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INSIDE

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Armed Sentry Course

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Images Of The Week

Supply At Work

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FROM THE EDITOR

They told us this day would come--the final week of deployment. Of course, the first time they prophecied this day, the seers placed it in the first week of May. Just like the Mayans, Abe’s prognosticators were a little off when they looked into the tale that 2012 would weave. After a couple of adjustments for operational requirements, they told us again this day would come, and now it’s so close we can almost taste it. In fact, before the ink is dry on this latest installment of every Lincoln Sailor’s favorite command newspaper (we really don’t give them much choice), some of our friends and family will be holding this issue in their hands, touring the ship as part of Big Abe’s 2012 Tiger Cruise Extravaganza. And a week from now, when we’re all reunited with our families and enjoying the comforts of home once again, we’ll be saying things that were unthinkable just a month ago, like: “That was eight months?! I can’t believe the deployment is over already!”


Congratulations To All The Chief Selectees!

ABEC (SEL) THEODIS LOUIS AKINS, Jr ASC (SEL) HECTOR URSABIA ASPURIAS LCS(SEL) FERNANDO ZABALA ATIENZO PSC(SEL) KATHRYN MARIE BENJAMIN ITC (SEL) JEFFREY GEER BEYEA ABHC(SEL) ANDREW ALAN BLACK ATIC(SEL) ANTHONY RYAN BURROUS ACC(SEL) STEVEN DAVID BYERS HMC(SEL) BRANDON CARRILLO LNC(SEL) MYRON LESHAUN CHISM ABEC(SEL) JAMES G COLLEY CTTC(SEL) MANUEL A CORONADO AMC(SEL) JIMMY ALIOLEGARIO DEASIS BMC(SEL) MICHAEL DURAN MMNC(SEL) DAVID MICHAEL EVANGER ITC(SEL) KATIE JOANN GLANDER HTC(SEL) HARMON JOHN HAZELWOOD, JR ATIC(SEL) DAVID FOLKS II HILLIARD SHC(SEL) WENDY RENE HOWARD

AMC(SEL) BILL R LOTT ATIC(SEL) PATRICK JACOB LYBARGER ABHC(SEL) ERIC GEORAY MACK CTRC(SEL) JAMES RYAN MARTIN ATIC(SEL) PHILIP ALLEN MAZREK ABFC(SEL) MICHAEL ROBERT MOTT ABEC(SEL) MIGUEL ANTONIO MUDAHY AOC(SEL) JUAN PABLO NEVAREZ ABEC(SEL) LARRY TODD PUGH MMNC(SEL) JUSTIN JOSEPH RIDER FCC(SEL) BETHANY LEEANN ROSS ATIC(SEL) PHILIP LOUIS SAWICKI MMNC(SEL) CHRISTOPHER BRYAN SMITH AOC(SEL) JOSEPH EMERSO STACKHOUSE, JR LDC(SEL) ARSENIO BOLANO TANGO, JR SHC(SEL) TRACY RENAE THRESHER MMC(SEL) JOHN ENRIQUE TORRES MMNC(SEL) NICCOLE RAMONA WEAVER


U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Zachary A. Anderson

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Carlos Vazquez

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Carlos Vazquez


U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Zachary A. Anderson

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Phylicia Sorenson

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Phylicia Sorenson


“It felt like my eyes were being scratched out with sandpaper and my face was melting.”

Armed Sentry Course Keeping the Peace aboard Lincoln Story by MCSN Joshua Walters

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Zachary S. Welch

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Zachary S. Welch

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VOLUME 24 , ISSUE 27

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Zachary S. Welch

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board Lincoln, the mastersat-arms (MAs) attached to the ship’s in-port security force (ISF) keep the peace on the ship and the surrounding area. When the action goes down (Sailors fighting, unruly personnel in need of some handcuffs), the ISF has to be ready and well-trained to know what to do depending on the circumstances. Before being temporarily assigned to the ISF, Sailors must attend the Armed Sentry Course (ASC), a class designed to prepare students for real-life situations that can happen at any time. ASC is a 12-day course consisting of a variety of training to prepare ISF Sailors to be able to assist with almost any Navy security situation. Sailors learn safety, operational risk management (ORM), subject communication (body language), use of force (when deadly force can and should be applied), self defense, proper baton use, mechanical advantage control handling (MACH) levels and cuffing. ISF Sailors endure hours of classroom and hands-on weapons training in which they simulate many of the more commonly encountered security scenarios. Prior to attending the class, Sailors must meet ISF’s evaluation mark history criteria: no candidate will be eligible without eval scores above 3.0 in all categories. They must also meet body fat standards, have passed their last physical fitness assessment and not have been put on the fitness enhancement program, among other requirements. “It’s important to have an excellent overall record to be involved with the security force,” said Master-at-Arms 1st Class Bradley Gust. “We can’t be expected to enforce the rules to other Sailors if we aren’t showing a proper example ourselves.” The course educates Sailors about some tactics of terrorism,


U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Joshua Walters

“We can’t be expected to delegate to other Sailors if we aren’t showing a proper example ourselves.” said. “We do everything from power points and lectures to on-the-job training to make sure we’re prepared for anything.” The OC spray exercise is the culmination of ASC. The students are sprayed in the face with OC spray and go through an obstacle course that tests everything they learned throughout the 12-day course.

“I couldn’t believe the intense pain when I got sprayed with OC,” Gust said. “It felt like my eyes were being scratched out with sandpaper and my face was melting.” ASC educates Lincoln’s ISF Sailors about the basics of personal protection and provides them with information that just might save a fellow Sailor’s life someday. U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Zachary S. Welch

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Joshua Walters

improvised explosive devices, proper watch standing, proper personnel and vehicle inspection, firearms safety, and proper operation of 9MM pistols, M16 rifles and shotguns. Toward the end of the course, Sailors use everything they’ve learned in the oleoresin capsicum (OC) spray course. “Training is extremely important in the ASC for any situation,” Gust

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U.S. Navy photo byMC3 Chris Johnson

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Carlos Vazquez

U.S. Navy photo by SN Phylicia Sorenson

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Timothy D. Godbee

THe PeNNY PRess 10 VOLUME 24 , ISSUE 26 8

U.S. Navy photo by SN Phylicia Sorenson

U.S. Navy photo by SN Phylicia Sorenson

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Zachary S. Welch


U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Colby K. Neal

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Brenton G. Poyser

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Timothy D. Godbee U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Chris Johnson

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Supply at Work

Photo Illustration by MC3 Zachary S. Welch

VOLUME 24 , ISSUE 27

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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Zachary S. Welch

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Jeremiah Mills

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Brenton G. Poyser

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Photos By MC3 Jeremiah Mills

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Jeremiah Mills


U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Mason Campbell

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Jeremiah Mills

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Jeremiah Mills

VOLUME 24 , ISSUE 27

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Brenan Gavin Born: July 14, 2012 @ 2307 Weight: 9 pounds, 14 ounces Parent: AO2 William Low Xyrille Adrien Flores Wells Born: July 16, 2012 @ 2047 Weight: 7 pounds, 3 ounces Parent: MMFR Noah S. Jordan Wells

Mickey Gordon Callahan Born: March 14, 2012 Weight: 8 pounds, 6 ounces Parent: AMEAN Timothy Callahan

Bryce Calvin James Kurz Born: July 13, 2012 @ 1200 Weight: 10 pounds, 4 ounces Parent: IT1 Kenneth Kurz

Bryce Gray Johnson Born: May 23, 2012 @ 1745 Weight: 7 pounds, 12 ounces Parent: ICC Brad Johnson


Know Your Shipmate

Briefly Photo and information by MC3 Wade T. Oberlin

LS2 Ronaldo Resalvo HSC-12/Supply Dept.

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orn in Delano, a small town smack-dab in the middle of California, Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Ronaldo Resalvo attended Garces Memorial High School in Bakersfield Calif., only thirty miles from his hometown. Before enlisting in the Navy, Resalvo spent some time working as a high school music teacher. Resalvo has now been in the Navy for nearly five years. As part of the Golden Falcons of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 12, he has primarily worked in the squadron’s tool room managing equipment inventory. Now that his term with the Falcons is drawing to an end, he will soon be transferring to his new shore duty command in Singapore. “I’m looking forward to not being underway, just staying stationary for a while. Since my duty station is overseas, I’m looking forward to getting adjusted to a new culture in Singapore.” In seven months underway, Resalvo made a habit of visiting a particular a worldwide restaurant chain popular with Sailors throughout the Navy. “My main hobby underway was visiting foreign places, eating great food and collecting merchandise from all the Hard Rock Cafés we visited.”

CNIC Tops Feds Feed Families Navy Goal Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) has donated 402,315 pounds as of week eight of the campaign to the 2012 Feds Feed Families drive, topping the Navy’s goal of 396,000 pounds for the entire three month campaign. Navy personnel have taken an incredible initiative so far with ensuring collection points are well identified and accessible across bases worldwide, collecting those goods, and donating them to charities both locally and around the world. “The generosity has been overwhelming in regard to the generous spirit of our personnel both here in our regions and installations in the United States, as well as abroad,” said Cmdr. Glenda Jennings Harrison, CNIC’s Supervisory Chaplain for Operations. “The success of Feds Feed Families so far is a testament to the quality and work ethic of these Sailors. They are doing a great job and it speaks volumes to who they are,”said Harrison. Navy Region Japan has the highest contribution total so far, donating 220,500 pounds to food banks both in their region and across the United States, including Oregon Food Bank, Second Harvest Food Banks, Community Food Bank of New Jersey, Feeding South Dakota Food Bank, Food Bank for the Heartland, Food Bank of Alaska and God’s Pantry Food Bank. (source: www.navy.mil)


August 3, 2012 -- Penny Press  

The Penny Press is the USS Abraham Lincoln's Command newspaper. It provides news and information to the Sailors and their families.

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