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Make a statement with striped platform sandals or wedges!

“Cocoa” Linen tan/navy, sizes 6-10M. $98

“Papaya” Red or navy stripes, 6-10M. $89

Call 1-800-345-5273 to find a Dillard’s near you. • PULSE




contents Issue No. 8 9

in this IssUe

March 2-15, 2012

InsIDe MAsteRPIece tHeAteR? Sadly, the art auction game isn’t featured this year by the Small Professional Theatre troupe, but Sorry and Monopoly are.

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FInD, FoLLoW & LoVe Us on Facebook: facebook.com/PulseMag on twitter: @CVPulse on your phone:

cVPULse.coM PULse MAGAZIne

is a product of Courier Communications, P.O. Box 540, 100 E. Fourth St., Waterloo, IA 50703.

CONTACTS eDItoR Meta Hemenway-Forbes 319.291.1483 meta.hemenway-forbes@ wcfcourier.com ADVeRtIsInG Sheila Kerns 319.291.1448 sheila.kerns@wcfcourier.com ReAcH oUt AnD toUcH Us pulse@wcfcourier.com 319.291.1483 cReAtIVe cReW Emily Smesrud Angela Dark Alan Simmer David Hemenway InteRnet GURU Christopher Koop

10 Grease is the word We got chills, and they’re multiplyin’. “Grease” will be featured in the Oster Regent Theatre’s March film series.

18 Shamrockin’ There’s a common thread here, and it’s mossy green. Check out this St. Paddy’s Day live music lineup.

14 Gone mad Original sketch comedy show “Key & Peele” reunites “MadTV” actors Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele.

20 On the sideline Jay-Z signed him. Haters were shocked. J. Cole will turn doubters into believers at the McLeod Center.

16 Feel the beat See if our reviewer found the groove of “Rhythm Heaven Fever,” a new minigame collection for the Wii.

21 Just a Trace Paying homage to the workin’ man is Trace Adkins’ M.O. And that won’t change at his Iowa tour stop in May.

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Vinyl with a

Vengeance T

here’s no other way to spin it. Vinyl is hot again. While CD sales fell by more than 5 percent last year, vinyl record sales grew more than 36 percent, according to Nielsen data published in the Wall Street Journal. “I think without a doubt CDs are on their way out. Why do you need them? I have an iPhone. That makes them obsolete right there. But I don’t think I’m going to live to see the end of records,” said Dave Deibler, co-owner of Mohair Pear in Cedar Falls, which sells vinyl records. Despite a full-throttle digital revolution, music old and new can still be heard the old-fashioned, analog way. And that’s just how vinyl fans like it. “You hear the exact music the way it was made,” said Jon Purdy of Cedar Falls. “A CD is a simulation of what’s really there. An MP3 they throw away what you can’t hear. A person with good ears can easily hear what’s missing. (With vinyl) there’s a richness, a fullness, a depth, a warmth.” Purdy has a collection of somewhere between 500 and 1,000 records — “I haven’t counted in decades” — and adds to his collection every now and then with LPs from his son’s 10,000-strong collection. It’s folks like Purdy that Deibler draws to his store’s annual Record Swap & Vinyl Appreciation Event. “It’s different now than two to three years ago,” Deibler said. “The exotic factor has gone away. People who are serious about music have some knowledge about how a turntable works. It’s one of the requirements for being a music nut.” Deibler, who has a collection of about 1,600 vinyl LPs, said 2011’s in-

augural event opened his eyes to just how important vinyl is to those with an ear for it. People showed up with relatively small collections, and few were willing to swap or pare down. “We didn’t have enough records,” Deibler said. The second annual event last month drew more people with bigger collections, including a collector who used to own a record store. Deibler still has the first record he ever purchased, The Rolling Stones’ “Metamorphosis.” Purdy’s precious gems include the Stones’ “Sticky Fingers” album with the zipper on the cover, The Beatles’ “The White Album” and LPs by Alan Parsons, Pink Floyd and Freddy and the Dreamers. “I still have some from when I was a kid, picked up at the old Clarks and Woolco stores,” Purdy said. But lest anyone believe LP records are reserved for oldies but goodies, new sounds are being laid on vinyl, too. Listeners can find contemporary artists like Drake, Kanye West, Adele, El Camino, Lana Del Rey, Bon Iver and more on vinyl at Amazon.com, Best Buy and other merchants. Target carries a turntable for those ready to spin. Whether it’s today’s hip-hop or yesterday’s classic rock, vinyl fans say listening to a record is a deliberate, intentional experience. “When you get an album out you actually want to listen to it,” Purdy said. “You have to clean it and clean the needle. You put it on carefully and listen to maybe 75 minutes of music. “But you buy that CD and skip through to only the stuff you like. It’s like a wine tasting compared to slamming down a couple draws at a bar.” META HEMENWAY-FORBES | PULSE Editor

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Got it covered 33 1/3 album art exhibit on display

at cup of Joe AMIE STEFFEN | PULSE WriTEr

W

ho has the time or money to fly out to Los Angeles every two months for a new gallery reception? Not Dana Lechtenberg. At the same time, he loves the idea of a quirky, new art opening. So, Lechtenberg thought, why not host one right here? “The whole reason I ended up doing a show in the first place was I got really jealous of all these cool art shows going on on the West Coast,” he said. “I came to the conclusion that since I can’t go to those shows every six weeks, I wanted to try doing one at home.” The result was last year’s successful 33 1/3 Art Show, a showcase of artists redesigning popular and obscure album covers. Lechtenberg curates the show. The number comes from the speed of a 12-inch LP record, Lechtenberg said. It also restricts the gallery to 33 artists, with Lechtenberg’s 5-year-old daughter as the one-third. “How people get their music is evolving; this is kind of a way to preserve the record cover,” he said. “As everything’s going digital, there are no more CD booklets. It’s a really cool, really important kind of a design kind of thing, and we don’t know how much longer it’s going to be around.” Artists are given free reign to either re-create an iconic album cover or partially or completely redesign an album cover. About half choose to re-create, with half redesigning. “It’s super easy. Basically, you pick an existing record and just give me your interpretation of the cover,” he said. “It kind of makes it a little more dynamic and interesting of a show, I think.” This year’s crop includes recognizable albums like Bob Dylan’s “Blond on Blond,” Amy Winehouse’s “Back to Black” and Jethro Tull’s “Aqualung,” as well as albums by Elvis Costello, Lyle Lovett, Led Zeppelin, The Ramones, Meatloaf, Dr. Dre and Kool and the Gang. Emmalene Lechtenberg — the 1/3 artist — did a reinterpretation of Foo Fighters’ “One By One” album. This year, besides being able to buy the originals, Lechtenberg is offering prints for sale online. Proceeds from the show go back to the artists. “There was a ton of blogging interest last year. The show ended up getting a whole lot of exposure,” he said. “This will definitely always be an annual thing.”

Thirty Three and a Third Point Two Art Show Through April 13 Cup of Joe, Cedar Falls cargocollective.com/thirtythreepointthree



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Games PeoPle Play ANGIE HOLMES | PULSE WritEr

Games People Play 2011-12 series Clue — April 13-14 Sorry — June 1-2 CSPS Hall, 1103 third St. SE, Cedar rapids spttheatre.org, 319.361.5297



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T

he night before the opening show of “Monopoly,” the Small Professional Theatre troupe works through the kinks during its final dress rehearsal. Actually, it’s the first and only dress rehearsal with the entire “Monopoly” cast and crew at their new performance venue, the recently renovated CSPS Hall in the New Bohemia District of Cedar Rapids. “Basically, we have one week to put it together,” said SPT co-founder and performer Doug Elliott. Why the rush? “For the positive tension of the creative process,” Elliott said. “We don’t want a wall between the performer and audience. There are people who intentionally attend the first show to see more mistakes.” Along with the nontraditional rehearsal process, SPT differs from other theater companies in several ways. “We don’t have a facility and don’t want a facility,” Elliott said. In the past nine years, the group has performed at Theatre Cedar Rapids, Cedar Rapids Art Museum, Brucemore and the Iowa Theatre Company in Amana. This is their first season at CSPS. “All of these organizations are open to let us yahoos in their house,” Elliott said. The money generated through grants and ticket sales goes back to the writers, actors, musicians, technicians and directors. “Every penny goes to the artists,” said co-founder Jane Pini. Compensating artists was a primary reason SPT was started nearly 10 years ago. That, and because the co-founders liked to work together. While Elliott, Pini and her daughter, Janelle Lauer, were singing together in a 2003 production at Theatre Cedar Rapids, they had an epiphany. “We literally stopped and looked at each other,” Elliott said. “We each have unique voices, but they blend well together.” The trio and area musician Gerard Estella informally formed SPT as an outlet for original productions for artists and audiences. “We started meeting at the corner booth of Leonardo’s for a couple years,” Pini said. After several successful musicals at Theatre Cedar Rapids and popular Modern Salon performances at Brucemore, SPT incorporated as a nonprofit in 2006. Last summer, the four co-founders and producers decided the theme of this season would be “The Games People Play,” with each show revolving around a board game. In September, writers started meeting weekly in a “room,” which can be anywhere from a bar to somebody’s living room. The fourth season of the Tales from the Writers Room series began with performances of “Monopoly” in February. “Clue” and “Sorry” hit the stage in April and June. Two weeks before each performance, the writers submit material to the producers. After a read-through, the producers piece together a script. “After we read everything, we put it in final order — but it may change,” Elliott said. “We may work the piece for the entire week and then cut it.” Before the dress rehearsal at CSPS, the troupe rehearses a few times wherever they can, such as in Estella’s living room, Elliott’s office or a local high school. “It’s very low tech with minimal costume changes,” Elliott said. Richard Barker, who retired from TCR four years ago, is this season’s Tales from the Writers Room director. Although the fast-paced structure is a far cry from TCR’s polished productions, Barker is drawn to SPT’s intimate nature. “Because it’s all original, it’s very appealing,” he said. “I like the smallness of it, the improv nature. Anything can happen, like in those old Carol Burnett shows.” Lauer, who typically performs solo, also thrives on the rush of the unknown. “It’s the thrill of the roller coaster,” Lauer said. “I love to collaborate with other people. The more people, the more creative.” During production week, the producers can easily put in 40 hours at the theater. But it doesn’t seem like extra work for them. “We trust each other so much, it isn’t as anxiety-producing as it was in the beginning,” Pini said.

Are We So Different? A Project of the American Anthropological Association

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA

MUSEUM

UNI Museums Spring Exhibit

Feb. 6 - June 9, 2012 319.273.2188 | www.uni.edu/museum

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Family. Film. Fun. JAMES FRAZIER | PULSE WritEr

T

he last couple of movie screening series at the Oster Regent Theater in Cedar Falls showcased a pair of filmmakers of serious import. First came three films from Alfred Hitchcock, the Master of Suspense; then came three from Stanley Kubrick, the dazzlingly cynical auteur whose films don’t lack for iconic moments. Demonstrating a commitment to variety as well as classic cinema, starting March 4, three family-oriented films will be screened at the Oster Regent. “We tried to find a theme that would appeal to lots of different people,” said Gary Chambers, a Cedar Falls Community Theater board member who helped select the titles. The next few movies represent a departure from the last six, though they aren’t out of place in the history of films shown at the Oster Regent. “We decided that it’s a good time to do a family series.” Chambers said fans can expect more series from the Oster Regent Theatre in the near future. “We’re just trying to have a series every two months or so, starting in fall and going through spring,” he said. As for what can be expected after the March series, Chambers speculates they “might pick a particular actor, like say Katherine Hepburn, Spencer Tracy or John Wayne, and have a series for them.” All screenings begin at 2 p.m. and admission is a free will offering. Refreshments will be available for purchase.

MARCH 4

GREASE The 1978 musical classic starring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John tells the story of two 1950s high school students in love who have to overcome a crisis of image to unite. Its upbeat musical numbers and style have made it a favorite of stage and screen for decades.

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MARCH 11

POPEYE The 1980 live action film adapted from the famed comic strip and cartoons is directed by Robert Altman. The musical adaptation stars Robin Williams as the titular sailor, who consumes spinach for extraordinary strength and romances the waifish Olive Oyl (Shelley Duvall).

MARCH 18

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON The 2010 animated film from Dreamworks tells the story of a young viking who ends up adopting a dragon, the mortal enemy of his village. Incredible animation and exhilarating sequences of fantasy excitement made this a smash hit upon its release.


Ballet

March 8, 9 & 10 @ 8 PM March 10 @ 3 PM Adler Theatre, Davenport $32-$152 | Adler box office | 800.745.3000 | ticketmaster.com

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BRET MICHAELS GET YOUR ROCK ON TOUR

mar.

The World-renowned director-choreographer of Bolshoi Theatre, Yuri Grigorovich, will present Legends of Russian Ballet at the Adler Theatre. Maestro Grigorovich, directing exclusively for his anniversary 2012 U.S. tour, has created a magical showcase featuring selections of famous masterpieces including “Swan Lake” (Tchaikovsky), “Don Quixote” (L. Minkus), “Le Spectre de la Rose” (Carl von Weber) and “Chopiniana” (Chopin).

mar.

buffet

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STEVE MORIS COMEDIAN

NEW SHOWS ANNOUNCED JOSH BLUE APRIL 11 HERE COME THE MUMMIES APRIL 14 F O R E I G N E R M AY 2 4 B 5 2 s J U LY 7

563.690.4800 | WWW.DIAMONDJO.COM Tickets available at www.diamondjo.com & at the Diamond Club. Acts subject to change without notice. Must be 21 or older. If you or someone you know needs gambling treatment, call 1-800-BETS OFF.

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John carter

MARCH 9

StarS: taylor KitSch, lynn collinS, Willem Dafoe, Bryan cranSton

Transplanted to Mars, a Civil War vet discovers a lush planet inhabited by 12-foot-tall barbarians. Finding himself a prisoner of these creatures, he escapes, only to encounter a princess who is in desperate need of a savior.

Dr. SeuSS’ the lorax

MARCH 2

StarS: VoiceS of Zac efron, taylor SWift, Danny DeVito

A 12-year-old boy searches for the one thing that will enable him to win the affection of the girl of his dreams. To find it he must discover the story of the Lorax, the grumpy yet charming creature who fights to protect his world.

proJect x

MARCH 2 StarS: thomaS mann, oliVer cooper, Jonathan Daniel BroWn, Dax flame

Three high school seniors throw a birthday party to make a name for themselves. As the night progresses, things spiral out of control as word of the party spreads.

a thouSanD WorDS StarS: eDDie murphy, cliff curtiS, Kerry WaShington, clarK DuKe

MARCH 9

SHUTTERSTOCK IMAGE

After stretching the truth on a deal with a spiritual guru, literary agent Jack McCall finds a Bodhi tree on his property. Its appearance holds a valuable lesson on the consequences of every word we speak.

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Photos courtesy of universal pictures, warner bros., walt disney studios and paramount pictures

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Original sketch comedy show reunites ‘MADtv’ actors RICK BENTLEY | McClatChy Newspapers

F

ormer “MADtv” actors Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele have reunited to star in the new half-hour sketch comedy show “Key & Peele.” Through improv, original characters and celebrity impressions, the pair will look at the oddities of life. Key and Peele talk about their new show and their brand of comedy.

Q: How did this show come together?

Key: I was on a show on CBS that had just been canceled, and Jordan had been working on a pilot, and the pilot didn’t get picked up. So we were both free at the same time, and our manager suggested, he goes, “Why don’t you guys want to work together, do something together?” We jumped at the chance.

Q: Why did you pick this format?

Peele: We’ve done sketch before, but the world

doesn’t really know us. And we just felt that there needed to be some kind of connection to introduce us to the world. That’s the way you get on board with something like that, and certainly that’s what worked for (Dave) Chappelle, who is, of course, a hero of ours. We knew we had to be ourselves and be honest about who we are to

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get that connection with the home audience. Sketch is sort of our craft, and then this new live element.

Q: How is the show put together?

Key: We started writing the sketches first. We just locked ourselves in Jordan’s apartment, much to my wife’s chagrin, and started to write sketches, and then after the pilot was finished, we just started doing shows on stage where we literally just walk on stage and kinda just start talking about stuff that we had thought about before and saw what resonated with the audience. Peele: We collected a gathering of who we feel are really some of the best sketch writers in the business, and we sat down and we overwrote. We wrote ... Key: ... about 260 sketches.

Q: What will the sketches be like?

Peele: This is my favorite sketch of the show. It’s the most absurd thing in the world. We have a fictional battle between Bobby McFerrin and Michael Winslow. No words are exchanged in the sketch.

Q: How rude and crude will the show be?

Key: I will say this, and I love this about my part-

ner. We both hate bullying. We hate people being mean in comedy for no reason. Everything we do, we always grind, grind, grind on the game of a scene to try to figure out how to try to get the funny foundation first; usually that we want to appeal universally to everyone, whether you’re from Iceland or Indonesia, and then we’ll put whatever the filter is on top of it. I’ve never understood why be offensive for no reason, or I never understood also a comedian that goes, “If you don’t get it, then whatever.” No. Maybe you’re not funny.

Q: How has comedy changed since you were on “MADtv?”

Peele: Obama was the best thing for black nerds everywhere. Finally we had a role model.

Key: Right, exactly. It’s OK for black people to

walk down the street saying, “Yeah, ‘Star Trek!’” Peele: Before Obama, we basically had Urkel.

Key & Peele 9:30 p.m. tuesdays Comedy Central


COMEDY CENTRAL PHOTOS Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele

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MArch 6

The galaxy has been ravaged by an assault from a group of aliens known only as Reapers. Earth has fallen under their onslaught. Commander Shepard has had enough. Take back terra firma by battling across multiple worlds in this third-person shooter/RPG mashup against more challenging enemies.

For: PC, PS3, X360

MArch 11

From the team that brought you Marvel vs. Capcom, SNK vs. Capcom, X-Men vs. Street Fighter, Namco X Capcom, Marvel vs. Capcom 2, Tatsunoko vs. Capcom, Marbury vs. Madison, Axis vs. Allies, Mac vs. PC, Paper vs. Plastic, Pepsi vs. Coke, Cake X Pie, Puppies vs. Kittens, and, shockingly, Marvel vs. Capcom 3 comes Street Fighter X Tekken, the smashup fighting game the world has been demanding. All right, maybe they haven’t, but by Jove, they’re going to get it. You can make Ryu take on Kuma (that’s the bear) or smack those pom-poms off Chun-Li’s head with Hwoarang.

MArch 6

For: PS3, Vita, X360

Explore a series of game boards as one of the many characters in the Mario universe. In this iteration, players travel together in one vehicle, with each taking a turn in the driver’s seat. Collect coins and stars to beat your opponents while enjoying the series’ standard minigames. For: Wii 16

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‘Rhythm Heaven Fever’ delights with zany minigames ALAN SIMMEr | PULSE WRITER

I

f you’ve played “Rhythm Heaven” for DS, all I should need to say is that there’s a sequel out for Wii, and you should probably get it. For the uninitiated, “Rhythm Heaven Fever” is a collection of rhythm-based minigames. Players press the A button, in some games in conjunction with the B button, in response to audio cues. This includes posing for the fans as a masked wrestler, deflecting objects to the beat of a bossa nova, playing badminton in airplanes and cheering on students at the library. Yes, it’s a little wacky. But that what makes these games so freaking fun. The game is filled with typically bizarre text, which must be a combination of Japanese translation, the quirky nature of the game and setting up implausible premises in as few words as possible. To wit: “It’s your first date with the girl of your dreams! Also, some weasels are on a date!” That happens to me all the time! This carries over into the ratings after each attempt. Each rating, from “try again” to “OK” to “superb,” comes with a little image and text at the end, like “Your performance was like … a fine meal!” The ratings can be frustrating — getting a “superb” requires excelling in several predetermined areas, which means that one wrong move in an otherwise perfect run-through can

result in an “OK.” The soundtrack, featuring songs from Japanese uber-producer TSUNKU, sadly isn’t quite as peppy or memorable as the DS prequel. But those songs go with games that are a lot harder. Some of the rhythms are very intricate — and some, like the rapping with MC Adore, seem to have no discernible pattern for the first dozen tries. The Wii minigames are also harder than the DS ones due to the control scheme. It’s easier to time the tapping of stylus to screen than it is to depress a button. The stylus felt natural, but it pays to be on top of the beat just a bit to account

for the button action. It doesn’t help that the game actively distracts you. The samurai levels feature “The story so far” panels that almost completely obscure the action, forcing players to rely on the audio only. It also happens in subtle ways: the background action of catching footballs in “Double Date,” the look of utter sorrow on the monkeys’ faces when missed in “Monkey Watch.” Take a second or two to look at what’s going on and you’ll have fun trying to get back in the groove. It’s surprising how many of the games are original, as opposed to DS updates. Munchy Monk is back in an extra game, and the Karate Man has his own minigame. I was admittedly hoping for more of the singing Glee Club trio or guitar-wielding Rockers. But if you love monkeys, they are everywhere, and they are adorable, especially as a tambourine player and as timekeepers in the aforementioned “Monkey Watch.” The new “Fever” two-player option takes single-player minigames and revamps them, splitting the action between joint and solo play. The players’ combined performances determine the end rating, and competing against similarly skilled friends is a blast. So it might not be as good as “Rhythm Heaven,” but “Fever” is still fun — and getting perfects on each game will be a challenge for even the most rhythmic of players.

Major League Baseball 2K12

Tales of Graces f

Silent Hill: Downpour

Walk the road to the World Series, skip straight there in Tournament Mode or forget about games and focus on power hitting with the Home Run Derby. PS3 owners may want to consider rival franchise “MLB12 The Show,” out the same day. DS, Pc, PS2, PS3, PSP, X360, Wii; March 6.

New stories, battle elements and costumes expand this HD upgrade of a Wii game that was never released stateside. An additional epilogue wraps up mysteries from the original storyline and adds another 10 hours of gameplay. PS3; March 13.

Your bus crashes near the sleepy town of Silent Hill, but all isn’t as it seems as you explore the creepy hamlet, slipping between our world and the Otherworld. Oh, did we mention that bus ride was a prison transfer? Play with the lights off at your own peril. PS3, X360; March 13.

Warp

Unit 13

Yakuza Dead Souls

You’re that cute little gold thingy, and you’ve got to escape the clutches of the General using your skills: warp, frag, echo, swap and launch. Sneak through levels or rush in guns a-blazing and wipe out all those nasty, kidnapping humans. Pc, PSN; March 13.

Tackle 36 tactical missions and play cooperatively with friends worldwide, then compete against them for high scores. The intuitive shooter uses the dual analog sticks and rear touchpad of the new Vita. Vita; March 6.

The undead are multiplying in the streets of Tokyo’s red light district. Enter the Yakuza, the last hope for the survivors quarantined inside, as they shoot, snipe, batter and bulldoze zombie after zombie in this thirdperson shooter. PS3; March 12.

NINTENDO, CAPCOM, EA, SHUTTERSTOCK PHOTOS

Rhythm Heaven Fever For: Wii | Price: $29.99 | rated: Everyone ProS: Lots of original rhythm games; cute monkeys; two-player mode. coNS: Can be frustratingly tricky; soundtrack isn’t quite as good.

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Lúnasa

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Shamrockin’ Lúnasa Lúnasa is a collection of many of the top musical talents in Ireland. Its members have formed some of the influential Irish groups of the decade. The lineup features bassist Trevor Hutchinson (The Waterboys), Paul Meehan (Karan Casey Band, North Cregg), fiddler Sean Smyth, flutist Kevin Crawford (Moving Cloud) and piper Cillian Vallely of the famous Vallely artistic clan. Known for their engaging live performances, Lúnasa has toured and performed with the likes of Mary Chapin Carpenter, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Rosanne Cash and Billy Bragg. Saturday, March 10 @ 8 PM $22 advance | $25 door | 319.688.2653 | englert.org

Banish Misfortune

Paddy parade

Begun as a session group at a coffeehouse in Cedar Falls, Banish Misfortune specializes in traditional acoustic Celtic music. Their music includes dance tunes, airs, songs and composed music within the Celtic music tradition. The group features fiddle, accordion, flute, penny whistle, guitar, banjo, bodhran and vocals. The Oster Regent performance will feature the Celtic Dance Society; Ross Schupbach and Russ Clarke on the Scottish Great Highland pipes; Gaylord Stauffer playing harps; Joan and Martha Easton Irish stepdancing; and Matthew Bancroft-Smithe joining the band with mandolin and fiddle. Thursday, March 8 @ 7 PM Hearst Center for the Arts, Cedar Falls Saturday, March 17 @ 7:30 PM Oster Regent Theater, Cedar Falls Free admission | banish-misfortune.com

Heralded as the only interstate St. Patrick’s Day Parade in the nation, the Quad Cities Grand Parade XXVII begins in downtown Rock Island, Ill., and winds its way to the Centennial Bridge. Then it crosses the bridge over the Mississippi River and marches into downtown Davenport. Crowds line the streets to watch the bands, Irish dancers, floats, groups and family clans. Immediately following the parade, a Post Parade Bash is held at the historic Col Ballroom. The Bash includes food, drink and entertainment, along with the presentation of the parade trophy winners. Saturday, March 17 @ 11:30 AM stpatsqc.com

More St. Patrick’s Day entertainment Waterloo & Cedar Falls Celtic Concert featuring Banish-Misfortune, 7:30 p.m., Oster Regent Dakota, 9 p.m., Whiskey Junction (Denver) Kari and Billy, 8 p.m., The Isle Never the Less, 9 p.m., Spicoli’s Talon, 9 p.m., The Winning Edge

Dubuque & Galena Andreas Transo with Tony Leonard, 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Dubuque Symphony Orchestra: Sounds of Scotland, 7:30 p.m., Five Flags Center The Jimmys, 8 p.m., Mystique R-Gang, 7:30 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. The Spazmatics, 8:30 p.m., Diamond Jo St. Patrick’s Day Celebration, 6 p.m., Fairgrounds

Cedar Rapids Anji Kat, 7 p.m., Java Creek Black Diamond Band, 9 p.m., Dance-Mor Ballroom (Swisher) Crazy Delicious, 3 p.m., Chrome Horse Well Lit, 9 p.m., Chrome Horse

Iowa City North of Fourth, 9 p.m., Wildwood

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12th Annual

Bluff Country Studio Art Tour of SE Minnesota

April 27 – 29, 2012 Friday – Sunday 10 AM – 5 PM

TWENTY-FOUR

SEVEN

365 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ART GALLERIES, EVENTS MUSEUMS AND EXHIBITS

MOVIES NEWS & REVIEWS, RELEASES & TRAILERS LIVE MUSIC SOUNDBITES, NEWS INTERVIEWS, CD RELEASES AND LIVE MUSIC VENUES

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COMING TO MCLEOD IN APRIL Jermaine Lamarr Cole, better known as J. Cole, is from Fayetteville, N.C. He is best known for being the first artist to be signed to Jay-Z’s label, Roc Nation, after Jay heard his single “Lights Please.” He released his highly anticipated debut album, “Cole World: The Sideline Story,” in September, debuting at No. 1 on the Billboard 200. Cole received a nomination for Best New Artist at the 54th Grammy Awards.

Tuesday, April 24 @ 7:30 PM McLeod Center, Cedar Falls $30-$75 | 319.273.4849 | unitix.uni.edu

MARK YOUR CALENDAR! WHO Bret Michaels WHAT Get Your Rock On Tour WHERE Diamond Jo Casino, Dubuque WHEN Thursday, March 15 @ 8 PM TIX $37.50 - $85 | diamondjo.com


ST. PATRICK’S DAY

MADNESS... 12 Buckets of beer $

Mulligan Stew Corned Beef & Cabbage Boulevard Irish Ale Schlafly Irish Stout meets.... ....March Madness

all NCAA Tourney long!

205 East 18th St. • Cedar Falls • 319-277-3671 • 11am–2am • 7 days a week WO-030212007

www.mulligansbrickoven.com

A

OF FUN Trace Adkins will perform in May at the Adler Theatre as part of his Songs & Stories Tour. The intimate evening will incorporate stories, both humorous and meaningful, that pay homage to Adkins’ working-man roots and rich musical heritage. “I’ve had many narrow escapes and blessings in my life,” he said in a press release. “The right song at the right time has been my saving grace and that’s something I have in common with the audience. Sharing meaningful songs, stories and some laughs around the campfire is the country music tradition, and I’m looking forward to it.”

Thursday, May 10 @ 7:30 PM Adler Theatre, Davenport Tickets: $35, $42, $52 Adler Theatre Box Office, Ticketmaster.com 800.745.3000 | Ticketmaster outlets PULSE

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REVIEW VAN HALEN | A Different KinD Of truth

Eddie Van Halen is on fire, but where are the songs? There’s a lot that’s good, and good-natured, about “A Different Kind Of Truth,” the first album that the still-combustibly carefree-sounding rock quartet bearing the name of Van Halen has recorded with David Lee Roth in 27 years. The 56-year-old professionally charming cad has lost much of his vocal range. The trouble is that even

pERFUME GENIUS | Put YOur BAcK n 2 it Mike hadreas, the man behind Perfume Genius, has a small trembling voice and a large, brave, lyrical palette, one that since his 2010 debut “Learning” has embraced not only gay sex and sensuality, but the humanity behind such orientation. Mothers, sisters, lovers and hookers are all part of hadreas’ eerie, earnest grand opera. there’s a creaky, emotional, chamber-pop elegance at work here, and each phrase is sung with a mix of pain and happy empowerment. — A.D. Amorosi, Philadelphia Inquirer

TENNIS | YOunG AnD OLD As a prelude to their second album, tennis released covers of songs from Brenda Lee, the Zombies and Broadcast, and those three artists suggest a few of the Denver band’s templates. credit producer Patrick carney of the Black Keys for the tougher, sharper sound compared with last year’s “cape Dory,” though the girl-group melodies remain. tennis songs are shamelessly nostalgic, and part of the fun is hearing echoes of the past. “Young and Old” proves this young band is adept at seducing with old styles. — Steve Klinge, Philadelphia Inquirer

though many of the songs are reworked versions of 1970s demos, with a few notable exceptions like “Blood and Fire,” they’re largely lacking in the melodic pizzazz that turned VH into such a hit machine in their heyday. It’s a complete, respectable effort that avoids nearly all of the pitfalls typical of reunions, but “Truth” is short of songs that can stand up to “Hot for Teacher.” — Dan DeLuca, Philadelphia Inquirer

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iTUNES Top 5 SoNGS dIERkS bENTLEy | hOMe Dierks Bentley gets his new album off to a rousing start with “Am i the Only One,” which has already been a no. 1 hit. it’s a honkytonk-inflected party anthem, but a smart and witty one — in other words, it’s Bentley at his country-mainstream best. “home” occasionally flirts with generic country-rock and ballads, but mostly Bentley shows why he has become a star. the album’s most striking number is the title song — a song about America that is clear-eyed and unsentimental, yet deeply patriotic and moving. — Nick Cristiano, Philadelphia Inquirer

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MARCH friday

2

Waterloo & Cedar Falls Beaker Brothers 9 p.m., Screaming Eagle Bruce Bearinger 8 p.m., Leo’s (Oelwein) Drivel, 9 p.m., Lloyd’s (Fairbank) Jascat, 8 p.m., The Isle Music on Main featuring Bob and Jovita Long, The Comfort Kings, Uncle Chuck Finch and Dave Malaam 7:30 p.m., Oster Regent Bach Cantata Series 12:15 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn Party!Party!, 9 p.m., Spicoli’s Pork Tornadoes 9:30 p.m., The Hub WCA Winter Music Series featuring WAGG 7 p.m., Waterloo Center for the Arts Wicked Andersons 9 p.m., Jameson’s Dubuque & Galena Josey Wails, 8 p.m., Mystique Nick Stika 9 p.m., Grape Escape Overman 8 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. Ralph Kluseman 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Cedar Rapids 8 Seconds 8:30 p.m., Meskwaki (Tama) The Kominas with Sunny Ali and the Kid 9 p.m., Gardner (Grinnell) O’Connell Brothers Band 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Shawn Ster, 7 p.m., Java Creek Sparks 41 8 p.m., Parlor City Pub Iowa City Origin of Animal with Daylight Savings Account 9 p.m., Blue Moose Tower of Power 7:30 p.m., Riverside Casino White Mystery with Liberty Leg, Skye Carrasco and Caterwaulla 10 p.m., Gabe’s Zeta June with Satchel Grande 10 p.m., Yacht Club

saturday

3

Waterloo & Cedar Falls Arch Allies 9 p.m., The Hub Bobaflex with Royal Bliss and Cornfed Bruiser 5:30 p.m., NCC Pavilion 24

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The Chieftains 7:30 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn Dakota, 9 p.m., Mr. G’s Heath Allen 9 p.m., Screaming Eagle Hector Anchondo 9 p.m., Spicoli’s Jascat 8 p.m., The Isle Talon, 9 p.m., Jameson’s

tuesday

Cedar Rapids Richie Lee and the Fabulous 50s 1 p.m., Meskwaki (Tama) Iowa City Foghorn Stringband 8 p.m., The Mill Los Angeles Guitar Quartet 7:30 p.m., Coralville Center for the Performing Arts Outernational, 9 p.m., Gabe’s

Dubuque & Galena 10 Gallon Hat 9 p.m., Grape Escape 12 Car Pile Up 9:30 p.m., Jumpers Chainsaw Dupont and the Blues Warriors 7:30 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. Josey Wails 8 p.m., Mystique Ralph Kluseman 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Zero 2 Sixty 9 p.m., Denny’s Lux Club

Wednesday

7

Waterloo & Cedar Falls Percussion Ensemble, Kaji-Daiko and West African Drum Ensemble 8 p.m., Davis Hall, Gallagher-Bluedorn Tyga and Kirko Bangz 8 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn Cedar Rapids BF Burt, 4 p.m., Shuey’s Richie Lee and the Fabulous 50s 1 p.m., Meskwaki (Tama)

Cedar Rapids 8 Seconds 8:30 p.m., Meskwaki (Tama) Big Daddy Cole and Bambalamb 8 p.m., Parlor City Pub Jasmine 7 p.m., Java Creek John McCutcheon 8 p.m., CSPS Mike and Rob 4 p.m., Shuey’s (Shueyville) Reddoor 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Water Liars with Overman 9 p.m., The Lift

Iowa City The Avett Brothers 8 p.m., Iowa Memorial Union Benjamin Schmidt with Dustin Busch, Ryan Bernamen and Scott Cochran 7 p.m., The Mill Doomtree, 8 p.m., Blue Moose Man Overboard with Handguns, Seahaven and Daytrader 6 p.m., Gabe’s The Mighty Regis with The Ills and Muddy Rails 10 p.m., Gabe’s

Iowa City Andrew Epstein 7 p.m., Uptown Bill’s Dennis McMurrin and the Demolition Band with Bad Intentions 9 p.m., Yacht Club Human Aftertaste with Peach Pies Burlesque 9 p.m., Gabe’s Neil Hewitt 9 p.m., Wildwood Old Thrashers V featuring Baggy Spandex, A Chance in Hell, Illinois John Fever, Acoustic Guillotine and Hott 9 p.m., The Mill Yelawolf 6:30 p.m., Blue Moose

sunday

6

thursday

8

Waterloo & Cedar Falls Rock 4A Cure featuring Lick It Ticket and Holy White Hounds 8 p.m., The Hub Cedar Rapids Daddy-O, 8 p.m., Parlor City Steve Kristopher 7 p.m., Java Creek

4

Waterloo & Cedar Falls Chamber Festival Recital 1 p.m., Russell Hall, UNI Heatbox with More Than Lights 9 p.m., The Hub

Iowa City Chasing Shade 10 p.m., Yacht Club Hot Tuna, 8 p.m., Englert Laura Gibson with Oak Creek Band and Brooks Strause and the Gory Details 9 p.m., The Mill

friday

9

Waterloo & Cedar Falls Bob Dorr and the Blue Band 6 p.m., The Hub

Blue Simon 9 p.m., Screaming Eagle Colin Hay 7:30 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn The Lads, 9 p.m., Jameson’s Mick Staebell, 8 p.m., The Isle Red Cross Benefit featuring The Snozzberries 7 p.m., Spicoli’s Dubuque & Galena Andreas Transo 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Lovin’ Country 9:30 p.m., Mystique Simply Marty 9 p.m., Grape Escape Cedar Rapids Billy Heller, 7 p.m., Java Creek Lonesome Road 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Silver Wings 8 p.m., Parlor City Iowa City A Place to Bury Strangers 8:30 p.m., Gabe’s The Fez 8 p.m., Englert The Heligoats with Grand Tetons 9 p.m., The Mill Jazz After Five featuring Eric Thompson and the Talented Tenth 5 p.m., The Mill S.S. Web with St. Christopher, Half Hearts, The Olympics and Zoo Animal 9 p.m., Yacht Club

saturday

10

Waterloo & Cedar Falls Dakota 9 p.m., Von Tucks (Oelwein) Mick Staebell 8 p.m., The Isle Never the Less 9 p.m., Jameson’s The New Black 7 9 p.m., The Hub Pony Express Dance featuring Wichita 8 p.m., Doc’s Tap (Clarksville) Susan Werner with Trina Hamlin, Natalia Zukerman and Karla Ruth 7:30 p.m., Oster Regent WildCard 9 p.m., Screaming Eagle Dubuque & Galena Andreas Transo 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Bad Habits 9 p.m., Shenanigan’s Galena Firefighters’ Annual Dance featuring Sunshine 9 p.m., Turner Hall

GET LISTED: We want to know about your live music. Email the details to amie.steffen@wcfcourier.com to be a part of our calendar.


Half-Fast 9 p.m., Denny’s Lux Club Kevin Beck and Johnnie Walker 9 p.m., Spirits Laura and the Longhairs 7:30 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. Lovin’ Country 9:30 p.m., Mystique Zero 2 Sixty 9 p.m., Jumpers Cedar Rapids Bad Girl No Biscuit 7 p.m., Java Creek Black Diamond 8:30 p.m., Wild Hogs (Walford) Flamin Cameros 4 p.m., Shuey’s (Shueyville) Jason Leroy Band 9 p.m., Parlor City Kate Campbell, 8 p.m., CSPS Lower Dens with Fort Frances 9 p.m., Gardner Lounge (Grinnell) Slap N Tickle 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Iowa City Dunlavin Green 7 p.m., Uptown Bill’s Jake McVey, 9 p.m., Wildwood Lipstick Homicide with North of Grand, Hott and The Blendours 10 p.m., Gabe’s Lúnasa, 8 p.m., Englert Memoryhouse 10 p.m., The Mill Porch Builder with Natural Oil 10 p.m., Yacht Club

sunday

11

Waterloo & Cedar Falls Don Williams 7:30 p.m., McElroy Auditorium Cedar Rapids The Makem and Spain Brothers 7 p.m., CSPS Iowa City An Horse with The Company We Keep 7:30 p.m., Blue Moose

monday

12

Cedar Rapids Slide, 7 p.m., CSPS

tuesday

13

Cedar Rapids Jeremy Kittel Band 7 p.m., CSPS

Wednesday Cedar Rapids BF Burt, 4 p.m., Shuey’s Steve Wik and Soul Funk 8 p.m., Parlor City

14

Iowa City Burlington Street Bluegrass Band 7 p.m., The Mill Comeback Kid with Living with Lions 6 p.m., Blue Moose

thursday

Dakota 9 p.m., Whiskey Junction (Denver) Kari and Billy, 8 p.m., The Isle Never the Less, 9 p.m., Spicoli’s Talon, 9 p.m., The Winning Edge

15

Dubuque & Galena Bret Michaels with Kip Winger 8 p.m., Diamond Jo Cedar Rapids Bad Girl No Biscuit 4 p.m., Shuey’s (Shueyville) Daddy-O, 8 p.m., Parlor City Iowa City Taboo with Ancestral Diet, Sister Midnight and User 45 10 p.m., The Mill

friday

16

Waterloo & Cedar Falls Ernest T, 9 p.m., Jameson’s The Goodyear Pimps with Nil8 9 p.m., Spicoli’s Kari and Billy, 8 p.m., The Isle Dubuque & Galena Adam Beck and Daniel Anderson Duo 8 p.m., Mystique Eric Joseph 9 p.m., Grape Escape R-Gang 7:30 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. Tony Leonard 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Cedar Rapids Black Diamond 9 p.m., Dance-Mor Ballroom Danny Whitson with Lonesome Road 8 p.m., Red Baron Irishjam, 7 p.m., Java Creek Loaded, 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Mike and Rob Show 9 p.m., Parlor City Peppino D’Agostino 8 p.m., CSPS Iowa City Aseethe with Brutus and the Psychadelic Explosions and Chupacabra 9 p.m., Gabe’s Jazz After Five: Equilateral 5 p.m., The Mill Stuart Davis, 9 p.m., The Mill

saturday

17

Waterloo & Cedar Falls Celtic Concert featuring Banish-Misfortune 7:30 p.m., Oster Regent

Dubuque & Galena Andreas Transo with Tony Leonard 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Dubuque Symphony Orchestra: Sounds of Scotland 7:30 p.m., Five Flags Center The Jimmys, 8 p.m., Mystique R-Gang 7:30 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. The Spazmatics 8:30 p.m., Diamond Jo Cedar Rapids Anji Kat, 7 p.m., Java Creek Black Diamond 9 p.m., Dance-Mor Ballroom Crazy Delicious 3 p.m., Chrome Horse Well Lit, 9 p.m., Chrome Horse

Upcoming shows at

The HuB 2 MAR 5:00PM

DAVE BARLETT FAMILY BENEFIT WITH LIVE MUSIC BY MASON GREVE

3 MAR 9:00PM

JOURNEY/REO/STYX BY ARCH**

4 MAR 8:00PM

HEATOX WITH MORE THAN LIGHTS**

5 MAR 9:00PM

GRATEFUL DEAD NIGHT

6 MAR 9:00PM

FREE KEG & KARAOKE

8 MAR 8:00PM

ROCK 4A CURE FUNDRAISER WITH MUSIC BY: LICK IT TICKET, HOLY WHITE HOUNDS, MORE TBA

9 MAR 6:00PM

BOB DORR & THE BLUE BAND PORK TORNADOES

9:00PM 10 MAR 9:00PM

THE NEW BLACK 7 WITH THE RAMBLERS

23 MAR 9:00PM

LOGAN MIZE**

30 MAR 9:00PM

CHRIS DUARTE GROUP WITH SCARLET RUNNER**

6 APR 9:00PM

VIC FERRARI BAND**

19 APR 9:00PM

JASON REEVES** ** = ADVANCE TIX AVAILABLE

Iowa City North of Fourth 9 p.m., Wildwood

sunday

18

Dubuque & Galena Dubuque Symphony Orchestra: Sounds of Scotland 2 p.m., Five Flags Center

WO-021712011 WO-030212009

THE GOODYEAR PIMPS

Iowa City Hoots and Hellmouth with Frontier Ruckus 9 p.m., The Mill Toki Wright with Old Man’s War 9 p.m., Blue Moose

tuesday

20

Waterloo & Cedar Falls The Hunt Family 7 p.m., Tama Hall, Hawkeye Cedar Rapids Joy Kills Sorrow with Lake Street Dive 7 p.m., CSPS

03.02 PARTY PARTY | 7 PM THE ULITMATE KARAOKE BAND

03.03 ANCHONDO | 9 PM WITH FEET 2 FALL OVER

Iowa City Langhorne Slim 9 p.m., The Mill

Wednesday

03.09 THE SNOZZBERIES | 7 PM 03.10 CAPOIERA | 9 PM BRAZILIAN DANCE CARNIVAL

21

Cedar Rapids Blitz the Ambassador 7 p.m., CSPS BF Burt, 4 p.m., Shuey’s

03.16 THE GOODYEAR PIMPS | 8 PM WITH NIL8, 8 FOUNDED, DESELECT

03.17 ST PATTY’S DAY PARTY! | 9 PM WITH NEVER THE LESS

03.23 TWINS | 9 PM

WITH THE OLYMPICS, DYLAN AND HIS NEIGHBORS, JUNE TUESDAY

03.31 INDEX CASE | 9 PM

WITH UNITY, 3 YEARS HOLLOW

Iowa City Rubblebucket with The Olympics 8:30 p.m., Gabe’s

3555 University Ave Waterloo | 287-5747 WO-030212018 WO-021712021

READ.WATCH.SURF

www.thereverb.net PULSE

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Black Boy, White School | Brian F. WaLkEr You’re a poor kid, and you’re offered a scholarship to an elite prep school. is this a club you want to join, or not? in Brian F. Walker’s “Black Boy, White School,” East Cleveland resident anthony has the chance to attend a fancy high school in Maine. He’s not sure that he wants to leave the life he knows, but then his best friend is murdered, and Belton academy is looking pretty good. Walker sometimes resorts to stereotypes, but a number of his observations are fresh enough to cut deep. although anthony has always been known as “ant,” everyone at Belton persists in calling him “Tony.” “Tony” is safe. Whether ant will insist on his name and his identity and make everyone around him uncomfortable or accept being Tony and live up to everyone’s expectations becomes the issue of the novel. Walker doesn’t resolve the question satisfactorily, but the reader is left fruitfully wondering whether such a question is ever resolved in our schools — or in our society. — Sonja Bolle, McClatchy News Service

Stay aWake | Dan CHaon Dan Chaon’s stories are restless nightmares. They’re the soft prickle at the back of your neck, the insistent fears that pull you from sleep, the full-blown horror that might greet you when you wake. He’s a master of psychological tension, which plays out mostly in small Midwestern towns in this collection of stories. Though the stories range widely in experience, they all carry a heavy atmosphere of dread. Chaon reminds us of the ripples that follow in the wake of terrible things — fatal accidents, family suicides, a man who consigns his dead mother’s dogs to the vet’s needle rather than find them new homes. The author’s dark gift is to understand those things we never want to tell — and to make us want to read about them anyway. — Connie Ogle, McClatchy News Service

heart of a killer | DaviD roSEnFELT a woman in prison for murdering her husband wants to kill herself to save her daughter in David rosenfelt’s latest page-turner, “Heart of a killer.” a young attorney named Jamie Wagner gets a case dropped in his lap that he doesn’t want to pursue. Sheryl Harrison has served only a portion of her sentence for a crime she says was to protect her and her daughter from an abusive spouse. Then her daughter is diagnosed with a heart defect. She will die without a transplant, and Sheryl is her closest match. Sheryl asks to be the donor to save her daughter’s life. Jamie cannot obtain approval for what is essentially suicide, so he decides to pursue the case against Sheryl and force a retrial. rosenfelt has crafted another terrific thriller that will keep the reader up late at night. The characters and the moral dilemma that create the hook raise some serious questions. as a result, even a somewhat weak payoff doesn’t lessen the impact of the journey. — Jeff Ayers, The Associated Press

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BorroW: the american Way of DeBt | LoUiS HYMan The drama leading up to the real estate crash of the mid-2000s is becoming as familiar as the Wall Street crash that sparked the Great Depression used to be. There are plenty of villains: social engineers and market ideologues in Washington; lying bond traders and careless bank bosses on Wall Street; and lenders, builders and borrowers. all found it profitable not to worry about shaky loans, until they blew up. Cornell University historian Louis Hyman has written a breezy book that goes deeper. Skimming decades of news, testimony and arcane trade reports, he reminds us that this has happened before, and that there was nothing secret about the public and business decisions that led to cheap money, price inflation, collapse, mass foreclosures and bailouts. His is an accessible and well-written primer on a vast history with plenty of cautionary tales for those who would fix what’s broken in our financial system, as well as what isn’t. — Joseph DiStefano, Philadelphia Inquirer


Difficult Sudoku 11

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23

32

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19

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18

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12

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17

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15

14

26

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4

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7 1 4 8 3 6 2 9 5

ACROSS 1. "Common Sense" pamphleteer 6. Timex competitor 11. Roll of bills 14. Ashcan's target 15. Astral hunter 16. Limerick loc. 17. Ore of uranium 19. Sardines holder 20. Stay glued to, so to speak 21. Rifle range command 22. Abyssinian or Siamese 23. Drop an easy one 24. Game with only nines through aces 26. Scale in which diamond = 10 29. Prefix with plunk or flop 31. Idle of comedy 32. Jackie O's second 33. Cupid's counterpart 35. Sign up 38. Makes a scene? 40. Hard hat's fastener 42. Matter for Mason 43. Like a he-man 45. Canceled, slangily 46. Grapefruit league state: Abbr. 47. Winter coating 49. "Casablanca" pianist 50. Pontiacs of yore 51. Making sense 54. TV sked abbr. 56. Bard of boxing 57. __-fi 58. Freon, for one 62. Suffix with beat or neat 63. Goateed sing-along bandleader 65. Original sinner 66. Heart chambers 67. French textile city 68. "__ Rosenkavalier" 69. Has to have 70. Like a lizard's skin DOWN 1. Critters in litters

6 2 9 7 5 4 8 1 3

Medium

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3 5 8 2 9 1 6 4 7

Sudoku

2 1 7

4 9 5 3 7 2 1 6 8

3 8 9

3 1 2 4 5 1 6 7 5 5 4 7 2 2 1 5 9 3 4 6 7 8

8 3 1 4 6 5 7 2 9

work your mind

3 4 5 1 6 7 8 9 4 3 7 8 1 2 5 3 9 8 5 6 1 2 4 3 7 5 4 1 8 3

5 1 9 2 8 7 4 6 6 3 2 7 1 5 6 9 4 2 8 1 3 9 7 8 9 4 3 5 7 8 5 3 2 6 1 4

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all puzzles ©Hometown Content

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Colin Hay Friday, March 9, 2012, 7:30 p.m. Adult: $30, $23 Youth: $30, $19 It’s the man from Men at Work at work! Colin Hay who put the irresistible hooks in the songs of the Australian rock band Men at Work. (And now that we’ve brought it up, do you think you can get “Down Under” out of your head?) Since those days he’s moved stateside and forged new musical paths. He’s had a fresh burst of songwriting inspiration in middle age and he’s touring with just an acoustic guitar.

His shows revisit Men at Work hits as well as introducing new songs. Hay’s solo shows intersperse classic and new songs with hilarious, poignant and downright surreal stories drawn from his often unbelievable experiences over the past three decades. “I’ve been doing these solo tours for a number of years,” he explains, “going back to the same places and building audiences by doing the best shows I can.” Part of the NEW Gallagher-Bluedorn Club Series!

Gallagher-Bluedorn

Sponsored by

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www.gbpac.org

Pulse Magazine - 3-2-2012  

The Heartbeat of Entertainment

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