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www.roosevelt.navy.mil

HABITABILITY FAST CRUISE Learn what’s happening when

November 2, 2012

21st CENTURY WARFIGHTERS Network Security protects TR


FOUR ROUGH RIDERS GO ALL-NAVY

Story & Photos by MC2 (SW) Austin Rooney USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Public Affairs

“Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – a desire, a dream, a vision,” – Muhammad Ali. ogistics Specialist Seaman Rich Diggs first started dreaming while watching Mike Tyson knock other fighters down on his TV screen as a child. For Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) Airman Daniel Silva, it was a calling, something he always knew he wanted to do. Electronics Technician 3rd Class Javarous Davis dreamed about it while getting in play fights with his brothers growing up. Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Michael Wheeler watched as servicemembers went head-to-head in the ring on the Armed Forces Network while deployed in Afghanistan in 2011. These four USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Sailors all shared the same dream – to be accepted onto the All-Navy Boxing team. All four had their dreams come true when they were accepted on the team after attending tryouts Oct. 22 at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story. “This was a really big goal of mine,” said Wheeler. “I’ve been training for a long time just to make it on this team.” While all four Sailors were skilled enough boxers to make the team, their experience, weight classes, and backgrounds vary. Diggs, known as “Baby Tyson” in the ring, has the most experience of the group, having been boxing since 2008 and participating in 31 fights. As a former college football player, Diggs began boxing weighing 220 pounds. Six weeks after he started, he was down to 200. Now Diggs boxes as a light heavyweight, weighing only 178. “I remember when I first started fighting,” said Diggs, thinking back to his days fighting in Atlanta in 2008. “I got hit in the eye really hard during my first fight, and I thought to myself, ‘what did I get myself into?’ I just kept at it though, and stayed in the ring until I ended up winning the fight.” Wheeler, or “Marvelous Mike” as he is known in the boxing community, said he has been boxing for about five years off and on, but never got completely serious about it until he returned from an IA to Afghanistan in June 2012. At 165 pounds, Wheeler boxes as a middleweight, and has been in five fights so far. “Dangerous Daniel” Silva has been boxing since 2010, and has 12

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fights on record. While still relatively new to the sport, Silva was accepted to the All-Navy team last year and fought in the Armed Forces Boxing Championship at Camp Pendleton, Calif., where he won a bronze medal for the team. Weighing in at 165 pounds and boxing as a middleweight, Silva said he knows what’s in store for him at the training camp and hopes to come out of the championship this time with a gold medal around his neck. Davis is relatively new to the sport, having started boxing last year when he noticed the Newport News Boxing Gym and decided to stop in and pursue his childhood dream. One year of intense training and four fights later, Davis is fighting as a heavyweight at 193 pounds and has already accomplished a major boxing milestone by getting accepted onto the All-Navy team. “I was really nervous while waiting to hear the results from the All-Navy tryouts,” said Davis. “When they called me to tell me I made it, I was really relieved.” Even though the four boxers were selected to compete as part of the All-Navy team, they still have to make it through a grueling six to eight-week training camp in Port Hueneme, Calif., before actually competing. While the camp will provide these Sailors with an opportunity to meet and train with new boxers, Diggs will have the chance to reconnect with a boxer he has known for a long time. Diggs was inspired to join the Navy by his coach in Atlanta, Anthony Chase Sr. – a retired Navy boxer. A former Rough Rider, Chase kept in touch with Diggs after finding out about his assignment to TR, and even pointed out a good local boxing gym which Diggs and Davis both attend. Now, after a stint coaching at the Olympics, Chase is the head coach for a new team – the All-Navy team. “If it wasn’t for my coach I wouldn’t be where I am today,” said Diggs. “I think having him as the head coach for the team will really help us when we go against the other services in the championship.” After completing the boxing camp in Port Hueneme, the AllNavy team will whittle their numbers down to one or two boxers per weight class and take the group to the Armed Forces Boxing Championship, where they will compete against Army, Air Force and Marine teams. Wheeler, Diggs, Silva, and Davis all say they are confident they will perform well at the training camp, but they agree the next challenge will be coming together as a team to defeat teams from the other services at the Championships. “The Army and Marines have been kicking butt at the championships the last few years,” said Diggs. “I think with our new coaching staff and team we’ll pull through this year, though. This game isn’t about individuals – it’s about us coming together and representing our Navy as a team.”


NOVEMBER 4 DAYLIGHT 5 SAVING ENDS

HABITABILITY FAST CRUISE

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11 VETERANS 12 (OBSERVED) DAY

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FA H A ST BI T A C SCHEDULED B R EVENTS UI ILIT SE Y

1230-1330 MAN OVER BOARD DRILL 1430-1600 GENERAL QUARTERS 1830-2000 MEDICAL SHOTS & DENTAL REVIEW 1800 - 2100 MENTORSHIP FAIR INFORMATION DOMINANCE FAIR ESWS & EAWS FAIR 1900 - 2000 CAPTAINS CALL CHOW SCHEDULE 0600 - 0830 BREAKFAST 1030 - 1230 LUNCH 1600 - 1830 DINNER 2330 - 0030 MID RATS


Story & Photos by MC2 (SW/EXW) Joshua B. Bruns USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Public Affairs

TR SAILORS HIT THE WALL MWR’S ADVENTURES OF THE UNKNOWN

Normal work day or unknown adventure? That is the question USS Theodore Roosevelt’s (CVN-71) FUNBOSS Holly R. Scheidt poses to TR Sailors in her monthly program “Adventures of the Unknown,” which gives Sailors the opportunity to sign up for an all-expense paid activity in place of a normal working Friday. October’s adventure took Sailors to “The Broken Egg” in Chesapeake for brunch, and Virginia Beach’s “Rock Gym” for two hours of rock-climbing. “It was a great experience and I would definitely recommend everyone try it,” said Electronics Technician 3rd Class (SW/AW) Lisa N. Gibbs. “Being away from the ship and getting to do something like rock climbing with Sailors you don’t normally work with was great.” Sailors interested in future adventures need only sign up and run a special request chit with their Chain of Command. “We want to see more Sailors participate,” said Scheidt, whose previous trips include deep sea fishing, Busch Gardens and Virginia’s Luray Caverns. “There are no stipulations on who can come but we would really like to see more participation from the junior Sailors who live onboard and in the barracks. It can also be utilized as a reward for Sailors who are putting in that extra effort.” Scheidt said the program is expected to continue into 2013 providing there is sufficient participation.

2) 2) 1) Airman (AW) Jatoya L. Brunn, “It was a little more difficult than I thought it was going to be, but pushing through it was worth it.” 2) Electronics Technician 3rd Class Kyle R. Delphey, “I was surprised that it was rock climbing and even more surprised that the whole thing was free!” 3) Electronics Technician 3rd Class (SW/AW) Stephanie L. Coyne, program organizer, “The program shows that the ship cares about its Sailors and supports them.”

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Story and photo by SN Eric Norcross USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Public Affairs

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21st CENTURY WARFIGHTING TR NETWORK SECURITY

he network security team aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) actively monitors the ship’s recently installed Integrated Shipboard Network System (ISNS) for cyber threats, while constantly training Sailors to protect the Nimitz class carrier’s information technology systems. “We monitor the network daily,” said Information Systems Technician 1st Class (SW/AW) Lativia Darbone, Network Security division’s leading petty officer. “We watch for excessive network use and what bandwidth is being used. Additionally, we look for unauthorized devices on the network. We run weekly scans to see who has plugged those devices into computers on the system. The main hits that we get are cell phones.” Personal devices, such as cellular phones and USB drives, can unknowingly contain viruses. When connected to a computer, a virus can potentially infect the entire network. For this reason, devices such as these are not permitted to be connected to computers on the ship’s network. “Bringing a virus to work can potentially

go through the network and bring down the whole system,” said Chief Information Systems Technician (SW/AW/IDW) Newton Allen, Network Security division’s leading chief petty officer. TR’s shipboard network is utilized by many departments in performing their mission on a daily basis. Protecting this system is vital to maintaining the ship’s operational readiness. “It’s important to protect our network because it is ultimately critical to national security,” said Ensign Paul Guidry, TR’s information assurance manager. Through the ISNS, a secure network is provided for Sailors to utilize services, such as file sharing, email and web browsing. “Our biggest threat is not outside, it’s internal,” said Allen. “Before outside intrusions can reach our network they are filtered out. Sailors that have access to the system are the ones more likely to introduce a virus to the network. It might not be deliberate; it could just be a lack of training.” Information Assurance training is held annually at the start of each fiscal year. This

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Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Samuel Boots of USS Theodore Roosevelt’s (CVN 71) Network Security divisionis monitors TR’s computer mandatory training administered to Sailors network for security threats.

via Navy Knowledge Online.

“IA training is designed to help users of information systems understand the importance of information assurance, its guiding principles, and what it means for the Department of Defense,” said Guidry. “The training will identify potential risks and vulnerabilities associated with information systems, and will provide guidelines to follow to protect against attacks on the systems.” In addition to Information Assurance Awareness training, members of TR’s network security team receive specialized training in network monitoring. “The extensive training that we receive is on how to use the equipment and software for our main intrusion detection system,” said Allen. “It’s a new system, and we still have a lot of work to do, but we are adequately prepared to protect our network.”

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Cardinals VS Packers Lions VS Jaguars Bears VS Titans Broncos VS Bengals Bills VS Texans Dolphins VS Colts Buccaneers VS Raiders Vikings VS Seahawks

1:00 PM 1:00 PM 1:00 PM 1:00 PM 1:00 PM 1:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM

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The future USS Minnesota (SSN 783) at Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va.

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NAVY CHRISTENS NEWEST SUBMARINE Story by Naval Sea Systems Command

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he Navy christened its newest submarine, the future USS Minnesota (SSN 783), Oct. 27, at Huntington Ingalls Industries - Newport News in Newport News, Va. Minnesota's sponsor, Ellen Roughead, broke a ceremonial bottle of sparkling wine against the submarine's hull, officially naming the ship. Roughead, the wife of former Chief of Naval Operations

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Photo by Chris Oxley

Adm. (Ret.) Gary Roughead, has been a tireless supporter of military families and continuing education initiatives for Navy spouses. Minnesota is the 10th ship of the Virginia class and the last under the second, or block II, contract. The submarine is on track to deliver to the Navy in late spring 2013, ahead of its April 2014 contract delivery date. The ship will be commissioned shortly thereafter.

ENTERPRISE COMPLETES FINAL AMMO OFFLOAD Story by MC3 Brian Reynolds

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SS Enterprise (CVN 65) Weapons Department completed the historic carrier's final ammunition offload Oct. 24-26. During the offload, 3,348,000 pounds of ordnance and ammunition were transferred from Enterprise to Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ships USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE 9) and USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE 2). Because Enterprise is scheduled to be inactivated later this year, all ammunition Page 6

and ordnance - other than small arms used for security purposes - had to be transferred off of the ship. After nearly three days of intense coordination and hard work of Enterprise's entire crew, all of "Big E's" ammunition and ordnance was successfully removed from the ship without any major issues. During the evolution, the crew conducted 314 connected replenishment lifts and 946 vertical replenishment lifts, for a total of 1,260 lifts.

A helicopter picks up ammunition from the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) during the carrier’s last ammunition offload. Photo by IT1 Stephen Wolff


PHOTO OF THE WEEK

Staff Commanding Officer Capt. William Hart Executive Officer Cmdr. Mark Colombo Public Affairs Officer Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Evans Media Officer Lt. j.g. Michael Larson Senior Editor MCCS (SW/AW/EXW) David Collins Editor MC2 (SW) Austin Rooney

Sailors from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) pose for a photo during a community relations event. During the event, Sailors from commands in the Hampton Roads region loaded old furniture from the Naval Support Activity Command’s unaccompanied bachelor quarters onto a tractor trailer truck so that it could be donated to impoverished families in Kentucky. Photo by MCSN Casey Cosker

ALL JACKED UP This Sailor is standing Petty Officer of the Watch. What is he doing wrong? We found 10 things! Check back next week for the answers.

Last Weeks AJU 1) No USS Theodore Roosevelt sticker on hard hat. 2) Missing hearing protection. 3) No safety glasses. 4) Hair out of regs. 5) Blouse buttoned incorrectly. 6) Sleeve not buttoned. 7) Side pockets look like “saddlebags.” 8) Boot bloused too high. 9) Boot not bloused at all. BONUS: Bad attitude!

Layout MC3 Katie Lash Rough Rider Contributors MC2 (SW/EXW) Joshua Bruns MCSN Casey Cosker SN Eric Norcross Command Ombudsmen April Kumley cvn71ombudsman@yahoo.com The Rough Rider is an authorized publication for the crew of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Contents herein are not necessarily the views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. government, Department of Defense, Department of the Navy or the Commanding Officer of TR. All items for publication in the The Rough Rider must be submitted to the editor no later than three days prior to publication. Do you have a story you’d like to see in the Rough Rider? Contact the Media Department at 5341406 or stop by 3-180-0-Q.

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