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contents Issue No. 8 2

in this ISSUE

Nov. 25 - Dec. 8, 2011

inside STUNT MAN Yes, he’s done a lot of stupid things. But they make you laugh, don’t they? Expect more of the same plus some jokes when Steve-O comes to town.

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9

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is a product of Courier Communications, P.O. Box 540, 501 Commercial St., Waterloo, IA 50704.

CONTACTS EDITOR Meta Hemenway-Forbes 319.291.1483 meta.hemenway-forbes@ wcfcourier.com ADVERTISING Sheila Kerns 319.291.1448 sheila.kerns@wcfcourier.com REACH OUT AND TOUCH US pulse@wcfcourier.com 319.291.1483 CREATIVE CREW Emily Smesrud Angela Dark Alan Simmer David Hemenway INTERNET GURU Christopher Koop

8 Watch the Throne

14 Hidden treasures

16 Cracking tradition

He’s worked with some of the biggest names in hip hop, currently touring with Kanye West and Jay-Z. Now, rhyme master Pusha T will make a stop in Iowa City.

She’s gone but not forgotten. “Lioness: Hidden Treasures,” a collection of previous unreleased tracks by Amy Winehouse, drops Dec. 5.

A unique version of “The Nutcracker” comes to the Englert Theatre, featuring dancers from Iowa City studios and a 30-piece orchestra of local musicians.

18 College Christmas The telling of the Christmas story is wrapped around the theme “Savior of Our Nations, Come” in Wartburg College’s annual Christmas program.

22 Excuse moi! Find your rainbow connection with flop-haired creatures, a felt frog and a saucy pig. Kermit and friends are back in a redux of the 1979 classic “The Muppets.”

24 Start your engines Luigi and company are ready to take to the track — and the sea and sky — in MarioKart 7. International icon Tintin also gets a game of his very own.

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Melody Parker Pulse Writer BRANDON POLLOCK Pulse PHOTOGRAPHER

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or anyone who has doubted that animals have souls, look into the eyes of Etienne Delessert’s three little pigs from the children’s book “Big and Bad” or the owl with eyeglasses in “Moon Theatre.” Their eyes glow like orbs, infused with feeling and near-human depth. “I like animals, and I draw them quite realistically. But if you look at the eyes of my characters, they are looking at you. If it is a mouse, an elephant or even a crocodile, everything is in the eyes,” said the award-winning Swiss-born illustrator. Visitors can explore his work in “Why Grow Up? An Exhibition of the Art of Etienne Delessert” through Jan. 5 at the Hearst Center for the Arts. Considered one of the fathers of modern children’s picture books, Delessert creates imagined worlds in realistic or fantastical settings that unfold for pint-sized readers (and adults) like a film come alive on the pages of a book. The stories include retelling of tales about the Big Bad Wolf, the Seven Dwarfs, Cock Robin and Humpty Dumpty, as well as adventures of characters of his own invention, such as Spartacus the Spider and a mythical creature named Yok-Yok. Delessert was born in 1941 in Switzerland and now lives in Lakeville, Conn. He has illustrated more than 80 books in his career, which stretches over three decades. Many books have been translated into 14 languages with millions of copies sold worldwide. He has animated films and drawn magazine illustrations for publications like The Atlantic Monthly and France’s Le Monde. His groundbreaking picture book about Noah’s Ark, “The Endless Party,” was created in the 1960s, and he collaborated with Eugene Inoesco, the famous playwright and dramatist of the Theatre of the Absurd, and child psychologist Jean Piaget. This exhibition was initiated in 2009 at Centre de l’Illustration in Moulins, France, and travels in the U.S. through the National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature in Abilene, Texas. More than 50 pieces are displayed in the Hearst’s main galleries. “Reaction has been phenomenal,” said Mary Huber, the Hearst’s director. “The pieces are narrative in nature, and we’re very interested in the link between the literary and visual arts. You see the illustrations and read about the stories, and they are more than books for children. Many of Etienne’s books have adult meanings but are wonderfully charming.” Delessert’s picture books are aimed at children ages 2 to 7. At this age, Delessert says, children are creative, expressive and attentive. “They love to draw, and they want to represent the world around them and their families. It is a complex age. They question and see everything around them. Then they arrive at school and a teacher tells them the horse can’t be blue, elephants aren’t red and the sky must always be blue. 

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Kids get a tracing to fill with color and they’re told to stay inside the lines and color it with the ‘right’ colors,” the artist explained. “I think it’s terrifying because the will of the adult is being imposed on the child.” Delessert is a self-taught artist who apprenticed at a graphics design studio, then moved to Paris where he became a successful advertising art director before coming to the U.S. in 1965. The artist chooses his themes and stories with great care, beginning with the text written in his own shorthand variation. Invariably, drawings take shape in his mind completely before he sketches a layout on a single sheet of 8.5-by-11-inch paper. Each scene is barely larger than a thumbnail. “It’s very precise. I follow the rhythm of the story.

I know quite well what the pictures will be, what the characters will do and the scene concepts. I hate to do dummies because you think too much about it. I just want to enjoy doing the illustrations.” In the last 15 or 20 years, all of his work has been done in watercolor and some colored pencils on paper. “But I treat the watercolor in a different way. I rub it in, with not too much water. Watercolor pigments are extremely intense. I like the texture and the full colors of nature. Transparent color is not in my nature. I like things to be very present and full,” he explained. Delessert continues to work on new projects, and is particularly excited about introducing Yok-Yok, who lives in a walnut shell, to American audiences next


When: Through Jan. 5. Where: Hearst Center for the Arts, Cedar Falls Details: Admission is free.

year. The character is beloved in France. “I conceived the little guy as a visual logo — you’d see and remember him — with his very large red hat, who brings nature to the big city. I let this character sleep for many years and started him again two years ago. I’ve done nine books in two years, which is for me, very different. Usually I’m working on one book a year,” he added, laughing. “It’s a great joy to relaunch Yok-Yok.” PULSE




No love lost

AN EXHIBITION OF THE ART R OF

ETIENNE

DELESSERT

Blessed with a blast-it-to-theback-of-the-room voice, Lydia Loveless is a 21-year-old who combines country classicism with punk rock candor — sometimes within the same song. Loveless grew up on a farm in Coshocton, Ohio, a small weird town with nothing to do but make music. So she did, starting off by playing bass in her sister’s band at age 14. She recently released her latest album, “Indestructible Machine.” Saturday, Dec. 3 @ 9 PM The Mill, Iowa City $8 | icmill.com

© 1 99 9922 b y E tie tii en enne Delesser t | T This Th his h is exh e ibit ex ibi t io ion o w aass o was orga rga nized rganize niz nize i ze d b by tthe hee NCC h NCCIL, NC N CC IL IL IL, L, Abil Ab b eene ene, en n e Tex T ex Texa e as as. as.

No pushover Pusha T will make a stop at The Union Bar in Iowa City. Currently touring with Kanye West and Jay-Z on the Watch the Throne Tour, Pusha will soon release his first EP, “Fear of God II: Let Us Pray.” An occasional actor and half of the critically acclaimed hip-hop duo Clipse, Pusha T was featured on West’s “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy,” premiering the track “Runaway” with West at the 2010 MTV Video Music Awards. Pusha also has ap-

Now through

Jan 5, 2012

See more than fifty works of art by the prolific illustrator, Etienne Delessert. Especially for families Open Saturday, November 26 & Sunday, November 27 James & Meryl Hearst Center for the Arts

HEARSTARTSCENTER.COM



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peared in four episodes of the second season of the HBO series “How to Make It in America.” Pusha T Tuesday, Nov. 29; doors open at 6 PM The Union Bar, Iowa City Opening acts include Quad Cities group Calliko and Cedar Rapids’ Big Bang. $15 | livewknd.com


“Doing stupid stuff is still a very big part of my career.”

COURTESY PHOTO

Steve-O Entirely too much information AMIE STEFFEN | Pulse Writer

S

tapling your butt cheeks together and having your buddies film it is probably not a good career move. Unless you’re Steve-O. In fact, it’s crazy, dangerous and injurious stunts like that is not only what got him his career, but also what he continues to do for a living. The star of “Jackass” and the spin-off, “Wildboyz,” both on MTV, has also written a memoir, “Professional Idiot,” and had a short-lived rap career. Steve-O is now on the stand-up comedy circuit, where — you guessed it — he still does stunts for the audience. He’ll bring his antics to Joker’s in Cedar Falls and the Diamond Jo Casino in Dubuque next month as part of his Entirely Too Much Information tour. He agreed to answer our questions via email while traveling in Europe. * PULSE: Most people probably know you best from “Jackass,” both the TV show and the movies. Is that still a big part of your career or are you trying to move out of that shadow? * STEVE-O: Doing stupid stuff is still a very big part of my career. I don’t have any delusion that I’m perceived as a stand-up comedian, and that’s why I always do ridiculous physical stunts and tricks at all of my shows. My approach to this comedy tour is very similar to the way I approached the (Comedy Central) Charlie Sheen roast — I want to be involved in comedy, but I understand that I need to remain faithful to my brand by still doing crazy crap, too. * PULSE: You were included in “Jackass” in the beginning because of videos you sent to Jeff Tremaine, correct? What was on those original videos? * STEVE-O: Yes, the videos featured a lot of me setting myself on fire and jumping off apartment buildings into shallow pools, as well as tons of random stuff, like me drinking bong water or being choked unconscious. I think what made my foot-

age appealing to Tremaine was that there was no way to guess what I was going to do next. * PULSE: Do people come up to you on the street and do crazy things or ask you to do a stunt? * STEVE-O: Sure, they ask me to do stuff, but that’s not a big deal. What’s most annoying is when I get to radio stations to promote one thing or another and they inform me on the air that I’m expected to do something that they’ve come up with. It’s so lame when that happens and so frequent, too. They’ll have something gross that they’ll tell their listeners I’m going to drink or some torture device that I’m going to be subjected to. Obeying orders from schmucks like that isn’t awesome at all — even on “Jackass” we do stuff because we want to. Sure, we’ll get pressured to do stuff, but we’re never given orders. * PULSE: How did you get into stand-up? How does going solo differ from being part of an ensemble, such as in “Jackass”? What can people expect from your stand-up? * STEVE-O: I first tried stand up very randomly in 2006. Someone asked me to go to a comedy club and do something crazy on stage. I agreed to show up but gave no thought to the game plan. When I showed up, it immediately occurred to me that I couldn’t think of anything crazier than trying stand-up comedy on that stage, so that’s what I did. I had some time to think of what I was going to say while waiting for my turn and I came up with a few things that were absurd enough to get real laughs. From that very first time, I was determined to pursue stand-up. After that, in 2006 and 2007, I bombed horrendously a few times, which gave me very mixed feelings about it. It took me a while to really dive into stand-up fully, but now that I’ve been on tour for over a year, I’m completely comfortable with it. I don’t mind doing it on my own at all, and people can expect absurd and truthful accounts of my experience as a semi-

famous, drug-addicted male slut and jackass for over 10 years now. They can also expect live stunts and tricks. * PULSE: What’s been your most dangerous stunt to date? * STEVE-O: That’s tough to say, but I would guess it happened on “Wildboyz,” with big cats, bears, sharks or venomous snakes. * PULSE: Are you planning to make more rap albums? STEVE-O: Absolutely not, but I do like to incorporate the story of my failed rap career and a sample of my horrible music into my comedy show. * PULSE: You are famously sober for a few years now and even a vegan. Does that mean that stunts actually hurt you more now? * STEVE-O: I’m pretty sure that being vegan doesn’t make anything hurt more, but being present and clear-headed isn’t necessarily helpful. Thankfully, it’s important enough to me to prove that I haven’t turned into a p****, that my urge to prove I’m still nuts overpowers my reluctance to do stupid things. * PULSE: What’s one stunt people have suggested, or maybe you’ve thought of, that you haven’t done yet and want to do? * STEVE-O: I get this question a lot, and I like to answer it on stage. We’ll see you at the show, thanks so much for your time.

Steve-O

with Tim Sullivan 6:30 and 9 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 14 Joker’s Comedy Night Club, Cedar Falls barmuda.com/jokers

Steve-O

7 and 9:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 16 Diamond Jo Casino, Dubuque dubuquetickets.diamondjo.com PULSE




iTUNES top 5 albums Adele

21

Glee The Christmas Album, Vol. 2 Coldplay

Mylo Xyloto

Michael Buble Christmas Various Artists Twilight: Breaking Dawn Soundtrack

REVIEW joe nichols | it’s all good

/

Joe Nichols has always shown two aspects of his persona: There’s the guy who ranks among the best traditional country singers of his generation and the one who sings humorous ditties and sentimental family fare aimed at getting radio play. Both sides rise up on Nichols’ sixth studio album, “It’s All Good.” The album is aptly named, as the 10-song collection features some of the best hardcore country music heard this year and a few lighthearted tunes that manage to be witty without being corny. On the traditional side, the title cut is a sweetly swinging fiddle-and-steel tune that proves

check out this track

once again that Nichols is as good as George Strait at blending tone and rhythm to perfectly deliver a timeless country song. On the contemporary side, Nichols brings a wink to the macho swagger of upbeat, guitar-and-drum cuts like the lusty “The More I Look” and the recent hit, “Take It Off,” which suggests letting go of worries by bringing the convertible top down, putting the boat in the water and losing some clothes as the day goes on. Even better, his deep, easy vocal style ideally fits a modern love song like “I Can’t Take My Eyes Off You.” — Michael McCall, The Associated Press

With “Never Gonna Get Enough,” Nichols celebrates discovering there’s more joy in a lasting love at home than in living it up on the town. He sings the softly swaying tune with the relaxed tone of a guy who has experienced both.

various artists | the twilight saga: breaking dawn part 1 soundtrack

Though the saga has had four different directors interpret how the stories should look, there has been only one music supervisor to determine how the movies should sound — Alexandra Patsavas. As influential as the soundtracks of John Hughes movies were over teenage musical tastes in the ’80s, the “Twilight” sound, as meticulously chosen by Patsavas, has practically created its own genre in the 21st century. “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 Soundtrack” adds to that reputation. The first single, Bruno Mars’ stately “It Will Rain,” sounds less like Mr. “Grenade” and more

like a soul-infused Death Cab for Cutie. The charming brother-sister duo the Belle Brigade get tougher than usual on the bluesy “I Didn’t Mean It,” and Noisettes turn their “Sister Rosetta” into something more lighthearted. If the “Breaking Dawn” soundtrack gets to use its hit-making powers for good, it will turn Belle Brigade and the chipper Welsh band the Joy Formidable into Paramore-like household names. These discoveries should tide them over until the next “Twilight” installment arrives. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

noel gallagher’s high flying birds | noel gallagher’s high flying birds

Noel Gallagher has finally spread his post-Oasis wings and delivered a debut album with a band of his building, Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds. Gallagher gives us a comfortably acceptable sound but something perhaps a little too close to his higher flying days with the hit-making Oasis. The thread of sonic continuity is undeniable and it appears there’s nothing new under the Gallagher family umbrella of creativity here. Things start off nice enough with “Everybody’s on the Run” and “Dream On,” the latter built around a sturdy, marching cadence of drum 10

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and guitar strums. However, songs like “Soldier Boys and Jesus Freaks” are simply a chore to listen to. Moreover, the intro on “(Stranded On) The Wrong Beach” borrows too heavily on the Oasis hit “Wonderwall,” and we’re left wondering if Gallagher is pining for his chart-topping music of yesteryear with his brooding brother Liam Gallagher. A supremely talented artist has played it relatively safe here and it remains to be proven whether he has something truly new to offer. He hasn’t done so here. — Ron Harris, The Associated Press


/

SOUND ADVICE meta hemenway-forbes | Pulse editor

“Now you can customize your workout listening experience this holiday season with InTune earphones from fuse!” the press release said. Maximize the experience of two of my favorite things — running and hiphop? How could I say no? So when Fuse electronics offered to let me test drive its new line of genre-specific earphones, I was all over it. I laced up for a 5-miler and hit play on the trusty iPod, ready to put InTune through the paces. The rap/hip-hop buds come in a pretty, shiny red, and I was psyched as my fav hip-hop playlist began to roll. The eminent Eminem, Snoop, Weezy, Wiz Khalifa, T.I., Luda, Kanye, David Banner, Flo Rida. They sounded odd, like I was listening through cotton balls. Say what? InTune earbuds come in four choices of genrespecific listening. They promise “deeper bass for rap/hip-hop, higher vocals and midrange for pop, great treble and clear bottom tones for rock/blues/

country and a clear, full response curve for superb overall sound with jazz and classical music.” Nope. To be sure I put the rap/hip-hop InTunes through the full rigors, I chose to bottom out the sound with a bone-rattling bass selection — “I’m on Everything,” a deep thump from Royce Da 5’9” and Eminem’s (Bad Meets Evil) “Hell: The Sequel.” The track pounds the mess out of any sub, making it perfect for testing InTune’s claims. Still, cotton balls. Sure, hip-hop/rap employs its share of thunder, but midrange and treble take up lots of space, too. That’s what makes the genre so damned good and the InTune earbuds so terrible. The buds muffled everything, from the delightful squeeze of Lil Wayne’s signature vocals to the raspy rhymes of Lil’ Jon. I’ll stick with the iPod’s factory earbuds. Unlike Fuse, Apple hasn’t made me any promises it couldn’t keep.

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Caged Birds Set Free Jason

Reeves

AMIE STEFFEN | Pulse WRITER

“Love is real, and it could save us all,” writes Jason Reeves on his Facebook musician page. “If we would only let it.” Reeves speaks to his own sensibilities with the aching lyrics on his latest EP, “Caged Birds Set Free,” which marks a bit of a divergence from his earlier, happy-go-lucky pop writing style. For this album, both melody and words present a more thoughtful, solemn Reeves — he is, after all, known better for songs like the high-onlove “Helium Hearts” or penning Colbie Caillat’s sweet-tinged “Bubbly.” But the solemnity brings forth a maturity, as well. “I loved you so much more than I knew,” he cries, on the heartbroken “More Than I Meant To.” His distinct voice and musicality still shines, but it’s through a kind of grief — which, songwriters know, always produces the best songs.

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november friday

saturday 25

Waterloo Fatcat 9 p.m., Jameson’s Mick Staebell 7 p.m., The Isle Cedar Falls The Austin Taft Soundtrack 9:30 p.m., The Hub Puddle of Mudd with Pop Evil and Lansdowne 7 p.m., Wheelhouse

your favorite bands in your favorite venues waterloo cedar falls iowa city cedar rapids dubuque get listed We want to know about your live music. Email the details to amie.steffen@wcfcourier.com to be a part of our calendar.

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STAY UP TO DATE WITH PULSE MAGAZINE

Dubuque & Galena 12 Car Pile Up 9 p.m., Northside Bryan Popp 9:30 p.m., Mystique Chuck Bregman 6 p.m., Mystique Ken Wheaton 8:30 p.m., The Cornerstone Laura McDonald and Jeff Weydert 8 p.m., Spirits Lonely Goats 9 p.m., Grape Escape Paul McHugh 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Sunshine 7:30 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. Cedar Rapids Ambushed 9 p.m., Parlor City Pub Bob Dorr and the Blue Band 3 p.m., Parlor City Pub Bob Dorr and the Blue Band 8 p.m., Gatherings Electric Mule 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Eleventh Hour 9 p.m., Red Baron Mass, Faurot and Crist 7 p.m., Java Creek Iowa City Jazz After Five featuring The Hands of Time Quartet 5:30 p.m., The Mill North of Forty 9 p.m., Wildwood T’Bone with Alex Body 8 p.m., The Mill

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Waterloo Bret Michaels 7:30 p.m., McElroy Auditorium Mick Staebell 7 p.m., The Isle Wicked Andersons 9 p.m., Jameson’s Cedar Falls Dakota 9 p.m., Mr. G’s Good Cop Rad Cop 9 p.m., The Hub Dubuque & Galena Bad Fished 10 p.m., The Other Side (East Dubuque, Ill.) Bryan Popp 9:30 p.m., Mystique Chuck Bregman 6 p.m., Mystique Danika Holmes 7:30 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. Fizgig 9 p.m., Northside Half-Fast 9 p.m., Courtside Jabberbox 9 p.m., Jumpers Kevin Beck and Johnnie Walker 9 p.m., Spirits Laura McDonald and Jeff Weydert 1 p.m., Grape Escape Massey Road 9 p.m., Georgie’s Skyline Paul McHugh 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Zero 2 Sixty 8 p.m., Dubuque Driving Range Cedar Rapids Brandon Gibbs 4 p.m., Shuey’s (Shueyville) Mike and Rob Show 9 p.m., Parlor City Pub Slap N Tickle 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Terry McCauley 7 p.m., Java Creek Iowa City Kelly Pardekooper 8 p.m., Englert Neil Hewitt 9 p.m., Wildwood Randy Weeks 8 p.m., The Mill

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december friday

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Waterloo Blue Suede Cruze 8 p.m., The Isle Talon 9 p.m., Jameson’s Cedar Falls Chamber Orchestra Recital 6 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn Dakota 9 p.m., Blue Room Lick It Ticket 9 p.m., The Hub Mick Staebell 9:30 p.m., Voodoo Lounge Northern Iowa Bach Cantata Series 12:15 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn UNI Varsity Men’s Glee Club Christmas Variety Show 7:30 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn Dubuque & Galena Blue Willow 7 p.m., Stone Cliff Chuck Bregman 6 p.m., Mystique Gareth Woods 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Just Cuz 7 p.m., Ground Round Misbehaven 9 p.m., Northside Mississippi Band 9:30 p.m., Mystique Ten Gallon Hat 7 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. Cedar Rapids Billy Lee Janey 7 p.m., Java Creek Kentucky Skunk Rupture 8 p.m., Parlor City Pub O’Connell Brothers Band 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Reddoor 9 p.m., Red Baron Iowa City Kris Lager Band with The Mutts 9 p.m., Iowa City Yacht Club


saturday

3

Waterloo Blue Suede Cruze 8 p.m., The Isle The Fabulous Trademarx 9 p.m., Jameson’s Cedar Falls Dakota 9 p.m., Blue Room Free Fallin’ 9 p.m., The Hub UNI Varsity Men’s Glee Club Christmas Variety Show 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn Dubuque & Galena The Brews Brothers Band 8 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. Bryan Popp and Corey Jenny 8 p.m., Spirits Chuck Bregman 6 p.m., Mystique Dubuque Symphony Orchestra 7:30 p.m., Five Flags Theater Gareth Woods 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Half-Fast 9 p.m., Denny’s Lux Club Mississippi Band 9:30 p.m., Mystique Okham’s Razor 2 p.m., Grape Escape Positively 4th Street 9 p.m., Grape Escape Sid V and the Human Resources 8 p.m., Dubuque Driving Range Zero 2 Sixty 9:30 p.m., Dirty Ernie’s (Farley) Cedar Rapids Mass, Faurot and Crist 7 p.m., Java Creek Pork Tornadoes 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Skeeter Lewis and the Allstars 9 p.m., Parlor City Pub Iowa City Dennis McMurrin and the Demolition Band with Funkma$ter 8:30 p.m., Iowa City Yacht Club Jake McVey 9 p.m., Wildwood Lydia Loveless with Grand Tetons and Milk and Eggs 9 p.m., The Mill

friday

9

Waterloo Checker and the Bluetones 9 p.m., Jameson’s Not So Silent Night featuring All That Remains, Sevendust, Hatebreed, Five Finger Death Punch, and Rains 7 p.m., McElroy Auditorium Cedar Falls Bob Dorr and the Blue Band 6 p.m., The Hub WildCard 9:30 p.m., The Hub Dubuque & Galena Chuck Bregman 6 p.m., Mystique Corey Jenny and Mojo Busted 9:30 p.m., Mystique Crude But Effective 7 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. Ian Gould 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Lonely Goats 9 p.m., Jumpers PashNBrew 9 p.m., Northside Cedar Rapids Beaker Brothers 9 p.m., Parlor City Pub Black the Sun 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Jeffrey Foucault 8 p.m., CSPS Pattymac 7 p.m., Java Creek Iowa City American Beauty Project 7:30 p.m., Riverside Casino (Riverside) Jazz After Five featuring Eric Thompson and the Talented Tenth 5:30 p.m., The Mill Mike Dillon’s GoGo Jungle with 5 in a Hand 9 p.m., Iowa City Yacht Club

saturday

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Waterloo Soul Fusion 9 p.m., Jameson’s Cedar Falls Pork Tornadoes 9:30 p.m., The Hub UV Blues 9 p.m., Mr. G’s WCFSO presents A Baroque Holiday 7:30 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn Dubuque & Galena Andrew Houy 7 p.m., Galena Brewing Co. The Boy’s Night Out 9 p.m., Spirits Chuck Bregman 6 p.m., Mystique Corey Jenny and Mojo Busted 9:30 p.m., Mystique Enemies of Confusion 9 p.m., Embe’s Half-Fast 9 p.m., Jumpers Ian Gould 7:30 p.m., Frank O’Dowd’s Jabberbox 9 p.m., Denny’s Lux Club Johnny Trash 9 p.m., Hammerhead’s Lonely Goats 8 p.m., Dubuque Driving Range Renegade Band 9:30 p.m., Eichman’s Granada Taste Like Chicken 9 p.m., The Hub on Main The Wundo Band 4 p.m., Honest John’s Cedar Rapids Anji Kat 7 p.m., Java Creek Funk Daddies 9 p.m., Chrome Horse Silver Wings 8 p.m., Parlor City Pub Iowa City Lonesome Road 9 p.m., Wildwood This Must Be the Band with BJ Jaggers 9 p.m., Iowa City Yacht Club

11.25

KARAOKE | 9 PM NO COVER

11.26

ERNEST T | 8 PM NO COVER

12.2

PARTY! PARTY! THE ULTIMATE KARAOKE BAND | 8 PM NO COVER

12.3

UNITY CD RELEASE SHOW DEATH AND ROMANCE, CUR, BLIZZARD AT SEA | 9 PM $5

FRI. 12.9 THE RAMBLERS | 8 PM NO COVER SAT. 12.10 FOOD BAND SHOW AUSTIN TAFT SOUNDTRACK, STILL TICKIN WELL, AREN’T YOU PRECIOUS ITEM 9 AND THE MAD HATTERS | 9 PM 3555 University Ave Waterloo | 287-5747 www.thereverb.net READ.WATCH.SURF

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AMY WINEHOUSE 14

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AP PHOTO

Outtakes album coming December 5

A

my Winehouse’s record company will release a collection of previously unreleased tracks, including several new songs and alternate takes of earlier releases the singer made before her death from an alcohol overdose in July. “Lioness: Hidden Treasures” consists of a dozen tracks spanning some of the five-time Grammy-winning singer’s earliest recording sessions in 2002 through her final studio session earlier this year with Tony Bennett, when the singers dueted on the pop classic “Body and Soul.” Among the other songs scheduled for release Dec. 5 are the bossa nova classic “The Girl From Ipanema,” which she recorded in Miami when she was 18 and started working with producer Salaam Remi; a demo

The Associated Press

version of the “Back to Black” song “Wake Up Alone”; a slower alternative take on “Valerie”; and her rendition of Leon Russell’s “A Song for You.” It will also feature “Between the Cheats,” a new song she recorded in 2008 with Remi for possible inclusion on what would have been her third album. During the same sessions she recorded a duet with rapper Nas, “Like Smoke,” that will be on the new collection. The tracks on “Hidden Treasures” are produced by Remi and the producer of her “Back to Black” breakthrough album and hit single “Rehab,” Mark Ronson. She died on July 23 at age 27 in what a British coroner ruled as “death by misadventure” from an accidental alcohol overdose.


z

A Brucemore Christmas 1234 Children are invited to Brucemore for a festive and memorable evening of holiday tradition with Santa, Snacks and Stories. The mansion’s holiday decor and the estate’s seasonal spirit add to the evening’s activities. In the visitor center, children will be delighted by two new activities: sing-a-long caroling with Brucemore’s most famous resident, Leo

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the Lion, and a cookie decorating station. In the mansion, children will make reindeer hats, listen to a holiday story and give Santa their wish lists. In between activities, children and parents are invited to roam the mansion and ask questions to the available stationary guides. Holiday mansion tours will also be offered daily through the Christmas season.

Sunday, Dec. 4, and Tuesday, Dec. 6 Brucemore, Cedar Rapids $7 | 319.362.7375 | brucemore.org

*

SHUTTERSTOCK PHOTO

Keep on rollin’ In 1984, Mannheim Steamroller released “Mannheim Steamroller Christmas,” an album that changed the entire music industry. Already a multi-platinum recording artist, founder Chip Davis decided to record an album of Christmas music combining the group’s signature mix of Renaissance instruments with

rock ’n’ roll beats. The resulting album was a runaway hit. It propelled Mannheim Steamroller to become the biggest selling Christmas music artist in history and one of the top 50 biggest selling musical acts ever. The group’s annual Christmas tour has become a tradition along with decorat-

ing the tree, exchanging presents and spending time with friends and family. Wednesday, Dec. 21 @ 7:30 PM Adler Theatre, Davenport $39-$65 | Adler Theatre box office 800.745.3000 | Ticketmaster.com

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UNI Museums presents

Our World in Focus: Iowa’s Cultural Heritage Photo Contest & Exhibit December 19, 2011 - January 21, 2012

319.273.2188 | www.uni.edu/museum

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA

MUSEUM

TWENTY-FOUR

SEVEN

365 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT • MOVIES • LIVE MUSIC

Goldmoor Christmas Carol Dinner November 25 December 2, 9, 16, 27 and 29

Experience a magical evening celebrating the spirit of the Christmas season complete with the choir of “Goldmoor Carolers” providing festive song and merriment. Enjoy a traditional 5 course English Meal with your choice of Roasted Prime Rib or Stuffed Cornish Game hen.

December 31

Celebrate New Years Eve in style with a dining experience you’ll remember for years.

The Goldmoor Inn 9001 Sand Hill Road, Galena, IL 61036 800-255-3925 | www.goldmoor.com

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The Englert Theatre will once again host a unique version of “The Nutcracker,” featuring dancers from Nolte Academy of Dance and other local studios. The performances will feature a professional 30-piece orchestra of local musicians, conducted by Carey Bostian. “The Nutcracker” is a two-act ballet, originally choreographed by Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov with a score by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. The libretto is adapted from the story “The Nutcracker and the Mouse King” by E.T.A. Hoffmann. Friday, Dec. 2, through Sunday, Dec. 4 The Englert Theatre, Iowa City $22 | 319.688.2653 | englert.org


dec

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dec

16

HAIRBALL A TRIBUTE TO 80’S ROCK LEGENDS

STEVE-O COMEDIAN

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! A I R S U P P LY F E B 3 C O L L I N R AY E F E B 9 BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY APR 6

563.690.4800 | WWW.DIAMONDJO.COM Tickets available at www.diamondjo.com & at the Diamond Club. Acts subject to change without notice. Must be 21 or older. If you or someone you know needs gambling treatment, call 1-800-BETS OFF.

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Upcoming shows at

25 NOV

The HuB

9:00PM THE AUSTIN TAFT SOUNDTRACK W/ GUESTS SUPERHOLIC

26 NOV 28 NOV 29 NOV 30 NOV 1 DEC 2 DEC

9:00PM: GOOD COP / RAD COP

3 DEC

9:00PM: TOM PETTY TRIBUTE BY: FREE FALLIN’

8 DEC

9:00PM: VOTERPALOOZA: FREE SHOW WITH MUSIC BY: PORK TORNADOES AND GOOD COP / RAD COP

16 DEC

9:00PM: JOURNEY/REO/STYX TRIBUTE BY ARCH ALLIES

9:00PM: GRATEFUL DEAD NIGHT 9:00PM: FREE KEG & KARAOKE (NO COVER) 9:00PM: HOBO AKA MATT HOEBELHEINRICH 9:00PM: UNI JAZZ BANDS I, II, III 9:00PM: LICK IT TICKET (NEW ALBUM AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE)

8PM-10PM ND

S GR SO OUNDS &

UN

DS

& SOUNDS

R &G

LIVE JAZZ BY HANDS OF TIME EVERY THURSDAY EVENING ALL MUSIC & OPEN MIC 8-10 p.m.

DS

NDS

KARLA RUTH RICK VANDERWAL OPEN MIC DAVE MALAM

OU

UN

OU

12.03 12.10 12.16 12.17

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DEC

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Christmas With I

n the opening moments of this season’s Christmas With Wartburg concerts, one candle will light the darkness, voices will cry out prayers in many languages and a soloist will be joined by different voices. This telling of the Christmas story is wrapped around the theme “Savior of the Nations, Come,” based on the hymn translated by Martin Luther. “It tells the life of Christ in six verses from birth to resurrection, simply and beautifully,” said Lee Nelson, director of choral activities at Wartburg College. “I love the idea of all the nations coming together and calling for understanding and peace and the hope of having the Savior rescue us. We will be singing carols in many languages — English, French, German, Norwegian, Latin, Spanish — and new songs from Africa, Haiti and South America,” Lee explained. Performing groups include the Wartburg Wind Ensemble, directed by Craig Hancock; the Castle Singers vocal jazz ensemble and the St. Elizabeth Chorale women’s choir, both directed by Jane Andrews; and the Wartburg Choir and Ritterchor men’s choir, directed by Nelson. World-renowned bass-baritone Simon Estes, distinguished professor of music and artist-in-residence, will sing a solo and a piece with the combined choirs. “We’re so excited to have Simon with us. He’ll sing ‘Beautiful Savior’ with the mass choir, and we’ll sing a set of carols from around the world and end with Simon singing ‘He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands,’” said Nelson. Donald Meyer and Kathryn Koob will provide the narration, joined by students who will be speaking in different languages. Craig Curry, an award-winning composer of Christmas jazz music, has written a “Gloria” movement set as a samba, and Stanford Scriven, a recent St. Olaf College graduate, has also contributed a new commission for the program. Joshua Evanovich, a 2007 Wartburg alumnus, has written a piece

that incorporates text from “Emmanuel, Savior of the Nations,” as well as such carols as “O Come All Ye Faithful” and “We Three Kings.” “The piece basically summarizes all of the music that we started with and brings it back full circle at the end of the show,” Nelson said. He’s also excited about a new mural for the concert created by Chris Knudson, a 2001 graduate and former Wartburg Choir member, who is now director of creative strategy in the college’s marketing and communication department. The center panel is 47 feet wide and 18 feet tall, with two side panels that each measure 8 feet wide and 18 feet tall. Knudson said the design process took about four months. “I talked to our religion faculty about what depictions are used to depict Christ and Christianity in different cultures, and those are interwoven in the mural. The printing process took a bit longer. We printed the panels in-house on canvas paper and took it to Waterloo Tent and Tarp to stitch together.” Lee described the mural as “beautiful and colorful, and symbols and images are almost hidden in it, to be revealed with changes in lighting.” He praised Knudson and technical/lighting designer Hans Pregler and his crew. “They’ve worked for literally hundreds of hours to create special lighting effects that I think audiences will really enjoy.” This is the 64th annual Christmas With Wartburg, Nelson noted. “Christmas is about tradition and the feelings of coming home. For many people, it’s the start of the Christmas season and puts them in the right frame of mind and reminds them of the reason for our celebrations. “Hopefully we’re building upon that wonderful tradition by honoring the past and moving it forward and keeping it fresh and exciting for the community. The telling of the Christmas story is timeless, and Christmas With Wartburg sheds new light, a new perspective on it. Students take great ownership of that and take their roles very seriously.” melody parker | Pulse writer

Christmas with Wartburg concerts 7:30 p.m. Dec. 2, Lutheran Church of Hope in West Des Moines 3 and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 3 and 3 p.m. Dec. 4 at Neumann Auditorium at Wartburg College General seating for the Dec. 2 concert in West Des Moines can be purchased in advance at the church bookstore, 925 Jordan Creek Parkway, or online at www.wartburg.edu/christmas.

CUP OF JOE

Reserved-seat tickets of $15 and $5 for rear balcony seats for the campus performances can be purchased at the information center desk in Saemann Student Center from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, by calling 319 352-8691, or online at www.wartburg.edu/christmas. Seating is limited; concerts sell out quickly.

1 0 2 M A I N S T . C E D A R F A L L S | 3 19 . 2 7 7.15 9 6

A meal will be available both nights at 5 p.m., Dec. 2 and 3 for $22. Reservations are required. 18

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Upcoming shows at

25 NOV

The HuB

9:00PM THE AUSTIN TAFT SOUNDTRACK W/ GUESTS SUPERHOLIC

26 NOV 28 NOV 29 NOV 30 NOV 1 DEC 2 DEC

9:00PM: GOOD COP / RAD COP

3 DEC

9:00PM: TOM PETTY TRIBUTE BY: FREE FALLIN’

8 DEC

9:00PM: VOTERPALOOZA: FREE SHOW WITH MUSIC BY: PORK TORNADOES AND GOOD COP / RAD COP

16 DEC

9:00PM: JOURNEY/REO/STYX TRIBUTE BY ARCH ALLIES

9:00PM: GRATEFUL DEAD NIGHT 9:00PM: FREE KEG & KARAOKE (NO COVER) 9:00PM: HOBO AKA MATT HOEBELHEINRICH 9:00PM: UNI JAZZ BANDS I, II, III 9:00PM: LICK IT TICKET (NEW ALBUM AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE)

8PM-10PM ND

S GR SO OUNDS &

UN

DS

& SOUNDS

R &G

LIVE JAZZ BY HANDS OF TIME EVERY THURSDAY EVENING ALL MUSIC & OPEN MIC 8-10 P.M.

DS

NDS

KARLA RUTH RICK VANDERWAL OPEN MIC

OU

UN

OU

12.03 12.10 12.16

&S UN OUNDS & GRO

GR

DS

&

&

SO U

DEC

ND

GR

S&

O

Christmas With I

n the opening moments of this season’s Christmas With Wartburg concerts, one candle will light the darkness, voices will cry out prayers in many languages and a soloist will be joined by different voices. This telling of the Christmas story is wrapped around the theme “Savior of the Nations, Come,” based on the hymn translated by Martin Luther. “It tells the life of Christ in six verses from birth to resurrection, simply and beautifully,” said Lee Nelson, director of choral activities at Wartburg College. “I love the idea of all the nations coming together and calling for understanding and peace and the hope of having the Savior rescue us. We will be singing carols in many languages — English, French, German, Norwegian, Latin, Spanish — and new songs from Africa, Haiti and South America,” Lee explained. Performing groups include the Wartburg Wind Ensemble, directed by Craig Hancock; the Castle Singers vocal jazz ensemble and the St. Elizabeth Chorale women’s choir, both directed by Jane Andrews; and the Wartburg Choir and Ritterchor men’s choir, directed by Nelson. World-renowned bass-baritone Simon Estes, distinguished professor of music and artist-in-residence, will sing a solo and a piece with the combined choirs. “We’re so excited to have Simon with us. He’ll sing ‘Beautiful Savior’ with the mass choir, and we’ll sing a set of carols from around the world and end with Simon singing ‘He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands,’” said Nelson. Donald Meyer and Kathryn Koob will provide the narration, joined by students who will be speaking in different languages. Craig Curry, an award-winning composer of Christmas jazz music, has written a “Gloria” movement set as a samba, and Stanford Scriven, a recent St. Olaf College graduate, has also contributed a new commission for the program. Joshua Evanovich, a 2007 Wartburg alumnus, has written a piece

that incorporates text from “Emmanuel, Savior of the Nations,” as well as such carols as “O Come All Ye Faithful” and “We Three Kings.” “The piece basically summarizes all of the music that we started with and brings it back full circle at the end of the show,” Nelson said. He’s also excited about a new mural for the concert created by Chris Knudson, a 2001 graduate and former Wartburg Choir member, who is now director of creative strategy in the college’s marketing and communication department. The center panel is 47 feet wide and 18 feet tall, with two side panels that each measure 8 feet wide and 18 feet tall. Knudson said the design process took about four months. “I talked to our religion faculty about what depictions are used to depict Christ and Christianity in different cultures, and those are interwoven in the mural. The printing process took a bit longer. We printed the panels in-house on canvas paper and took it to Waterloo Tent and Tarp to stitch together.” Lee described the mural as “beautiful and colorful, and symbols and images are almost hidden in it, to be revealed with changes in lighting.” He praised Knudson and technical/lighting designer Hans Pregler and his crew. “They’ve worked for literally hundreds of hours to create special lighting effects that I think audiences will really enjoy.” This is the 64th annual Christmas With Wartburg, Nelson noted. “Christmas is about tradition and the feelings of coming home. For many people, it’s the start of the Christmas season and puts them in the right frame of mind and reminds them of the reason for our celebrations. “Hopefully we’re building upon that wonderful tradition by honoring the past and moving it forward and keeping it fresh and exciting for the community. The telling of the Christmas story is timeless, and Christmas With Wartburg sheds new light, a new perspective on it. Students take great ownership of that and take their roles very seriously.” melody parker | Pulse writer

Christmas with Wartburg concerts 7:30 p.m. Dec. 2, Lutheran Church of Hope in West Des Moines 3 and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 3 and 3 p.m. Dec. 4 at Neumann Auditorium at Wartburg College General seating for the Dec. 2 concert in West Des Moines can be purchased in advance at the church bookstore, 925 Jordan Creek Parkway, or online at www.wartburg.edu/christmas.

CUP OF JOE

Reserved-seat tickets of $15 and $5 for rear balcony seats for the campus performances can be purchased at the information center desk in Saemann Student Center from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, by calling 319 352-8691, or online at www.wartburg.edu/christmas. Seating is limited; concerts sell out quickly.

1 0 2 M A I N S T . C E D A R F A L L S | 3 19 . 2 7 7.15 9 6

A meal will be available both nights at 5 p.m., Dec. 2 and 3 for $22. Reservations are required. 18

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Wartburg

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9.99 ust, Hat t McElro Sevend at 6:00pm. A ion tickets $1 s n is pe m Gates O . General adm ketmaster.co y. ic m T iu , r r s F o t – ida Audit onday er outle t M et Mas –4pm at Tick Office 10am NCC or the

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Get Your

Christmas ON A Christmas Celebration Jim Brickman’s “A Christmas Celebration” hits the road for the holiday season once again with an evening of dazzling solo piano, vibrant vocals and the warmth and humor that has made this concert a seasonal tradition for the past 15 years. The platinum-selling pianist and songwriter, in addition to featuring favorite holiday music, will introduce fans to his upcoming album releases, “All Is Calm” and “Romanza.” Audiences will experience the romance and spirit of the holidays in an unforgettable evening of music, laughter and memories. Jim and his special guests, singers Anne Cochran and Benjamin Utecht, plus electric violinist Tracy Silverman, will blend fan favorites and seasonal classics with new Brickman compositions.

Monday, Nov. 28 @ 7:30 PM Adler Theatre, Davenport $27-$67 Adler Theatre box office Ticketmaster.com 800.745.3000

Lessons & Carols The Mount Mercy University Choir, Jazz Connection and handbell ensembles will present a special ceremony of traditional readings and carols of the season. The University Choir will perform two works alongside the handbells, “People, Look East” by William Schoenfeld and “From Heaven Above to Earth I Come” by Howard Helvey. Other favorites, such as “He Is Born,” “Bring a Torch, Jeanette Isabella,” “Noel Nouvelet” and “Angels We Have Heard on High,” will be performed.

Thursday, Dec. 8 @ 7:30 PM Stello Performance Hall, Mount Mercy FREE

Mount Mercy’s newly formed University Band will also take part in the evening’s performances.

A little Dickens The year following publication of “A Christmas Carol,” Charles Dickens’ famous tale of Ebenezer Scrooge, he put his pen to writing “The Chimes: A Goblin Story of Some Bells That Rang an Old Year Out and a New Year In.” Sometimes referred to as the forgotten Dickens Christmas story, the tale received popular acclaim when released in 1845 but has since fallen into relative obscurity, eclipsed by constant renditions and spoofs of the Scrooge story.

Thursday, Dec. 1, to Sunday, Dec. 18 Lampost Theatre, Cedar Falls $16 | 319.277.8034 Performances include dessert and coffee lampost.com

The Lampost Theatre will debut a new musical based on “The Chimes,” which follows Trotty Veck, a poor street messenger with a kind heart. Running his errands through London, Trotty has encounters with the rich and poor, the famous and forgotten. Constantly hounded by newspaper headlines and everyone else’s opinions, Trotty’s big challenge is to hold onto hope in the midst of troubled times.

Smooth as eggnog Building on the success of previous holiday concerts, Max Wellman is excited to return to Des Moines for “Home for the Holidays.” The concert will feature holiday favorites as well as the return of his cast of fantastic musicians. Nick Rieser will be on piano, Brooke Peters will be returning from her tour of the Caribbean to play bass, Joel Gettys will be the drummer and Dave Rezek will be playing trumpet as well as co-arranging the show. Wellman burst onto the local jazz scene with the 2006 release of “Gimme the Keys,” an EP with five covers including “You Don’t Know Me.” With a voice that evokes jazz legends, Wellman has become a mainstay on the local jazz scene as frontman for assorted combos. In 2009, Wellman released his second CD, “Comes Love,” a full-length production that included four of his own original tunes, and followed that up in fall 2010 with a live recording of his big band show at Hoyt Sherman Place. 20

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Thursday, Dec. 15, to Sunday, Dec. 18 Civic Center, Des Moines $20 and up CivicCenter.org


• BOUL ULEVARD U EVA ARD D WHE WH HEAT • B BLUE LUE U MO UE MOON ON N • GOOS GOOSSE ISLA ISLAAN ND D 312 GO GOOSE SE ISLAND LAND HONKER’S H • GOOSE ISL S AN A D IP AND IPAA • G GO OO O E ISSLLAN OSE LAAAN ND MATI TILD LD LDA DAA • *GO GOOSE OSSE O SE IS ISLAN SLLAN LAAN AND SOFI O E • SAM AADAMS BOSTON • MILLLST MIL LSSSTREA REAM M IPAA • MILL MILL ILLSTR LLSTR STREAM EA EEAM AM M BA BACK BACK CK RO ROA R OAAD STOU O TO OU O UT • 15 155544 EN 1554 EENL NLIGH NLIGH IGHTEN TE ED BLA TEN BLACK ALE • FAT TIRE AMBE TIR MBER MB R • RAN RANGE NGER GEER IPA IPA A • SU UMM MM MM MIT IITT EPA EEPPA PA • SAM S AD ADAAMS AM M W WIIN NTTE NTE TER LAAG AGE G R • NEEW BELGIUM SNOW DA • GOO DAY OO OSE SE ISLLAND AND D MI M LD LD W WIIIN WIN NTER TTEER ER • SSC SCH CH C HLLAF LA AAFFLLYY CHR CH HRIST ISSSTTTMAS MAAAS MAS M S AL ALE • SSIIERR E A NEVAADA D PALE ALE • SIERRA IERRA IER R NEV EVVAD AD DAA CE CELEBRAT EB BR RA RAT AT ATIO IION ON • BUD ON B LI LIG GHT GH HTT • B H BU BUD UD D SELLEC LEECT • MILLER LIGHT • COOR COOR OR RS LIGH GHT • BO BOU ULLEVA U VVAR AAR RD W WHEA EEAAT • B BLLU UEE MOO MO M OO O ON • G GO OOSE OSSE O SE IS ISLAAN AND 3122 GOOSE ISLAND HON HO HON ONKER R’S • GOOS SE ISLA SSLLA LAND A D IIPA PAA • G GOO GO OOSSEE IIS OO ISL SSLLA LAN AND AND ND MA MATTIL MATIL ILLD DAA • *G GO OOSE IS ISL S AN AND ND SO OFIEE • SAM S AADAMS AM BOS BOS BO STON ON • MIL O M LLST STTR TREA R M IPA REAM A • MIL MILLLSTR LLLLSST STR TTR REAM EAM EA AM BA BAC CKK RO ROA ROA OAD STTO TOU O T • 1554 1554 15 54 EN NLLIGH HTEN TE ED DB BLA LAACKK ALE L • FA FAT AT TTIR RE AM MBE BER • RAANGE N ER IPA PA • SU UMM UM MMIT MM IT EPA EEPPA PA • SSA SAM AM AD AM ADAM AMS MSS WI M WIN NTE NT T R LAGE GEER • NEEW BELG BELG ELGIUM I IU IUM SSNO NOW DAY DAY AY • GOOS OO E ISLA ISSLA LAAND MIL MIILD M IILLD WIN WIN IINT NTTEER N R • SC CHL CH HLLAF H AAFL FLY CHR FL HRI R SSTM TM MAS AS AAL ALE L • SIERRA SIIEERR SIE SI RRA NEEVADA RRA VAD DA PPALE AL AL ALE ALEE • SIER IERRA IE RA A NEV 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(DOMESTIC) / MUG REFILLS B *HIGH ABV=$5 REFILLS $2 BEEF TACOS • $2.50 CHICKEN OR FISH TACOS SNO SN NOW DAY DAYY GOO OOS OSE ISLA ISLA LAN LAND ND MIL MI D W MILD WINT INTEER SC INTER INT CHL HLAFL HL AFLLY CH HR HRI RIST STM TMAS AS ALE SIER RRA RA NEVVAD VA ADA PALE L ALLE • SIE IER IERRA RRA NEVVADA A CE CELEB LE RATION LEB RATTION IO O • BU BUD B UD LLIIG UD GHT GH H HTT • BUD BUD BU U SE SELEC LECT LEC ECT • MI MILLE LLLE LEER R LIIG IGH GHT • CO OOR OR RS LIGH IGHTT • BO BOULE ULL VAR ULE VARD VA D W WHEA HEA H EAAT • BL EAT BLUE UE MO MO MOO OO ON • GO GOOSSSEE IS SLLAN AN ND 3312 1122 GOO GOO GOOSE OSE ISL IS AAND D HON ON O NKER KER’S ’S • G GOO OO OSE ISLA ISLA S ND SL ND IPA PA • G GO GOO OOS OO OSE SE IIS ISL SSLLAN AND MATIL AND TTIIL ILD DAA • *G GOO OO OSE OS SE IS ISSLLAND SSOFIE ISL ISLAND I • SAM AD ADAMS AAMS MS M S BOS BO O TON TO ON • MIL MILLLST LSTRE REA EEAAM IIPA PA • MILL PA ILLL LLS LSSTR STTTR REAM EEAAM M BAAC CKK RO ROA R O D STOU TO OUT • 15 OU 1554 54 EEN 54 ENL NLIIG NL IGH GH G HTTEN TEEEN NED ED BLA ED BLLAC B CKK AL AALE L • FAT AT TIR T E AMBE MBER • RANGE NG NGE GEER IPPA G A • SU UMM MMITT EPA PA • SAM PA SSAAAM M AD ADAMS AM AM MSS W WIINT NTE N T R LAG GER • NEW GE NEW BELG NE EELLLG ELGI GIUM IU UM M SNO SN NO OW DAY • GOO O SE ISLAAND ND M MIL ILLD WINT WN NTTER • SCHL HLAFL HL LAFL AFL AF FLY CH HRI HR R SSTM STTM MAASS ALE LEE • SIERR RA R A NE NEVAD VADAA PALE PALE AL ALEE • SIER IERRA ERRA R NEVVAD ADA ADA DA C CE CELEB ELEB LEB BRAT RA R AATTIO ION ON O N • BUD D LI LIGH GHT GHT HT • B BUD BU UD UD SE SELLE LEC ECT • MI MILLE LLER LLE R LIGH LIGHT GHT • COO OOR RS LIGH LIG IGH GHTT • BO GH OU ULE LEVAR LE EVAR VAR VA AARD RD WHEA WHEA HEA HE EAT • B BLLUE UE MOON MO MOO M OON • GO OO GOO OSSE OSE SE ISSLLA LAN AAN ND 31122 GO GOO G OO O OSE SE IISL SLAND AND D HO HONKE NKE N KER’S ’S • GOOSSE ISLA ISLA SLAND SL ND IIPA ND PAA • GOO GOOSSEE ISL SSLAN ND MA ND MATTIL ILLDA LD DA A • *G GO GOO OO O OSSEE IS ISL SSLLAND AN AN ND D SO SOFFIE FIIEE • SAM AM M AAD DAM DAMS AAMS MSS BO M BOSSTO TON • MIL M IL ILLST LSSTREA REAM EAM IPA IPA PA • MILL LLSTR LL SSTTTR REAM EAM M BA AC CKK RO ROA R OAD STOU OA STOU TO TO OU UT • 15 155 55544 EENL EN NLIG NL IGH GH G HTTEN TEEN ENED ED BLA BLA LAC CKK AL ALE ALE LE • FA FAT FAT AT TI TIRE RE RE AM AAMB M EER R • RAANG AN NG N GER R IPA IPPA PA • SU SU SUM UMM UM MM MIT I EP IT EPA • SA EPA SAM AAD ADAM DAMSS W DA DAM WINT INT NTER NT E LAG LAGER LA GER R • NEW EW BEL BEEELLGI B GIIU GIU UM• M• CO CO COO OO OR RS S LIG LIG GHT HT

MUG NIGHT SPECIALS

205 East 18th St. • Cedar Falls • 319-277-3671 • 11am–2am • 7 days a week www.mulligansbrickoven.com

Jingle all the way at CVPulse.com. WO-102811067

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film

2011

now playing

get your flick on

Amy Adams, Jason Segel, Chris Cooper With the help of three fans, the Muppets must reunite to save their old theater from a greedy oil tycoon.

MUPPETS FUN FACTS BY THE NUMBERS

FILMMAKER FRENZY

MANY MUPPETS — More than 120 Muppets appear in the film. STEPPIN’ OUT — The film tapped 60 dancers to perform with Jason Segel and Amy Adams for the “Everything’s Great” opening musical performance. Hollywood Boulevard was shut down for two evenings to record the finale dance scene of the reprise of “Everything’s Great,” featuring 100 dancers. PRETTY PIG — A total of 12 different costumes were made for Miss Piggy — more costume changes than any other actor in the film. SO BIG — The largest Muppet, Thog, stands over 9.5 feet tall and is 4 feet wide.

AT THE HELM — Director James Bobin makes his film directorial debut. Bobin co-created HBO’s “Flight of the Conchords,” which he wrote, directed and executive produced. CUE THE MUSIC — Bret McKenzie of “Flight of the Conchords” wrote and produced three original songs and served as music supervisor for the film. 1979’s “The Muppet Movie” was nominated for two Oscars: Best Music, Original Song (“Rainbow Connection”) and Best Music, Original Sound Score. ALL IN THE FAMILY — Choreographer Michael Rooney is the son of Mickey Rooney, who appears in the film in a cameo role. This is the first time the two have ever worked together on a film. MINI ME — Muppet versions of Jason Segel and director James Bobin were created.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE ACCESSORIES HIGH FASHION — Miss Piggy had shoes made for her by Christian Louboutin and a dress by Zac Posen, which she wears in the finale scene. FANCY DUDS — Kermit had a suit made for him by Brooks Brothers for the scene where he walks through the streets of Paris with Miss Piggy. TIME WILL TELL — Walter wears a Kermit watch in the film. TICKLING THE IVORIES — Rowlf’s original piano is back — incorporated into the Muppet Show orchestra. STRUMMING THE SAME STRINGS — Kermit uses the banjo from 1979’s “The Muppet Movie” during the “Rainbow Connection” performance. The staging of the scene features Kermit on a replica of the log where he was first found strumming his banjo in the very first Muppet movie. Miss Piggy shows up in a rowboat very much like the one the late Dom DeLuise used when he joined Kermit in their sweet duet.

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now playing james McAvoy, Jim Broadbent, Bill Nighy On Christmas at the North Pole, Santa’s youngest son looks to use his father’s high-tech operation for an urgent mission.

Asa Butterfield, Chloë Grace Moretz, Christopher Lee

now playing

In this Martin Scorsese-directed film set in 1930s Paris, an orphan who lives in the walls of a train station is wrapped up in a mystery involving his late father and an automaton. PULSE

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The Adventures of tintin: The Game The rest of the world adores Tintin, the intrepid reporter of comic book fame. Now it’s America’s chance to catch Tintin fever with a new movie, directed by Steven Spielberg, and this game based on it. Play as the young hero, Snowy the dog or Captain Haddock to track down information about a sunken pirate vessel that holds untold riches.

FOR: DS, PC, PS3, X360, Wii

Dec. 6

The latest installment in the racing franchise is back on a handheld device and features a host of new characters and tricks. Get some serious air on jumps with a glider wing or keep moving underwater with a rear propeller. Maybe Lakitu will stop stealing your coins now when you fall in the drink — especially because he’ll be too busy racing, along with other new characters like Metal Mario, Wiggler, Shy Guy and Honey Queen.

DeC. 4

For: 3DS

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Mario proves 3-D is more than a gimmick in latest adventure Alan Simmer | Pulse Writer

L

et’s be real: The best Mario suit is the Hammer Bros. outfit. I mean, it can kill Boos and Thwomps. But the Tanooki suit ranks up there pretty high, what with the weird statue business and all, so it’s fine that it’s the star of “Super Mario 3D Land.” There is a new Boomerang suit — not quite as awesome as the Hammer Bros. one, but still pretty cool. Those and the other power-ups come in handy as Mario tries, once again, to save the Princess from Bowser. (You’d think she’d invest in some bodyguards or a security system or something.) The game is a hybrid of “Super Mario 64” and “Super Mario Bros. 3” — linear levels in three dimensions. The levels have the simplest progression since, well … actually, this might be the simplest ever. Even in “Super Mario Bros.” it was possible to skip levels and worlds. The typical world in “3D Land” consists of five levels, a mushroom house or Mystery Block (more like Snooze Blocks) and a boss level, either an airship with a Boom Boom/Pom Pom fight or a Bowser castle. Some levels must be unlocked with a certain number of Star Coins, three of which are hidden in each stage. These locked levels can be bypassed, as can the mushroom houses and Mystery Blocks, but other than that it’s straight from one level to the next. No secret endings, no alternate routes.

I was worried as I blew through “3D Land” that it was too short — saving the Princess took me about five hours, after which my eyeballs melted from too much 3-D. Thankfully, there’s a second set of levels, and that’s where things really get fun. In the special worlds, Tanooki leaves are silver, which adds back the old statue trick, and say hello to poison mushrooms for the first time since “Lost Levels.” Also, Luigi (spoiler alert?) looks cute as a blonder Tanooki. The level design is tougher too, sometimes taking regular stages and revamping them, other times pulling entirely new tricks out of the hat.

Perhaps most importantly, this is the first game I’ve played on the 3DS where the added dimension isn’t just for kicks. After the title screen, there’s a screen that, in 2-D, looks sort of like an Escher drawing — an endless path. Flip the 3-D on, and suddenly the difference in elevation is clear. With the 3-D off I found myself missing coins and jumps because I wasn’t exactly aware of how deep or shallow Mario was in the field of play. The 3-D provides that knowledge instantly. And this is why it’s too early to write off the 3DS, price cut and circle pad fiascoes notwithstanding. Finally, eight months after launch, there’s a killer app for Nintendo’s handheld. No other game has shown off what the 3-D can do like this, shown off how much it can matter. This is the showcase that should have been available back in March, but I’ll settle for having it now.

Just Dance 3

Fortune Street

Final Fantasy VI

The PS3 version of the smash dance series is finally hitting shelves, joining the Xbox 360 and Wii titles. Jam out to songs like “Forget You” and “California Gurls” while showing up your friends with your awesomest dance moves. PS3; Dec. 6.

It’s like Monopoly on speed combined with stock market speculation — oh, and did we mention the characters from the Mario and DragonQuest universes? Try to bankrupt your friends on more than 15 game boards with online co-op play. Wii; Dec. 5.

American gamers know this better as “Final Fantasy III” for the SNES, but that’s because Japan got three games in the series we didn’t. Now that we’re all grown up and can handle that fact, Square Enix is re-releasing this brilliant RPG with the proper title for the PlayStation Network. PSN; Dec. 6.

7 Wonders 3

National Geographic Challenge

Power Ranger Samurai

A rune-matching game, this Greekinspired, highly addictive casual title features a cubic game board. Break blocks and rotate the cube to form a path from lock to key and win new compass parts to continue on your journey. DS; Dec. 5.

Conquer more territory than your opponents by answering the most geography and history trivia questions correctly, or just kick back and play the minigames. Brings back memories of “Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?” PS3, X360, Wii; Nov. 29.

Use Samurai Symbols of Power to control the elements of fire, water, sky, forest and earth to beat up on Knighlok monsters. And then do a bunch of overexaggerated kicks at guys in silly-looking outfits. DS, Wii; Nov. 29.

Super Mario 3D Land For: 3DS | Price: $39.99 | Rated: Everyone

NINTENDO, UBISOFT, SHUTTERSTOCK PHOTOS

PULSE

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PICK

the

word the book of human insects | osamu tezuka Toshiko Tomura, a beautiful woman in her early 20s, has been the lead in a theater troupe and won a prestigious design honor. Now she’s set to accept an award for her writing, and everyone is left wondering how one woman can be so talented. She sheds herself and completes a metamorphosis into a new creature before the public’s very eyes. “The Book of Human Insects” is a graphic novel that tells Tomura’s tale, a collection of serialized works from the 1970s by Osamu Tezuka, the grandfather of Japanese manga and creator of characters like Astro Boy. Tomura isn’t a standard heroine. She’s ruthless, willing to do anything to get what she wants, yet childlike, returning to the home of her youth after each incarnation to revel in her mementos and creepily converse with a wax figure of her deceased mother. Tomura’s endless reinvigoration of herself, bouncing from one career to the next, echoes the modern quarter-life crisis. Most worker bees feel helpless at the banality of their day-to-day work, a great success ever eluding them. Tezuka’s work has meaning today that could barely have been predicted the 40-odd years ago he began to write it. A story like this is best read more than once — and given that it’s a graphic novel, the pages fly by quickly enough to make a return trip alluring. — Alan Simmer, Pulse Writer

shiny objects | james a. roberts The sixth pair of black shoes. The kitchen device that peels a grape. The diet-breaking bag of chips on sale at the grocery store. We’re all guilty of making purchases we don’t need. Now along comes James Roberts’ “Shiny Objects: Why We Spend Money We Don’t Have in Search of Happiness We Can’t Buy,” which promises to explore and explain Americans’ possession obsession. Roberts’ book contains hard evidence for some claims you probably already suspected were true. People who are more materialistic are less happy and more stressed. We are more likely to buy something when we make the purchase with a credit card. And lottery winners are no happier than the rest of us. Roberts knows his stuff. He references scholars, researchers and historians on nearly every page. But the problem for the casual reader is that his style is less that of an engaging storyteller and more that of a sonorous college professor. Roberts, a professor at Baylor University in Texas, probably cannot help himself. Roberts saves the best part of his book for the last chapters where he finally starts to talk about how to combat the daily bombardment of advertising and product placement. But most of his advice isn’t new: cut up credit cards, build a budget and avoid the mall, for example. He might as well just say, “Use common sense.” — Jessica Gresko, The Associated Press

the territory | tricia fields Readers get a taste of the fear experienced when Mexican drug cartels threaten a small Texas border town and its sheriff in Tricia Fields’ new mystery, “The Territory.” Artemis has a population of 2,500. Police chief Josie Gray finds both terror and treachery as she is drawn into a war between two rival drug cartels that are fighting to control the town. Gray shoots two members of one of the cartels when they storm the town clinic looking to kill the boss of the rival drug gang. One dies and the second is locked in the Artemis jail, presenting a constant danger of retaliation. The situation is complicated by the murder of local right-winger Red Goff, who didn’t trust the government or any of its agencies. Goff’s body is found on his neighbor’s couch with a bullet hole in his forehead. Add a corrupt deputy, a mayor who doesn’t believe women should be in positions of power and a collection of colorful and fearsome characters and Gray has her hands full. “The Territory” provides plenty of thrills for readers, as well as food for thought, as it examines the problems that Mexico’s drug cartels, their wealth and their ruthlessness present for small U.S. communities along the Texas border. — Mary Foster, The Associated Press

WO-112511028

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Difficult

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32. Caspian Sea feeder 33. Frost-covered 34. Car bomb? 35. Writer LeShan 36. Provoked 38. Inflexibility 39. Rah-rah 44. Pugs' venues 45. Word before shoe or soap 46. Like helium 47. An ex of Cugat 48. Navigation acronym 49. In__ (not yet born) 50. "Oh," phonetically 51. Punch in 52. Tout's hangout 53. Forearm bone 54. Little lice 58. Weasel word?

T O N

3. Entry in black 4. Radio type 5. Subjects of tracking polls 6. Musical set in Argentina 7. Nehi drinker on TV 8. Corrida shout 9. Von Richthofen and von Steuben 10. Without letup 11. Has __ (is connected) 12. Buster Brown's bulldog 13. Fed Exed, e.g. 22. Poison __ (irritating shrub) 24. Maneuver carefully 25. Codeine source 28. Xenia's locale 29. Pull a fast one on 30. Quite a bit 31. States further

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H O D

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R O N C

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NO PEEKING!

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Links Letters ACROSS 1. Healthful places 5. __Beach, Florida 9. Dinghies and dories 14. New Ager John 15. 440-yard-long path 16. Warbucks ward 17. Estimator's words 18. It may be stemmed or turned 19. Hold sway 20. Baltic Sea feeder 21. LAX guesstimate 22. 14-line poem 23. Do this and that 26. Third word in many limericks 27. UK leaders 28. Frequently, in rhyme 31. Halos, e.g. 34. "Star Wars" princess 36. "Scram!" 37. Popular high school course 40. Agatha Christie's title 41. Shi'ite leader 42. Early fiddles 43. Machiavellian 44. In the past 45. Word said with a salute 46. It has no exceptions 52. Singlet wearer 55. Bricklayer's burden 56. Thames town 57. Little green man 58. Chum, on the ranch 59. Sign of impact 60. IV part 61. Like some confessions 62. Do some arm-twisting 63. Hangs in there 64. Dixie bread 65. Like a church mouse DOWN 1. Posture problem 2. Concealed

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work your mind

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puzzles

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All puzzles ©Hometown Content

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Great Shows

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 7:30 p.m. Adult: $46, $39, $36, $33, $30 Youth: $46, $31.80, $29.40, $27, $24.60 Sponsored by Buzz Hope Martin Anderson,

Sunday, May 13, 2012 2 & 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $47, $37.80, $33.30, $22.50, $18

Isle Casino Hotel, Simpson Furniture, OnMedia

Couple dancing is by nature passionate and romantic, therefore not appropriate for all audiences. Sponsored by Isle Casino Hotel, KBBG, Bravo Printing, Clarion Inn, Elements Massage Therapy

28 • U.S.PULSE ©EPE, Reg. Pat. & Tm. Off. © Elvis Presley Enterprises, Inc., ULTIMATE ELVIS TRIBUTE ARTIST CONTEST is a trademarks of Elvis Presley Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserve

Pulse Magazine - 11-25-2011  

The Heartbeat of Entertainment

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