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INSIDE

6 Steel Beach Revisited Images of the Week

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Frocking

12 FROM THE EDITOR

There is no better place in this world to witness the cycle of history firsthand than in the United States Navy. And this week at sea aboard Big Abe is no exception. We started the month with a moment of reflection, looking back on the brave Sailors and Marines who fought to secure victory in the war in the Pacific at the Battle of Midway 70 years ago. Then, as always, after remembering the lessons and sacrifices of the past, we got back to business building the future. This week we pinned four new master chief petty officers on board, and just to make sure we had enough petty officers to come running when they called, we frocked or capped 460 Sailors to the next paygrade during a long, hot ceremony in the ship’s hangar bay. We continue to be amazed and impressed by the performance of our shipmates. Even after six full months of deployment, we look around and see the world’s greatest Sailors piling up the achievements and the honors that go with them. Maybe we aren’t history’s greatest heroes, but we’re damned good Sailors.


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he Golden Falcons of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 12 held a change of command ceremony on the flight deck as a symbolic lead change took place in the air. Cmdr. Christopher G. Bailey relieved Cmdr. Anthony C. Roach as commanding officer. Roach assumed command of HSC-12 in March of 2011. During his tour, the Golden Falcons deployed once to the U.S. 7th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility (AORs) with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. Roach later received transfer orders to the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the Plans and Policy directorate. “It has been an amazing tour. I owe a huge debt of gratitude to all of the Golden Falcon family for their outstanding performance,” said Roach. Bailey most recently served in the National Military Command Center as an emergency actions officer. He was born in Palmyra, N.J., graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1995 and was designated a naval aviator in August 1997. “I’m truly honored and humbled to serve as commanding officer of the world famous Golden Falcons,” said Bailey. “It is a true privilege to serve with each and every one of our Sailors, chiefs and officers. Their poise and professionalism over this deployment has been awe-inspiring. I’ve been afforded the chance of a lifetime to lead the finest helicopter squadron in the Navy.” Bailey’s previous assignments include Helicopter Combat Support Squadron (HC) 11; HC-6; flag aide to Commander, Naval Air Forces, U.S. Atlantic Fleet; and a department head tour with Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 2.

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Zachary S. Welch

HSc-12 Change Of Command

Story by Lt. j.g. Amanda McNally Photos by MC3 Carlos Vazquez

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he Vigilantes of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 151 were named as the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 Top Hook squadron for carrier landing performance aboard Lincoln. Top Hook is awarded to the squadron with the highest landing grade average during a line period. The Vigilantes had a landing grade average of 3.527 and a boarding rate of 96.6 percent for the third line period. Each pass, or landing attempt, is graded by the landing signal officers (LSOs) of CVW-2. An LSO’s primary responsibility is to safely and efficiently land all fixed wing aircraft aboard an aircraft carrier. An LSO’s secondary purpose is to grade each pass, which is debriefed to every pilot for learning and trend analysis purposes. Over time, these grades have become a source of pride and competition among air wing pilots, leading to increased carrier aviation safety. Vigilante pilot Lt. Jaime Moreno was separately recognized as a top five “nugget” with a 3.380 landing performance and a 96 percent boarding rate. Other VFA-151 pilots recognized in the air wing top 10 include Cmdr. Robert Loughran (3.742 landing grade average/100 percent boarding rate), Lt. Cmdr. Jason Dalby (3.75/100 percent), Lt. Cmdr. David Whitmer (3.762/100 percent) and Lt. Cmdr. Mike Strong (3.833/100 percent). “The competition was incredibly fierce this line period,” said Lt. Ted Reeves, VFA-151’s senior LSO. “It definitely feels good to earn this award considering how many top-notch ball flyers there are in CVW-2.”

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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Timothy D. Godbee

New

Command Master Chief

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hen Lincoln arrives in Hampton Roads, Sailors with a desire to further their education will want to know where to start and what schools are available to them. The Hampton Roads area boasts more than a dozen colleges and universities that offer nearly every type and level of degree imaginable. Not only does Virginia offer a variety of educational opportunities for Sailors and their families, G.I. Jobs Magazine rates Norfolk State University (NSU), Old Dominion University (ODU) and the College of William and Mary (W&M) among some of the most military-friendly in the country. Three of the area’s schools--Hampton University, ODU and W&M--are members of the National Institute of Aerospace

(NIA). NIA is one of the nation’s leading aerospace research programs that allow students pursuing master and doctorate degrees the opportunity to take classes at over a half dozen colleges up and down the east coast. For prospective student-Sailors looking for a nontraditional school, Tidewater Community College, in Norfolk, and Thomas Nelson Community College, in Hampton, cater to students looking for lower tuitions and more flexible classroom hours. Additionally, East Virginia Medical School in Norfolk offers a variety of medical degrees. There are many more colleges and universities available to Sailors in Virginia. Contact your command career counselor or conduct independent research online for an in-depth look at all the schools that may interest you. U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Zachary S. Welch


Story by MC3 Carlos M. Vazquez U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Zachary S. Welch

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incoln Sailors commemorated the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway with a wreath-laying ceremony on the ship's fantail. The commemoration included an invocation from the ship's chaplain and a narration of the events leading up to the historic battle. At the conclusion of the ceremony, a wreath was dropped into the sea by Rear Adm. Mike Shoemaker, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, in remembrance of the Sailors and Marines who gave their lives in the battle. "While we look back on the incredible achievements of Midway and reflect on what it took for those Sailors to win, we can also look forward with great confidence," said Shoemaker. "I know that the challenges we face today will be overcome by Sailors with the same devotion, spirit and uncommon valor of those who fought and won at Midway. Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Brandon Kittle said it is important for today's Sailors to honor service members who gave their lives in battle in the past. "It's a good way to show respect to the people that literally saved this country," said Kittle. "They defended freedom and democracy for us. Many of them gave their lives, and it's good for us to show our appreciation." Fought in June 1942, the Battle of Midway is widely considered the turning point in the Pacific theater of World War II. During the battle, the U.S. Navy sunk four Japanese aircraft carriers, one Japanese cruiser and destroyed 248 Japanese aircraft while only losing one aircraft carrier, one destroyer and 150 aircraft. Story by MC3 Timothy D. Godbee

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Carlos M. Vazquez

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Wade T. Oberlin

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Zachary S. Welch U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Wade T. Oberlin


U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Jonthan Idle

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incoln Sailors took a break from their operational schedule to enjoy a picnic on the ship’s flight deck, June 1. The steel beach picnic, Lincoln’s second of her current deployment, included a barbecue for more than 4,000 Sailors, a dodgeball tournament, a disc jockey and three golf tee boxes. “It’s a great chance to relax from work and get some sun,” said Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Ronalia Davis. “It’s a wonderful morale booster that will keep our spirits high for the next chunk of the cruise.” Volunteers from the ship’s chiefs’ mess started the food preparation early when they lit the grills in the morning to get them ready to start cooking the large meal. The menu included hot dogs and hamburgers, pasta salad, assorted fruits, desserts, water and soda. “It’s our chance to give back to our Sailors,” said Command Master Chief Kevin Martin of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34, embarked aboard Lincoln as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. “Every day, they work hard for us. The least we can do is give them a break.” Many Sailors found their own entertainment. With plenty of open space on the flight deck, Sailors organized games of soccer and football, while others sat in the sun and socialized. “It gave me the chance to take a break from work and spend time catching up with friends,” said Seaman Beverly Brown. “It was fun.” Story by MCSN Kathleen Church U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Jonthan Idle

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THE PENNY PRESS


U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Zachary A. Anderson

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Kathleen Church

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Zachary A. Anderson

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Kathleen Church

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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Timothy D. Godbee

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Carlos M. Vazquez U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Carlos Vazquez

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Carlos Vazquez

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Joshua Walters

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Carlos Vazquez U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Karolina Martinez

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Joshua Walters

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Carlos M. Vazquez

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Timothy D. Godbee


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U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Timothy D. Godbee U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Zachary S. Welch

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Carlos Vazquez

U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Karolina Martinez


THe Lincoln Room Inside The Shipboard Museum Dedicated To The Life and Times of The 16th President of The United States

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mid the daily chaos of shipboard life aboard Lincoln, it’s easy to forget the incredible life and many accomplishments of the ship’s namesake. However, no matter how far from home Lincoln ventures, we take a traveling museum with us: the Lincoln Room. Located adjacent to the officer’s brow, the Lincoln Room contains a collection of reproductions of items from our 16th president’s life and era. The room includes a life-sized bust of Lincoln, a copy of the Gettysburg Address and a one-of-a-kind quilt displaying Lincoln’s face, signature, photos, and notable speeches and policies. “It’s easy to forget you’re on a ship,” said Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Mayobanex Vargas, petty officer in charge of the Lincoln Room. “It’s very well-kept, and everything in the room has its own story behind it. There’s a lot to learn here.” The Lincoln room is one of the first places Lincoln personnel take distinguished visitors when the ship visits foreign ports.

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The Penny Press

“It’s important for people who visit the ship to know why the ship is named for Lincoln and what he stood for,” said Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jimmy Cellini, the ship’s tour coordinator. “The Lincoln Room gives people from other countries not familiar with Abraham Lincoln an opportunity to get to know a little bit about him.” The bulkheads of the room display narratives of different stages in Lincoln’s life paired with photos of Lincoln and maps of the different places he lived. “The biographies on the walls are very informative,” said Vargas. “They cover everything from his childhood to his assassination.” Though the Lincoln Room may not always be available for tours while the ship is underway, it’s located in a space where anyone with an urge to learn can experience it. This treasure trove of history offers Lincoln Sailors the chance to access more of the story behind the man for whom our ship is named. Story and photos by MC3 Timothy D. Godbee


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he Damge Control (DC) Olympics is a practical The Reactor division team representing Repair Locker 5 training competition pitting the ship’s 10 repair lockers won the overall shipboard competition. For their efforts, the against each other in a host of contests to test their DC victorious locker received a plaque along with head of the knowledge and their physical skills. line passes for chow, the ship’s store and the liberty brow “The DC Olympics gives Sailors the opportunity to for the ship’s next port visit. handle damage control situations under pressure and to “It’s fun and it’s good training for the overall crew,” said actually hold a 150 psi hose in their hand and see how tired Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Anthony Castille. “It helps us they can get quickly,” said Cmdr. Kenneth Belkofer, Lincoln’s have more fun doing the training evolutions rather than just damage control assistant. “It also puts them under a stressful looking at it as work. It helps keep people more active, and situation where they have to put on a firefighting ensemble it will get other people to try different things rather than and experience how long it can take to put that gear on.” being restricted to one task.” Belkofer said the event allowed Sailors to demonstrate Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 3rd their knowledge of general damage control equipmentU and Class Bryant Guest said the event reinforced mission .S. N avy readiness, preparation, fun and a feeling of purpose in the several fire extinguishing systems, from aqueous film forming pho to b foam (AFFF) to other fixed firefighting systems. The Olympics participants. yM C3 Wad a great time,” said Guest. “We train to make also provided Sailors with opportunities to work in teams. “I had e T. O e rlin The competition consisted of multiple relay races, such sure, should an bactual casualty occur, that our shipmates are as advanced protective chemical gear dress out, fire fighting prepared, that they know what to do and that they are going ensemble dress out, hose handling on the flight deck and to have each other’s backs.” AFFF stations. Story by MCSN Martinez VOLUME 24 ,Karolina ISSUE 18

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SUN KINGS

CONDUCT SAFE-FOR-FLIGHT TRAINING By Lt. Blake A. Baccigalopi

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he Sun Kings of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116 held safe-for-flight (SFF) certification training classes for senior enlisted maintenance personnel, May 31. SFF is a qualification required to certify and release an E-2C Hawkeye aircraft to an aircraft commander prior to takeoff or launch. Once designated by the VAW116 commanding officer as fully qualified, SFF-certified personnel screen all documentation required to determine that an aircraft is safe for flight. The VAW-116 Maintenance Department has held the SFF classes weekly since mid-February. While the certification is optional, Senior Chief Aviation Electronics Technician Robert Armer of VAW-116’s Maintenance Control said the benefits the training provides the command are invaluable. “I have been assigned to other squadrons where individuals had the desire and motivation but were simply unable to acquire their safe-for-flight due to lack of either time or resources,” said Armer, an SFF instructor. “We have

done an outstanding job in providing a unique service to our maintenance leadership. The result of these courses not only helps our squadron, but also our ability to meet the mission needs of the flight deck and air wing as well.” Hawkeye senior enlisted personnel typically earn SFF certification following approximately one year of class work, immersion and demonstrating a level of reliability in various aspects of aircraft maintenance operations. VAW116’s dedicated instructional program enables the squadron to satisfy operational demands and requirements while underway. “To cope with the intense operational tempo of deployment, it is an absolute necessity for all of our maintainers to strive for excellence and continue to professionally better themselves,” said Lt. Cmdr. Lawrence Nance, the VAW-116 maintenance officer. “The implementation of our safe-for-flight classroom training is one example of the many successful efforts the Sun King team has made to improve the level of knowledge and procedural compliance of our Sailors.”

U.S. Navy photo by MC3 Adam Randolph


Photo and information by MC2 Jonathan Idle

Know Your Shipmate

LSSN DARVEE SMITH S-1/SUPPLY

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ogistics Specialist Seaman Darvee Smith, assigned to Lincoln’s postal team, joined the Navy in October 2009 after graduating from high school in his hometown of Birmingham, Ala. Smith, a die-hard University of Alabama Crimson Tide fan, said he has enjoyed the opportunities the Navy has afforded him to experience new things. Among them, he counts Thailand as his favorite place he has visited so far. “My favorite part of the Navy has been seeing the world and meeting new people,” he said. “I’ve made some great friends out here.” When his term of enlistment concludes next year, he plans to go to college to pursue his dream of becoming a teacher. “That is my main goal right now,” he said. “I know it sounds funny, but I want to be a music teacher.” His goals in the near future include earning both of his enlisted warfare pins before the end of deployment and getting some much-needed down time when Lincoln pulls into Norfolk, Va. “I’m looking forward to relaxing,” he said. “After getting extended twice, we have to get some rest and relaxation in. I think I’m going to take a cruise--not like this, a vacation cruise.”

Briefly Navy Issues Guidance For Sailors Transitioning From Active To Reserve

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he Navy announced guidance streamlining the transition from active duty to Selected Reserves (SELRES) through Perform to Serve (PTS) or Early Career Transition Program (ECTP) in a message released June 5. NAVADMIN 179/12 outlines a new process for active duty and fulltime-support Sailors transitioning to the SELRES via PTS or ECTP to receive Navy Personnel Command (NPC)-funded separation orders with an intermediate stop at their requested Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC). According to the message, Sailors who receive a SELRES quota through PTS or ECTP must use Career Management System/Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) to select a NOSC nearest to the area they intend to reside after release from active duty. Working with their command career counselor, a completed Reserve affiliation screening checklist must be forwarded to CTO to ensure completion of all required enlistment and Reserve affiliation documents prior to the Sailor beginning terminal leave. Transitioning Sailors who complete this process at least two months prior to separation will receive funded orders from their command to their NOSC where they will complete their release from active duty (separation) processing and Reserve affiliation. Under this process Sailors affiliating with a NOSC greater than 50 miles from their residence are authorized up to three days per diem while completing their active duty to SELRES processing at the NOSC.

(source: www.navy.mil) VOLUME 24 , ISSUE 21

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June 8, 2012