership

Whether you are in enforcement, industry, safety advocacy, government regulation, security, public sector or private sector, you will not succeed in our common goal of providing for safety and security in commercial motor vehicle operations without effective partnerships. In many ways CVSA may very well be the ultimate partnership as it brings together the resources of enforcement, engineering, education, industry, safety advocates and more to collaborate on a common goal of reducing commercial motor vehicle involvement in traffic crashes. More about that later. We can all think of many examples of partnerships that we have developed and nurtured throughout the course of our professional careers in commercial vehicle enforcement and safety. For example in the Midwest/Great Lakes region, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan and Ohio have formed a regional partnership for sharing information and best practices and planning and executing cooperative joint enforcement operations. The result of this multi-state partnership is a synergistic impact each state could not achieve individually. In Michigan we have two commercial vehicle related partnerships that have been especially successful. The Michigan Truck Safety Commission (MTSC), created in 1988 brings together industry, education, engineering, enforcement and the general public in a unique partnership that promotes truck safety through a combination of education and enforcement. For more infor-

mation about this one-of-a-kind partnership please visit the MTSC website at www.truckingsafety.org. Another partnership we are particularly proud of in Michigan is the Michigan State Police/Michigan Department of Transportation Commercial Vehicle Strategy Team. Developed in October 2006, the CVST has been highly successful in enhancing communication, collaboration and cooperation between MSP and MDOT to levels never previously imag-

reducing CMV involved crashes, injuries, and fatalities. The sharing of ideas, information and best practices by the members and staff at CVSA is invaluable. The collaborative and unified voice of CVSA on major issues such as UCR and reauthorization is priceless. Yes, CVSA is truly a partnership on international levels that has and will continue to make a difference. What is it that makes CVSA the ultimate partnership? It is the mem-

CVSA brings together the resources of enforcement, engineering, education, industry, safety advocates and more to collaborate on a common goal of reducing commercial motor vehicle involvement in traffic crashes ined. The CVST, comprised of staff and field representatives from both agencies, meets quarterly. The real benefit of the CVST partnership is that both agencies now understand each other’s policies, procedures and limitations. Because of this partnership, both agencies are now more willing to share information and resources to achieve their common goal of enhancing commercial vehicle safety and security and better protect Michigan’s highway infrastructure. So what does all this have to do with CVSA? CVSA is the ultimate partnership in the world of commercial vehicle safety. CVSA brings together partners from state, local, and federal enforcement to work with industry, safety advocates, and others toward a mutual goal of

bers and staff. The strength of CVSA is dependent on active involvement of its members on the alliance’s standing committees and special ad hoc work groups. It has been an honor for me to partner with CVSA and its members for the past 14 years. CVSA is a great organization and a great partnership. Please keep CVSA strong and relevant by getting actively involved at the conferences, at the regional meetings, at the working committees, and by effectively deploying the principles, policies, and procedures of your alliance at the roadside.

Capt. Robert R. Powers, Michigan State Police, (Retired)

CVSA’s Guardian welcomes your letters and comments. To submit a letter, send an email to communications@cvsa.org or write to CVSA, c/o Guardian, 6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310, Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319.

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Third Quarter 2010

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THE LEGISLATIVE RUNDOWN

CVSA Testifies Before Senate and House Committees By Richard D. Henderson, CVSA, Director, Government Affairs Richard Henderson

CVSA President testifies at Senate Hearing on Oversight of Motor Carrier Safety Efforts CVSA President Francis (Buzzy) France recently testified at a hearing before the Senate Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety, and Security on “Oversight of Motor Carrier Safety Efforts” on April 28, 2010. Subcommittee Chairman Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) chaired the hearing and emphasized issues he considered of greatest importance: electronic onboard recorders, hours-of-service rules, CSA 2010 and truck size and weight. Ranking subcommittee member Sen. John Thune (R-SD) emphasized the importance of state efforts in making CSA 2010 successful and also expressed concern about the lack of harmonization in truck size and weight standards. Sen. Clare McCaskell (DMO) expressed strong concern about the lack of concern that driver pay is most often determined by miles rather than hours worked and recommended that a study be conducted about the effect of this on truck study. Questions directed to CVSA President France concerned hours-of-service, EOBRs, and truck size and weight. He reaffirmed CVSA Reauthorization policy on each of these issues. Chairman Lautenberg raised the possibility of a further hearing on truck size and weight. CVSA Testifies Before House Highways and Transit Subcommittee on CSA 2010 CVSA’s Interim Executive Director, Stephen A. Keppler testified before the House Subcommittee on Highways and Transit at a hearing on June 23, 2010 called by Chairman Peter DeFazio (D-

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OR) to review FMCSA’s plans to implement CSA 2010. Keppler testified on a panel of witnesses that included FMCSA Administrator Anne S. Ferro, representatives of the American Trucking Associations (ATA), and the Owner Operators Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA). While there were concerns about the process and timing of the implementation of CSA 2010, there was general consensus among all of the witnesses on the overall need for the new plan. Members agreed if the implementation was done carefully, a significant improvement in commercial vehicle safety would be the result. Key issues raised by ATA and OOIDA were crash preventability, violations being counted against the carrier without an effective due process procedure in place and using VMT as an exposure measure rather than power units. Other issues were the weightings being considered for the Safety Fitness Determination Rulemaking, as well as the possibility of inconsistent enforcement among the states such as probable cause states having a disproportionate amount of violations assigned to carriers for safety rating purposes. A key concern of CVSA, also shared by Chairman DeFazio and other subcommittee members, was whether the states will have adequate funding to implement the new program since they will have to expend the same resources as FMCSA for this purpose. Administrator Ferro said FMCSA would look into the possibility of letting states use funding from the state safety grant programs, including MCSAP, to help with these costs.

House DOT-HUD Appropriations Subcommittee Marks Up 2011 Funding Bill This subcommittee reported out its version of the bill to the full House Appropriations Committee on July 1. Since a new Transportation Reauthorization bill has not yet been passed, motor carrier safety programs will be funded at the maximum limits allowed under SAFETEA-LU, as was the case with the 2010 funding bill. However, at the request of FMCSA, an additional $20 million was approved for their administrative budget to help with the costs associated with CSA 2010. Final action on the 2011 budget is uncertain. The entire appropriations process in Congress is behind schedule and there is a possibility that Congress will not complete work on the appropriations bills by the start of the new fiscal year that starts on October 1 of this year. There will very likely be at least one or more Continuing Resolutions before final passage. Since this is an election year, Congress is anticipating an early adjournment. Auto Safety Bill Extends Event Data Recorders Requirement to Commercial Vehicles Both the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the Senate Commerce Committee have reported their respective versions of the Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 2010. The bill number in the House is HR 5381 and in the Senate, S. 3302. As of this moment, floor action in either the House or Senate has not been scheduled. This legislation largely deals with issues raised by the Toyota crisis by strengthening the power and authority


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of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The Senate version (S. 3302) as reported out of the Commerce Committee contained an amendment offered by Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) extending the requirement for event data recorders to commercial vehicles. The amendment reads in part, “Not later than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall revise part 563 of Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, to require that all mediumduty vehicles and heavy-duty vehicles sold in the United States beginning with the model year 2017 be equipped with an even data recorder that meets the requirements of that part.”

CVSA Participates in Coalition “Toward Zero Deaths” (TZD) CVSA is participating in “Toward Zero Deaths,” a national highway safety strategy with the purpose to serve as a national roadmap for reducing highway fatalities and serious injuries. The strategy will be to develop a national safety plan and an outreach program as well as a process for implementing the plan. Efforts will be made to coordinate the plan with Canada’s Road Safety Vision activity. The steering committee is made up of representatives

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of CVSA, Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA), American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA), National Association of Counties (NACO), International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) as well as FHWA, FMCSA, and NHTSA. In addition to a series of webinars held in June, a national TZD Summit will be held in Washington, D.C. on August 25-26, 2010.

Senate Commerce Committee Approves Bill Offering States Incentives to Ban Texting The Senate Commerce Committee also has approved a bill, S. 1938, that would make federal grants available to states that enact laws prohibiting texting and/or other use of handheld cell phones. NHTSA would administer the grant program which requires that 50 percent of grant money received by a state should be used to educate the public about the dangers of texting or using a cell phone while driving, as well as to enforce the law. While hearings have been held in the House, a bill has not been reported out of Committee. In the meantime, CVSA has filed comments on a proposal by FMCSA to prohibit texting in commercial motor vehicles. CVSA pointed out that there are a number of other distracted driving activities that contribute to crashes and driver performance.

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KNOWLEDGE MATTERS

Partnerships, Communications Integral in Achieving Shared Goals By Paul Claunch, Major, Arkansas Highway Police, CVSA President 2004-2005

I have participated in the Alliance for more than 20 years and I can tell you that nothing quite prepares a person for the responsibility of representing the thousands of men and women who dedicate their lives to making our highways safer. After a few months on the job, I quickly learned how integral partnerships and communications were in achieving shared goals. Both of these were critical not only with our own members but especially with those outside the organization. For the Alliance to continue to grow and improve, we literally must take ownership of it and carry out its activities in the spirit of our Strategic Plan. I said that five years ago and I can attest to the fact that this has indeed been the case. CVSA members, associate members, the headquarters staff and others work with enthusiasm to help each president during their term to further build on the goals and objectives we set out some 25 years ago and I’m confident that, 20 years from now, they will continue helping to bring about its growth and improvement. I am very impressed with the progress that has been made over the years in terms of commercial motor vehicle safety and of our Alliance’s role in helping make it happen. While we have made progress on reducing crashes and fatalities, much of the credit to achieving that goal goes to the high degree of cooperation CVSA fosters with its vast network of partners in both in law enforcement, policy making and industry. Let’s get real; while it would be a bona fide ego boost to think one single entity was responsible for the ongoing safety improvements – it’s just not the case! A multitude of people and organizations working together are jointly responsible -

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not just one or two individuals in search of personal legacies. From my perspective, such cooperation and hard work are imperative - particularly at the state and local level. As one example, in my home state of Arkansas, Arkansas Highway Police (AHP) sent a contestant to NAIC in 2004. Upon returning from the competition, that contestant came back, sat down

run adverse to conventional wisdom, both organizations sit in the same banquet hall for the awards presentations! And yes, we actually stand, cheer and applaud each other. Go figure. And to think all of this started out with someone reaching out to another organization and asking the simple question: How can we work together to reach our common goals? As a result, the Arkansas Trucking Association’s

While we have made progress on reducing crashes and fatalities, much of the credit to achieving that goal goes to the high degree of cooperation CVSA fosters with its vast network of partners…. and talked to me about what he observed. At the time, Arkansas didn’t have a state competition. Instead we pretty much looked at the quality and number of inspections and more or less hand-picked someone to recognize. We discovered what other states were doing and discussed how we could get that started in our own state. It was at that time that we reached out to our state’s trucking association. I would be hard pressed to name all of the individuals making a difference, so I will instead focus on the efforts of our trucking association’s Safety Management Council. The Arkansas Trucking Association has provided judges, equipment and other resources for the past several years to assist in conducting the AHP Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspection Competition conducted annually in early to mid June. In turn, AHP contestants also serve as judges for the Arkansas Truck Driving Championship later the same week. Even though to some it would seem to

Safety Management Council always invites us to talk to them. When I was CVSA President they asked me to come and give a presentation. We always need to remember to reach out to industry when we gather around the table. And as you will see throughout the regional news section of Guardian, many other states, such as New York and South Carolina, do this as well. This is a great testament to the fact that while we often have differing opinions on transportation and funding issues, when it comes to the critical question of safe operation of CMVs and other vehicles along the highways, our philosophies run parallel. It truly is an equation of 1+1=3. As Arkansas pursues its CVISN/ intelligent transportation goals, readies itself for full implementation of CSA 2010 and works through various challenges (not just of the DataQs variety), enforcement and industry both recognize the mutual dividends to be gained by coming to the same table as a single group focused on saving lives.


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Ask the FMCSA Administrator

FMCSA Anne S. Ferro answers questions from CVSA members. In this issue, the Administrator talks about training in preparation for CSA 2010, the success of Roadcheck and the planned course of strike forces. Question: What is the latest update from FMCSA regarding CSA 2010 training for state enforcement personnel? What can we do at the state level to get ready for CSA 2010? Answer: We are entering a very exciting chapter in the history of FMCSA with the evolution of focused commercial vehicle safety enforcement — the Comprehensive Safety Analysis. The rollout for CSA 2010 began in April this year with the data preview for carriers. The actual safety measurement system will be previewed in late August, followed by full view of all data to the public at the end of the year. The remaining components, which include warning letters, the notice of proposed rulemaking on safety fitness determination, the new intervention process and more will continue to be rolled out to the end of Fiscal Year 2011. By that time, CSA 2010 will be only known by its initials — Compliance, Safety and Accountability. We have come a long way and we have further to go. Many of our CVSA member partners have contributed their expert knowledge in the development of CSA 2010; many more have been involved in the pilot testing. Let me offer my sincerest appreciation to all who have been a part of laying the groundwork for this important safety program. Training is a critical component for state enforcement personnel and we are well into the development stage. The

training package will include webinars that address the basics of CSA as well as CSA “BASICS” — Behavioral Analysis and Safety Improvement Categories. The critical importance of roadside data and how the data informs the Safety Measurement System (SMS) will be thoroughly covered. The four 50/50 test states converting to 100 percent CSA will undergo training throughout July and August beginning with Colorado on July 12 and ending with New Jersey on August 16. For state personnel involved in the Compliance Review process, plans call for an incremental roll out beginning later this fall in preparation for the December 5, 2010, rollout of the new safety measurement system. Training will cover four key components: performance based sampling procedures; red flag driver; focused CR procedures, and; the direct-to-NOV (Notice of Violation) concept. A one day seminar will be offered for state and federal supervisors and intervention managers and training for the field staff will be delivered in a series of webinars. In the meantime, I urge everyone to be pro-active in learning about CSA 2010. If you have not yet visited the website, please make it a favorite. It is a great resource that is continually being updated. The address is: http://csa2010.fmcsa.dot.gov Question: What were your impressions of the Roadcheck activities this year? Answer: Each time Roadcheck is held it proves to be a tremendous undertaking. The “continental coordination” across North America was unbelievable. I am convinced that it’s only through working

together can we gain ground in commercial vehicle safety. And when I say working together, I mean federal, state and provincial governments, commercial truck and bus industries, carriers and drivers, safety organizations, as well as the motoring public — all of us have a crucial role to play. The bottom line is about saving lives. Every unsafe vehicle or driver taken off the road protects every traveler. Every passenger vehicle driver who gives extra space to large trucks and buses and who drives with alertness and courtesy does a great deal in preventing needless crashes and injuries. I am confident that this fall’s “Operation Safe Driver” will be highly successful as well, and I look forward to taking part in our joint educational efforts. CVSA members are outstanding partners not only for Roadcheck and Operation Safe Driver but throughout the year and each and every day on the roadside. Question: Will enforcement strike forces be continuing? Are any planned for this fall and winter? Answer: Strike forces are valuable tools within our larger enforcement toolbox. This past spring, along with state enforcement agencies, we conducted another highly successful household goods movers strike force that led to civil actions against 31 moving companies that were operating without USDOT Operating Authority. Another 74 companies are facing penal-

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FMCSA Streamlines the Process for Requesting Changes to Its Information Technology Systems By Hesh Ansari, FMCSA, Chief, IT Development Division

Submitting a request to change or enhance an FMCSA Information Systems (IT) system just got faster and easier, thanks to a new automated process that is now available online. No longer is a paper-based “IT Systems Change Request Form” necessary. By accessing the Information Systems Web site via the FMCSA Portal, it is now possible to submit a request electronically. Simply click on a link to enter or update a change request. The first time a user accesses this link, the system will ask that a profile be created. This profile includes an email address so that automatic updates can be sent about the request. When finished, click “Submit,” and the request will be automatically routed for processing. To

check on the status of a request, simply re-enter via the FMCSA Portal and read any messages that have been added. The convenience of an online request mechanism will not alter the review process by CVSA’s Information Systems Committee. All requests will be carefully reviewed and considered by the CVSA IT Committee, and if ultimately accepted, a formal recommendation will be submitted to FMCSA, where it will go before an Enterprise Change Control Board (ECCB). The ECCB provides the technical review required for all systems enhancements, manages the control and pace of IT infrastructure system changes, and ensures that the recommended modifications are aligned with FMCSA’s strategic objectives.

In the event that a requested IT change is not adopted or delayed and absent of explanation, begin by first contacting CVSA’s IT Committee. For technical glitches — such as a bug requiring a fix — with any of FMCSA’s online systems, please contact FMCSA Technical Support at (617) 494-3003 or email FMCTechSup@dot.gov. The matter will be logged in and staff will work to resolve the matter. For general feedback regarding FMCSA’s IT systems, please send comments to compass@dot.gov. The FMCSA IT Team is constantly striving to provide better service; we recognize the life-and-death importance of roadside officers possessing critical safety data.

ASK THE FMCSA ADMINISTRATOR (continued from page 7) ties for violations of Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. This year’s strike force in particular focused on the most egregious household good movers with an emphasis on companies that advertise through the internet. We found that the majority of movers are good companies but there are some bad apples. We are committed to weeding them out. We have more strike forces planned for passenger carriers as well. Consistent with FMCSA’s continued focus on passenger safety, the National Passenger Carrier Strike Force is planned for all FMCSA Division Offices and MCSAP Partner Agencies from Monday, August 23 through Saturday, September 4, 2010. A sustained effort to conduct passenger vehicle inspections and related enforce-

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ment activities will occur during this period. Passenger Carrier Strike Forces are just one of several enforcement strategies identified by FMCSA as part of comprehensive approach to ensure that passenger carriers are operating in regulatory compliance upon our nation’s highways. By capturing data through roadside inspections and other enforcement activities, those carriers with poor performance indicators will be targeted for compliance reviews through SafeStat and CSA 2010. This initiative also offers an opportunity to execute the motorcoach inspection program which is now a required component of each state’s Commercial Vehicle Safety Plan. In the long term, we’ll be looking at more passenger carrier strike forces and other focused regional and national

activities. The success resides, once again, in the fact that we all have shared goals in our important safety mission. Working together we can raise the safety bar to enter the motor carrier industry; maintain high safety standards to remain in the industry, and remove high risk behaviors and operators from operating. Keep up the good work. What you do everyday prevents crashes, saves lives and makes our roads safer for everyone. Have a question for FMCSA Administrator Anne Ferro? Send it to askFMCSA@dot.gov for inclusion in a future Guardian column by the Administrator. Due to limited space not all questions can receive a personal response or be published in a future issue of the Guardian.


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FMCSA Recognizes States at 5th Annual MCSAP Leadership Conference

MCSAP LEADERSHIP AWARD CATEGORY #1 DATA QUALITY (Fiscal Year 2009)

Standing left to right: Wyoming: Capt. Shannon Ratliff, Lt. Douglas Dome, Wyoming Highway Patrol; Louisiana: Mark Morrison, Lousiana State Police; Indiana: Maj. Jeffry L. Walker, Indiana State Police; DOT Deputy Secretary John Pocari.

MCSAP LEADERSHIP AWARD CATEGORY #2 TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT (Fiscal Year 2009)

Standing left to right: Massachusetts: Lt. Thomas Fitzgerald Massachussetts State Police; Idaho: Lt. William Reese, Idaho State Police; Indiana: Maj. Jeffry L. Walker, Indiana State Police; DOT Deputy Secretary John Pocari.

MCSAP LEADERSHIP AWARD CATEGORY #3 COMEMRCIAL VEHICLE FATALITY RATE (Calendar Year 2006- Calendar Year 2008)

Standing left to right: Massachusetts: Lt. Thomas Fitzgerald, Massachussetts State Police; Rhode Island: Captain Darren Delaney, Rhode Island State Police, Rhode Island State Police; New Jersey: Shari Lechter, Paul Truban, New Jersey Department of Transportation; DOT Deputy Secretary John Pocari.

MCSAP LEADERSHIP AWARD CATEGORY #4 COMPLIANCE REVIEWS (Fiscal Year 2009)

Standing left to right: New Mexico: Maj. Ron Cordova, Capt. Chris Mayrant, New Mexico Department of Public Safety; Ohio: Alan Martin, Public Utilities Commission of Ohio; Illinois: Ed Hoover, Illinois Department of Transportation; Montana: Montana Department of Transportation (not present); DOT Deputy Secretary John Pocari.

CSA 2010 OPERATIONAL MODEL FIELD TEST PARTICIPATION Standing left to right: Colorado: Sgt. Rocco Domenico, Capt. Mark Savage, Colorado State Patrol; Georgia: Chief Mark Mcleod, Georgia Department of Public Safety; Missourri: Jan Skouby Missouri Department of Transportation; New Jersey: Shari Lechter, Paul Truban, New Jersey Department of Transportation.

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Third Quarter 2010

www.cvsa.org

Innovation and Modernization Charts the Path for FMCSA’s National Training Center By Joe DeLorenzo, FMCSA, Director, National Training Center

The National Training Center (NTC) is committed to following a path of innovation and modernization. While our existing catalog is tried and true, a number of the courses were developed almost a decade ago — long before the existence of today’s teaching technology resources. NTC has assembled a team of highly qualified Instructional Systems Design specialists to work with state and federal subject matter experts to review our existing curriculum and course content for instructional improvements and enhancements. And with interactive formats, students have an opportunity to actively participate in the training course. Classes currently in the process of undergoing a complete curriculum overhaul include: Compliance Review; New Entrant Safety Audit; Roadside Enforcement; Enforcement Procedures, and; Instructor Development. The Hazardous Materials courses

are in the review phase and are in the queue to be updated next. NTC is also actively pursuing accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA). Our goal is to provide the best product possible to our state and federal partners. We appreciate the contributions of all the individuals who have participated on review panels and curriculum redesign teams. In fact, if you have an interest in sharing your expertise as a subject matter expert or as an instructor, please let us know by e-mailing NTC-State-Programs@dot.gov. We value your feedback. Let us know what you think and what ideas you might have to further strengthen and improve NTC. Our website is www.fmcsa.gov/ntc. From there, click on “Contact Us.”

NTC News Briefs Instructor Development NTC is in the process of creating an Instructor Development Course. It will cover concepts of presentation development; design and delivery of instructional material; adult learning theory; preparation of lesson plans; testing; evaluations and assessments as well as other areas. The course will meet two longstanding goals: first, to continually elevate the skill sets of NTC instructors and, second, to ensure a high degree of instructional consistency as required to obtain accreditation. DIAP Making Strides in Enforcement The Drug Interdiction Assistance Program — DIAP — was launched in 1988. The NTC-DIAP training staff provides criminal interdiction training to approximately 7,500 local, state and federal law enforcement officials each year. DIAP works closely with the El Paso Intelligence Center (EPIC) State and Local Liaison Group. DIAP delivers post and pre-seizure investigative support, predictive analysis and “Carriers of Interest” data for law enforcement per-

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sonnel. Predictive analysis and seizure data compiled at EPIC drive DIAP’s Commercial Vehicle Criminal Interdiction training curricula as well as EPIC’s Criminal Interdiction courses. Between February and May 2010, DIAP-trained enforcement highlights have included: 5,944 pounds of marijuana seized by U.S. Border Patrol Agents seizing; 99 kilos of cocaine seized by Alabama State Troopers; 29,000 pounds of untaxed tobacco seized by New York State Troopers, and; $2.3 million in U.S. currency seized along with the recovery of three pallets of stolen electronics valued at over $50,000 by Iowa Motor Vehicle Enforcement Officers. During Fiscal Year 2009, EPIC staff analyzed reports from local, state and federal, officials detailing an incredible 859 intransit illicit drug and currency seizures from commercial vehicles. The cumulative contraband removal during the 12-month period consisted of: 18,645 pounds of cocaine; 79 pounds of heroin; 845,315 pounds of marijuana; 1,036 pounds of methamphetamine and $48.4 million in illicit U.S. currency.


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“Commercial Skills Test Information Management System” Now Available By Quon Kwan, FMCSA, General Engineer, Office of Analysis, Research and Technology

On May 11, 2010, FMCSA launched the Pre-Employment Screening Program (PSP), which allows commercial truck and bus companies to electronically access inspection and crash records of drivers who are being considered for employment. PSP offers access to up to five years of driver crash data and three years of inspection data — regardless of the state or jurisdiction. By using driver safety information during preemployment screening, commercial carriers will be able to better assess the potential safety risks of prospective driver-employees. PSP also provides drivers additional opportunities to verify the data in their driving history and correct any discrepancies. A driver’s records are protected in accordance with federal privacy laws.

“Safety is our highest priority. The Pre-Employment Screening Program sends a strong message to commercial carriers and drivers that we are serious about having the safest drivers behind the wheel of large trucks and buses,” said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood in announcing the launch of the program. “Commercial carriers will have an essential tool for making informed hiring decisions that will lead to safer drivers on our roads,” added FMCSA Administrator Anne S. Ferro. “The Pre-Employment Screening Program raises the safety bar for the motor carrier industry and helps to make our roads safer for everyone.” How it Works The PSP is populated monthly by

FMCSA’s Motor Carrier Management Information System (MCMIS), which is comprised of driver performance data including inspection and compliance review results, enforcement data, state-reported crashes and motor carrier census data. State and local Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP) partners may recognize this dataset as the Driver Information Resource (DIR). The PSP database is the same as the DIR; however, use of PSP is limited to motor carriers who are conducting checks on specific drivers who have granted their consent. When an inspector pulls up a driver record file in the DIR during a roadside inspection, it is the same data that a hiring official will be able to view on a driver in accessing PSP.

For more information, go to http://www.psp.fmcsa.dot.gov.

HazMat Courses Under Review The content for “General HazMat,” as well as “Cargo Tank Inspection” and “Other Bulk Packages and Cargo Tank Facility Review” are going through NTC review. The goal will be to develop streamlined materials for course modules that can be efficiently and effectively presented. Instructional Systems Design specialists are continuing to meet with subject matter experts on the project.

second phase of the test, NTC created course registration and evaluation survey forms for the safety training classes held this spring in Texas. NTC will be expanding its registration and survey system utilizing SurveyGizmo. State and local partners interested in learning more about this online registration and evaluation system, including IT requirements, please contact NTC-StatePrograms@dot.gov.

Evaluating Evaluations In late March 2010, NTC began a test of the online survey tool SurveyGizmo for collecting course and instructor evaluations at the FMCSA Academy in Austin Texas. The inaugural test was deemed a major success. The web-based application was easy to build for staff and easy and convenient for students to use. In a

CALEA Accreditation In November 2010, the clock will start on NTC’s application with the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) for accreditation. If the process goes smoothly, NTC’s training programs will receive CALEA accreditation by October 2012.

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Third Quarter 2010

www.cvsa.org

TSA Highway & Motor Carrier Division Trains HazMat Shippers, Drivers, Carriers on New Security Demands By David Cooper, Acting Branch Chief Threats, Vulnerabilities & Consequences, DHS, TSA, Highway & Motor Carrier Division The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has a strategic goal of implementing preventive measures to mitigate potential terrorist threats and other risks to the hazardous materials (HazMat) transportation sector. TSA’s Transportation Sector Network Management Office (TSNM), Highway and Motor Carrier Division (HMC), identified a need to promote a better understanding of the new demands for transportation security on HazMat drivers, shippers and carriers. HMC’s first step in this process was the development of the HazMat Motor Carrier Security Self-Assessment Training program. This program is based on existing U.S. DOT regulatory guidance, and increases the HazMat trans-

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portation community’s awareness of security planning requirements, and the use of security self-assessments to identify security shortfalls. The next step was the development of a program to give HazMat drivers, shippers, and carriers a set of recommended security actions based on industry best practices, they could implement to reduce their security vulnerabilities and mitigate the risk of a HazMat transportation security incident. These recommended security practices are known as Security Action Items (SAIs). The use of the SAls is currently voluntary, not a regulatory requirement or standard. HMC developed the Security Action Item Training (SAIT) program for the HazMat transportation community,

based on the SAIs. The SAIT package employs a multi-faceted approach, including a self-instructional computer based training (CBT) module, a guide and materials for instructor-led training by larger companies, and an award winning scenario based DVD that illustrates the SAIs in practical use. The goal of SAIT is to enable HazMat transportation stakeholders to identify their security vulnerabilities, and determine which SAIs are appropriate to mitigate the risks. SAIT emphasizes the benefits of implementing the SAIs in all areas of HazMat transportation including general security, personnel security, unauthorized access, and en-route security. The SAIT program builds upon HMC’s previous HazMat Motor Carrier Security Self-Assessment Training program, and provides an incremental step for preparing the HazMat motor carrier community for future TSA codified security requirements. The training emphasizes the wide range of security actions HazMat drivers, carriers, and shippers can implement; from no/low cost security practices any company can adopt, to high technology hardware solutions for enhancing the security of the most dangerous HazMat in transport. HMC developed the SAIs in conjunction with security partners including representatives from the chemical manufacturing industry, chemical transportation industry, and appropriate Federal agencies. Industry and government focus groups considered threats to HazMat in the transportation cycle, identified security best practices, and considered common regulatory compliance issues during development of the SAIs. In June of 2008, HMC introduced the SAIs and associated documents to the


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Transport Canada, FMCSA Agreement Allows Recognition of HazMat Endorsement

HazMat motor carrier industry as a whole. The SAIs consist of four separate documents: • TSNM Letter to Highway and Motor Carrier Stakeholders • Appendix A — Description of Voluntary Security Action Items for Tier 1 Highway Security Sensitive Materials (Tier 1 HSSM) and Tier 2 Highway Security Sensitive Materials (Tier 2 HSSM) Transported by Motor Carrier • Attachment 1 to Appendix A — TSA Highway and Motor Carrier Division Guidance for Background Checks for Motor Vehicle HazMat Employees other than Motor Vehicle Drivers • Appendix B — List of Tier 1 Highway Security Sensitive Materials (Tier 1 HSSM) and Tier 2 Highway Security Sensitive Materials (Tier 2 HSSM) with Corresponding Security Action Items In 2009 TSA’s Highway & Motor Carrier Division (HMC) partnered with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration (PHMSA) to conduct half-day workshops in eight locations around the U.S. Due to the success of the program, TSA’s HMC Division has again partnered with DOT’s PHMSA to offer a revised curriculum and full-day workshops throughout the U.S. beginning in July 2010 and ending in April 2011. These single day workshops are also being offered for two consecutive days in each location. A full schedule of the workshops can be found by visiting www.tsa.gov/highway.

Following an agreement with FMCSA, Transport Canada has posted the following alert on their web site. Part 6 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Regulations requires anyone who handles, offers for transport or transports dangerous goods (HazMat in the US) to hold a valid training certificate. Subsection 6.4(1) of the TDG Regulations provides for US drivers who hold a document valid in the United States that shows they are trained as set out in sections 172.700 to 172.704 of 49 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations). In the US, drivers that transport HazMat in quantities that require placards must pass a state-level exam required by Section 383.93 of 49 CFR. The state will then add a HazMat endorsement to their Commercial Driver’s License. In Canada, Canadian drivers are not required to have a HazMat endorsement on their driver’s license when transporting dangerous goods. An agreement between the US Department of Transportation - Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and Transport Canada states that: • Transport Canada will recognize: - the HazMat endorsement of the Commercial Driver’s Licence; - a copy of the certification stipulated in section 172.704(d)(5) of 49 CFR; or - a TDG training certificate issued under Part 6 of the TDG Regulations. • The US will accept a Canadian driver’s TDG training certificate in lieu of a HazMat endorsement. • Canadian TDG Inspectors can request further verification by contacting the Director, Compliance and Response, Transport Dangerous Goods Directorate within Transport Canada. To find out more, please contact your regional Transport Dangerous Goods Office or visit the TDG website at: www.tc.gc.ca/tdg/safety/menu.htm Atlantic Region

866-814-1477

Quebec Region

514-283-5722

Ontario Region

416-973-1868

TDG-TMDOntario@tc.gc.ca

888-463-0521 or

TDG-TMDPNR@tc.gc.ca

Prairie & Northern Region Pacific Region

TDG-TMDAtlantic@tc.gc.ca

204-983-3152 604-666-2955

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Third Quarter 2010

www.cvsa.org

PHMSA Streamlines and Improves Procedures; Cross-Shares Critical Data; Strengthens Emergency Response Capabilities The Regulatory Program Goes Beyond the HMR The 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) are issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) and govern the commercial transportation of hazardous materials (HazMat) by highway, rail, vessel, and air. The HMR address HazMat classification, packaging, hazard communication, emergency response information, and training requirements. The HMR are generally performancebased regulations that provide the regulated community with a certain amount of necessary flexibility in meeting safety requirements. PHMSA recognizes that the HazMat community is particularly strong at developing new materials, technologies, and innovative ways of moving materials. For these reasons, not every transportation situation can be anticipated and built into the HMR, even when regulations are performance-based. Therefore, a process of issuing HazMat special permits and approvals has been built into the regulatory system to address those unexpected situations. A special permit is an authorization permitting a person to perform a function that is not otherwise permitted under the HMR. An approval is an authorization, classification, or registration for a shipper, carrier, manufacturer, or package retester to perform an activity that requires prior authorization under the HMR. For a special permit to be granted, applicants must first submit a thorough application demonstrating an equivalent level of safety as provided by the regulations or, if not, an equivalent level of

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safety as consistent with the public’s interest. Working with its modal partners, such as FMCSA, PHMSA verifies and evaluates special permit applications to determine if the proposed actions achieve the necessary result. Applications for approvals provide similar information as required for special permits. Depending on the type of approval being sought, PHMSA may coordinate with its modal partners to evaluate the fitness of the applicant. PHMSA is in the process of streamlining and improving procedures for receiving and evaluating HazMat special permits and approvals. On May 1, 2010, PHMSA launched an on-line special permit and approval application process. This on-line process will facilitate faster processing and turnaround, provide applicants with 24/7 system access, allow the ability to attach supporting documentation, and provide immediate confirmation and tracking. The agency has also identified a number of special permits and approvals with long-standing safety records that are repeatedly and widely used by industry, and will be converting them into the HMR for broader use across industry. Doing so will eliminate the need for repeated special permit and approval renewal requests and facilitate commerce while maintaining an appropriate level of safety. On May 14, 2010, PHMSA published HM-233A, which is the first final rule in a series of rules to accomplish this. To further assist HazMat stakeholders, PHMSA also provides Letters of Interpretation clarifying the HMR based on the stakeholder’s specific request. For example, on March 12, 2010, PHMSA issued a letter stating that HazMat need not be stored in the rear of a tractor trail-

er to allow for inspection in accordance with 49 C.F.R. part 177.802, and that the driver of a tractor trailer is not required to unload the contents of the trailer at a place other than the truck’s origin or destination as doing so would place an unreasonable burden on the driver. PHMSA issued this letter when it became aware of some state enforcement officials stopping tractor trailers and, citing the HMR, demanding that the driver allow for immediate inspection of the HazMat packages. The Importance of Information Sharing PHMSA recognizes that each agency with HazMat responsibility approaches its mission differently and independently. PHMSA is also aware of the critical roll data has in decision making. There is an ongoing need to use quality data, analytical techniques, and collaboration tools to help manage, minimize, and mitigate the risks to public safety and security. Quality data not only serves as the foundation for PHMSA’s regulatory initiatives, but helps the agency determine priorities and the needs of its stakeholders. Therefore, effective information sharing across agencies is necessary for improving HazMat programs and increasing safety performance. PHMSA, along with its interagency and Federal partners, has launched the HazMat Intelligence Portal (HIP), which is a web-based resource integrating and sharing data on inspections, incidents, regulations, penalties, and other data from PHMSA, the Federal Aviation Administration, FMCSA, and the Federal Railroad Administration. Also, HIP is integrated with the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Environmental


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Protection Agency. HIP provides the Federal government with the ability to cross-share critical data and make effective decisions. In the future, HIP will be available to enforcement personnel to review information on companies that transport HazMat. Enhancing First Responder Capability PHMSA understands that career and volunteer emergency first responders are the first to arrive at the scene of a HazMat transportation accident or incident. Furthermore, PHMSA understands that communities often rely on their first responders to help prepare for a potential HazMat incident, and provide objective information about the types of HazMat being transported to, and through, their areas. Therefore, strengthening the capabilities of the first responder community is a key element of PHMSA’s strategy to mitigate the consequences of HazMat incidents that cannot be prevented. PHMSA and the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) are leading an effort to create the National Hazardous Materials Fusion Center (HazMat Fusion Center), whose purpose will be to support and enhance first responder HazMat response capabilities nationwide via a secure, web-based portal. Focusing on the safety of HazMat first responders, no matter their primary discipline, the HazMat Fusion Center will collect and analyze HazMat incident data, and distribute free training materials on the latest HazMat trends thereby enhancing first responder tactics, operations, policy, and training. This nationwide portal will allow HazMat teams to share knowledge in real time, and build

off of the knowledge acquired during each incident. In another HazMat safety effort, PHMSA publishes the Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG), which is developed jointly by PHMSA, Transport Canada, and the Secretariat of Transport and Communications of Mexico, with collaboration of Centro de Información Química para Emergencias (CIQUME). The ERG is a guide to aid first responders in quickly identifying the specific or generic hazards of the material(s) involved in an incident, and protecting themselves, and the general public, during the initial response phase of an incident. PHMSA’s goal is to place one ERG in each emergency service vehicle, nationwide, through distribution to state and local public safety authorities. To date, nearly 11 million hard copies of the ERG have been distributed without charge to the emergency response community throughout the United States. The ERG also is available electronically. The ERG is reviewed and refreshed every four years in order to reflect changes in domestic and international regulations, and the needs of the user community. The next version of the ERG is scheduled for publication in 2012. The development cycle for the 2012 edition is currently underway. A significant component of this process is collecting and addressing feedback from YOU. During this period, PHMSA opens the door to its partners, members

of the emergency response community, Federal agencies, and other users of the ERG to help explore: • Challenges facing the emergency response community in the 21st century and how those challenges impact the use and distribution of the ERG; • Recommendations on ways the ERG may be enhanced to better support the emergency response community, and pros and cons of those recommendations; • How the ERG is currently meeting the needs of the emergency response community; and • In what formats the emergency response community uses and receives the ERG — via hard copy, electronic, or other format. On March 18, 2010, PHMSA hosted an Emergency Response Guidebook 2010 Roundtable for Responders. PHMSA thanks the CVSA for its active participation in this meeting. A Federal Register notice will be published in June 2010 to solicit public comment. PHMSA is eager to hear your perspectives and encourages all CVSA members to comment. Your input is vital to ensuring the ERG continues to meet your needs. In addition to the Federal Register notice, comments can be submitted through PHMSA’s ERG webpage. For more information on PHMSA’s Office of Hazardous Materials Safety, visit HazMat.dot.gov.

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Third Quarter 2010

www.cvsa.org

CVSA Urges Congress to Pass Long-Term Transportation Bill to Ensure Highway Safety

Testifying before the Committee on House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on June 23, 2010, CVSA’s Interim Executive Director Stephen A. Keppler, urged Congress to ensure there are adequate resources for increasing safety on U.S. highways — citing the 4,229 deaths in 2008 resulting from commercial vehicles as unacceptable — and pass a long-term transportation bill as soon as possible. “The large truck fatality rate dropped by 12.3% in 2008, and is down 20.8% since 2005, resulting in 1,000 fewer deaths in 2008 from large truck crashes than there were in 2005,” said Keppler. “Significant credit for this goes to the more than 12,000 commercial vehicle safety inspectors and law enforcement officers in North America who are working hard each and every day (as well as) to the many responsible members of the truck and bus industries who are mindful every day of the need to keep our highways safe. However… we still have plenty of work to do in our march towards zero deaths on our roadways.” CVSA strongly supports the Comprehensive Safety Analysis 2010 (CSA 2010) concept and credited the FMCSA for moving it forward. It offers significant promise to transform compliance and enforcement activities to be more surgical in nature and to allow for more proactive safety interventions with motor carriers, which will ultimately save more lives. It also is consistent with one of CVSA’s major reauthorization priorities — to streamline the compliance review process to make it more effective, as well as to establish a better safety rating process for motor carriers. “With a program of this size and scope there are bound to be some bumps along the way,” said Keppler. “The key to success is to keep an open line of communication and for FMCSA to work together

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with the states, industry and other affected parties to ensure they are fully aware of what is happening and when.” CVSA outlined several reasons for the need for CSA 2010 during the hearing on the ‘CSA 2010: Understanding FMCSA’s New System of Motor Carrier Oversight,’ but indicated it requires a long-term and sustained federal investment, and needs to be appropriately resourced at both the federal and state levels for it to be successful. “This can only happen through a significant increase in funding and the passage of a long-term bill. A glimpse of the additional resources needed at the federal level for CSA 2010 is evidenced by the President’s request for an additional $20 million beyond SAFETEA-LU authorized limits for his Fiscal Year 2011 budget for the purpose of rolling out CSA 2010,” said Keppler who explained the CSA 2010 experience thus far (through nine pilot states) is it having a positive impact and is being received well by both enforcement and industry. “We fully understand why FMCSA recently announced that they are modifying their timelines for implementing this

program and fully support their doing so. A program of this size and scope needs careful planning, as well as input from all affected parties. Throughout this process FMCSA has been listening to us and others, and we appreciate them doing so. While we understand that schedules and timelines must be set to allow for proper planning and budgeting, we do not believe timelines should be set for the sake of timelines. We need to be realistic about what our expectations are and communicate them to all who have a need to know,” Keppler added. CVSA supports FMCSA’s request for an additional $20 million beyond SAFETEA-LU authorized limits for its Fiscal Year 2011 budget for rolling out CSA 2010. However, CSA 2010 will also require the states to expend more resources for implementation just as it has required the FMCSA to do so. In this regard, the Alliance sees several key issues that need to be appropriately resourced: Training; Work force adjustments; Information Technology changes/upgrades; Roadside inspections; Data challenges and adjudication; and, CVSP and grant-related changes. CVSA also outlined concerns members have. In particular, states would like to be more informed on items such as implementation, program funding and its impact, and schedule, deliverables and timelines. FMCSA is implementing a peer-to-peer program to help with this; however, a key piece of the puzzle is to ensure the FMCSA Division Offices in the field are communicating effectively with their state counterparts. Another key issue is whether FMCSA will be able to implement the information systems and software changes to support field operations in a timely manner. To view the full congressional testimony, visit www.cvsa.org.


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Expanded MCSAC Tackles Distracted Driving By Capt. Robert Powers (Retired), Michigan State Police

An expanded FMCSA Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee met June 8 10, 2010 in Alexandria, Va. tasked with providing FMCSA with specific ideas, concepts, and information for the Agency to consider in addressing the safety risk posed by in-cab distractions other than texting and cell phone use by CMV drivers operating in interstate commerce. The Committee is expected to complete work on this task (#10-02) by the conclusion of its next meeting that will be held August 30 - September 1, 2010 at the Hilton Old Town in Alexandria, Va. Task #10-02 specifically excluded texting and cell phone use because FMCSA already published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) regarding texting on April 1, 2010 and is currently preparing a NPRM to address cell phone use by CMV drivers operating in interstate commerce. FMCSA recognizes that there are many other potential sources of in-cab driver distractions, hence the latest charge for the MCSAC. In addition to work on Task #10-02, the Committee provided feedback to the Agency regarding revisions to the FMCSA Strategic Plan during an interactive presentation by Tretha Chromey, Leader of the FMCSA Strategic Plan Team. When the MCSAC was first established on March 5, 2007, then FMCSA Administrator John Hill appointed 15 individuals from industry, law enforcement, and safety advocacy to serve two year terms on the Committee. Most members were reappointed to an additional two year term on October 1, 2010. Recently, current FMCSA Administrator Anne Ferro decided to expand the mem-

bership of the MCSAC to a full complement of 20 members as authorized by Congress. Newly appointed members to the MCSAC are: Capt. Bill Dofflemyer, a 25-year veteran of the Maryland State Police and a member of CVSA representing enforcement; Master Patrol Officer Thomas Jacques, a 16year veteran of the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police and a member of CVSA representing enforcement; Mr. Kevin O’Brien, New York Department of Motor Vehicles, representing enforcement; Mr. Lamont Byrd, International Brotherhood of Teamsters, representing labor; Mr. John Lannen, Truck Safety Coalition representing safety advocacy; Ms. Jane Mathis, Parents Against Tired Truckers (PATT) representing safety advocacy; Mr. Peter Pantuso, American Bus Association representing industry; and, Mr. Danny Schnautz, Clark Freight lines representing industry. In addition to achieving an expansion of the Committee to 20 members, these new appointments also fill vacancies that were created by the departure from the committee of Roger Vanderpool, Michael Irwin and Clyde Hart. Due to my recent retirement from the Michigan State Police, I too will be ending my service on the MCSAC. For complete biographies of all of the MCSAC members and other information regarding the MCSAC, please visit www.FMCSA.DOT.GOV/MCSAC. The newly appointed members of the Committee have jumped right in and we should all look forward to the great work the MCSAC will continue to do to enhance truck safety.

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CVSA Members Selected to FMCSA’s Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee Two CVSA members, Capt. Norman Dofflemyer, Commercial Motor Vehicle Division

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Pennsylvania Bureau of Police, were recently appointed to FMCSA Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee (MCSAC). “CVSA is proud to see Capt. Dofflemyer and Officer Jacques recognized for their outstanding service to commercial vehicle safety,” said Stephen A. Keppler, CVSA’s interim executive director. “Their appointments, in addition to previous CVSA members appointed to the MCSAC, underscore our mission to promote commercial motor vehicle safety and security by providing leadership to enforcement, industry and policy makers.” The MCSAC membership is balanced and is comprised of fifteen experts from the motor carrier industry, safety advocates, and safety enforcement sectors. Members are appointed by the FMCSA Administrator and serve two year terms and were chosen from a field of many qualified candidates who possess a wide range of motor carrier experience and expertise. To obtain a complete summary of all MCSAC members and for details on upcoming MCSAC public meetings, visit http://mcsac.fmcsa.dot.gov.

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Third Quarter 2010

www.cvsa.org

Brake Safety Model Prototypes Developed for Operation Air Brake By Stephen A. Keppler, CVSA’s Interim Executive Director

Automatic brake adjusters (ABAs) have been required on all commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) manufactured on or after October 20, 1994. As older vehicles are retired, it would be expected that the number of vehicles with manual brake adjusters would decrease, and the propensity for inspectors to find brakes beyond the adjustment limit (“out-ofstroke”) would also decrease with the use of ABAs. Unfortunately, the statistics obtained from Operation Air Brake events (Spring Brake Check and Fall Brake Safety Week), as well as those reported to the FMCSA through the MCMIS

system do not bear this out across the board to the extent hoped. Inspectors still place more than 1 in 10 vehicles out of service (OOS) for brake adjustment violations. There may be a number of reasons for the continued surprisingly high number of vehicles placed out of service for brakes found to be out of adjustment (OOA). However, the CVSA believes that education of drivers, mechanics and fleet safety officials is a key component among the ongoing Operation Air Brake efforts needed to lower the percentage of brakes found to be OOA, and to improved roadway safety. Improved education appears to be warranted in two areas; the importance of proper brake adjustment and the importance of properly diagnosing a brake system in which an ABA is found to be out of adjustment. As such, in 2009, CVSA, with funding support from FMCSA and participation from industry (in particular the Heavy Duty Brake Manufacturers’ Council — HDBMC), developed two prototype brake safety demonstration models. The models, which are available for loan to CVSA members, are aimed at: 1) Demonstrating the importance of proper brake adjustment, and 2) The importance of properly diagnosing the cause of an automatic brake adjuster (ABA) that is found to be OOA. While the first display is aimed toward drivers and the second toward mechanics and safety directors, both disOne of two informational posters developed to accompany the demonstration models. A PDF of this poster may be accessed at www.cvsa.org.

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Student intern Amy Long with the brake safety displays at the NAIC/NTDC in Pittsburgh.

plays created a lot of “Wow, I didn’t know that!” responses from each group when first exhibited at NAIC and NTDC held in Pittsburgh. “The primary reason drivers don’t realize their brakes may be out of adjustment is that under normal braking conditions, at 20 psi or less application pressure, an out of adjustment brake may exhibit the same behavior as a brake in proper adjustment, and the driver can’t feel any difference,” says Steve Shaffer of the Battelle Memorial Institute, where the displays were developed for CVSA. So when a situation arises for a “high demand” brake application (at 100 psi), adequate brake force may not be available if the brake is OOA. These concepts are further illustrated in the two informational posters developed to accompany the demonstration models. Links to PDF versions of the educational posters are available at www.cvsa.org. Select Programs, then Operation Air Brake. For information on the loan of the models, contact Steve Keppler at stevek@cvsa.org.


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COHMED Not Just For HazMat Geeks By Tpr. Rex Railsback, Kansas Highway Patrol

If you regulate, teach, ship, carry, or enforce hazardous materials in transportation, then COHMED is for you. You don’t have to be a HazMat geek to get the most out of what COHMED has to offer, but beware — after attending just one COHMED conference you might want to reconsider and just give in and become a HazMat geek. COHMED has been around for quite awhile, spanning three decades, and yet our purpose and goal of Cooperative Hazardous Materials Enforcement Development is still our number one objective. Now you ask, what is ‘enforcement development’? Well, we look at it as the process of getting all the players involved in the safe transportation of hazardous materials on the same page by understanding the issues and hurdles that we all face during transportation and enforcement activities. By attending COHMED conferences, you have the opportunity to obtain some of the most up to date information in the hazardous materials community. You have the opportunity to speak with representatives of each of the modal regulatory agencies in the U.S. and Canada; including, FMCSA, PHMSA, TC, FAA, TSA, Coast Guard, and sometimes FRA. You have the opportunity to speak with representatives from industry to try and understand their particular industry or iron out issues you or your jurisdiction might be having. You can send two or three top hazardous materials trainers, who will have the chance to gain up to date training and information to take back and pass along to your other HazMat personnel. This relates to lots of training for a limited budget. All of this interaction and training between so many varied members of the hazardous materials community can pay off in multiple ways. One of those ways occurred on September 11, 2001, when representatives of the New York State Police were able to directly contact representatives of the packaged gas industry they had met during COHMED. They shaved hours off the time needed to coordinate the delivery of needed sup-

plies to the rescue efforts at Ground Zero. This is one of biggest ways that contacts made during COHMED have paid off. Every year, numerous issues are ironed out between enforcement, industry and regulators in a more economical way, due in part to contacts made at COHMED. COHMED is currently held in mid to late January and in the southern latitudes, not for the warmer climate, but to avoid the conference location being hit by a major snow or ice storm and causing numerous travel issues and the possibility of more time away from the office (although the warmer climate doesn’t hurt). COHMED 2011 will be held in the Tampa Bay, FL area from January 31st to February 4th. We tentatively have the following training planned for COHMED 2011: • Inspection of industrial and home medical use cylinders • U.S. / Canadian Safety Marks – Differences and Similarities • Class 7 (RAM) Packaging Standards • Batteries – All Kinds • Transportation of Non-Bulk Combustibles • IBC’s • Local Emergency Assistance Program (LEAP) • IAEA and the 49 CFR • Intro to ICAO • HazMat/DG transportation Chemistry for Dummies One attendee can’t make all sessions, so don’t miss out on anything by sending just one representative. The COHMED leadership is looking at several ways of keeping our cost down. We are looking at industry sponsorship, realigning conference events and possibly grant options. Our current leadership consists of a National Chair, National Vice Chair, two Canadian representatives, two industry representatives, and a Chair and Vice Chair, from each of our four U.S. regions. As you can see, by attending COHMED conferences you will be getting a rather large bang for your buck. You also might discover that being a HazMat geek isn’t as bad as it sounds.

Every year, numerous issues are ironed out between enforcement, industry and regulators in a more economical way, due in part to contacts made at COHMED.

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International Safety Team Award to Recognize CMV Safety Personnel Individuals making the biggest impact on commercial vehicle safety are often those with their “boots on the ground.� These are the dedicated government and law enforcement personnel who are on the front lines each and every day ensuring that trucks and buses are operating in compliance with safety regulations. Often times, they are making critical judgments that can have life and death consequences. These individuals also go out every day and actively promote commercial vehicle and highway safety to the general public through their education and public awareness efforts. The CVSA International Safety Team award was created to recognize the efforts of these dedicated government

and law enforcement personnel from across North America, who go above and beyond the call of duty of their normal responsibilities and have such a significant impact on CMV safety, highway safety, and an overall reduction in crashes and deaths. These are the individuals that are reaching beyond themselves and truly exemplify the Mission and Values of CVSA; These are the individuals that are having a significant impact on safety and ultimately are saving more lives because of their dedicated efforts. The primary goals of the International Safety Team are to: 1) Honor CVSA member motor carrier safety professionals in government/

law enforcement for their work in the furtherance of motor carrier safety; and, 2) Use these individuals to help further the message of commercial vehicle safety and public awareness. Although nominations have closed as of July 31, 2010, please visit www.cvsa.org for more information about the program, how to apply for the award, and the selection criteria.

N E W C V S A A S S O C I AT E A N D L O C A L E N F O R C E M E N T M E M B E R S Aldridge Electric Allied Automotive Group APL. Ltd Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association BGY LSFM Bonilla Trucking LLC Calportland CDTA Collier Transportation LLC DEKRA Commercial Fleet Performance Systems Farmland Transportation Fleetwood Transportation Services, Inc. Great White Pressure Pumping GulfMark Energy, Inc. Harrison Company Kiewit Infrastructure South Co. Layne Christensen M. Gerace Enterprise Inc.

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Maersk Equipment Service Company McClane Company, Inc. Midland Transport Miller Family Transport National District Attorneys Association PGT Trucking Inc. Reno Police Department Republic Services Roland J. Montbrand & Sons Trucking LLC SGS North America, Inc. Suffolk County Police Department TIP National, Inc. Trailways Transportation System TransX USA TSCi Veolia Transportation Services, Inc. XATA Corporation


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ROADCHECK MESSAGE RESONATES THAT MAINTAINING SAFE VEHICLES AND DRIVERS IS WORTH THE EFFORT

Commercial Vehicles, Drivers Maintaining Close to Record Low Out-of-Service Rates

Results from CVSA’s Roadcheck 2010 reveal that the commercial motor vehicle (CMV ) industry is hovering close to the record low out-of-service rates set during 2009. Additionally, while overall inspection totals are down from the previous year’s records, more inspectors participated at more locations in this year’s event.

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Roadche This seems to indicate during 2010 that there was a shift to an increasing focus on mobile roadside inspections. In 2010 roadside inspectors focused on the North American Standard (NAS) Level I Inspection, safety belt enforcement; and motorcoach inspections. More than 9,856 CVSA and FMCSA certified inspectors at 2,482 locations across North America performed 65,327 truck and bus inspections. Of that total, there were 48,970 NAS Level I inspections, the most comprehensive roadside inspection. The total inspection output is a 10.2 percent decrease over the previous record total, and the NAS Level I output is a 14.1 percent decrease over the previous record, both of which occurred in 2009. “The number of CMV inspections is an indicator that, even in these continued tough economic times, state, provincial, local and federal agencies are committed to enforcing truck and bus safety standards,” said CVSA’s Interim Executive Director Stephen A. Keppler. “Roadside enforcement remains committed to this critically important role in saving lives on North America’s highways and helping to provide all travelers a safe and secure place to travel.”

This year during Roadcheck approximately 15 trucks or buses were inspected, on average, every minute. During the 72hour inspection blitz, which took place from Canada to Mexico from June 8-10, 2010, drivers were pulled over, asked to show their commercial driver’s license, medical examiner’s certificate and record of duty status. Brakes, tires, lights and every major component of the truck or bus were also examined during Roadcheck. While Roadcheck has taken place every year since 1988, it is important to note that roadside inspections occur every day across North America, to the tune of more than 3.8 million in 2009. CVSA sponsors Roadcheck each year with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA), Transport Canada, and the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation (Mexico). “Roadcheck has once again successfully reinforced the critical importance of safety, compliance and crash prevention – lives depend on both safe and well maintained trucks and safe and well trained drivers,” said FMCSA Administrator Anne S. Ferro. Data from 2010 show the overall vehicle compliance rate at

Percent of Total OOS Violations

OOS Volation Data

VEHICLES Brake Adjustment Brake System Tires/Wheels Lights Safe Loading Steering Frame Suspension Coupling Devices Fuel System Exhaust System 22

2008 25.0 27.5 9.5 11.7 10.4 2.1 1.8 4.8 0.7 0.6 0.2

2009 24.7 26.9 10.5 11.6 9.8 2.2 1.6 4.5 0.8 1.0 0.3

2010 23.7 27.1 11.2 13.2 9.1 2.1 1.6 4.7 0.8 0.6 0.4


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eck 2010 80.0 percent (80.4 percent in 2009), with an overall driver compliance rate of 95.6 percent (unchanged from last year). For NAS Level I inspections, the compliance rates were 76.7 percent for vehicles (77.8 percent in 2009) and 96.3 percent for drivers (96.1 percent in 2009). In addition, there were 189 more safety belt violations in 2010 than there were last year (1,159 vs. 970), a 19.5 percent increase. Inspections of passenger carrying vehicles resulted in an increased vehicle compliance rate (91.0 percent in 2010 vs. 88.5 percent in 2009) and a driver compliance rate in 2010 that was unchanged from last year (96.4 percent). Hazardous materials inspections resulted in a vehicle compliance rate of 83.7 percent (83.0 percent in 2009) and driver compliance rate of 97.5 percent (97.0 percent). There were 26,605 CVSA Decals issued to vehicles that passed the inspection, which was down from the number issued in 2009 (29,972). “Brake-related defects continue to account for half of all outof-service violations,” said CVSA Region V (Canada) President Steve Callahan. “As such, we strongly encourage governments, industry associations and individual carriers and drivers alike to

Percent of Total OOS Violations

OOS Volation Data

DRIVERS HOS False Logs Suspended Expired License Cancelled License DQ’d Revoked License Endorsement Age Drug/Alcohol

2008 55.8 12.5 4.8 1.4 0.3 3.2 0.5 2.8 0.6 0.8

2009 53.1 10.4 4.7 1.3 0.3 4.7 0.6 3.2 0.4 1.1

2010 52.1 13.3 4.3 1.2 0.4 3.7 0.4 2.5 0.4 1.4

take an active part in the upcoming 2010 Brake Safety Week, September 12-18. We need all industry players to continue working together to achieve a further sustained drop in the OOS rate in the years ahead.” CVSA held an international press conference at Fed Ex Field in Landover, MD, June 8, 2010 at 10 a.m. which included speakers from FMCSA and other federal agencies, safety organizations and industry partners. In addition, Maryland State Police pulled commercial motor vehicles, including unoccupied motor coaches off the inner loop of I-95 screening vehicles that need to be inspected. “Every time an inspector checks the brakes, tires, tie downs, a driver or other items while conducting an inspection, what’s in the back of their minds is this — what I’m doing will save a life. The people who we read about in the news are “our” family members and we are here to protect them,” said CVSA’s President Buzzy France. “There is no one person, agency or organization that feels we can achieve zero fatalities alone. We need partners to solve this complex problem. All of us have an important role to play.”

Percent of Total OOS Violations

OOS Volation Data

HM Shipping Papers Placards Bulk Packagings Marking Loading Package Integrity

2008 30.0 24.4 2.6 8.2 26.5 8.4

2009 27.5 25.1 3.7 7.9 26.9 9.0

2010 21.0 29.0 8.8 6.3 28.1 6.8

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INSPECTOR’S CORNER

NAIC: A Look at the Experiences and Opportunities That Await Contestants, Future Champions By Alex Bugeya, Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Transportation Enforcement Officer, NAIC 2009 Grand Champion Alex Bugeya

As my year of writing articles for Guardian has come to an end, I decided I should put a fair amount of thought into what topic I would like to cover as my “finale.” Ultimately, I felt I should look at the experiences and opportunities that have been opened up to me through my participation in last year’s North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC). A year ago around this time, I was fortunate enough to be selected to represent Ontario at NAIC in Pittsburgh, PA. In preparing for the competition, I spoke so several Inspectors from Ontario whom had participated in NAIC in previous years. Their biggest piece of advice was to simply enjoy the experience. They gave glowing reviews of their time spent at the competition, talking about how it

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was something they would never forget. As such, I went to Pittsburgh with high expectations. Needless to say my time there did not disappoint. NAIC provided me with a chance to test my skills and knowledge as well as being presented with new challenges. It allowed me to evaluate the roadside inspections I complete and improve on them by applying what I had learned during the competition. In addition, the training sessions that were provided at NAIC were led by instructors who are the best in their field. These sessions have proved invaluable. They helped enhance my knowledge base for roadside inspections and helped me enforce commercial vehicle safety standards more effectively. Essentially, the added information that I have taken with me since

last year’s competition has allowed me to become a more complete Inspector. NAIC has also proved to be a great opportunity to meet with fellow inspectors from across North America. The time spent learning with and about fellow competitors is thoroughly enjoyable. Each one brings a unique perspective and background to the event, which is shared amongst all the competitors. The partnerships, contacts and friendships that develop over the course of the week are second to none. There are many contacts that I made and that I continue to utilize as part of my day to day work. Perhaps most telling of the NAIC experience is that several people I met during my week have now become good friends. Over the course of the past year, my appreciation and understanding of CVSA as an organization has been greatly enhanced. The chance to make a small contribution to the organization, whether it has been working on articles for Guardian or simply talking to those involved with CVSA, has been very rewarding. For me, these doors were opened through my participation in NAIC. Finally, to those of you who are attending NAIC in Columbus, OH this year; Congratulations for representing your home jurisdictions! I know many of you participated in competitions for the opportunity to participate at NAIC. Similar to the advice that was provided to me before attending last year’s competition, the only suggestion I would give to everyone is to enjoy yourself! NAIC is a great experience, so make sure you take the time to step back, relax and just have a good time. Enjoy the city, enjoy the events and have fun. All the best, good luck and I’ll see you in Columbus!


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State Enforcement, Industry Work Together to Make Motorcoach Destination Inspections a Win-Win for Everyone By Timothy Davis, Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities, CVSA Chair, Passenger Carrier Committee Timothy Davis

The wheels on the bus go round and round all through the town, but that children’s nursery rhyme never mentioned the behind the scenes inspection process that motorcoaches go through to ensure the safe transport of its passengers. For many in the motorcoach industry, inspections en route with passengers can be an untimely delay in reaching their destination. To alleviate that concern without lessening the safety compliance standards, the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities (MassDPU), Massachusetts State Police, as well as FMCSA, Massachusetts Division, decided to conduct a joint effort to work with some local destinations to see if they could use their property to perform safety inspection on incoming motorcoaches. When the MassDPU initially reached out to Six Flags New England, a large amusement park in our region and contacted the director of safety to discuss what we wanted to do they were unsure and a little reluctant to imposition their motorcoach travelers. We suggested to them that inspections would be unobtrusive. Customers/passengers would be off loaded and motorcoaches and drivers directed to the back of property where the safety inspections would take place. Iif there was a major problem the motorcoach operators would have plenty of time to have repairs made or have the driver replaced. We explained to management that this was a win-win for everyone. We were able to inspect motorcoaches from surrounding states and that ensured their customers would have a more pleasant experience because the bus was just inspected and traveling safely. In many cases passenger aren’t even aware that buses are inspected. At this point we reached out to the

American Bus Association (ABA), which Six Flags is a member of, and asked them to provide assistance. ABA proved to be very helpful and were able to convince management it would be a win-win for all parties. “There are many misconceptions among destination representatives about the inspection process. Some see it as having police in uniform with lights flashing in front of their property. Others worry about the reactions of passengers or visitors, especially if the passengers’ bus or driver is placed out of service,” said Norm Lilttler, Vice President of Regulatory and Industry Affairs at ABA. “Destinations that embrace and promote on-site motorcoach inspections give visible proof that they care about their visitors’ well-being and want them to come back and tell their friends about their great experiences,” said Littler. “The inspections also encourage visits by quality carriers, help get bad operators off the road and send a message to substandard providers that destinations care about safety. Bad operators—those who don’t pay proper attention to safety—hurt the entire motorcoach travel industry, including destinations. Because it is possible that carriers will select a destination that

does not require inspections over one that does, all destinations should work together to help protect their customers’ wellbeing by embracing inspections.” The MassDPU has conducted numerous individual motorcoach inspections during the four inspection events in last two years.The Six Flags safety manager has remarked that as a result motorcoach companies only send brand new buses to their destination making passenger travel both better and safer. In a similar situation, the MassDPU approached the owner of the Boston Mass Bus Terminal to discuss the benefits of destination safety inspections, especially for curb side operators. Due to traffic and pedestrian safety concerns, the City of Boston instituted an ordinance that restricts pick up and drop off on city streets which force them to go to the bus terminal. As a result, we see a lot of interstate bus companies. On average we see roughly 20 to 30 buses on any given morning and we try to go once a month. As a result of our onsite inspections at the bus terminal, we have seen a marked improvement over the past two years. In addition, equipment defects are not being found anymore, driver log books are more accurate.

CONNECTICUT DMV PERFORM SAFETY CHECKS ON CHARTER BUSES Connecticut’s Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) inspectors are inspecting charter buses after their passengers have been dropped off at area casinos. Working in teams, inspectors perform safety inspections (level I, II or III as appropriate) on motor coaches and check for properly functioning equipment and driver logs for hours of service compliance. The state inspects roughly 1,000 buses a year, but there are slightly more than 10 percent declared out-of-service and pulled off the road.

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Intermodal Equipment –What Inspectors Should Know About Upcoming Marking Requirements By Capt. John E. Harrison, Georgia Dept. of Public Safety, CVSA Vehicle Committee Capt. John E. Harrison

FMCSA recently amended the intermodal chassis marking requirements [390.21(g)(4)] to provide for a fifth option in regards to identification of the Intermodal Equipment Provider (IEP). To provide a little background, on December 17, 2008 FMCSA published a final rule phasing in new regulatory requirements for IEPs. In that final rule the IEP’s were required to file a MCS150C and obtain a USDOT number by December 17, 2009. Furthermore, by December 17, 2010 the final rule outlined four marking options for identifying intermodal chassis: (1) mark the intermodal chassis equipment on the curbside with the IEP’s name and USDOT number; (2) place a label on the curbside of the intermodal chassis marked with the IEP’s name and USDOT number; or (3) identify the IEP’s USDOT number on an interchange agreement that accompanies the intermodal equipment; or (4) identify the IEP’s USDOT number on a document placed in a weather-tight holder attached to the frame of the intermodal chassis. Subsequently, on December 29, 2009 FMCSA granted a request of the

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Intermodal Association of North America (IANA) to provide for an electronic means to identify the IEP. That amendment provides for a fifth marking option under section 390.21(g)(4) by basically cross-referencing the intermodal equipment’s license plate number, license plate state, or the alpha numeric equipment number to the IEP’s USDOT number using a real-time internet connection or through telephonic access. This fifth marking option (or IEP identification method) will be accomplished by through a website that accesses an electronic database of intermodal equipment known as the Global Intermodal Equipment Registry (GIER) maintained by IANA. Based on discussions with industry officials, most IEPs will likely exercise this fifth option of marking (or identifying) their intermodal equipment, via the GIER system. This is due to the nature of how intermodal equipment is owned, interchanged, and pooled to together by various entities. For example, an intermodal chassis might be owned by a bank or leasing company and furnished to a

chassis pool operator; the chassis pool operator in turn may offer the equipment to various IEPs as needed. Consequently, the IEP responsible for a particular piece of equipment may change several times during a week or even multiple times during a given day. The intermodal industry has indicated that changing the physical markings on each chassis every time the IEP changes would be cost prohibitive. They believe that this electronic clearinghouse (GIER) provided for under this new fifth marking option will be the most accurate and effective means of identifying the IEP for all parties involved. According to IANA, the GIER website will be accessible by roadside inspectors at some point in late summer. Once accessibility is granted enforcement that has web access would be able to query the system using an online public query feature that would allow the single lookup of any specific intermodal chassis. The beta test site can be accessed at: www.gierregistry.com. Inspectors are encouraged to visit the GIER website to see a mockup of how this cross-reference intermodal database will work. FMCSA is also exploring various options for roadside inspectors to access the GIER database using current FMCSA technologies in a seamless manner, such as through the Query Central website and through ASPEN. In addition, CVSA has established a subcommittee of the Training Committee to assist enforcement with understanding the many nuances associated with identification of intermodal equipment, understanding the industry jargon and bringing clarity to portions of the regulations. The subcommittee is made up of CVSA, FMCSA and IANA representatives.


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Increased Interaction Between South Carolina State Transport Police, State Trucking Association Shows How Cooperation Counts

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REGION I Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, US Virgin Islands, and Vermont.

REGION II Alabama, American Samoa, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

REGION III Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Northern Mariana Islands, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

REGION IV Alaska, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Mexico, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

REGION V Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, and Yukon.

By Sgt. William (Don) Rhodes, South Carolina State Transport Police The expression “Cooperation Cuts Claims” has been used in the safety and risk management industry for many years. It is no secret that working together allows groups to identify processes, solutions and achieve their goals quicker. Seventeen years ago, the South Carolina Trucking Association’s Safety Management Council (SCSMC) and the South Carolina State Transport Police (SCSTP) decided to cooperate more during South Carolina’s annual Truck Driving Championships (TDC). For years the South Carolina safety group would ask the State Transport Police to serve as judges on the field course, driver vehicle pre-trips, and driver interviews. It was noticed that the interaction between the officers, drivers and council members during the Championships increased the safety awareness of everyone in attendance. The South Carolina State Transport Police Officer “Challenge” is held every April in conjunction with the South Carolina Truck Driving Championships. The trucking industry provides the judges for the Challenge, and the Transport Police continues to provide the judges for the TDC. In addition to the judges, educational activities are held for the drivers and the officers. SC State Transport Police do regulatory classroom training on current issues and the trucking industry provides classroom education on current industry issues and concerns. This allows both groups to better understand the other and how they oper-

ate, what they face, which results in a greater understanding and respect for each other and highway safety issues. At the conclusion of the Truck Driving Championships and the Challenge, at the awards banquet, the top performers (both truck drivers and officers) are recognized for their knowledge and personal performance. The top scoring Transport Police officer from Challenge along with the Truck Driving Championship Class champions go to the Nationals, each representing South Carolina. Recent South Carolina industryenforcement highway safety task force meetings again continued to reveal that SC highway crashes involving smaller vehicles and larger commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) continue to show that the driver of the smaller vehicles are at fault the majority of the time in SC. SCTA’s SC Road Team (active drivers) have for years visited schools (middle, junior and senior high), civic groups and other gatherings to discuss highway safety using their trucks to demonstrate and discuss Sharing the Road and how to drive safely around larger vehicles. It was decided that adding a SC State Transport Police officer to the SC Road Team would be a benefit and add insight to the program. That State Transport Police officer would be the annual Challenge champion and would participate on the SC Road Team for a year. Yet another way industry and enforcement are working together to provide highway safety education.

Courtesy Counts — Safety Saves — Cooperation Counts

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New Mexico’s Motor Transport Police Division Recognized for Revolutionizing Highway Safety State Smart Roadside Program Selected as Finalist by National Safety Group

New Mexico’s Department of Public Safety (DPS) Motor Transportation Police Division (MTPD) is being recognized by the Intelligent Transportation Society (ITS) of America for its Smart Roadside Inspection Program – a program which changes the way commercial motor vehicle safety screening is conducted in New Mexico and will act as a model for other law enforcement agencies to revolutionize the delivery of highway safety using innovative technologies and improve roadside commercial vehicle operations practices. ITS America selected MTPD’s entry as finalist in the Innovative Practices category of the 2010 Best of ITS Awards. “This technology represents a powerful new tool set for our agency, it enables a strategic shift away from the ineffective practices of the past and helps us promote safer highways in our state,” said MTPD’s Maj. Ron Cordova. “In addition, it holds the opportunity to revolutionize the delivery of CMV safety and security operations in the state and around the nation by promoting a future model of CMV safety in North America.” Screening intelligence at the roadside is a radical departure from traditional screening methods that were either limited to the weight, dimensions and obvious physical defects or based on simple random inspections. With a current national equipment out-of-service rate of around 22 percent, traditional methods offer limited success, saddle enforcement agencies with inefficient use of resources and reinforce an unlevel playing field in the transportation industry, where irresponsible carriers can skirt maintenance and safety costs with impunity. The MTPD began deploying a statewide Smart Roadside Program that uses

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Maj. Ron Cordova accepting the award on behalf of the New Mexico Motor Transport Police Division.

advanced technology systems to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its roadside operations. The program includes the installation of next generation camera systems on the ramps that lead up to inspection facilities. Each passing vehicle is identified by its license plate and USDOT number. Other onsite sensor data from traditional roadside electronic devices like weigh-in-motion systems and over dimension devices are integrated and pooled together with the vehicle and carrier identification. Smart Roadside uses the identification data to access multiple remote databases and utilizes the information returned, in conjunction with other sensor data, to determine whether the identified vehicle warrants a follow-up inspection according to MTPD’s risk profiles. Smart

The Smart Roadside Inspection Program will act as a model for other law enforcement agencies….

Roadside’s connectivity to remote safety and security databases includes information sources such as Federal DOT safety programs like SAFER and PRISM, the FBI’s National Crime Information Center, and New Mexico’s Taxation and Revenue Department. “Smart Roadside brings the power of multiple information systems to the roadside to enable the automated pre-screening of vehicles in motion,” said Maj. Cordova. “It ends the anonymity and guesswork at the roadside and offers front line officers access to timely and critical information before pulling a vehicle from the flow of traffic which then allows our officers to focus attention and resources on high-risk vehicles,” said Cordova. Winners were announced at the Annual Meeting and the Best of ITS awards ceremony on May 3-5, 2010 in Houston. ITS America is the leading advocate for technologies that improve the safety, security and efficiency of the nation’s surface transportation system. Our members include private corporations, public agencies, and academic institutions involved in the research, development and design of Intelligent Transportation Systems technologies that enhance safety, increase mobility and sustain the environment. For more information about ITS America visit www.itsa.org. The New Mexico DPS Motor Transport Police Division mission is to promote safety on New Mexico highways by providing law enforcement traffic services to the motoring public, to ensure the safe and legal operation of commercial motor vehicles and to prevent the introduction of illicit contraband into New Mexico while facilitating trade. For more information visit http://www.nmmtdpolice.org.


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“Tragedy Averted - Why We Do What We Do” By Capt. Londell Jamerson, CVED Division Director, Missouri State Highway Patrol

During the week of April 12, 2010, the Missouri State Highway Patrol Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division (CVED) conducted a truck check in Boone, Callaway and Cole Counties in Missouri. The truck check involved 14 Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Troopers and Commercial Vehicle Officers who focused their enforcement activities on Interstate 70, and U.S. Highways 54 and 63. On April 14, 2010, I was on a field day, riding with CVED Training Coordinator, Sgt. Kevin Kelley on I-70 W/B near the 145 mile-marker in Callaway County when we observed an eastbound tractor-trailer with tinted windows pulling a flatbed trailer carrying four generators. Median cable barriers prevented us from flipping around to run the vehicle down, so Sgt. Kelley radioed Tpr. Eddie Walker who was east of our location to stop the vehicle. Trp. Walker stopped the vehicle on the ramp from I-70 E/B to U.S. 54 highway and made his initial contact with the driver. When Sgt. Kelley and I arrived on scene and took a closer look at this truck, it became clear to us that this vehicle was in need of a full inspection due to its cargo leaking diesel fuel. The truck was moved to a safe location and the inspection began. During the inspection, the 35-year old male driver from Gallipolis, OH stated to Tpr. Walker, “You won’t find a cleaner 1990 Peterbilt anywhere.” The driver seemed to be very confident and proud of his truck and equipment, but when the inspection was over, the true condition of the vehicle was revealed. The inspection began at 1020 hours and ended at 1145 hours. During this 1 hour and 25 minute long inspection, Sgt.

The employment of Smart Roadside initiatives…will provide roadside inspectors with better information to target and select unsafe drivers and vehicles for inspection. Kelley and Tpr. Walker discovered 21 safety violations, 5 of which required the vehicle to be placed out of service. The most notable out of service violations (OOS) are as follows: mis-matched brake chambers on the steering axle, the left chamber was size 20 and the right was size 30, brakes out of service – the number of defective brakes is equal to or greater than 20 percent of the service brakes on the vehicle or combination, leaking cargo, excessive diesel fuel leaking from one of the generators being hauled, damaged securement devices front and rear securement straps torn. The inspection also revealed the driver’s record of duty status was not current and nearly all of the brakes on the truck and trailer were out of adjustment. The vehicle’s rear brake lights and turn signal

lights were also inoperative. The sad reality is, the condition of this truck is representative of a significant number of commercial vehicles travelling on our nation’s highways every day. The safety violations found during this inspection averted a tragedy and this is why we do what we do. The driver of this truck must have had some idea about the poor condition of his vehicle and load. Just as I know when the tires feel a little low or the brakes feel a little soft on my patrol car or personal vehicle, this driver must have known his truck had some safety issues. Whether he was aware of it or not, he put himself and countless others across the country in harm’s way by driving an unsafe commercial vehicle with a registered gross weight of 80,000 pounds on our roadways. I am confident that the implementation of the FMCSA Comprehensive Safety Analysis (CSA) - 2010, the employment of Smart Roadside initiatives and similar emerging technologies will provide roadside inspectors with better information to target and select unsafe drivers and vehicles for inspection. Safety and the reduction of the number of serious injury and fatal accidents involving commercial vehicles is our primary goal. From 2007 through 2009, Missouri experienced a 46.5 per cent decrease in the number fatal traffic crashes involving commercial vehicles. This reduction can be attributed to a number of reasons such as, persistent enforcement, compliance reviews/safety audits, safer trucks, drivers and equipment, etc. Truck checks and other enforcement/ regulatory strategies, coupled with good working partnerships with federal, state, local and private industry are necessary to ensure our roadways remain safe for all to travel.

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New York State Police Combine Partnerships with Education to Net Comprehensive Highway Safety Effort By Sgt. Raymond Weiss, New York State Police

CVSA’s Quality Assurance Statement reads: Our mission is to promote commercial motor vehicle safety and security by providing leadership to enforcement, industry and policy makers. This is accomplished by establishing effective transportation safety standards for motor carriers, drivers, vehicles, and inspectors through compliance, education, training, and enforcement programs. CVSA fulfills this mission statement on an international level. Each jurisdiction has the same obligation on a local level. We are all striving for the same goal, a crash free environment on our highways. What we do to achieve our goal should be continuously evaluated and re-evaluated to ensure that our efforts are effective. We should be looking for new programs and utilizing new tools to help us grow and become better tomorrow than we are today. Laws, regulations, and policies are in place to guide us on how to travel the highways safely. Education is essential for compliance. Law enforcement needs to be properly trained in order to have uniform application of the laws and inspection procedures. Industry needs to

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be properly trained in order to be able to comply with the laws. With good partnerships, we can educate each other. Partnerships between government agencies and private industry are essential to an effective and comprehensive highway safety program. New York State has an annual Truck Safety and Education Symposium cosponsored by the New York State Motor Truck Association, New York State Department of Transportation and the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles with cooperation from New York State Police and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. This symposium brings government and industry together in a local forum where each learns from each other. New laws

and regulations are announced, industry and law enforcement concerns are addressed information is shared and ideas are expressed to help all attendees. The theme for 2010 was “RPM: Reducing Risk, Providing Protection, Managing Mandates.” There were numerous sessions including Distracted Driving, CSA 2010, Roadside Inspection Demonstration, Sleep Apnea, Staying Healthy on the Road, The Detection of Deception: The Art of Getting the Truth from Applicants, and HazMat Security to mention a few. There is also a “Resources Fair” where government personnel set up booths to answer questions and provide handouts, and a Law Enforcement Roundtable discussion where specific issues and be addressed by representatives of various government agencies. This two-day annual event has been tremendously successful and is scheduled to continue through the foreseeable future. We all need as much help as we can to keep on top of the changing laws, regulations, technologies, equipment and services being made available to us. The symposium in New York is just one example of how we can all help each other.


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Maryland State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division Assists with Nuclear Summit Security Operations By Capt. Norman Dofflemyer, Maryland State Police, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division As a part of the security operations for the Multi-Nation Nuclear Security Summit held in Washington, DC, April 12 – 14, 2010, the Maryland State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division (CVED) and the Maryland Department of the Environment conducted homeland security operations in areas around and leading to Washington DC. The CVED operation known as Guardian Angel encompassed intense commercial vehicle enforcement efforts from the early morning hours of April 12th through mid morning on April 14th at undisclosed facilities and numerous mobile enforcement teams. As troopers and inspectors encountered commercial vehicles operating in the region, particular attention was given to the drivers of the commercial vehicles as well as anything unusual about the vehicle or the load it was carrying. During Guardian Angel there were 934 commercial vehicle inspections conducted; 75 of which were carrying hazardous materials. As the result of the inspections 135 vehicles, (2 of which were carrying hazardous materials) and 47 drivers, were placed out-of-service for non-compliance with federal and state safety regulations. In addition, 48 vehicles were stopped and determined to be overweight with 13 of those vehicles requiring parts of the load to be redistributed to another vehicle before continuing their trip. Troopers and inspectors also issued 403 citations and 869 warnings for safety and overweight violations.

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CVSA Congratulates CVSA Members for their Recent Promotions MARK SAVAGE, GARY ALBUS PROMOTED TO RANK OF MAJOR Capt. Mark Savage, a 15 year veteran with the Colorado State Patrol (CSP), was recently promoted to the rank of Major of the Operational Services Branch. Savage joined the CSP in January 1995 and served his first duty station in Idaho Springs, CO. Three years later he was transferred to the HazMat Division in Idaho Springs and promoted to HazMat technician after one year. Since then, Savage was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and assigned to MCSAP in March 2002 and subsequently Captain September 2006. Maj. Savage currently serves as CVSA’s Region III President. Capt. Gary Albus, a 31-year veteran with the Texas Department of Public Safety Highway Patrol, was recently promoted to the rank of Major. Albus started his career in 1979 as a PatrolmanTrainee. His first duty station as a trooper was in Odessa in Highway Patrol. In 1987 he was transferred to License & Weight (L&W, now know as Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Service (CVE). and was later appointed to License & Weight Corporal in Odessa. Following that appointment Albus was promoted in 1993 to Sergeant L&W; in 1995 promoted to Lieutenant L&W; and promoted to Captain in L&W and transferred to El Paso.

NEW BRUNSWICK DPS CVE HOSTS TRAINING SESSION IN MONCTON NB Five provinces were represented at a CVSA Part A and B NASI course in Moncton NB May 1-14 for Instructor development and Inspector certification.

Walt McKinney NB Department of Public Safety (DPS) Instructor Candidate, Eric Roy NB DPS Inspector participant, Joel Turner NS Vehicle Compliance Instructor Candidate, Kerri Wirachowski MTO Evaluator Developer, John Lunney DPS Host and Evaluator Developer, Brenda Dorion NB DPS and inspector Candidate, Cody Stevens NS Vehicle Compliance Instructor Candidate, James Trombley Alberta CVE and Instructor Candidate, Steven Noonan Prince Edward Island Highway Safety and Instructor candidate, Mark Bishop NB DPS and Inspector Candidate

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REGIONAL RAP

RETIREMENTS TWO VETERAN CVSA MEMBERS, CAPT. BOB POWERS, JIM MCFARLIN, RETIRE Capt. Robert R. Powers, Jr., commander of Michigan Department of State Police (MSP) Traffic Safety Division and 37-year veteran, was honored at the Governor’s Traffic Safety Advisory Commission (GTSAC) annual awards for his efforts to improve commercial motor vehicle (CMV) safety. Powers received the Richard H. Austin LongTerm Traffic Safety Award, which is presented to individuals or organizations that have made significant long-term contributions to the field of traffic safety. Powers administers the department’s traffic safety programs including Michigan’s commercial vehicle safety and enforcement programs, the operation of 19 weigh stations and the School Bus Safety Inspection program. He also directs motor carrier safety and security at three international border crossings. During his tenure, Powers has promoted partnerships between local, county, state and federal agencies. These efforts have resulted in the creation of CMV enforcement training programs for law enforcement, prosecutors, magistrates and judges; the Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police Award for Excellence in Commercial Vehicle Safety that honors law enforcement agencies for innovative programs to enhance truck safety; and the Midwest Multi-State CMV Enforcement coalition, an initiative that coordinates enforcement efforts between Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio and Michigan. Under his leadership, crashes and fatalities involving CMVs in Michigan have declined 20 percent over the past four years. In 2009, the MSP Traffic Safety Division was honored by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration for having the nation’s lowest CMV fatality crash rate. Capt. Powers’ presence in highway and commercial vehicle safety circles will be sorely missed, said Stephen A. Keppler,

CVSA’s interim executive director. “His willingness to try out new ideas and his ability to inspire and motivate people has truly made an impact on saving countless lives in his home state and across North America,” said Stephen A. Keppler. James W. McFarlin, Director of Safety and Security at ABF Freight System, Inc., has announced his retirement effective August 6, 2010. Jim began his ABF career in 1986 as a Security Supervisor, progressed to Manager of Security in 1990, and became director of the department in 1997. In his twenty-four years with the company, McFarlin’s professionalism, knowledge, and years of experience played a major role in the Safety and Security Department being considered the transportation industry’s best-in-class. ABF is the only five-time winner of the American Trucking Associations President’s Trophy for Safety and the only five-time winner of the Excellence in Security Award. Through his career, McFarlin has been recognized by many industry awards and accolades. In October 2003, he was named as the Safety Director of the Year by the American Trucking Associations. The award recognizes ABF’s and McFarlin’s leadership in safety and security in the transportation industry. “Your presence in highway and commercial vehicle safety circles will be sorely missed,” said Keppler. “You should be extremely proud of your accomplishments with ABF Freight System, Inc. as well as those you have achieved in your contributions to CVSA. Your efforts have truly made an impact on saving lives. Your dedication to the job, to the mission and to people has been nothing short of exceptional. Last but not least, your ability to work collaboratively with others to solve problems has been a valuable asset to increasing safety on our highways.”

CITT’S MANITOBA AREA COUNCIL CREATES DARREN CHRISTLE INNOVATION AWARD Darcy Calder, CITT, Chair of the CITT’s Manitoba Area Council, recently announced the creation of a new scholarship award named after former CVSA President Darren Christle. The Darren Christle Innovation Award will be given to a Grade 12 student at Windsor Park Collegiate Institute in Winnipeg interested in a career in supply chain management. Darren Christle, CITT, is currently the Executive Director of the Motor Carrier Division of the Manitoba Department of Infrastructure and Transportation. “I would like to thank the Manitoba Council for putting this scholarship in my name,” said Mr. Christle. “The key to success is education, and I am honored to be associated with all future recipients of this award who share in this belief.” The first Darren Christle Innovation Award will be presented on Thursday, June 17 at the Manitoba Council Annual Dinner and Convocation ceremony.

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PrePass and CVSA: Partners for Safety Progress Next Year, the Nation’s Largest Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) for Commercial Vehicles Will Turn 15 Years Old

The PrePass® system and CVSA share much in common. Both have as their core mission the improvement of highway safety. Many of CVSA’s current and past leadership actively serve on the governing board of the public-private partnership that offers the nation’s largest roadside screening system that is operational in nearly 300 locations in 29 CVSA-member jurisdictions. And now, the two are closely allied in launching the inaugural International Safety Team award announced last April. PrePass and CVSA have become partners in the truest sense of the word. “ Without the involvement and support of CVSA’s volunteer leadership and staff, the widespread acceptance of PrePass among out nation’s commercial vehicle enforcement leaders could not have been realized,” said Richard P. Landis, President and CEO of HELP Incorporated, the public-private partnership that offers PrePass and the former head of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Office of Motor Carriers (now the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration). “Similarly, by electronically ensuring compliance with state safety, credential and weight regulations, PrePass assists CVSA member jurisdictions in improving safety, reducing roadside infrastructure needs and reducing greenhouse gas and related emissions,” added retired Chief Steve Vaughn of the California Highway Patrol and Past President of CVSA. Recent collaboration between CVSAmember jurisdictions and PrePass are having a positive impact on the PrePass system and how it is advancing public safety and related goals.

Looking Beyond Federal Data Systems First and foremost, PrePass is a safety program. PrePass uses technology to advance safety on our highways, assist enforcement personnel in focusing on those carriers that need a closer look, and promoting safety to carriers and the general public. According to Vaughn, “By utilizing information collected through the weigh-in-motion scales associated with PrePass, California as well as other states can utilize aggregate information of traffic volumes and equipment to establish the proper deployment of personnel in the most cost effective manner, as well as design future roads and bridges for realworld traffic conditions.” Among the most important commitments made by PrePass states is its best practices screening criteria which takes the federal Inspection Selection System (ISS) system, and refines it into a screening criteria that really makes sense for roadside enforcement. By minimizing those aspects of the ISS score about

which commercial enforcement officers can do nothing, a PrePass Safety Algorithm (PSA) indentifies those trucks with deficiencies that can be addressed at the roadside. The PSA has been voluntarily adopted by all 29 PrePass states. “Rather than taking the easy way out, the PrePass states developed a screening mechanism that does a better job than ISS of identifying the variables that can be enforced at the roadside.” asserts Col. Terry Maple, Superintendent of the Kansas Highway Patrol. “Although the PSA can be confusing to some roadside officers because it can conflict with the aggregate ISS score, it offers a superior selection tool for identifying those vehicles most in need of attention at weigh stations and ports of entry.” While the total crash history of a motor carrier can be an indicator for future crashes, PrePass states believe that identifying those crashes in which the carrier is at fault is a better indicator and measure for determining the safety of a carrier. As a result of numerous discus-

287 Operational Sites in 29 States & Growing

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additional support from other sponsors in future years to continue and expand the Safety Team award program. Brady added, “We need to make this program grow. It’s good for safety. It’s good for CVSA. And, it’s a great incentive for the roadside officer, whose tireless efforts go unrecognized far too often.” For more information on the International Safety Team Award, http://www.cvsa.org/programs/ist.aspx

sions among PrePass states the PSA was established. PrePass assists the states by analyzing safety and credential information identified by the states and determining which carriers will be permitted to participate in the program, and then on an individual event basis, which will be permitted to by-pass. This approach is consistent with both the PrePass and CVSA mission of promoting highway safety. The PSA minimizes the safety management and crash Safety Evaluation Areas (SEAs) for roadside screening, instead focusing on the vehicle and driver SEAs. “PSA offers an important lesson for FMCSA as they finalize the CSA 2010 program: What’s good for terminal inspection and compliance review targeting is not necessarily the right tool for the roadside,” said Rick Clasby, Director of Motor Carriers for the Utah Department of Transportation. More information about the PrePass safety criteria can be found at http://www.prepass.com/services/prepas s/pages/SafetyCriteria.aspx

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International Safety Team Award Program When CVSA announced the inauguration of the International Safety Team Award Program in April, it was an idea initiated by PrePass. According to Lauri Brady, the Director of Site Operations for PrePass, and the primary liaison with commercial vehicle enforcement officials in PrePass states, “The purpose of the CVSA International Safety Team award is to annually recognize the efforts of the dedicated government and enforcement personnel whose efforts go above and beyond the call of duty of their normal responsibilities. Their efforts ensure compliance with safety regulations and assist in promoting education and awareness of safe commercial vehicle operations and with the general public about operating safely around commercial motor vehicles.” In 2010, PrePass is the sole sponsor, and has committed to recruit

Transportation Sustainability Although PrePass is predominantly a tool to assist officers in selecting trucks most in need of attention at the roadside, it has played a very significant role in bolstering the sustainability of transportation through reduced fuel consumption and related greenhouse gas emissions. Trucks have successfully complied electronically nearly 400 million times with state safety requirements. As a result of this system, the motor carrier industry has saved more than 158 million gallons of fuel, over 33 million hours of driver time and nearly $2.5 billion in operational savings. “According to estimates based on data from the Environmental Protection Agency, PrePass reduced greenhouse gas emissions by over 350 thousand metric tons,” said Doug Donscheski, MCSAP Manager for the Nebraska State Patrol. “Although safety is our core mission, the fact that PrePass helps improve Nebraska’s air quality is a well documented fact recognized by many thought-leaders in our state.” For more information on savings a c c r u i n g a t e a c h Pr e Pa s s s i t e , www.prepassmap.net


Guardian Executive Director’s Message By Stephen A. Keppler, CVSA, Interim Executive Director

As you can see from this issue of Guardian, our members and associate members are going the extra mile to forge relationships and partnerships all in furtherance of the ultimate goal — to save lives. This has been a key tenet of President France’s year in office, and he continues to encourage all of us to get “outside of our comfort zone” to search out those who share in our cause. It is clear from reading about all the success stories in this issue of Guardian that it pays off to join with others in sharing thoughts, ideas and best practices. I truly believe this is one of CVSA’s principal strengths and in fact, is embodied in one of our core values: Teamwork. In addition, two CVSA’s organizational goals in our strategic plan also are relevant to partnerships: 1. Enhance CVSA’s position as the “goto” organization for advice and support on issues related to commercial vehicle safety. 2. Enhance collaboration with national and international organizations with similar goals and values as CVSA.

Stephen A. Keppler

Also on point 2, CVSA has joined with a number of other state and local government based safety organizations (AASHTO, GHSA, AAMVA, IACP and NACO) in the U.S., along with the three major highway safety surface transportation modal agencies of the U.S. DOT (FMCSA, FHWA and NHTSA) in an effort to further a dialogue on the development of a national highway safety strategy called “Toward Zero Deaths.” You

will be hearing more on TZD in the coming year. We are also making efforts to coordinate this activity with Canada’s successor to their Road Safety Vision 2010. We will not be successful at fulfilling our mission unless we figure out how to effectively work with others. Many of you contributing to and reading Guardian get it. You understand the importance of bringing people together of different backgrounds and areas of expertise to help solve problems. That is what CVSA is all about. We need to continue down this path. The challenges are not getting any easier, and in many instances it really does take a village to move us further down the road towards zero deaths on our highways. We also need to lead by example and bring others along on this journey. It generally is not easy, but as my high school baseball coach used to tell me, nothing worth anything was ever easy. Challenge yourself and others to take things head on and partner with others — you won’t regret it.

There have been several important recent events that go to the heart of these two goals. On item 1, CVSA was invited to testify several times before the US Congress on two key strategic items with respect to commercial vehicle safety: the DOT Reauthorization legislation and CSA 2010. On item 2, we signed several Memoranda of Understanding, one with the Pipeline of Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) of the US DOT and another with the International Motor Vehicle Inspection Committee (CITA), an organization based in Belgium and recognized by the European Union and the United Nations.

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CVSA Executive Committee and Committee Chairs PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

SECRETARY/TREASURER

Francis (Buzzy) France Maryland State Police

Capt. Steve Dowling California Highway Patrol

Maj. David Palmer Texas Department of Public Safety

REGION PRESIDENTS

REGION VICE PRESIDENTS (Non-Voting)

PAST PRESIDENTS

Region I Sgt. David Medeiros Rhode Island State Police

Region I Lt. Thomas Kelly Maine State Police

Region II Capt. Bruce Bugg Georgia Department of Public Safety

Region II Capt. Craig Medcalf Oklahoma Highway Patrol

Darren E. Christle, Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation Capt. John E. Harrison, Georgia Department of Public Safety Lt. Donald Bridge, Jr., Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles

Region III Maj. Mark Savage Colorado State Patrol

Region III Alan Martin Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

Region IV Lt. Bruce Pollei Utah Highway Patrol

Region IV Capt. Chris Mayrant New Mexico Department of Public Safety

Region V Steve Callahan Alberta Transportation, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement

Region V Reg Wightman Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation

LOCAL PRESIDENT

LOCAL VICE PRESIDENT

Tom Jacques Pittsburgh Police Department

Tom Mueller Reno Police Department

GOVERNMENT NON-VOTING MEMBERS

William (Bill) Quade, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) William (Bill) Arrington, Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Peter Hurst, Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA), CRA Chair Mauricio Hinojosa, Secretaria de Comunicaciones y Transportes (SCT) Adolfo Spinola, Secretarìa de Seguridad Publica, Policìa Federal Preventiva ASSOCIATE NON-VOTING MEMBER

Larry Woolum, Chair Associate Advisory Committee, Ohio Trucking Association

COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Associate Advisory Committee Larry Woolum Ohio Trucking Association Driver-Traffic Enforcement Committee Capt. Dan Meyer Kansas Highway Patrol Hazardous Materials Committee Capt. Bruce Bugg Georgia Department of Public Safety Information Systems Committee Capt. William ( Jake) Elovirta Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles

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Intelligent Transportation Systems Committee Cpl. Rick Koontz Pennsylvania State Police North American Inspectors Championship Committee M/Tpr. R.C. Powell Virginia State Police Passenger Carrier Committee Timothy Davis Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities

Program Initiatives Committee Sgt. William (Don) Rhodes South Carolina State Transport Police Size and Weight Committee Capt. Jay Thompson Arkansas Highway Police Training Committee Sgt. Raymond Weiss New York State Police Vehicle Committee Kerri Wirachowsky Ontario Ministry of Transportation


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Level VI Classes Scheduled for 2010 Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. DOE, CVSA has scheduled the Level VI classes for 2010 to certify inspectors to conduct Level VI inspections on all transuranic waste and Highway Route Controlled Quantities (HRCQ) of radioactive materials. CVSA provides Level VI training to inspectors who meet the prerequisite of being Level I and HazMat certified. The following are the remaining classes scheduled for 2010: ■ Nashville, TN–July 12-15 ■ Albany, NY–August 9-12 ■ Sacramento, CA–

September 27-30 ■ Vaughn, NM–October 18-22 ■ Austin, TX–November 8-11 ■ Austin, TX–January 12-13, 2011

Level VI “Train the Trainer” Course Any state interested in hosting a class or needs inspectors trained is asked to contact Larry D. Stern, Director Level VI Program, at larrys@cvsa.org or 304-292-1601.

RAD Inspection News is made possible under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy.

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Blue Ribbon Commission On America’s Nuclear Future Meets in D.C. The federal government is pushing ahead with identifying alternatives to Yucca Mountain. The first meeting of the Blue Ribbon Commission on American’s Nuclear Future (BRC) was held in Washington, D.C., on March 25-26. The meeting which was attended by approximately 100 members of the public was webcast live on the DOE website. Timothy A. Frazier with DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy, who has been appointed the Designated Federal Officer for the commission, facilitated the meeting. The 15-member panel is being co-chaired by former Congressman Lee Hamilton, and former presidential national security advisor Brent Scowcroft. On the first day, the BRC heard an overview of the National Waste Policy Act, the history of the repository program, and a summary of commercial spent fuel inventories from the Congressional Research Service. DOE speakers then provided details on the inventories of defense high-level waste, other sources of spent nuclear fuel, and projections for growth in nuclear energy and spent fuel inventories. The following day the commissioners held several hours of discussion on how they will conduct their work. The BRC promised to move quickly in completing its tasks, with the co-chairs suggesting that the commission may not need the entire two years it has been given to issue its recommendations. Before the close of the meeting, the commission heard comments from 21 members of the public, each of whom were given three minutes to speak. Initially only 15 minutes had been allotted for the public comment period. Among those delivering public comments were members of host communities to DOE facilities, industry representatives, and officials from Nevada, and stakeholder organizations. Many of those providing comments urged the BRC to consider Yucca Mountain as a final destination for high-level waste, in spite of the administration’s insistence that Yucca is “off the table.” Others commented that the BRC should be transparent and solicit input from the communities in which high-level waste is currently located. There has been a great deal of controversy over whether the BRC would consider Yucca Mountain among the alternatives for waste management. The commission reportedly has been instructed to focus on “non-site specific solutions.” At the commencement of the meeting, Secretary Chu reiterated that the BRC is not to focus its attention on whether Yucca Mountain can be used as a repository in the future.

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Yucca Mountain Update: Objections to License Application Withdrawal

The list of communities, states, lawmakers, organizations, and other interested parties that have publicly objected to DOE’s cancellation of the Yucca Mountain Project continues to grow. DOE’s motion to withdraw the Yucca Mountain License Application was filed on March 3rd, and is currently being reviewed by the NRC’s Atomic Safety and Licensing Board. The states of South Carolina and Washington, and county of Aiken, S.C., and the Prairie Island Indian Community of Red Wing, MN, have all filed petitions with the NRC objecting to the withdrawal of the license application. The Prairie Island Indian Community, which resides near Minnesota’s Prairie Island nuclear plant, is the first entity from the Midwest to intervene in DOE’s attempt to withdraw the application. Aiken County, the state of South Carolina, and a group of private citizens from the Tri-Cities community in Washington State have all filed lawsuits against DOE for violating the Nuclear Waste Policy Act by canceling the Yucca Mountain Project. The National Association of Regulatory Utility

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Commissioners has filed paperwork objecting to the withdrawal of the license application, and the Nuclear Energy Institute plans to do so as well, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal. Approximately a dozen members of Congress have spoken out publicly against the Obama administration’s abandonment of the Yucca Mountain Project. Five Congressmen from Washington and South Carolina recently sent a letter to Energy Secretary Steven Chu outlining the negative financial consequences of canceling the repository at Yucca Mountain. More Yucca Mountain Developments The state of Washington filed a court injunction to put a halt to DOE’s dismantling of the Yucca Mountain Project while the court case is pending. The following day, April 15, DOE said it would put on hold its efforts to shut down the project for 21 days to give the court time to consider the legal issues. However, the threeweek delay will not provide adequate time for the legal questions to be resolved. Yesterday, DOE responded to Washington’s request for an injunction by saying that canceling the Yucca Mountain project will not have an adverse effect on cleanup efforts at Hanford. DOE’s motion to withdraw the license application had been submitted to the NRC’s Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, but that three-member panel decided earlier in April to refrain from making a decision on DOE’s motion until the legal questions have been settled in court. The parties suing DOE then asked the courts to expedite the cases and begin hearing oral arguments in June.

Approximately a dozen members of Congress have spoken out publicly against the Obama administration’s abandonment of the Yucca Mountain Project. Conversely, DOE and State of Nevada requested that the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., refrain from taking up the lawsuits until the licensing board makes a decision on the withdrawal of the license application. These parties asked the NRC to reverse the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board’s decision and make a prompt ruling on whether DOE can withdraw the license application. On April 23, the NRC did just that. Four commissioners directed the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board to continue hearings on whether to allow DOE to withdraw the license application and issue a decision by June 1st. In the order, the Commissioners stated that it is important for the NRC to act expeditiously and that the court “may well benefit from NRC’s consideration of the issues surrounding DOE’s motion.” DOE and the state of Nevada were pleased with the NRC’s order, while some critical of the decision fear that the NRC is being pushed to make a politically rather than scientifically-based decision. The federal court cases on the issue will proceed.


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U.S. DOE’s Environmental Management Site Cleanup Program This is the first of several articles regarding the DOE’s Site cleanup program. Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Management (EM) is the largest DOE program in Oak Ridge, TN, with cleanup programs under way to correct the legacies remaining from several years of energy research and weapons production. Many key developments in DOE cleanup of the Oak Ridge Reservation took place in Fiscal Year (FY ) 2009. The most notable was the additional $755 million that the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Program received as a result of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The increased funding allowed us to expedite many planned cleanup projects on the Reservation. In December 2008, Oak Ridge initiated demolition of the K-25 Building West Wing at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Although bringing down such a massive gaseous diffusion facility posted many challenges, our focus was and continues to be on safely accomplishing this complex demolition project. At the end of FY 2009, two-thirds of the west wing had been demolished. Approximately 5,500 loads of demolition debris, 1,300 compressors, and 700 converters were shipped to the Environmental Management Waste Facility (EMWMF) for disposal. Final stages of the West Wing of K25 have been completed, the shipment of waste will continue to the EMWMF through 2010. • Oak Ridge implemented a Radio Frequency Identification Device system that tracks waste shipments from ETTP to the EMWMF via eightmile dedicated Haul Road. The system not only tracks each individual

truck, but also identifies its contents. This system has lead to greatly increased efficiency in the disposal of ETTP waste. • Other facilities at ETTP were demolished during FY 2009, including the K-1035 former maintenance facility and three high-risk building in the Poplar Creed area. A large, contaminated pond near the K-1007 Building was drained and re-contoured. • FY 2009 marked the last full year of operation for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator, a one-of-akind facility that has treated more than 34 million pounds of waste since it began operating in 1991. At the end of the fiscal year the Incinerator was in the process of being shut down will completely cease operations in FY 2010.

• The K-33 Building at ETTP covers 34 acres. The ARRA D&D project was recently awarded to Lata-Sharpe. Transportation of over 12,000 leads to the EMWMF will start sometime after October 2010 thru 2011. • The Reindustrialization Program had many notable achievements in FY 2009. It transferred three buildings and two land parcels to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee as it continued its effort to transform ETTP into a private sector industrial park. To date, 11 buildings and five land parcels at ETTP have been transferred to private companies. Construction has also begun on speculative buildings on two of the parcels. • Bechtel-Jacobs statistics thru the first quarter of FY 2010.

Demolition of the K-25 Building West Wing.

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CVSA Scheduling 2011 Level VI Classes

CVSA is planning the 2011 Level VI Basic Classes for radioactive shipments inspection program. Under a cooperative

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Hanford Resumes Shipments In March, Washington State’s Hanford Site resumed shipments of TRU waste to WIPP. Prior to March, waste had not been shipped from Hanford since September 2008. The Department of Energy (DOE) had not planned to resume shipments from Hanford until 2014, but the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding made acceleration possible. “This investment has allowed Hanford to speed up preparing the waste for shipment,” said Chat Twitchell, of the Carlsbad Field Office Recovery Act Project Planning & Execution Office. “ARRA is allowing us to significantly reduce the nation’s nuclear waste footprint by accelerating the cleanup process across the country.” The DOE has started with two shipments to WIPP a week from Hanford and plans to build to five a week by late spring and summer. By fall, WIPP may be receiving up to seven shipments a week from Hanford. Hanford became the fourth DOE site to ship waste to WIPP on July 12, 2000. WIPP has received over 450 shipments from Hanford.

Under this cooperative agreement, CVSA will provide the Level VI training to jurisdictional inspectors who meet the prerequisite (CVSA Level I and HazMat certified). Any jurisdiction that needs inspectors trained and/or can host a Level VI Class in 2011 is asked to contact Larry D. Stern at 304-292-1601 or at larrys@cvsa.org by August 31, 2010.

Level VI Refresher Training Now Available on Level VI Website The Level VI refresher training course is now available on the CVSA website www.cvsa.org in the Level VI website section. This course can now be downloaded for the use by the State’s Level VI Train the Trainer so he/she can provide the Level VI refresher training to the Level VI certified officers in their state to maintain their certification. To maintain their Level VI certification they must have eight of refresher training every two years. The State must send the Level VI refresher training status (officer’s name/date of refresher training) report to Larry D. Stern, Director Level VI Program, at larrys@cvsa.org.

Visit CVSA’s Level VI Website for the Latest Program Information and Online Blog… for the most up-to-date information on the CVSA’s Level VI Inspection Program, the minutes of the RAM Subcommittee, Level VI training and public outreach schedules, and other information. Also, you can ask questions concerning the Level VI Inspection Program on the Level VI Online Forum (blog). Visit www.cvsa.org, click on the Level VI radiation symbol, and you are in the Level VI website.

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2010 CVSA SPONSORS DIAMOND

BENEFACTOR

PLATINUM A & R Transport, Inc. DEKRA America, Inc. Great West Casualty Company J.J. Keller & Associates, Inc. May Trucking Company Mercer Transportation Company

Owner Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) R+L Carriers Shell Oil Products, US Specialized Carriers & Rigging Association Tyson Foods, Inc.

GOLD ABF Freight System, Inc. Arizona Trucking Association Austin Powder Company Continental Corporation Covenant Transport, Inc. Daecher Consulting Group, Inc. Groendyke Transport, Inc. Help, Inc. Intermodal Association of North America International Road Dynamics, Inc. (IRD)

Landstar Ohio Trucking Association Schlumberger Technology Corporation STEMCO SYSCO Corporation TML Information Services, Inc. Transport Service Co. United Motorcoach Association Vehicle Inspection Systems, Inc.

SILVER Academy Express, LLC AMBEST, Inc. Bestway Express, Inc. Boyle Transportation Brown Line, LLC Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Compliance Safety Systems DATTCO, Inc. DiSilva Companies

G & D Trucking, Inc. / Hoffman Transportation, LLC Greyhound Lines, Inc. Greyhound Canada Transportation Corporation Grocery Haulers, Inc. James Burg Trucking Company Lynden, Inc.

Motor Transport Association of Connecticut, Inc. New Jersey Motor Truck Association Registrar of Imported Vehicles RegScan, Inc. Rubber Manufacturers Association The Besl Transfer Co. Travel and Transport Universal Truckload Services, Inc. YRC Worldwide, Inc.

BRONZE Dibble Trucking, Inc.

Mid-West Truckers Association


Presorted Standard US POSTAGE

PAID 6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310 Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319

CALENDAR OF EVENTS NAIC 2010 August 2-8, 2010 Columbus, OH SUMMER EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING August 2, 2010 Columbus, OH BRAKE SAFETY WEEK 2010 September 12-18, 2010 CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL COMMERCIAL VEHICLE SAFETY SUMMIT September 19, 2010 Anaheim, CA NORTH AMERICAN CARGO SECUREMENT HARMONIZATION PUBLIC FORUM September 19, 2010 Anaheim, CA 2010 CVSA ANNUAL CONFERENCE September 20-23, 2010 Anaheim, CA OPERATION SAFE DRIVER 2010 October 17-23, 2010 2011 COHMED CONFERENCE January 31 – February 4, 2011 Tampa, FL WINTER EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING February 2, 2011 Tampa, FL 6TH ANNUAL FMCSA MCSAP LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE March/April 2011 Chicago, IL NORTH AMERICAN CARGO SECUREMENT HARMONIZATION PUBLIC FORUM March/April 2011 Chicago, IL 2011 CVSA WORKSHOP March/April 2011 Chicago, IL

BALTIMORE, MD PERMIT # 3361


CVSA Guardian 3rd Quarter 2010