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CELEBRATING

FREEDOM


TR’s new senior chiefs get their stars

A STAR

IS BORN

Story by MC2 (SW) Brian G. Reynolds Photos by MC2 Corey Asato and MCSN Anthony Hilkowski

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ailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) were authorized to wear the new rank insignias of Senior Chief Petty Officer during an event June 27 honoring their hard work and dedication. The frocking ceremony, held on the activity field at Huntington Hall in Newport News, Va., is a Navy tradition that permits Sailors to receive the right to wear the uniform and assume the responsibilities of their next rank prior to actual advancement. Sailors are later advanced in pay over the course of the year. The freshly-frocked Senior Chiefs assigned to TR include Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Albert K. Oparaji, Senior Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Robert A. Eidson, Senior Chief Machinist’s Mate William J. Leftwich, Senior Chief Aviation Support Equipment Technician James E. Bibow, Senior Chief Machinist’s Mate Daniel Chronister, Senior Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) James W. Rutherford.

“You ought to be proud of what you’ve accomplished and what you have done,” said Capt. Daniel Grieco, commanding officer of USS Theodore Roosevelt. “More importantly, realize that you have an obligation to earn it (the promotion) every single day, an obligation to lead your troops properly.” Many of the newly-frocked TR senior chiefs see this as a milestone in their careers. However, some of these Sailors see this promotion partially as the result of the hard work of their division and peers. ”To be honest, this is more of an honor for my division than myself,” said Senior Chief Aviation Support Equipment Technician James E. Bibow, a newly-frocked TR senior chief. “It was absolutely the hard work and loyalty of the Sailors my division (IM4) that allowed me the opportunity to be successful. I feel more indebted to them than ever before and I’m very fortunate that I now have the chance to spend the rest of my career ensuring their success.”


TR’s new senior chiefs get pinned by family and fellow Sailors June 27 at Huntington Hall in Newport News, va. Senior Chiefs assigned to TR include Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Albert K. Oparaji, Senior Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Robert A. Eidson, Senior Chief Machinist’s Mate William J. Leftwich, Senior Chief Aviation Support Equipment Technician James E. Bibow, Senior Chief Machinist’s Mate Daniel Chronister, Senior Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) James W. Rutherford.

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COMING TO AMERICA Story by MC3 Christopher A. Liaghat

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his Fourth of July, most USS Theodore Roosevelt Sailors will be celebrating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence and all the freedom and opportunity this country has to offer with fireworks, parades, barbecues and picnics, but not all TR Sailor’s were born into this privilege. For many Americans, and several TR Sailors, the benefit of being a citizen of the United States of America and our right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness was something they had to work hard to obtain. “I was born in Jamaica,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Kenesha D. Bryan of Air department’s V-1 division. “I came to the states when I was 11 years old and I didn’t like it at all. I wasn’t used to being so alone. When I was in Jamaica I had cousins, aunts and family. So when I came up here, it was lonely. I didn’t have any friends, just my mom.” After being in America for almost a full year Bryan remembers experiencing her first Fourth of July celebration. “I was in Fort Lauderdale Beach,” said Bryan. “It was crowded. There were people everywhere and fireworks. I knew they were celebrating American Independence Day, but we only have fireworks at Christmas, so it made me think of Christmas.” Jamaicans celebrate an Independence Day, but in contrast they celebrate in August and did not gain full independence until 1962 when they left the West Indies Federation, a political union of Caribbean colonies that formed with the intent of gaining independence from Britain. “In Jamaica we celebrate in the streets,” Bryan said. “It’s like a barbeque, but we don’t call it a barbeque. Everyone is just out on the town. Here I typically celebrate with a barbeque in Fort Lauderdale, but this year I am going to watch the fireworks in Virginia Beach.” Bryan’s mother, who had Bryan when she was only 16 years old, immigrated to Florida to find work, leaving a young Bryan behind in the care of family. “She came up here on a working visa taking care of kids on babysitting jobs when I was three,” Bryan said. “I didn’t see her again until I was eleven.” During that time Bryan’s mother gained permanent residency in America. When Bryan arrived in the U.S. she was eligible for permanent residency. However, by the time her mother received citizenship Bryan was already over the age of 18 and therefore no longer eligible for citizenship through her mother. Two years later, Bryan did get help applying for citizenship

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from a warrant officer who helped her fill out the necessary paperwork and mail it in to be processed. When interviewed for citizenship in 2009, Bryan says she was only asked about what day Independence Day landed on, but it means more to her then just a day off work. “We are celebrating our independence from the British during the Revolutionary War,” said Bryan. “I feel proud when I see the American flag. I helped paint all 25 of the stanchions on the back of the fan tail red, white and blue. When chief brought up the idea I was very excited to do it.” One of the American institutions that Bryan says she is thankful for this Fourth of July is education. While in Jamaica, Bryan’s mother sent home money to insure she received a good education, but this was not the case for most Jamaican children. “In Jamaica you have to pay to go to high school,” said Bryan. “If the family is not financially set to go to school, then the child will not go to high school.” For many naturalized citizens education is just one of the many perks this melting pot has to offer. “It’s not material things,” said Legalman 2nd Class Luis E. Garcia, legal clerk in TR’s Legal Department. “I personally think its education, career and what you want to do with your life. The fact that you are free to do whatever you want. In Nicaragua there are people who go to school and graduate, but then they have no jobs because there is no work. I know the economy here is bad right now, but you can always do whatever you want to do as long as it’s legal.” Garcia is from Estelí, Nicaragua. He came to the U.S. when he was 13 years old. He remembers spending his first Fourth of July in Buena Park,


We’ve come a long way for all the freedoms we enjoy,” said Garcia. “So appreciate what you have and really think about what you are celebrating.

California. “I didn’t know about Fourth of July before I came to America,” said Garcia. “I learned about it in school here. When I was young I thought it was cool that you celebrated your independence and I thought it was fun with the fireworks and barbeques, but I didn’t know about its importance.” Nicaragua gained its independence from Spain in September 1821 with the Act of Independence. Nicaraguans celebrate their independence throughout the month of September, but Garcia says that when he was a child the way they celebrated was very different from America. “They did ceremonies and parties all over the place and they shot firearms to celebrate,” said Garcia. “I don’t know if they do it anymore, but I know when I was over there everyone had an AK-47, so they’d start shooting in the air. That’s how they did it.” Unlike Bryan, Garcia spoke no English when he arrived in the U.S. and had to take classes for English as a second language throughout Junior High School and the first half of High School. Garcia gained citizenship after joining the

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TR’S NATURALIZED CITIZENS SPEAK OUT ABOUT WHAT JULY 4TH MEANS TO THEM

Navy while in South Carolina and would encourage anyone seeking citizenship to contact the Legal department where they can receive assistance with accelerated immigration services that are just for military members. Although Bryan and Garcia had different experiences in their journey to becoming a citizen, they both shared in the excitement of their first benefit of being an American. “I could vote,” said Garcia. “That was the biggest thing. I remember that was right after I became a citizen. I was able to vote in the presidential election. I think your vote makes a difference even if the person you vote for doesn’t win.” During the 2008 election for President, Bryan was still applying for citizenship and was not allowed to vote. “I was disappointed that I had been in the Navy for a year and I still couldn’t vote yet,” Bryan said. “In 2012 I waited in line for three hours and voted for the President for the first time with an absentee ballot. It was very exciting.” While both Garcia and Bryan want TR’s Sailors to have fun this Fourth of July, they also hope they remember not to take our independence for granted and think about what they are celebrating. “We’ve come a long way for all the freedoms we enjoy,” said Garcia. “So appreciate what you have and really think about what you are celebrating. It’s like Sammy Sosa, the baseball player, used to say, ‘America has been good to me.’ That is how it is for me and my family, so this is my way of giving back and there is no better way to give back to the U.S. then to serve in the military.”

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TR GETS dirty Runners participate in the Great American Mud Run

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By MCSN Brian Flood & MC2 Cory Asato

tumbling, sliding and crawling, Sailors and civilians frantically cross the finish line. Bruised and battered, tired and filthy, the Theodore Roosevelt Rough Runners run club gathers together catching their breath. They pause for a moment for a photo to commemorate their completion of the Great American Mud Run. To look at them, covered in mud from head to toe, breathing heavy, it is reasonable to ask “why?” “Why not?” says Yeoman 3rd Class Ronnie A. Jones. “It was fun. It was great exercise and good team building. It’s always nice to be a part of something when everyone wants to be there.” The Theodore Roosevelt Run Club uses events like the Great American Mud Run last Saturday, to keep up their fitness in fun and different ways. Summer can be a bad time for Sailors in terms of fitness. The Physical Fitness Assessment season is over. Cookouts are in full swing, and a day at the beach may sound much better than a day at the gym. With temperatures reaching the upper nineties and humidity to match, time on the track or in the gym may not be priority one. This is why events like the Great American Mud Run appeal to the TR Run Club. “Events like this makes fitness fun,” says Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class (SW/AW) Laura Auer, head of the Theodore Roosevelt Run Club. “You’re getting in shape and having a good time.” The mud run was the first official outing of the run club. Given a quarterly stipend by Morale, Welfare and Recreation, Saturday’s event was the first of many. “We do everything we can to promote fitness and ensure that our Sailors on TR get a chance to participate in events like these which boost morale,” claimed Nate Owen, TR’s Fit Boss. “I’m really excited that these Sailors take charge of their fitness and make it fun, so it doesn’t seem like a chore. I’d like to encourage everyone on TR to make a lifestyle change like these Sailors, in which

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TOP: Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) (AW) 1st Class Carmine A. Bosco crawls through thick mud during the final obstacle of the Great American Mud Run 5k obstacle course in Chesapeake, VA June 28, 2013. BOTTOM: USS Theodore Roosevelt’s (CVN 71) Rough Runners run club poses for a group photo after completing the mud run. they incorporate fitness into their daily lives.” Before the event began emotions were mixed. Some of the members of the run club were excited to take part in the mud run, while others were nervous. “I’ve love doing events like these where you get excited and anxious,” said Jones. “It’s never about winning or losing to me. I just like to go out there do my best and have a blast.” But the feeling afterward was unanimous. “It was awesome,” says Auer. “I’m definitely going to do another one. The run club helps us to get other Sailors involved. Having the chain of command support us is always a great plus.” Jones added that he wants to keep doing events like this one and to try longer more

difficult races as well. “If you have the opportunity to get dirty with a bunch of fun people you should do it,” says Jones. “The general atmosphere here is awesome. There’s a live concert, free samples and so many people to meet.” Auer mentioned that she wants the rest of the ship to know and appreciate the opportunity they have with TR having a run club. “The run club is not just for show,” explained Auer. “The reason why I take charge and try to disseminate the message through emails and meetings is to encourage everyone on the ship to make fitness fun and we’ll keep saying that because no one wants to see a shipmate go home because of not passing the Navy’s Physical Readiness Test.”


Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class (SW/ AW) Laura Auer donates her shoes to a charity after participating in of the Great American Mud Run 5k obstacle course in Chesapeake, VA June 28, 2013.

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aimtowin Story by MC3 Katie Lash

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atch your breathing. How does the trigger feel? Do you have your sight? Squeeze, don’t pull the trigger. Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Peter Hecht’s mind races with his pre-match checklist, but he stays calm as he approaches the line to shoot. The calls are made, and he fires. For some Sailors, boot camp is the first and last place they touch a gun. For others, however, it is just another chance to practice a skill they grew up with. Regardless, marksmanship, is an important skill in the military community and the USS Theodore Roosevelt’s (CVN 71) Marksmanship Team is the perfect place to improve. “I started learning about marksmanship in Boy Scouts and I grew up hunting,” said Hecht. “Now, in the Navy, it’s all about marksmanship. I joined the club to improve my skills and want to help

pass on what I know to new members.” TR’s Marksmanship Team consists of five marksmen at the moment, but is always open to new members. Their purpose is to compete in regional and national shooting competitions and to train Sailors in marksmanship and small-arms safety. Lt. Thomas Clark, a shooter stationed onboard TR and the team’s leader, stresses the importance of training as a team and passing on the basic pistol and rifle shooting skills that make a good marksman. “Even at our competitions we train,” said Clark. “During our two-week competition in March, we focus a large part of the first week on training for the compensation of elevation, wind and distance. We all help each other improve.” Clark not only helps lead and train the team, but is a top shooter himself, winning multiple competitions which

have placed him on the All-Navy team. During the team’s last Fleet Forces Command Rifle and Pistol Match in Quantico, Va., Clark placed second overall in the individual Fleet Pistol Matches, third place overall Fleet Pistol and Rifle Aggregate and fourth place pistol during the all Navy Matches. For the win, Clark received a Secretary of the Navy M1 Garand Trophy Rifle. This is his 5th year competing on the Navy’s Pistol Team and has been invited to continue at higher level competitions including the National Pistol Competitions in Ohio which is considered the “Super Bowl of shooting”. “We represent TR as a team and we take pride in what we do,” said Clark. “Our goal is to come back to the TR and pass on what we learn to other Sailors. We want to make others better.” The team, including Lt. Thomas Clark, Lt. Kurt Christen, Hospital


TR’s shooting team trains to compete

Corpsman 2nd Class Shannon Ramey, Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Peter Hecht, and Machinery Repairman 3rd Class Jake TerronesFernandez (T-Rex) also showed up strong to Quantico, winning Third Place in the large command division team pistol match. “I joined because I enjoy shooting,” said Hecht. “I get satisfaction when I can hit that 600 or 1000 yard target with no opticals, but the camaraderie is great. It’s what keeps me coming back.” The marksmanship team doesn’t begin or stop at TR. It’s Navy wide. Competitions are held locally and all over the U.S giving shooters plenty of practice and competition. The Navy’s official matches start the end of March with one on the East Coast and one on the West Coast. The match consists of two weeks of high

power rifle and pistol shooting, starting with clinics and instruction that help shooters improve. At the end of the two weeks the top 20 shooters are invited to compete on behalf of the Navy pistol and or rifle teams at interservice and national competitions. The United States Navy Marksmanship Team supports the Navy in its efforts to train personnel in small arms marksmanship and safety, thus contributing to national defense. They believe that Sailors who have been trained are more effective watchstanders aboard ships and at Navy installations. The TR shooting team is looking for members. Whether you just want to become a better marksman or looking for serious competition, contact Lt. Clark at thomas.clark@cvn71.navy.mil to be added to the shooting team email list to receive information and updates on upcoming matches.

LEFT: Lt Kurt Christen, Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Peter Hecht, Machinery Repairman 3rd Class Jake TerronesFernandez, Lt. Thomas Clark and Lt. Cmdr. Joe Zerby pose for a group photos after receiving their awards. MIDDLE LEFT: Lt. Thomas Clark fires a round during a rifle match. MIDDLE RIGHT: Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Peter Hecht fires in the standing position during a rifle match. RIGHT TOP: TR Marksmanship Team members watch the sights during a match. RIGHT BOTTOM: Competitors in the single-arm pistol competition take aim during a match

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rough riders

Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class

WILLIAM MCCANN

Department: Media Home Town: Starksville, MS Goals: Go back to school for Masters degree, work at Combat Camera, get EAWS pin, compete in triathlon, compete in Military photographer of the year, and attend more “C” schools Hobbies: Photography, writing, cooking, videography, travel and music Why McCann was picked: As visual information work center supervisor, MC3 McCann supervises the production of all CVN 71 visual information support efforts. Since taking work center ownership in May, he took part in more than 37 studio portraits, 4 videos totaling 290 minutes of raw footage, and more than 40 photos released to Facebook and navy news outlets totaling more than 300 man hours. His crew supported documentation of key milestone events including turn ship evolution, strike group change of command, Tilly acquisition and crew certification. While serving as Media Department’s Damage Control Petty Officer, MC3 McCann mentored 15 Sailors in damage control maintenance and assisted in qualifying 4 Sailors in 3M 301, craftsman and DCPO. MC3 was a key factor in all departmental spaces being meticulously groomed ahead of schedule and all damage control readiness being maintained. He successfully led Media department’s battle lantern conversion evolution ensuring installation was 100% complete, ahead of schedule, and all departmental personnel were properly trained to perform maintenance requirements. MC3 has been instrumental to Media’s production and combat readiness. MC3 McCann’s exceptional work ethic and dedication are worthy of recognition as THEODORE ROOSEVELT’S Rough Rider of the Week.

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above & beyond Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class

LUKE STONE

Department: Medical Home Town: Austin, TX Goals: Become an Orthopedic Surgeon, Start a non-profit to help military members with the expense of prosthetic limbs Hobbies: Hunting, Fishing, Hockey Why Stone was picked: Petty Officer Stone is a highly motivated, talented and dedicated Sailor. He is without question my top performer in any competitive group. As a member of the Medical Training Team, he expertly coordinated and trained 100 personnel across seven divisions, during four General Quarters and two Stretcher Bearer Rodeos. His ability to simplify, articulate, relate and inspire are without equal – be it drills in first aid response, proper stretcher bearing techniques, care of injured shipmates or simply patient reassurance, he directly impacts our overall readiness by increasing crew confidence to take proper action in the event of a medical emergency. As the departmental Training Petty Officer, he meticulously processed 30 TAD orders leading to zero missed training opportunities. Additionally, ensured the input of shipboard, personal qualification standards, and Medical training into RADM for both Enlisted and Officer personnel in Medical enabling a 90% overall training readiness. As the Departmental Command Fitness Leader, he pushes us to be better during our departmental physical enhancement training sessions. HM3 Stone is prime example of a well-rounded Sailor and is exactly what it means to be the Command’s Rough Rider of the Week.

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TR evaluates departmental readiness

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in the spotlight Story by MC2 (SW) Brian G. Reynolds

s the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) moves closer to being a fully-functioning and operational warship, it goes without saying that there are many steps being taken in order to ensure that the ship’s crew and its departments are functioning as a welloiled machine. One of the primary programs that TR is currently using to achieve this goal is the Department in the Spotlight (DITS) program. This program allows the Executive Officer to gather information from all of the program managers on this ship. In each one of these functional areas, each manager has specific metrics that they are required to meet to pass inspections. In other words, DITS is an extensive assessment of exactly how operationally ready TR is. “Some of the programs we look at during the DITS inspections include 3M, career counselor and DC,” said Lt. Wayne A. Shipman, the DITS coordinator aboard TR. “You can kind of see where I’m going when I say ‘operationally ready,’” The inspection is conducted division by division. Within each division, every collateral duty and program is put under a microscope and deemed effective or not effective. “There are 72 divisions on the ship, and we look at three divisions per week,” said Shipman. “We look at all of these areas that we’ve compiled in the DITS inspection. So the 3MO will go out and look at 3M. The Medical officer will look at medical readiness. The career counselor will look at the career counselors to see if they’re trained and knowledgeable in career information. As far as warfare goes, they’ll see if people are getting qualified.” One of the reasons behind the DITS inspections is to ensure that there is an outside source monitoring the progress and efficiency of each program. “The purpose of DITS is to make sure that someone else is looking at your department,” said Chief Aviation Electronics Technician Tega Dodson, the warfare qualification program DITS inspector. “You see your programs everyday. It’s always good to have a fresh set of eyes looking at your programs so that you don’t become complacent.” This is actually the second round of DITS inspections. The first ones were conducted earlier this year. The results were auspicious and suggested that TR is one step closer to being operationally ready to rejoin the fleet. “DITS actually began Jan. 7,” said Shipman. “That’s when we kicked it off. They did round one in 20 weeks. One

of the most surprising things that I found was that most of the divisions were a lot further along than I thought they would be.” After barreling through the first phase of the program, the second phase is now in full effect. Although the first phase went fairly well, the next phase is designed to improve upon the flaws of the previous one. “We’ve been learning along the way about how to make DITS better and how to make it more customer friendly for the divisions,” said Shipman. “It can be a great tool that divisions can use to find out where they’re at. I think we’ve been successful in developing a tool for division officers and division leadership.” Even as the program inspectors are responsible for inspecting other departments on the ship, some, like Dodson, have found that it also forces them to take a second look at their own. “The DITS program has helped tremendously,” said Dodson. “I can even speak for myself. It made me look at my own department in a different light and take a look at where we can improve. I guess it forced us to clean our room.” Shipman also stated that the DITS inspection is a quite a large undertaking. After all, the inspection entails every program in every division on the entire ship. Needless to say that the team involved in performing the inspection is quite vast. “The team is quite large,” said Shipman. “This is a shipwide effort. It is not just one department conducting this. I’ve got people from all over the ship working to assess these divisions. It is a collateral duty for most of these program managers. These program managers own their programs.” Considering the fact that these program managers have taken ownership of these programs, they have made it their purpose to ensure that these programs are performing at a high standard. As TR strives to regain her status as an operationally-ready warship, it is the responsibility of her crew to ensure that the programs that drive her functionality are adequate to meet any challenges that may come. The crew of TR uses programs like DITS to gauge this process and to focus on areas where they can improve. “We’ve come up with solutions to fix problematic areas, so that we can come closer to being operationally ready,” said Shipman. “I expect to see improvement. Now people know what we’re looking for, so they’ll be targeting those areas.”


photos

from the GULF OF AQABA (June 22, 2013) Seaman Sophia Lam measures the bearing of navigational land marks during a strait transit aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3). Kearsarge is the flagship for the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group and, with the embarked 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Corbin J. Shea/Released)

FLEET

From Navy.mil

AQABA, Jordan (June 22, 2013) A Marine from the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (26th MEU) dives near the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) during a swim call after the conclusion of Exercise Eager Lion 2013. Eager Lion 2013 is an annual, multinational exercise designed to strengthen military-to-military relationships and enhance security and stability in the region. Kearsarge is the flagship for the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group and, with the embarked 26th MEU, is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Corbin J. Shea/Released) 130623-N-BX824-022 PACIFIC OCEAN (June 23, 2013) Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Jonard Sygaco, from Olongapo City, Republic of the Philippines, monitors the departure of an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter from the “Sea Knights” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 25 from the flight deck of the U.S. Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). George Washington and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, provide a combat-ready force that protects and defends the collective maritime interest of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ricardo R. Guzman/RELEASED)

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Hagel: WASHINGTON (NNS) -- Defense Department officials will move forward in making benefits available to all military spouses, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said in a statement issued after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act. The law had prevented federal agencies from offering all of the same benefits to spouses in same-sex marriages that they provide to other spouses. Here is the secretary’s statement: The Department of Defense welcomes the Supreme Court’s decision today on the Defense of Marriage Act. The Department will immediately begin the process of implementing the Supreme Court’s decision in consultation with the Department of Justice and other executive branch agencies. The Department of Defense intends to make the same benefits available to all military spouses -- regardless of sexual orientation -- as soon as possible. That is now the law,

Defense Department Welcomes Supreme Court Decision From American Forces Press Service

and it is the right thing to do. Every person who serves our nation in uniform stepped forward with courage and commitment. All that matters is their patriotism, their willingness to serve their country and their qualifications to do so. Today’s ruling helps ensure that all men and women who serve this country can be treated fairly and equally, with the full dignity and respect they so richly deserve. Later, a Defense Department spokesman issued a statement detailing some of the steps the department is taking: ●The Department will immediately begin to update the identification card issuance infrastructure and update the applicable implementing guidance. We estimate that this process will take about 6-12 weeks. For civilian employees, the Department will look to OPM for guidance. For civilian employees who are eligible for ID card-related benefits, the Department intends that ID cards will be made available

to same-sex spouses of civilian employees at the same time as same-sex spouses of military members. ●The Supreme Court’s ruling means that the Defense Department will extend all benefits to same-sex spouses of military personnel that are currently extended to opposite-sex spouses, including medical, dental, interment at Arlington National Cemetery, and with-dependent Basic Allowance for Housing. The Department will implement these benefit changes as soon as possible for same-sex spouses. ●The policies governing burial at Arlington National Cemetery will apply equally to same-sex and opposite-sex spouses. ●We are carefully reviewing command sponsorship for overseas tours, and all applicable Status of Forces agreements. ●We will assess costs as we move forward with implementation.

DOD Near you! VEHICLE DECALS what’s going on

●DOD VEHICLE DECALS (DD FORM 2220) WILL NO LONGER BE REQUIRED FOR ADMITTANCE ONTO NAVY INSTALLATIONS EFFECTIVE 01 JULY 2013, TO INCLUDE NAVAL STATION NORFOLK AND CRANEY ISLAND.

●VEHICLES ON NAVY INSTALLATIONS MUST CONTINUE TO BE LICENSED, REGISTERED, INSPECTED, AND INSURED IN ACCORDANCE WITH

STATE AND LOCAL LAWS. PERSONNEL WILL CONTINUE TO REGISTER ALL PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLES WITH THE NAVAL STATION NORFOLK PASS AND ID OFFICE.

●RENTAL VEHICLES ARE CONSIDERED PRIVATELY-OWNED VEHICLES FOR PURPOSES OF BASE ENTRY AND ACCESS CONTROL. THE VEHICLE RENTAL CONTRACT WILL SUFFICE AS PROPER LICENSING, REGISTRATION, AND PROOF OF INSURANCE FOR INSTALLATION ACCESS AND WILL PROVIDED TO THE GATE SENTRY, IF REQUESTED. RENTAL VEHICLES ARE NOT REQUIRED TO BE REGISTERED WITH PASS AND ID.

●PER REF B, ALL PERSONNEL CURRENTLY ASSIGNED TO ANY COMMAND ONBOARD NAVAL STATION NORFOLK (FOR 60 OR MORE CAL-

ENDAR DAYS PER CALENDAR YEAR) WILL INPROCESS AND OUTPROCESS AT THE NAVAL STATION NORFOLK PASS AND ID OFFICE, BLDG CD-9. ALL PERSONNEL WITH CURRENT DOD DECALS FROM ANY NAVY INSTALLATION MEET REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS AND ARE NOT REQUIRED TO REREGISTER. FOR PERSONNEL WITH VEHICLES THAT HAVE NOT BEEN PREVIOUSLY REGISTERED WITH A DOD DECAL, REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. OWNER MUST PRESENT A VALID IDENTIFICATION CARD, VEHICLE REGISTRATION, PROOF OF INSURANCE, DRIVERS LICENSE, AND VIRGINIA STATE SAFETY INSPECTION, IF APPLICABLE, TO REGISTER THEIR VEHICLE WITH NAVAL STATION NORFOLK. THIS REGISTRATION IS VALID FOR ALL NAVY INSTALLATIONS AND ADDITIONAL REGISTRATION AT OTHER NAVY INSTALLATIONS IS NOT REQUIRED. For more information refer to the plan of the day

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AWARDING EXCELLENCE

Staff Commanding Officer Capt. Daniel Grieco Executive Officer Capt. Mark Colombo Public Affairs Officer Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Evans Media Officer Lt. j.g. Michael Larson Senior Editor MCCS (SW/AW/EXW) David Collins Public Affairs Supervisor MC2 (SW) Brian G. Reynolds

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (June 26, 2013) - The commanding officer of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Capt. Daniel Grieco, Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class (SW) Luke M. Stone, Christian Parsons, Supervisor of Shipbuilding Employee of the Week and Matthew Weaver, Newport News Shipbuilding Employee of the Week and TR’s RCOH Program Manager Todd West, pose for a photograph after receiving awards for employee and Rough Rider of the week. Stone, Parsons and Weaver were all chosen for their exemplary work and dedication. Theodore Roosevelt is currently completing Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Huntington Ingalls Newport News Shipbuilding shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman John M. Drew/Released)

Editor & Layout MC3 Katie Lash MC2 (SW) Brian G. Reynolds Rough Rider Contributors MC3 Katie Lash MC3 Christopher A. Liaghat MCSN John Drew MCSN Brian Flood MCSN Anthony Hilkowski Command Ombudsman April Kumley cvn71ombudsman@yahoo.com

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (June 26, 2013) -- Sailors assigned to the Deck department of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) onload a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB) onto the aircraft carrier. The RHIBs are returning to the ship as Theodore Roosevelt prepares to complete Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Stephane Belcher/Released).

The Rough Rider is an authorized publication for the crew of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Contents herein are not necessarily the views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. government, Department of Defense, Department of the Navy or the Commanding Officer of TR. All items for publication in the The Rough Rider must be submitted to the editor no later than three days prior to publication. Do you have a story you’d like to see in the Rough Rider? Contact the Media Department at 534-1406 or stop by 3-180-0-Q.



July 3, 2013