Page 1


PENNY

Welcome Aboard! USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) WELCOME BACK LINCOLN NATION!

On Oct. 19 at exactly 00:01, all commands in Virginia will switch to winter uniforms.

during swabbing, could also function as a flotation device in an emergency situation and were integrated into the uniform long before the style’s popularity rose in the disco world. I guess the style is Stayin’ Alive.

“Pull out your Dress Blues… They’re the black ones,” I recall an RDC saying. It was just foreshadowing for how Introduced in the Civil War confusing the Navy would as an official uniform item, the seem at times. neckerchief was not actually a strange tie substitute, but Some might say the dress was a handy towel of sorts. blue uniform is one of the It was used as a sweat rag most recognizable in the or to wipe something up. military. When people see Black was chosen because it the neckerchief and dixie cup showed less dirt. they instantly recognize it as a Sailor’s uniform. But why is The flapper on the jumper it so unique in appearance? originated as a protective cover for the jacket to Unbeknownst to me, protect it from the grease or everything on the dress blue powder normally worn by uniform during its heyday Sailors to hold hair in place. as a working uniform or The piping on the flapper and “undress uniform” had sleeves were worn with the purpose. The trousers were dress variant of the uniform, bell-bottomed to easily roll up but not the working.

IN THIS ISSUE

Like the dixie cup’s selection as a uniform item, a lot of our traditions in the Navy don’t really have a practical purpose or make that much sense, but maybe that’s not a bad thing. Maybe that demonstrates that the Navy is not an industrial machine focused solely on the bottom line and statistical advantages, but instead shows that we are an entity that hangs on to its nostalgic traditions.

Editor MCSN Derry Todd

10

4

Lincoln welcomes 28 new Chief Petty Officers into the mess.

A variant of the “dixie cup” was first introduced in 1866 and was designed to… actually every source I read stated the white hat has absolutely no practical application whatsoever. No surprise there.

6

Lincoln Sailors walk 12 hours and 52 miles at Huntington Hall to raise awareness for depression and suicide.

Lincoln and the Newport News community commemorate the 14th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

PRESS


THE CRITICAL NATURE OF

ZONE INSPECTIONS

T

hroughout the Navy there are hundreds of ships with varying operational missions homeported around the world, each focused on mission readiness. Whether assigned to a destroyer moored at Naval Station Norfolk, or a forward-deployed aircraft carrier, most Sailors have experienced one crucial part of mission readiness: zone inspections. Zone inspections are periodic inspections conducted to ensure proper measures are taken to keep machinery, spaces and equipment mission ready. All spaces of a ship should be visually inspected at least once quarterly. Aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), Sailors conduct zone inspections weekly. The ship is split into 12 zones and each compartment on the ship is assigned a zone number. In accordance with the governing instruction (OPNAVINST 3120.32), Sailors inspect one zone per week to ensure that each zone is inspected per quarter. Lincoln’s 3M Officer Lt. Nikolas

Story by: MCSN Brandon Davis

Creveling explains that zone inspections help give a more in-depth look at the ship as a whole.

“While we aren’t necessarily verifying the readiness of equipment within a space, it does get visibility to the spaces and associated equipment,” he said. During zone inspections, Sailors who own the space present it to senior Sailors E-7 and above, who in turn

grade the space on a scale ranging from unsatisfactory to excellent. Grades are given based on the presenter’s knowledge of the space, as well as history of maintenance and how many discrepancies are discovered in the compartment. Creveling stresses the importance of zone inspections, especially during Lincoln’s time in Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). The RCOH is an extensive yard period that all Nimitz-class aircraft carriers go through approximately halfway through their 50-year life cycle. “During (RCOH), it is very easy for Sailors to lose ownership of the ship,” Creveling said. “While it can be difficult because the space may be turned over to the shipyard for ongoing work, the zone inspections help the chain of command monitor the work in the spaces, and also to maintain overall space ownership by the department and division who will ultimately own that space.”

LINCOLNSAILORS FEED THOSE IN NEED H

Story by: MC2 Eric Soto

unger affects many citizens young and old in the Hampton Roads community. Lincoln Sailors took action to help local citizens by donating food and volunteering for the Feds Feed Families Food Drive at the Virginia Peninsula Foodbank, Aug. 28. “The Feds Feeds Families Food Drive comes at a perfect time to help fill the shelves during the summer months leading into the fall when the donations are extremely low but the need is still great. Hunger doesn’t take a vacation,” said Donna Tighe, Food and Fund Drive manager. Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Tommy Aflague spearheaded Lincoln’s contribution to the food drive by setting

up collection boxes at both Huntington Hall and parking areas. He also assisted by rallying Sailors to volunteer at the Food Bank. “I feel great about helping out the community and representing the command,” Aflague said. “I love to help people and this really got my attention.” Volunteers helped by separating

different food products to create a mobile pantry. A mobile pantry is used to assist areas where grocery stores are not readily available. Sailors donated food that will be distributed to more than 200 agencies supported by the Virginia Peninsula Food Bank. “Sailors should be encouraged to donate by becoming educated about hunger and realize that there are many families who cannot afford food,” Aflague said. Sailors interested in participating in upcoming volunteer opportunities with the Food Bank should speak with their volunteer coordinator or the Command Religious Ministries Department.


LINCOLN P I N S H E R N E W EST

CHIEF PETTY

OFFICERS

STO RY AN D P H OTOS BY M C2 WI L L IAM B L AKE AD D I T I O NAL P H OTOS BY M C3 MAT T H E W YO U N G

I

n a ceremony steeped with tradition, dating back to the birth of the chief petty officer, 28 USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Sailors received their chief anchors and combination covers Sept. 16 at Bayview Commonwealth Center on Joint Base LangleyEustis in Hampton, Va. As the guest speaker, Lincoln Commanding Officer Capt. Ron Ravelo impressed upon the recipients the importance of their new leadership roles and the impact they will have on the careers of their Sailors. “By the time one has become a chief, he or she has learned to avoid attributing unpleasant orders or duties to higher authority, but rather gives orders as being their own,” Ravelo said. “The type of leadership the chief exercises will be reflected in the conduct of his Sailors.” The rank of chief petty officer was

created 122 years ago on April 1, 1893. Earning khakis and anchors is a goal many Sailors have on their mind from the time they first come into the Navy.

“It’s a great feeling. It’s a career-long goal of mine since I joined the Navy.” -Chief Logistics Specialist Mark Pollard

Achieving this career milestone takes years of dedication and commitment which epitomizes the saying “earned not given.” “What it took to get there was an everyday routine of exceptional performance and commitment to their Sailors, their chain


PENNY

72

PRESS

of command and the Navy,” said Master Chief Logistics Specialist James Contreras. “The impact happens with the family sees them wearing the khaki uniform for the first time.” Following Ravelo’s remarks, family members were escorted on stage while the new chiefs had gold anchors pinned on their collar and were presented with their new covers by their sponsors.

5


OUT DARKNESS L I N C O L N PA RT I C I PAT ES I N

of the

WA L K T H R O U G H T H E N I G H T

Story by: MC3 Robert Ferrone Photos by: MC3 Evan Parker, MC3 Robert Ferrone, MC3 Ciarra Thibodeaux, MCSN Derry Todd

I

n 2013, 259 active duty service members committed suicide. A veteran dies by suicide every hour. With these alarming rates in mind, the military recognizes Suicide Awareness Month throughout September every year.

overnight Out of the Darkness Walk in Newport News, Sept. 9.

This year, Sailors assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) raised suicide awareness by participating in an

The family of Yeoman 3rd Class Ryan Alfaro, a Lincoln Sailor who died by suicide earlier this year, made the trip from Toledo, Ohio to attend.

More than 300 Sailors participated during the 12-hour event to walk the track and light vigils in memory of loved ones.

Ryan’s mother, Annette Alfaro, had trouble finding words for her appreciation of Lincoln’s support over the past few months. “Seeing all these Sailors out here for an event like this shows that they care,” said Annette. “They might be that person or know that person who needs help. We’re all here for each other. It’s so overwhelming. Words can’t describe it; they really can’t.”


PENNY

72

9

PRESS

Alfaro’s life a tragic loss. Since then, Lincoln has come together to celebrate his life as a Sailor, a brother, a son and a friend. Yeoman 3rd Class Robert Kuna, assigned to Lincoln and former A-school classmate of Alfaro, recognizes the benefits of the walk, even if the loss of such a close friend still hurts emotionally.

“It’s a little painful, but it’s good to remember,” Kuna said. “It’s good that the command is doing something like this, it will help prevent anything like this happening again aboard Lincoln.” Lincoln’s Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) chapter spent the past few months assisting in coordination of the event with the memory of Alfaro in mind.

Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Hillary Tabor, a CSADD member aboard Lincoln, has been involved through the whole process. “We started gathering ideas, and with this month being all about suicide awareness we thought why not represent Ryan’s family and show our support to them, while showing our Sailors that we care about all of them,” Tabor said. “When an individual feels


like suicide is the answer, they feel alone. Walking, essentially, into the morning, is representative of bringing someone who has those feelings of loneliness to the light.” Participants put candles in paper bags and lined the track with them, some carrying powerful messages like “You are not alone,” and “One life lost is too many.”

awareness to prevent suicide and save lives.

from Cmdr. Maurice Buford, Lincoln’s command chaplain.

Over the course of 12 hours, participants covered more than 52 miles.

“If you hear the statistics on suicide, an American committed suicide every 13 minutes last year,” said Buford. “If that trend stays the same, the inference is that someone in the service, someone at our command may have been touched by that. People are out here to show

The dedication to a noble cause, and support of the Alfaro family did not go unnoticed by Annette. Alfaro’s sister, Ursula Alfaro, expressed her gratitude to the command, and recognized the opportunity for others to pay it forward through the walk. “I feel like it’s a cycle, if you open a door for someone, you would hope that person would open a door for someone and so on,” Ursula said. “Everyone that’s doing this is going to try harder to help someone in the future, even if it’s something as small as telling you love them or are thinking of them.” Out of the Darkness walks, promoted by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), help to raise

“We’re staying the whole twelve hours, we aren’t going to the car,” said Annette, smiling. “We’re staying right here. It’s an honor to be a party of this military family. This shows they’ll never forget Ryan and who he was, and that keeps us going, and keeps [the memory of] Ryan alive.” And they did just that. Other than a few respites on the bleachers, the Alfaros walked through the darkness, and at 7:30 a.m. Thursday morning, led a large assembly of Lincoln Sailors around the track one final time. The group gathered for final words

respect to those that have gone on. But more importantly, it’s to send a message to say we believe there’s a better way. The better way is to embrace hope and embrace life.” “The Navy’s like our family now,” Ursula said. “There are people here who were close to my brother and consider him a brother, so all of us feel like we’ve lost something in ourselves. Coming together helps with that feeling. Thank you, we love you and you’ll always be with us. And I’m sure Ryan is saying the same thing, so thank you.”


PENNY

72

PRESS

9


10

In Remembrance of

September 11

Story and Photos by: MC3 Matthew Young Additional Photos by: Mc2 Danian Douglas

M

ore than 100 Sailors from the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) joined several Newport News, Virginia, officials to remember those affected by the terrorists attacks of 9/11 during a ceremony held at the Victory Arch Sept. 11. Among those in attendance were the Vice Mayor of Newport News Robert Coleman; Lincoln Executive Officer, Capt. Todd Marzano; Newport News Chief of Police Chief Richard Myers and Newport News Deputy Fire Chief Kenneth Lay. Coleman expressed to the Sailors that while 9/11 may be remembered for the tragic events that claimed the lives for thousands of innocent people, we also honor the courageous men and women - those heroes who served then as well as those who serve today. “While the passing of September 11 each year most certainly warrants special recognition and gratitude for the men and women who serve our nation, it is important to remember that they truly are heroes each and every day,” he said. Cmdr. Maurice Buford spoke on the importance of those brave men and women who gave their lives on 9/11 as well as those who have given their lives defending our country. “...on this 9/11 ceremony let us continue to pay our respects, recalibrate our patriotism, and remain true to freedom’s cause by reviving that American Spirit,” said Buford. “Don’t forget. Others died trying to save Americans like you and me!”


PENNY

72

PRESS

During the ceremony, Lincoln’s chief petty officer selectees presented a timeline of the events on that September morning. Each chief select took a turn reciting a specific time from the morning of September 11 and the events that occurred. “The part of the ceremony that stuck out to me today was when the chief selects gave a timeline of events of that day,” said Seaman Bri Corchado. “It touched my heart. It happened years ago, but every year at this time and every time you hear about that morning you try to remember those people that were there even if you weren’t.” The selectees then lead a wreath laying ceremony and Chief (select) Aviation Electronics Technician Nidia Martinez recited the poem “The Names,” by Billy Collins dedicated to the victims of the attack. The ceremony concluded with the ringing of six bells and the playing of “Taps” by Tech. Sgt. Scott Dooley.

11


Penny Press, Sept. 22, 2015  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you