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ROUGH RIDER USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT (CVN 71)

NAVY MEDIA AWARD WINNING NEWSPAPER

April 29, 2014 • DAILY

INSIDE:

SAILORS PHONE HOME

New phones keep Sailors and families in touch

TRADITION IN THE DETAILS Wood shop carves into history


W

Staying Connected Out to Sea Story and Photo by MCSA Wyatt Anthony

hen Sailors are at sea for weeks at a time and only able to communicate through the occasional Facebook message or email, the ability to pick up a phone and call loved ones is an important morale booster. Now Sailors aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) can use “Sailor phones” to call home after AT&T and the Navy Exchange Service Command teamed up to install 20 of the phones around TR’s mess decks and library. “This gives Sailors the opportunity to dial home and talk to friends and family while we are underway,” said Chief Interior Communication Electrician Henry Hernandez, leading chief petty officer for Combat Systems Department’s CS-8 division. “I’ve seen it on other ships where 5-10 Sailors are lined up waiting to call home and tell their family how their day went,” said Hernandez. “It’s definitely a morale booster that everybody from E-1 to O-5 can use at any time.” Not only will the phones help boost morale but all the proceeds will go towards Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) to help fund future events. “All proceeds that go through the sales of calling cards and the actual charges through AT&T will all go back to MWR to help benefit our Sailors even more,” said Hernandez. “All the phones aboard will be up and ready for all of our underways from here on out,” said Hernandez. “We’re just working on getting the Religious Program Specialist Seaman Nicholas Rospos uses a “Sailor phone” for calling cards supplied to the ship’s stores, but until then, Sailors will be the first time to call home. able to use their credit cards when attempting to call home.” “As a new Sailor, who has never been out to sea before, it’ll be great Mosquera, from TR’s Weapon’s Department G-4 division. For any questions about the newly installed “Sailor phones”, contact to be able to call home and hear a family member’s voice after a couple the Combat Systems Support Center Control Room at J-dial: 6363. of weeks,” said Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Apprentice Jonathan

Navy Carpenters Keep Naval Tradition Alive

T

Story and Photo by MCSA Matthew Young

he Navy has evolved considerably since the wooden frigates of the 1700’s. Now, the U.S. boasts 90,000-ton steel aircraft carriers and smaller ships alike. Although the U.S. Navy has gone through many changes, one skill has remained through the ages: carpentry. The craft of building, finishing and repairing wood objects and structures, still plays a vital role on naval ships. Carpenters aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) build everything from Rough Rider of the Week plaques to stairs, shadowboxes and tables. The shop can also customize a wide variety of products. Hull Technician’s (HT) from Engineering Department’s R-Division do all the carpentry aboard the ship. “Just being able to take a board and make it into something that people look at, transform it into anything, that’s my favorite part of the job,” said Hull Technician 3rd Class Dallas Garrison. Even with ever-advancing technology, carpentry remains a necessary skill and tradition aboard Navy vessels. “It is kind of cool how it’s always been there,” said Hull Technician 3rd Class John Boren. “I’m glad I have the job I have.” From hand held tools of yesteryear to modern saws and drills, TR’s HTs are keeping carpentry Hull Technician 3rd Class John Boren cuts a wooden board on a band saw aboard TR. alive with their custom products and wood working detail.


midnight in New York F R O M T H E PA G E S O F

TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014

White house sets a college agenda on sex assaults WASHINGTON — Reacting to a series of highly publicized rapes on college campuses, the White House is increasing the pressure on universities across the country to more aggressively combat sexual assaults on campus. Administration officials released guidelines on Monday that colleges should follow, including recommendations that administrators conduct anonymous surveys of sexual assault cases. The White House is likely to ask Congress for measures that would enforce the recommendations. The guidelines are contained in a report by a task force that President Obama formed this year. The report will also urge universities to better ensure that sexual assault reports remain confidential. Sometimes fears that reports will not remain confidential can discourage victims from coming forward. The task force found that many assault prevention training efforts are not effective, and it will recommend that universities and colleges institute programs like those used at the University of New Hampshire and University of Kentucky, which train bystanders how to intervene. Many advocates for such a crackdown may see the proposals as an inadequate response to a crisis, but the White House is both hamstrung about what it can do without congressional action and has just begun its own attack on the issue. A number of recent cases have led to accusations that college and university officials are not doing enough to police sexual crimes committed by students. The furor has led to calls that Washington — where Congress and the administration are already moving to crack down on sexual assault in the military — take similar action when it comes to colleges and universities. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., who spent much of last year trying to legislatively police sexual assault in the armed forces, said, “Once again the problem is systemic, survivors feel twice betrayed, and reform is required.” (NYT)

© 2014 The New York Times

FROM THE PAGES OF

Obama Defends His Foreign Policy MANILA — President Obama, stung by criticism of his response to turmoil from Eastern Europe to the Middle East, defended his approach to foreign policy as a slow but steady pursuit of American interests while avoiding military conflict, and he lashed out at those he said reflexively call for the use of force. Standing next to the Philippine president, Benigno S. Aquino III, Obama said his critics had failed to learn the lessons of the Iraq war. On a day in which he announced new sanctions against Russia for its continued threats to Ukraine, Obama said his foreign policy was based on a workmanlike tending to American priorities that might lack the high drama of a wartime presidency but also avoided ruinous mistakes. “You hit singles, you hit doubles, every once in a while you may be able to hit a home run,” Obama said at a news conference with Aquino. “But we steadily advance the interests of the American people and our partnership with folks around the world.” Obama’s statement, delivered

at the end of a weeklong trip to Asia, was a rare insight into a second-term president sizing up his legacy as a statesman. By turns angry and rueful, his words suggested the distance he had traveled from the confident young leader who accepted a Nobel Peace Prize with a speech about the occasional necessity of war. Obama offered this trip as Exhibit A for the virtues of an incremental approach: He nudged along trade negotiations with Japan, consoled a bereaved ally in South Korea, cultivated ties with a once-hostile Malaysia and signed a modest defense agreement with the Philippines. He drew a sharp contrast between the international coalition the United States had marshaled to pressure President Vladimir V. Putin and the proposals of some Republicans to funnel weapons to Ukrainian soldiers, which he mocked as ineffective. “Why is it that everybody is so eager to use military force?” Obama said. “After we’ve just gone through a decade of war, at enormous cost to our troops and

to our budget. What is it exactly that these critics think would have been accomplished?” Obama did not name his critics, except to refer to them as foreign policy commentators “in offices in Washington and New York.” “If we took all of the actions that our critics have demanded, we’d lose count of the number of military conflicts that America would be engaged in.” These days, one crisis follows on the heels of another. Even Obama’s Asian trip, which he had put off from last October because of the government shutdown, was overshadowed by the tensions with Russia and the suspension of peace talks between the Israelis and Palestinians. For Obama, who spent his childhood years in Indonesia, Southeast Asia is normally a place to slow down to its tropical rhythms. Not this time: after his long, occasionally fiery, response to a question on his foreign-policy record from Ed Henry, a Fox News White House correspondent, Obama said, “you got me all worked up.” MARK LANDLER

A Deadly Fungus and Questions at a Hospital NEW ORLEANS — The first victim was a premature boy in the intensive care unit whose mother noticed a mysterious irritation in his groin area; it quickly grew into an open wound burrowing into the baby’s abdomen. The last patient to die was a 10-yearold girl, whose face was ravaged. Three other patients at Children’s Hospital here were also stricken, including a 13-year-old whose parents say endured more than 20 surgical procedures in 54 days in a futile effort to save him. Like the other patients, Zachary Malik Tyler, the 13-year-old, arrived at Children’s Hospital battling a serious illness before being overwhelmed by an infection. “What haunts me more than anything is thinking about what he suffered,” said Stephen Tyler, his father. The children died between August 2008 and July 2009 during an outbreak of a flesh-eating fungus,

mostly likely spread by bed linens, towels or gowns, according to a medical journal. The disclosure this month raised questions about how the infections came about, why doctors did not connect the cases until more than 10 months after the first death, and what obligation the hospital had to inform parents — and the community — of the outbreak. Those questions take on greater urgency, experts say, because deadly fungal infections, while still rare, appear to be on the rise nationwide. That may be because of changes in the environment and a larger pool of vulnerable people with suppressed immune systems because of patients are living longer with serious illnesses. An estimated 75,000 patients with infections picked up in health care facilities die each year, according to figures released last month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The outbreak may have spread unchecked, at least in part, because of lapses in the hospital’s infection controls and sloppy handling of contaminated linens, according to a review of emails, patient records, legal testimony from hospital and laundry staff, and interviews with doctors, lawyers, federal health officials, hospital administrators and patients’ families. In recent weeks, hospital officials have emphasized the protective measures that Children’s has taken, like resterilizing key areas of the hospital. The hospital now uses sterile linens for highly vulnerable patients. It also now wraps linens for transport. Tyler, Zachary’s father, said that such measures might have saved his son and other patients. “Perhaps it will inspire other institutions to be more vigilant.” IAN URBINA and SHERI FINK


TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014 2

INTERNATIONAL

In Brief In Ukrainian City, The Mayor Is Shot The crisis in eastern Ukraine took dark turns on Monday as the mayor of the country’s second-largest city was gravely wounded in an assassination attempt and masked antigovernment militants seized control of Konstantinovka almost effortlessly, laying bare the limits of the interim government’s control. At least one unidentified gunman opened fire on Gennady A. Kernes, the mayor of Kharkiv, the second-largest city in eastern Ukraine, as he ran as part of his fitness regimen, municipal officials there said. (NYT)

Air Search Called Off For Missing Airliner Prime Minister Tony Abbott of Australia announced on Monday an end to the search by air for debris from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, but he said the underwater search would be intensified and expanded. Abbott said that while the United States Navy’s Bluefin-21 submersible vehicle would continue to search the ocean floor for wreckage from the jet, which vanished on March 8 with 239 people on board, the search coordinators were arranging to hire private contractors that would use a different type of equipment. (NYT)

Iran and Russia Said To Be in Energy Talks The Obama administration’s strategy of punishing Russia with economic sanctions over the Ukraine crisis hit a new complication on Monday with word that the Russians are negotiating an $8 billion to $10 billion energy deal with Iran, another country ostracized by American-led sanctions. The energy deal, reported by the Iranian state news media, is the second significant economic collaboration under negotiation between the two countries that could undercut the efficacy of the sanctions on Iran. Under the deal, as reported by Iran’s Mehr News Agency, the Russians would export 500 megawatts of electricity to Iran and construct new thermal and hydroelectric generating plants and a transmission network. (NYT)

Judge’s Ruling Causes an Uproar Across Egypt EDWA, Egypt — Egyptian courts on Monday delivered devastating new blows to both the Islamist and liberal opponents of the new military-backed government. A court in Minya, a provincial capital, sentenced to death the top spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood along with more than 680 others in connection with the killing of one police officer during a riot here last summer, while a court in the capital banned the activities of the most effective left-leaning protest group, the April 6 movement, on espionage charges. The rulings were the clearest evidence yet of the judiciary’s support for the new government’s crackdown on dissent of all kinds in the aftermath of the military ouster last summer of Egypt’s only fairly elected president, Mohamed Morsi of the Brotherhood. The mass death sentence, announced after a cursory trial of a few sessions lasting just minutes, was the second of its kind from the same court in a month, and it drew condemnation from the White House and international rights groups. The reaction threatened to embarrass the new government just as its foreign minister, Nabil Fahmy, was visiting Washington on a mission to persuade the Obama administration to unlock millions of dollars in aid suspend-

In Edwa, Egypt, a town of a few thousand, at least one member of every extended family appeared to have been sentenced to death on Monday. a school principal here who was among those sentenced to death. Both of the trials that ended in mass death sentences date to clashes that took MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY/REUTERS place when the security forces used deadly force to ed after the military takeover. Yet here in Edwa, a town where break up sit-ins held by Morsi’s at least one member of every ex- supporters to protest his ouster, tended family appears to have killing nearly 1,000 people in a day, been sentenced to death, anger at according to the best estimates by the sweeping verdict mixed with independent rights groups. Rights advocates say the two wonder at the apparent dysfunction of the courts and police. With mass death sentences are just only a small portion of the de- the most extreme examples in fendants in custody — and some a pattern of harsh, politicized living openly at home in Edwa — verdicts supporting the new milmany residents said they took the itary-backed government in its verdict as a threat meant to intim- sweeping crackdown. Increasidate the Islamist opposition and ingly, said Michelle Dunne, an argued that the executions could Egypt expert at the Carnegie Ennever take place without trigger- dowment for International Peace, “there seems to be no attempt ing an insurrection. “We are living in absurdity,” even to construct plausible cases.” DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK said Mohamed Abdel-Wahab, 60,

Militants Pose Threat on Eve of Election in Iraq BAGHDAD — Snipers line the rooftops across Falluja, waiting for a chance to shoot at government soldiers, should they try to invade. Homes have been wired to explode, too, just in case the government rushes the city. And roads have been studded with countless steel-plated bombs, of the type that killed so many American soldiers here. Falluja — and the rest of Anbar Province — perhaps more than any other locale in Iraq, embodies the lengths the United States went to tame a bloody insurgency unleashed by its invasion. But now, much of the region is again beyond the authority of the central government and firmly in the control of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, a jihadist group that is so radical it has broken with Al Qaeda. That reality, which the government appears powerless to remedy, offers a sobering postscript to

the American war and a volatile backdrop to elections scheduled for Wednesday. The vote will be Iraq’s first nationwide election since the withdrawal of United States forces at the end of in 2011, and it is clear it will he held amid rapidly growing violence and sectarian bloodletting. On Monday, six suicide bombers struck polling sites around the country as security force members voted in advance, killing at least 27 people, officials said. The greater fear, though, is that there is no way back this time, that the sectarian division of the nation will become entrenched as the government concentrates its forces on protecting its seat of power in Baghdad. With fighting in Abu Ghraib, on the western edge of Baghdad, the government recently shut down the prison. Insurgents have gained strength in Salahuddin Province, to the north of Baghdad, and in Diyala Prov-

ince, northeast of the capital. “All arrows are pointing toward Baghdad now,” said Jessica D. Lewis, research director at the Institute for the Study of War. Iraq’s security forces have been unable to dislodge the militants. In trying to help, the United States may have made matters worse when it pressed the government to arm the tribes to fight the radicals, a strategy that worked the first time the United States struggled to restore order in the region. Since January, Washington has rushed guns and bullets to the fight — including 14 million rounds of ammunition and more than 250,000 grenades. But arming the tribes did not work, and some of those American-supplied weapons are now in the hands of militants, having been captured during clashes, officials and tribal leaders said. TIM ARANGO and DURAID ADNAN


TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014 3

NATIONAL

Storms Carve Deadly Path Through Midwest VILONIA, Ark. — Ryan Henry stood outside his brick home and saw the tornado nearing his neighborhood, razing much of this small city in Central Arkansas as it went. He dashed inside, grabbed a bedspread and headed for the bathroom, where his three daughters were already in the tub. He placed his body over the girls — twin 9-year-olds and an 8-yearold — and waited. “I used my legs and my forearms to kind of push in on the tub,” Henry, 31, recounted Monday. “The house started rumbling. It sounded like an F-16. It rumbled for maybe 10 seconds or so, and then you could start hearing things rip apart. Once things started ripping apart, everything was shaking.’’ Rarely have twisters struck the same town with such ferocity along much the same path, but for Vilonia, the tornado here on Sunday was a nightmare revisited. Nearly three years ago, a tornado swept through this city of

A home that was destroyed by a tornado on Sunday in Mayflower, Ark. the overturned tub nearly 30 minutes after the storm hit in early evening. But at least 10 DANNY JOHNSTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS others in Faulkabout 3,800, snapping power lines, ner County perished. The tornado ripping apart homes and leaving that touched down here was part them exposed to the torrential of a storm system that stretched through the Midwest before it rains that followed. For some, like Karen Seeds, a streaked across the South. State retired K-mart clerk who survived and local authorities said at least the earlier storm, it was almost 15 people were killed, 14 in Arkantoo much to bear. “You could hear sas and one in Oklahoma. On Monpart of the house falling, and I’m day, tornados flattened homes like, ‘I can’t believe this is happen- and businesses and flipped trucks ing again,’ ” she said. “It was just over on highways, killing two people in Alabama and one in Mississhock and numbness.” ALAN BLINDER Henry and his daughters sur- sippi. and MANNY FERNANDEZ vived, crawling out from beneath

Snowden Retained Expert in Espionage Act Defense WASHINGTON — Edward J. Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who provided journalists a trove of classified documents, retained a well-known Washington defense lawyer last summer in hopes of reaching a plea deal with federal prosecutors that would allow him to return to the United States and spare him significant prison time. The lawyer, according to people familiar with the investigation, is Plato Cacheris, who has represented defendants in some of the highest-profile cases involving Espionage Act charges, including the convicted spies Aldrich Ames and Robert Hanssen and the con-

victed leaker Lawrence Franklin. But nearly a year after Cacheris became involved, no agreement appears imminent, and government officials said the negotiations remained at an early stage. The officials and others who discussed the case and Cacheris’s involvement in it spoke on condition of anonymity. Snowden, who now lives in Moscow, was charged last year with multiple violations of the Espionage Act. He faces up to 30 years in prison and prosecutors could easily add more counts. In a phone call, Cacheris said: “It’s not something that I want to discuss, so I have no comment.”

Snowden’s revelations about the breadth and intrusiveness of the N.S.A.’s surveillance prompted the first major reconsideration of the government’s surveillance powers since Sept. 11. But prosecutors have signaled no interest in giving Snowden credit for the surveillance debate he started. “He is accused of leaking classified information, and there is no question his actions have inflicted serious harms on our national security,” said Marc Raimondi, a Justice Department spokesman who said Snowden was not a whistle-blower. CHARLIE SAVAGE and MATT APUZZO

State’s Gay-Marriage Ban Challenged by Liberal Church In a novel legal attack on a state’s same-sex marriage ban, a liberal Protestant denomination on Monday filed a lawsuit arguing that North Carolina is unconstitutionally restricting religious freedom by barring clergy members from blessing gay and lesbian couples. The lawsuit, filed in a Federal District Court by the United Church of Christ, is the first such case brought by a national religious denomination challenging

a state’s marriage laws. The denomination, which claims nearly one million members nationwide, has supported same-sex marriage since 2005. “We didn’t bring this lawsuit to make others conform to our beliefs, but to vindicate the right of all faiths to freely exercise their religious practices,” said Donald C. Clark Jr., general counsel of the United Church of Christ. The denomination argues that a North Carolina law criminaliz-

ing the religious solemnization of weddings without a state-issued marriage license violates the First Amendment. The United Church of Christ is joined in the case by a Lutheran priest, a rabbi, two Unitarian Universalist ministers, a Baptist pastor and several same-sex couples. They said the state’s marriage law “represents an unlawful government intervention” of plaintiffs’ religions. MICHAEL PAULSON

In Brief Optimism as Detroit Makes Financial Deals As the list of deals being struck by Detroit grows, the chances of a relatively smooth, swift exit from bankruptcy do, too, city officials say. On Monday, Detroit added tentative agreements with some of its unions to pacts already reached with retiree groups, pension funds and several financial creditors, moving the city closer to a plan that would allow it to emerge from bankruptcy by mid-October. In court, Judge Steven W. Rhodes urged those still involved in talks to proceed with negotiations. Among the toughest, imminent challenges: The city needs to figure out quickly what to do with the its water department in the face of suburban leaders’ objections to the prospect of a regional authority. (NYT)

White House Pushes To Confirm Judges With the possibility that Republicans could take the Senate in November, the White House and Senate Democrats are working with a sense of urgency to confirm judges to the federal courts in an effort to allow President Obama to leave a lasting liberal imprint on the judiciary. Republicans, still fuming over the change in filibuster rules that ended their ability to block presidential appointments, could shut down the confirmation process any time. Some Republicans are openly threatening to hold up or halt the confirmation process altogether. (N YT)

Utah Woman Charged In Newborn Deaths Prosecutors on Monday charged a Utah mother with six counts of murder in the choking and suffocation deaths of her babies within minutes of their births. Their bodies were found stuffed into cardboard boxes hidden in the garage of her home in Pleasant Grove, Utah, just south of Salt Lake City. Megan Huntsman, 39, who has three daughters and whose family members said she lived a troubled life, faces a life sentence on each count if she is convicted. Huntsman is being held in a Utah County jail. Her bail is set at $6 million. Huntsman was arrested April 12. (NYT)


BUSINESS

TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014

THE MARKETS

Pfizer Proposes a Merger and Move to Britain down the company in January. Nonetheless, the pursuit by Pfizer has made it clear that the company wishes to effectively renounce its U.S. citizenship. Pfizer points out that it would retain its corporate headquarters here and remain listed on the New York Stock Exchange. It also says that the main rationale for the deal is broadening its portfolio of drugs, and saving money through combined operations with AstraZeneca. Still, a deal would allow it to follow dozens of other large American companies that have already reincorporated abroad through acquiring foreign businesses. They have been drawn to countries like Ireland and the Netherlands that have lower corporate rates, as well as by the ability to spend their overseas cash with-

out being highly taxed. At least 50 American companies have completed mergers that allowed them to reincorporate in another country, and nearly half of those deals have taken place in the last two years. “Pfizer is the Coca-Cola of health care. It’s as American as apple pie,” said Mark Schoenebaum, an analyst with ISI Group. “If there is a deal that is going to start a real dialogue in Washington, it might be a company like this.” Analysts at Barclays estimated that for each percentage point less Pfizer paid in taxes, it would save about $200 million a year by reincorporating. That means that Pfizer would be saving at least $1 billion a year in taxes alone. DAVID GELLES and MICHAEL J. de la MERCED

Bank Finds a Mistake: $4 Billion Less in Capital Bank of America disclosed on Monday that it had made a significant error in the way it calculates a crucial measure of its financial health, suffering another blow to its effort to shake its troubled history. The mistake, which had gone undetected for several years, led the bank to report recently that it had $4 billion more capital than it actually had. After Bank of America reported its error to the Federal Reserve, the regulator required the bank to suspend a share buyback and a planned increase in its quarterly dividend. While regulators still believe Bank of America has sufficient capital, the disclosure of the accounting error will most likely

add fuel to the debate over whether the nation’s largest banks are too big and complicated to manage. The error also raises questions about the quality of Bank of America’s own accounting employees, who are supposed to present an accurate financial picture of the bank’s sprawling operations to the public and regulators each quarter. The audit committee of the bank’s board and PricewaterhouseCoopers, its external auditor, also allowed the error to slip by for so long. “There are signs that controls are not as tight as they need to be,” said Mike Mayo, an analyst at CLSA. “It’s a bank. It needs to get the numbers right.”

In a twist, there are plans to change the rule that tripped up Bank of America. Some of the spotlight may also fall on the Fed, which conducts so-called stress tests of big banks each year to assess whether they have enough capital to withstand shocks. But after the accounting error, Bank of America will have to go back to the Fed to try to resolve its issues. If the Fed is satisfied with Bank of America’s explanations and remedies, it will probably be able to make some payouts, though the bank said on Monday that it expects the distributions to be less than originally announced. PETER EAVIS and MICHAEL CORKERY

At Meeting, Fed Is Likely to Again Cut Its Bond Buying WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve is tiptoeing away from its economic stimulus campaign, and so far the broader economy has barely noticed. The Fed’s policy-making committee, which meets on Tuesday and Wednesday, is widely expected to announce another $10 billion cut in its monthly bond purchases, to $45 billion, en route to ending the purchases this autumn. Fed officials, meanwhile, have focused on assuring markets that interest rates will remain near ze-

ro for the next year or so, and stay low thereafter. And after a rocky start to the Fed’s retreat last summer, investors generally have accepted the official line, to judge by the prices of financial assets. “We’re exactly on the right track,” John C. Williams, the centrist president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, told Bloomberg News last week. Things are going well enough that a management issue is rising up the list of the Fed’s concerns. The Fed’s seven-person board

in Washington will be reduced to just three members at the end of May, for the first time in its100year history, unless the Senate moves quickly to confirm two additions. A preliminary vote on the nominations of Stanley Fischer and Lael Brainard is scheduled for Tuesday morning. The administration also would like to nominate at least one more woman; the Fed’s board had three women when it was most recently at full strength. BINYAMIN APPELBAUM

DJIA

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NASDAQ

87.28 0.53%

16,448.74

S & P 500

1.16 0.03%

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4,074.40

6.03 0.32%

1,869.43

E UR OP E BRITAIN

GERMANY

FRANCE

FTSE 100

DAX

CAC 40

U

14.47 0.22%

U

6,700.16

44.81 0.48%

U

9,446.36

16.90 0.38%

4,460.53

AS I A / PAC I FI C JAPAN

HONG KONG

CHINA

NIKKEI 225

HANG SENG

SHANGHAI

Market holiday

D

91.00 0.41%

D

22,132.53

33.03 1.62%

2,003.49

A ME R I C AS

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14,530.91

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40,136.57

C O MMO D I T I E S / B ONDS

GOLD

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1.80

$1,298.90

10-YR. TREAS. CRUDE OIL YIELD

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0.04 2.71%

0.24

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$100.84

FOREIGN EXCHANGE Fgn. currency in Dollars

Australia (Dollar) Bahrain (Dinar) Brazil (Real) Britain (Pound) Canada (Dollar) China (Yuan) Denmark (Krone) Dom. Rep. (Peso) Egypt (Pound) Europe (Euro) Hong Kong (Dollar) Japan (Yen) Mexico (Peso) Norway (Krone) Singapore (Dollar) So. Africa (Rand) So. Korea (Won) Sweden (Krona) Switzerland (Franc)

.9257 2.6524 .4498 1.6807 .9069 .1599 .1856 .0232 .1429 1.3848 .1290 .0098 .0762 .1666 .7958 .0941 .0010 .1527 1.1362

Dollars in fgn.currency

1.0803 .3770 2.2230 .5950 1.1027 6.2520 5.3874 43.1600 6.9999 .7221 7.7527 102.48 13.1197 6.0025 1.2566 10.6250 1034.9 6.5491 .8801

Source: Thomson Reuters

ONLINE: MORE PRICES AND ANALYSIS

Pfizer, the maker of best-selling drugs like Lipitor and Viagra and a symbol of business prowess in the United States for more than a century, no longer wants to be an American company. On Monday, Pfizer proposed a $99 billion acquisition of its British rival AstraZeneca that would allow it to reincorporate in Britain. Doing so would allow Pfizer to escape the United States corporate tax rate and tap into a mountain of cash trapped overseas, saving it billions of dollars each year and making the company more competitive with other global drug makers. A deal — which would be the biggest in the drug industry in more than a decade — may ultimately not be completed. AstraZeneca said on Monday that it had rebuffed Pfizer, after first turning

4

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TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014 5

BUSINESS

New Sanctions Cause Headaches for Russia MOSCOW — Once a year, the chief executives of the world’s largest oil companies fly to St. Petersburg for an economic forum and a rare chance to meet with President Vladimir V. Putin and his key lieutenant in the energy business, Igor I. Sechin. At one panel discussion last year, leaders of major oil companies like BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Eni, Statoil and Shell sat in an auditorium, as Sechin trumpeted the future of the industry here, namely opportunities in Arctic offshore drilling and shale oil development in Siberia. Sechin sat beside Jeffrey Immelt, the chief executive of General Electric, a major supplier to the energy industry. “The participants of this meeting are a big and powerful group which controls capital of two and

a half trillion dollars,” Sechin said. “It is of course an honor for me to speak to such a high-level group.” Now, such relationships — between Russian state-owned businesses and large, multinational companies — look increasingly complicated. As part of the latest round of sanctions over the Ukraine crisis, the Obama Administration on Monday targeted Sechin, the president and chairman of the management board for Rosneft, the state-owned oil company. He is the highest profile businessman ensnared to date. The administration’s measures, and similar ones in Europe, have taken aim at companies, officials and wealthy businessmen with deep ties to the Russian government and Putin. The energy business has been a particular focus;

along with Sechin and six other individuals, the latest American sanctions cover 17 companies, largely clustered in oil and gas construction and financing. While the financial implications for large multinationals have so far not been significant, the list is creating headaches for compliance departments of Western companies. For example, American investors will likely be able to continue to own shares in a company with a sanctioned chief executive, according to one investment banker who was not authorized to speak publicly. But it is unclear whether portfolio managers could take part in a quarterly conference call or other meetings with an individual on the list, lest it be seen as a form of commercial interaction. ANDREW E. KRAMER

U.S. Report Sees Deeper Bank Flaws on Loans A new government report suggests that errors made by banks and their agents during foreclosures could have be significantly higher than the previously believed when regulators halted a national review of the banks’ mortgage servicing operations. When banking regulators decided to suspend the Independent Foreclosure Review last year, most banks had not completed the examinations of their mortgage modification and foreclosure practices. At the time, the regulators — the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Reserve — were frustrated that the lengthy reviews by the bankhired consultants was delaying

compensation getting to borrowers who had suffered through improper modifications and other problems. But the decision to cut short the review left regulators with limited information about actual harm to borrowers when they negotiated a $10 billion agreement with the 15 banks, according to a draft of a report by the Government Accountability Office reviewed by The New York Times. The report shows, for example, that an unidentified bank had an error rate of about 24 percent. This bank had completed far more reviews of borrowers’ files than any of the other 15 banks involved the settlement, suggesting that if other banks

had looked over more of their records, additional errors may have been discovered. Regulators had calculated a 6.5 percent error rate that regulators across all 15 banks when they negotiated the settlement last year, according to the report. The discrepancy raises questions about whether regulators would have revealed more errors if they allowed the consultants to continue their reviews, resulting in higher payouts to homeowners. The G.A.O. report, which is expected to be released on Tuesday, also criticizes regulators for failing to oversee the $6 billion in foreclosure prevention measures in the agreement. MICHAEL CORKERY

Yahoo to Offer Two TV-Style Comedy Series on Web Yahoo’s chief executive, Marissa Mayer, is about to dive into the shark tank of television-style original video. Mayer announced on Monday evening that Yahoo is commissioning two original TV-length comedy series that will air exclusively on its websites and mobile apps. The company is also unveiling a partnership with Live Nation, the country’s largest concert promoter, to stream one concert live on Yahoo every day for a year. The moves plunge Yahoo di-

rectly into the increasingly competitive world of high-quality digital video. Technology companies like Amazon.com, Netflix, Google, Hulu and even Microsoft are challenging traditional producers of television content, such as HBO, AMC and the broadcast and cable networks, for fickle viewers. Yahoo has made serious forays into video in the past, only to pull back after disappointing results. But Mayer and her lieutenants are betting that a big push into original content, both with video

and digital magazines, will draw legions of new viewers and advertisers to the long-plodding Internet company. In committing to eight episodes apiece for the two comedy series, Yahoo is pledging to spend many millions of dollars in a business where experienced programmers often waste tens of millions before they find a single hit — and very often those become hits or flops for reasons no one can anticipate or explain. VINDU GOEL and BILL CARTER

MOST ACTIVE, GAINERS AND LOSERS % Volume Stock (Ticker) Close Chg chg (100) 10 MOST ACTIVE Bankof (BAC) Facebo (FB) Pfizer (PFE) Micros (MSFT) NthSta (NRF) CiscoS (CSCO) Genera (GE) JCPenn (JCP) Intel (INTC) Sprint (S)

14.95 56.14 32.04 40.87 17.20 23.02 26.78 8.70 26.33 7.43

◊1.00 ◊1.57 +1.29 +0.96 +1.17 +0.02 +0.18 +0.72 +0.07 ◊0.39

◊6.3 ◊2.7 +4.2 +2.4 +7.3 +0.1 +0.7 +9.0 +0.3 ◊5.0

3426507 1075201 703834 505784 403619 367793 345438 345367 334484 331323

% Volume Stock (Ticker) Close Chg chg (100) 10 TOP GAINERS Susser (SUSS) 77.72 Furiex (FURX) 103.05 TGTher (TGTX) 5.15 JCPenn (JCP) 8.70 CSTBra (CST) 32.99 Prosen (RNA) 6.73 Techne (TECH) 90.84 Global (GAI) 6.25 RCSCap (RCAP) 36.45 System (SYX) 17.84

+20.69 +22.90 +0.45 +0.72 +2.71 +0.53 +6.96 +0.47 +2.69 +1.31

+36.3 +28.6 +9.6 +9.0 +8.9 +8.5 +8.3 +8.1 +8.0 +7.9

41130 46984 1996 345367 34076 5160 4509 129 495 1234

% Volume Stock (Ticker) Close Chg chg (100) 10 TOP LOSERS Rubico (RUBI) LaJoll (LJPC) Radcom (RDCM) Waysid (WSTG) McClat (MNI) Knight (VLCCF) Canadi (CSIQ) POZEN (POZN) StageS (SSI) Och-Zi (OZM)

16.30 9.05 5.63 15.87 5.25 11.86 26.83 8.18 19.93 11.65

◊3.19 ◊1.44 ◊0.87 ◊2.06 ◊0.66 ◊1.47 ◊3.32 ◊0.95 ◊2.19 ◊1.28

◊16.4 ◊13.7 ◊13.4 ◊11.5 ◊11.2 ◊11.0 ◊11.0 ◊10.4 ◊9.9 ◊9.9

6344 2244 411 1367 10581 14837 60964 24499 8575 36584

Source: Thomson Reuters

Stocks on the Move Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday: Bank of America Corp., down $1 to $14.95. The bank suspended a dividend increase and stock buyback program after discovering an error in a financial report for the Federal Reserve. AstraZeneca PLC, up $8.35 to $77.01. Pfizer said it made another $100 billion offer to buy the drugmaker after being turned down twice. Charter Communications Inc., up $10.04 to $140.05. The cable company announced solid quarterly results and said it will buy 1.4 million customers and own part of a spinoff from rival Comcast. Furiex Pharmaceuticals Inc., up $22.90 to $103.05. Forest Laboratories said it will spend as much as $1.5 billion to buy the maker of gastrointestinal disease treatments. Sohu.com Inc., down $3.90 to $54.10. The operator of one of China’s most popular Web portals said it lost $79 million in the latest quarter because of higher expenses. Zynga Inc., down 19 cents to $3.89. Shares of the maker of “Farmville” and other online games continued to fall after reporting a first-quarter loss last week. (AP)


SCIENCE

TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014

The Continuing Evolution of Genes Each of us carries just over 20,000 genes that encode everything from the keratin in our hair down to the muscle fibers in our toes. It’s no great mystery where our own genes came from: our parents bequeathed them to us. And our parents, in turn, got their genes from their parents. But where along that genealogical line did each of those 20,000 protein-coding genes get its start? That question has hung over the science of genetics ever since its dawn a century ago. “It’s a basic question of life: how evolution generates novelty,” said Diethard Tautz of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön, Germany. New studies are now bringing the answer into focus. Some of our genes are immensely old, perhaps dating all the way back to the earliest chapters of life on Earth. But a surprising number of genes emerged more recently — many in just the past few million years. The youngest evolved after our own species broke off from our cousins, the apes. Identifying Gene Families Geneticists first speculated about the origin of genes in the early 20th century. Some proposed that when cells duplicate their DNA, they accidentally copy some genes twice. At first the two genes are identical. But later, they evolve into different sequences.

Scientists have found that new genes in many species are developing more recently than previously thought. ZACH WISE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

At the end of the century, as scientists gained the ability to read the precise sequence of DNA, they found that this hunch was correct. “It became clear that gene duplication played a role in evolution,” Tautz said. As genes duplicate over millions of years, they can grow into so-called gene families, each containing hundreds of similar genes. ‘De Novo Genes’ David Begun, an evolution scientist at the University of California, Davis, and his colleagues renamed so-called orphan genes “de novo genes,” from the Latin for new. He found that many of his fellow scientists weren’t ready to accept this new idea. “It took a while for people to believe this was occurring,” he said. “It seems kind of nutty to people when they first hear of it.” One reason it no longer seems so improbable is that Begun and

other researchers have documented the step-by-step process by which a new gene can come into existence. The scientists found 142 de novo genes that were present in some populations of flies and not in others, meaning that they must have evolved recently: They’ve only had enough time to spread across part of the species. Begun suspects that the true number of de novo genes in the flies is higher. And his research indicates that new genes can evolve at a remarkably fast rate. But what does that mean to our species? Anne-Ruxandra Carvunis, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, San Diego, says the answers are still a way off. “The true impact of de novo genes in what makes us humans,” she said, “remains to be fully investigated.” CARL ZIMMER

Some Corals Can to Adapt to Warmer Waters Warming ocean waters have already devastated many coral reefs. But new research involving a species of coral that is resistant to higher temperatures suggests that others may be able to adapt, too. When water gets too warm, most species of coral turn white, a process known as bleaching, It often leads to death. But one species of coral, Acropora hyacinthus, is thriving off the Samoan Islands in pools of water that reach temperatures up to 95 degrees Fahrenheit. To determine what made the species so heat-resistant, and to see if others could adapt, a team led by Stephen R. Palumbi, a marine biologist at Stanford, devised what he called a “coral stress test.” The researchers placed several species of coral, including the heat-resistant one, into coolers

Certain species of coral have the ability to withstand higher temperatures in changing waters. STEVE PALUMBI

that periodically hit high temperatures then cooled down again. “We found that all the colonies we tested could acquire the ability to withstand higher temperatures,” though the species already accustomed to warm water performed best, Palumbi said. The scientists report their findings in the journal Science. Though A. hyacinthus owes

some of its heat resistance to genetics, Palumbi said, the test shows that it also gained resistance through gradual conditioning as temperatures rose and fell, like an athlete running one mile farther every day. If other species can do so as well, then perhaps the short-term prognosis for coral is not so dire. DOUGLAS QUENQUA

6

Now It’s Learning To Read Humans How well can computers interact with humans? Certainly computers play a mean game of chess, which requires strategy and logic, and “Jeopardy!,” in which they must process language to understand clues read by Alex Trebek. But in recent years, scientists have striven for an even more complex goal: programming computers to read human facial expressions. The practical applications could be profound. Computers could supplement or even replace lie detectors. They could be installed at border crossings and airport security checks. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have written software that not only detected whether a person’s face revealed genuine or faked pain, but did so far more accurately than human observers. While other scientists have already refined a computer’s ability to identify nuances of smiles and grimaces, this may be the first time a computer has triumphed over humans at reading their own species. “A particular success like this has been elusive,” said Matthew A. Turk, a professor of computer science. “It’s one of several recent examples of how the field is now producing useful technologies rather than research that only stays in the lab.” Studies show that people generally excel at using facial expression to deceive others. And other people, studies show, typically cannot discern those deceptions. In a new study, humans and a computer were shown videos of people in real pain or pretending. The computer differentiated suffering from faking with greater accuracy. “We have a fair amount of evidence to show that humans are paying attention to the wrong cues,” said Marian S. Bartlett, a research professor at the Institute for Neural Computation at San Diego and the lead author of the study. For the study, researchers used a standard protocol to produce pain, with individuals plunging an arm in ice water for a minute. Researchers also asked the subjects to dip an arm in warm water for a moment and to fake an expression of pain. JAN HOFFMAN


OBITUARY

TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014

7

Jack Ramsay Dies at 89; Led Blazers to 1977 N.B.A. Title “Among players, Ramsay was the ultimate coach’s coach,” David Halberstam wrote in his book, “The Breaks of the Game” (1981), a look at the pro basketball world through Ramsay’s Blazers teams. “Nothing Jack Ramsay was left to chance. His scouting and his breakdown of opponents before a game were acute, complete and prophetic. He expected certain things to happen on the court and they almost always did.” Lionel Hollins, a guard on the Blazers’ championship team and later a coach of the

Jack Ramsay, the Hall of Fame coach who took the Portland Trail Blazers to their only N.B.A. championship and who was regarded as one of pro basketball’s keenest coaching minds, died on Monday in Naples, Fla. He was 89. The cause was cancer, his son Chris said. Ramsay was known in the basketball world as Dr. Jack, for the doctorate in education he received from the University of Pennsylvania. But coaches and players were also paying respect to his cerebral approach. Ramsay emphasized preparation, dedication, unselfish play, a running game, tough defense and strong rebounding. He put his teams through grueling practices.

CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz PUZZLE BY JULES P. MARKEY

ACROSS 1 Sticks

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Man’s Brest friend?

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Agatha Christie title

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Inexperienced in

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Ones coming into view

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2014 TV retiree

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Indonesia joined it in 1962 … and left in 2008

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Mexican mama bear

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beachgoer

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Elite group

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 5,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/studentcrosswords.

Grizzlies, first in Vancouver and then in Memphis, described Ramsay’s approach after being traded to the Philadelphia 76ers in 1980. “Jack taught me the fundamentals,” Hollins said. “Making the right pass at the right time, defense, how to concentrate and become a more disciplined player.” Bill Walton, the star center on the Blazers’ championship team, who had played for John Wooden on N.C.A.A. championship teams at U.C.L.A., called Ramsay “the very best coach I played for, and I played for some great coaches.” Ramsay was famously intense, whether badgering referees or plotting strategy in timeout huddles, kneeling on a towel, a balding figure with bushy eyebrows and an intimidating glare. He was also a physical fitness buff, doing daily calisthenics, jogging and swimming even into his 80s while being treated for cancer. When he was named the Trail Blazers’ coach in 1976, replacing Lenny Wilkens, Ramsay took over a team that never had a winning record in its six seasons in the N.B.A. But his first Portland squad, led by Walton, Hollins and Maurice Lucas at forward, captured the 1977 N.B.A. championship by defeating the 76ers of Julius Erving in a six-game playoff final. Ramsay spent more than 60 years in basketball, as a player and coach at St. Joseph’s of Philadelphia, a head coach for four N.B.A. teams and a TV and radio broadcast commentator and analyst, most recently for ESPN. He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass., in 1992. Ramsay was captivated by the beauty of basketball and the creative challenges it presented. In his book “The Coach’s Art” (1978), written with John Strawn, he called basketball “a ballet, a graceful sweep and flow of patterned movement, counterpointed by daring and imaginative flights of solitary brilliance.” He added: “It is winning; it is winning; it is winning!” RICHARD GOLDSTEIN

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OPINION

TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014

EDITORIALS OF THE TIMES

Political Executions in Egypt An out-of-control Egyptian government has now sentenced more than 680 people to death in a mass trial that lasted a few minutes and is part of an effort not just to crush its political opponents but to eliminate them. Last month, a court delivered a similar sentence on 529 other Islamists. The sentences further demonstrate that the military-led government’s ruthless disregard for the law and its contrary political views go far beyond anything that former President Mohamed Morsi was accused of doing when he was deposed by the army in July. And what did the Obama administration have to say about this travesty, which will further fuel hostility and division in one of the Arab world’s most important countries? “The United States is deeply troubled,” the office of the press secretary said in a shockingly weak statement. There was no indication that the administration would reconsider last week’s decision to provide the Egyptians with 10 Apache helicopters and more than $650 million in aid. The death sentences are subject to appeal, but that is little solace to the defendants who have been accused and sentenced with nothing resembling justice or even minimal due process. In Monday’s ruling, the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, Mohamed Badie, was among those convicted even though he repeatedly emphasized nonviolence in his public remarks in the period leading up the anti-Islamist crackdown that began with Morsi’s overthrow and the backlash against it. The sentences were imposed for inciting violence and disturbances in which one police

officer was allegedly killed. But none of those sentenced were charged with participating in his murder. Badie and many others were given the death sentence for lesser crimes. In a separate ruling, a court banned the activities of the April 6 group, a liberal organization that spearheaded the revolt against then-President Hosni Mubarak in 2011. Its leaders are already serving three-year sentences for organizing an unauthorized protest.

The sentencing of 680 people in a mass trial demonstrates a ruthless disregard for the law. The courts in Egypt were once regarded as relatively liberal within its authoritarian system, but it is clear that the judges have become a government tool. There has been no serious attempt to deliver justice for the thousands of antigovernment critics who are languishing in jails or the estimated 1,000 who were killed by security forces during last year’s protests by supporters of Morsi and the Brotherhood. Like the United States, Israel has an interest in a stable Egypt that can honor the 1979 Israel-Egypt peace treaty and defeat militants in Sinai. But an Egyptian government that persecutes its political opponents and denies them justice and any political role in society will produce only instability and violence.

Troubling Student Loans College students who borrow from private lenders often assume that private and federal student loans work the same way. The two could not be more different. Federal loans, for example, have low, fixed rates and broad consumer protections that permit people who run into trouble to make lower, partial payments or to defer them altogether until they recover financially. Private student loans from banks and other lenders typically come with variable interest rates, which means that borrowers who misunderstand the conditions of the loan can be shocked to find what they owe in the end. In addition, private loans offer limited consumer protections, leaving borrowers who get into trouble with few options other than default. This makes it difficult for them to get jobs, credit or to even rent apartments. The adverse consequences of a single default can last many years. These drawbacks are bad enough, but the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau now finds other problems. Borrowers have been forced into default without warning. Borrowers with perfect credit histories can suddenly be required to pay the full amount

of the loan if someone who co-signed on the loan dies. Some have received the bad news, accompanied by threats of legal action, even as they mourn the death of the parent or grandparent who co-signed their loan. These unfair contracts date from the fiscal crisis, when investors were burned by securities backed by sloppily drawn student loans to borrowers who had not been properly vetted. The upshot was that more lenders began requiring co-signers who could be held accountable. That seemed reasonable. But the agency report shows that lenders are springing surprises not only on borrowers but on co-signers, keeping them tied to loans long after borrowers have proved their creditworthiness. Federal regulators clearly have a lot to do to address what amounts to a student loan crisis. (Total student indebtedness is now about $1.2 trillion.) They can begin by preventing contracts that unfairly burden borrowers in the private market who owe $150 billion. Terms should be clearly stated. Borrowers should be notified that their loans are at risk. And in no case should a borrower in good standing be shoved into default.

8

JOE NOCERA

Buffett Bites Back The first Saturday in May is always a great day for Warren Buffett. That’s the day his conglomerate, Berkshire Hathaway, holds its annual meeting in Omaha. Thousands of shareholders descend on the city — there were more than 30,000 last year — where they eat ice cream at Dairy Queen (a Berkshire Hathaway holding) and dine at Buffett’s favorite restaurants. This year, according to his letter, the festivities will include a newspaper-tossing contest, and a table-tennis champion who will take on all comers. Mostly, though, investors come to hear Buffett and his longtime partner, Charlie Munger, answer questions, which they’ll do on Saturday. Some of the questions will be about Berkshire Hathaway. Others will give Buffett a chance to talk about the buy-and-hold stock strategy that has made him, at 83, the second-wealthiest American behind Bill Gates. I wonder, though, if anyone attending this year’s meeting is going to ask him about his decision to abstain from voting Berkshire Hathaway’s 400 million shares against Coca-Cola’s equity compensation plan, even though Buffett felt the plan was, in his words, “excessive.” Given Buffett’s previous statements about the importance of institutional investors speaking out against excessive executive compensation, I thought he had been both cowardly and hypocritical. So did a lot of other people. But Buffett went on the offensive in an interview with Fortune magazine. In abstaining, he said, he was taking a stand. “That’s a very loud voice coming from Berkshire,” he said. “It obviously means we don’t approve of the plan.” He added that the Coke board was simply acting the way all boards do: “The other guys are doing it so we will do the same thing. The idea of fundamentally re-examining the whole thing doesn’t occur to these companies.” Nor was Buffett willing to try to bring about such a re-examination, even though he was in the perfect position to do so in this case. In fact, Buffett had it right last week in an interview with CNBC: He should be embarrassed. As the company’s largest shareholder, he should have felt duty-bound to vote against the plan — or at least to let it be known beforehand how he was going to vote. Indeed, when I asked David Winters of Wintergreen Advisers, who had led the charge against the Coke equity plan, what he thought about Buffett’s latest statement, he told me that if Buffett had announced a month before the Coke annual meeting that he was going to abstain, it might well have been a factor. “If people had known that Buffett had agreed with us that the plan was excessive, the outcome of the vote might have been significantly different,” he said. As it was, 83 percent of the shares voted favored the plan, a number Coke has been trumpeting ever since the meeting. When it comes to buying stocks, everybody should follow Warren Buffett’s example. But, on the subject of executive compensation, do what he says, not what he does.


TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014 9

SPORTS

Sterling’s Fate May Lie With the New Guard When the Memphis Grizzlies were sold in 2012, a 34-year-old entrepreneur paid $377 million. Earlier this month, two hedge fund billionaires shelled out $550 million for the Milwaukee Bucks. And then there is Donald Sterling, the former divorce lawyer who bought the Clippers for $12.7 million some 33 years ago and now finds himself at the center of swirling debate over racist remarks attributed to him. Sterling represents the old guard of N.B.A. owners, a group of men who bought teams before the league became a global phenomenon worth billions of dollars. Now, the new guard of owners could help determine Sterling’s fate as they await findings from the investigation led by Adam Silver, the N.B.A. commissioner, into the alleged racist statements. Silver, who has been commissioner

since February, scheduled a news conference for Tuesday. Pressure on the Clippers mounted by the hour. On Monday, a flurry of advertisers including CarMax, Virgin Airlines, Red Bull, Kia, State Farm and others, raced to suspend or cut ties with the team. State Farm called the alleged remarks offensive and said the insurance company would be “taking a pause in our relationship with the organization.” As the Clippers prepared to play Game 5 of its first-round playoff series at home against the Golden State Warriors on Tuesday — the first home game since the recordings were released Friday — Sterling found himself increasingly isolated, drawing universal condemnation from President Obama, Michael Jordan and even Sterling’s own wife, Rochelle. Sterling has reached out to Doc

Rivers, the Clippers’ coach, but Rivers said he rebuffed him, and he felt certain that it was Sterling’s voice on the tape, which was allegedly recorded by a woman identified as V. Stiviano, who has regularly been seen with Sterling. “I haven’t given him an opportunity to explain himself and, quite honestly, right now I don’t want him to, to me,” Rivers said Monday. “I’ll wait for that further judgment.” Several team owners released statements condemning Sterling’s alleged remarks while pledging their support for Silver. “There is no place for prejudice or intolerance in our league, or anywhere else,” said Tom Gores, 49, a private equity investor who bought the Detroit Pistons for $325 million in 2011. “That’s not a debatable point.” SCOTT CACCIOLA and BILLY WITZ

James and Heat Complete Their Sweep of Bobcats LeBron James scored 31 points, and the Miami Heat completed a first-round sweep of the host Charlotte Bobcats with a 109-98 victory Monday night. James 19 points after N.B.A. scored injuring his thigh in Roundup the third quarter. He finished the game 10 of 19 from the field and had nine assists. Chris Bosh added 17 points, and Dwyane Wade battled through foul trouble and finished with 15 points as Miami won its 20th straight game over Charlotte. The two-time defending champion N.B.A. champions will await the winner of Brooklyn-Toronto series, which is tied 2-2.

Kemba Walker led Charlotte with 29 points. The Bobcats played without Al Jefferson, their leading scorer and rebounder who has been bothered by a foot injury since the first quarter of Game 1. The loss signaled the end of an era for the Bobcats. They will become the Hornets next season. ATLANTA 107, INDIANA 97 Mike Scott made five 3-pointers during a 30-6 second-quarter run in Indianapolis, and the Atlanta Hawks fended off a furious fourth-quarter rally to beat top-seeded Indiana 107-97 and take a 3-2 lead in the best-of-seven series. Atlanta can clinch the firstround series at home Thursday.

WEATHER High/low temperatures for the 21 hours ended at 4 p.m. yesterday, Eastern time, and precipitation (in inches) for the 18 hours ended at 1 p.m. yesterday. Expected conditions for today and tomorrow. Weather conditions: C-clouds, F-fog, H-haze, I-ice, PC-partly cloudy, R-rain, S-sun, Sh-showers, Sn-snow, SS-snow showers, T-thunderstorms, Tr-trace, W-windy.

U.S. CITIES Albuquerque Atlanta Boise Boston Buffalo Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas-Ft. Worth Denver Detroit

Yesterday 63/ 44 Tr 78/ 62 0.03 55/ 33 0 53/ 42 0 57/ 37 0 83/ 65 0 55/ 46 0.09 56/ 47 0.18 82/ 65 0 54/ 34 0.02 52/ 46 0.13

Today 61/ 40 S 78/ 66 T 64/ 42 S 50/ 38 C 53/ 44 R 78/ 64 T 66/ 49 T 69/ 53 T 76/ 47 PC 54/ 31 R 70/ 52 R

Tomorrow 62/ 42 S 77/ 55 T 71/ 45 S 47/ 42 R 62/ 48 R 79/ 60 T 58/ 44 Sh 73/ 49 C 68/ 45 PC 50/ 28 Sh 70/ 49 T

Houston Kansas City Los Angeles Miami Mpls.-St. Paul New York City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Salt Lake City San Francisco Seattle St. Louis Washington

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Scott scored all 17 of his points during an incredible 12-minute stretch when Atlanta went 13 of 16 from the field and outscored Indiana 41-19 to take a 61-40 halftime lead. The Hawks and the 1970 Milwaukee Bucks are the only road teams in the shot-clock era to score at least 40 points and allow fewer than 20 in any quarter of a playoff game. Paul George had 26 for Indiana, which got as close as eight points in the final minute. For the Pacers, it was another bleak chapter in a second-half implosion that could go down as the worst in N.B.A. history if they can’t survive this series. (AP) 84/ 56 55/ 38 89/ 63 88/ 77 43/ 36 51/ 44 91/ 71 51/ 46 89/ 63 56/ 39 75/ 54 71/ 47 70/ 49 54/ 53

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FOREIGN CITIES Acapulco Athens Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo

Yesterday 90/ 75 0 70/ 52 0.01 79/ 50 0 68/ 52 0 72/ 59 0 88/ 70 0

Today 91/ 72 PC 69/ 54 PC 80/ 54 S 72/ 49 PC 64/ 57 Sh 89/ 67 S

Tomorrow 90/ 73 PC 71/ 55 PC 85/ 56 S 73/ 51 PC 64/ 54 PC 90/ 67 S

Cape Town Dublin Geneva Hong Kong Kingston Lima London Madrid Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Paris Prague Rio de Janeiro Rome Santiago Stockholm Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Warsaw

In Brief Penguins Advance Evgeni Malkin and the Pittsburgh Penguins finally flexed their offensive muscles. And they needed every bit of scoring they could muster. Malkin had a hat trick and the Penguins almost blew a four-goal lead before holding off the Blue Jackets in Columbus, Ohio, 4-3 on Monday to clinch their first-round playoff series in six games. (AP)

Wild Tie Up Series Zach Parise scored early and late on tipped shots, and the host Minnesota Wild tacked on two empty-net goals for a 5-2 victory over the Colorado Avalanche on Monday night that sent the firstround playoff series to a decisive Game 7. The teams will meet again Wednesday in Denver. (AP)

N . B . A . SCORES SUNDAY’S LATE GAME Portland 123, Houston 120, OT Trail Blazers lead series, 3-1 MONDAY Miami 109, Charlotte 98 Heat win series, 4-0 Atlanta 107, Indiana 97 Hawks lead series, 3-2

N . H. L. SCORES MONDAY Pittsburgh 4, Columbus 3 Penguins win series, 4-2 Minnesota 5, Colorado 2 Series is tied, 3-3

A . L. SC O RES MONDAY Oakland 4, Texas 0 Chicago White Sox 7, Tampa Bay 3

N . L. SC O RES MONDAY Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, ppd., rain 72/ 45 57/ 46 54/ 46 85/ 76 88/ 81 73/ 62 63/ 50 77/ 52 83/ 57 54/ 36 64/ 51 85/ 75 59/ 46 66/ 50 77/ 64 64/ 54 72/ 43 72/ 41 72/ 61 72/ 59 55/ 37 57/ 39 63/ 50

0 0.02 0.11 0.02 0 0 0.01 0 0 0 0.02 0 0.02 0.02 0.02 0 0 0 0.02 0 0 0.01 0

68/ 52 59/ 44 62/ 47 82/ 73 87/ 79 74/ 60 63/ 48 75/ 52 80/ 55 60/ 46 68/ 47 87/ 76 62/ 48 70/ 47 76/ 65 67/ 50 72/ 54 54/ 34 79/ 63 70/ 57 48/ 42 63/ 50 70/ 45

R PC Sh S PC PC Sh PC PC C PC PC R Sh S PC S PC PC C R PC PC

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S R Sh R S PC PC PC T R PC PC Sh Sh S PC PC Sh C R R PC PC


SPORTS JOURNAL

TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2014

After 33 Years, Reaching a Boiling Point Why did it take a tape recording aired on a gossip website to ignite nationwide ire against Donald Sterling? Suddenly, as if it were breaking news, a recorded SportS of conversation the timeS said to be beJuliet macur tween Sterling and a girlfriend has made the Los Angeles Clippers’ owner the most hated outlaw in the sports world, a man considered such a vile bigot that even President Obama felt the need to weigh in. It looks as if the N.B.A. and its team owners have finally had enough of Sterling, and the moment for dealing with him is here. It only took the league 33 years. Sterling bought the Clippers in 1981 and has been a blight on the N.B.A. ever since. It’s only now — just as the Clippers are making a rare cameo in the playoffs — that the league has pledged to punish its troublesome owner. When the Clippers were losing, which they did for 27 of Sterling’s years there, the league tacitly accepted Sterling’s well-documented racism and other flaws. For decades it was acceptable to let him run his team like “a Southern plantationlike structure,” as the former Clippers general manager Elgin Baylor once charged in a lawsuit. Sterling routinely oper-

DANNY MOLOSHOK/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Donald Sterling, the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, at a March 2009 game. ated below the radar, so what was there to worry about? Only now, after an illicit recording obtained by the gossip site TMZ.com caught someone who is said to be Sterling saying that he did not want his friend associating with black people and did not even want blacks at his games, and after team sponsors began to flee en masse because of the recording, the N.B.A. decided that enough was enough. One of the most distressing parts of the revelations might have been that they did not come as a surprise. A string of lawsuits against Sterling over the years was not enough to pique the N.B.A.’s interest in disciplining

him. A claim in one lawsuit said Sterling did not like Hispanics as tenants because all they did was “smoke and drink and just hang around the building.” A 2009 federal discrimination lawsuit led to a $2.76 million settlement, widely reported to be the largest amount paid in such a suit. Did the N.B.A. and its team owners somehow miss that news? Or did they just ignore it and hope others would too because, after all, the Clippers were usually so bad that no one really cared what they did? It’s time for the league and the team owners to act. None of them can feign ignorance. For years, they had their chance to point out that Sterling was a liability for the league, and to press for his departure from the their ranks. Now the league is in an unwinnable situation. It may try to force Sterling to sell the team — that is what its players seem to want — but that will not be easy or cheap. In January, Forbes valued the team at $575 million. Sterling is the league’s longest-tenured owner and will probably not react well to any attempt to drive him out. The sad part is that it took this long. Maybe that is because until now everyone was making so much money. Maybe their pockets became so heavy they could not stand up for what was right.

Move Over Tennis Elbow; Wrist Injuries New Plague What should have been an exciting clash between two tennis titans was instead clouded by a white mass. Novak Djokovic, who had complained about pain in his right wrist earlier at the Monte Carlo Masters, took the court April 19 for his semifinal against Roger Federer with his forearm wrapped in white tape. Djokovic lost, 7-5, 6-2, but the outcome did not generate nearly as much concern as did worries about his health. Although Djokovic said he would be able to return to competition at the Madrid Open next week, the wrist has long been a trouble spot for tennis players. And with the top players swinging harder and more frequently than ever, the wrist has become an increasingly vulnerable joint. Caroline Wozniacki, ranked No. 14, withdrew last week from the tournament in Stuttgart, Ger-

many, citing a left wrist injury. No. 17 Sloane Stephens has also been hampered by a wrist injury this season. Juan Martín del Potro, ranked a career-high No. 4 in January, has been particularly plagued by wrist injuries. After winning the 2009 United States Open, del Potro missed much of the next year with an injury to his right wrist that required surgery. More recently, del Potro, 25, was having trouble with his left wrist and decided to have surgery in late March. Dr. Richard Berger, an orthopedic surgeon at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., performed the operation on del Potro. “I do sense that more of the top players, the very elite touring pros, are probably experiencing injuries sufficient to take them out of the sport for some period in time at a higher rate,” Berger said. “Tennis is one of those sports that,

honestly, the wrist is one of the structures at most risk because the force of contact with the ball is transmitted directly through the wrist, and very often, with an element of torque as the player attempts to place higher and higher degrees of spin on the ball.” Berger said players with a power-laden baseline style were especially vulnerable to wrist injuries. “When you hear him make contact with the ball when he’s 100 percent, you can just hear the crack of the contact,” Berger said of del Potro. “It’s almost like the ball is going, for a moment, supersonic.” And the level of physicality in the sport continues to be pushed higher, especially in lengthy rallies. Berger said, “They’re going to be playing as hard as they can against their opponents, and they can get into this vicious cycle of ‘Well, I can outhit you.’ ” BEN ROTHENBERG

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In Brief Harper Out Until July The Nationals outfielder Bryce Harper reportedly will be sidelined at least until July because of surgery on his left thumb. ESPN. com reported Monday that the two-time All-Star will have the operation Tuesday. A spokesman for the Nationals, John Dever, declined to comment. The team was off Monday, and plays Tuesday night at Houston. The Nationals put Harper on the 15-day disabled list Sunday, saying he had a sprained left thumb. (AP)

Young Gets Tryout The free-agent quarterback Vince Young was expected to take a physical with the Cleveland Browns on Monday and to participate in Cleveland’s minicamp this week. Browns General Manager Ray Farmer said the team had been tracking Young, who has not played in an N.F.L. regular-season game since 2011 with Philadelphia. The Browns need to add a veteran to back up Brian Hoyer, who is penciled in as the starter heading into this season but is coming off knee surgery. (AP)

A Fifth Quarterback The Giants have signed quarterback Rusty Smith, who played the last four seasons as a backup with the Tennessee Titans but has not gotten into a game since 2012. Smith is the fifth quarterback on the roster, joining the starter Eli Manning, the 2013 backups Curtis Painter and Ryan Nassib, and Josh Freeman, who was signed last week. (AP)


YOURNAVY IN THE NEWS

Sea Duty to bring more Money and Opportunity for Sailors By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Elliott Fabrizio, Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- The Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) and Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, Moran’s senior enlisted advisor, addressed Sailors and answered questions at the Association of the United States Navy’s 1st Annual Career Development Symposium (AUSN), April 23 in Norfolk, Va. Vice Adm. Bill Moran, CNP, spoke about the importance of sea duty, upcoming advancement changes and stressed the need for Sailors to look out for one another. “Post Iraq and Afghanistan, our Navy will continue to be out forward-where we need to be, when it matters,” said Moran. “A key part of making sure those ships and units are ready will be their manning.” Moran told the audience that his office remains focused on

filling critical gaps at sea and that the Navy has reduced those gaps by approximately 50 percent in the last two years. “We are working hard to demonstrate how we value service at sea-not just talking about it,” said Moran. “Improving at-sea manning, reducing ‘cross decks’, paying Sailors more for going and staying at sea are all tangible examples of our commitment.” In addition to the Career Sea Pay (CSP) increase, which takes effect on May 1, Moran said that the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) and he are working to institute an additional allowance for Sailors deployed longer than 190 days. “Your leadership wants to reward you for the sacrifices you and your families make during the longer and tougher deployments

that we expect for the foreseeable future,” Moran told the roughly 150 Sailors in the audience. Responding to questions, CNP and Fleet discussed the latest news on advancements and retention. Moran said upcoming changes to the Final Multiple Score, expected to be announced next month, will increase the focus on performance and the opportunities for Sailors excelling

in their job. “The best chances our Sailors have to advance and succeed are at sea--the changes we have in the works for the Final Multiple Score and for CAP (Command Advancement Program) are intended to recognize performance and further incentivize sea duty.” CNP closed by reminding Sailors about the importance of looking out for each other and using bystander intervention to prevent suicide, sexual assault and destructive decisions. “If we can’t trust each other as ‘Shipmates’, we are in real trouble,” said Moran. “If we are going to continue to be successful as a Navy, we have to be able to rely on each other-up and down the chain of command.”

PO2 Mark A. Mayo Awarded Navy and Marine Corps Medal From Naval Station Norfolk Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark A. Mayo will be posthumously awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal on Friday at Arlington National Cemetery. Mayo, 24, was killed during a shooting incident at Naval Station Norfolk Mar. 24. Mayo was assigned to Naval Security Forces, Naval Station Norfolk. The Navy and Marine Corps Medal is the highest non-combat decoration awarded for heroism by the United States Department

of the Navy to the members of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps. Vice Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Mark Ferguson, will present the award to Mayo’s family in a private ceremony prior to the burial. Mayo will be laid to rest at 1 p.m. Friday at Arlington. A Hagerstown, Md. native, Mayo enlisted in the Navy in October 2007 and reported to Naval Station Norfolk in May 2011.

140326-N-ZZ999-501 WASHINGTON (March 26, 2014) An undated file photo of Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Mark A. Mayo. Mayo, 24, was killed during a shooting incident at Naval Station Norfolk Monday, March 24. Mayo was assigned to Naval Security Forces at Naval Station Norfolk. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)


TR IN ACTION


Staff Commanding Officer Capt. Daniel Grieco Executive Officer Capt. Mark Colombo Public Affairs Officer Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Evans Media Officer Ensign Jack Georges Ensign Courtney Vandament Senior Editor MCC Adrian Melendez Editor MC2 Katie Lash Layout MC3 (SW) Heath Zeigler Rough Rider Contributors Theodore Roosevelt Media MCSN William Spears MCSA Wyatt Anthony MCSA Matthew Young Command Ombudsman Sabrina Bishop Linda Watford Michelle V. Thomas cvn71ombudsman@gmail.com The Rough Rider is an authorized publication for the crew of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Contents herein are not necessarily the views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. government, Department of Defense, Department of the Navy or the Commanding Officer of TR. All items for publication in The Rough Rider must be submitted to the editor no later than three days prior to publication. Do you have a story you’d like to see in the Rough Rider? Contact the Media Department at (757) 443-7419 or stop by 3-180-0-Q.

CHECK US OUT ONLINE! Facebook.com/ussTheodoreRoosevelt Twitter: @TheRealCVN71


WHAT’S ON underway movie schedule

Times

Ch. 66

Tuesday

April 29, 2014

Ch. 67

Ch. 68

0900

THE LEGEND OF HERCULES

FROZEN

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE MARKED ONES

1100

LONE SURVIVOR

ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES

JURASSIC PARK

1330

ALL IS LOST

BULL DURHAM

I, FRANKENSTEIN

1530

THE HOBBIT: DESOLATION OF SMAUG

THE LONE RANGER

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE

1830

LABOR DAY

VAMPIRE ACADEMY

ELYSIUM

2030

THE LEGEND OF HERCULES

FROZEN

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE MARKED ONES

2230

LONE SURVIVOR

ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES

JURASSIC PARK

0100

ALL IS LOST

BULL DURHAM

I, FRANKENSTEIN

0300

THE HOBBIT: DESOLATION OF SMAUG

THE LONE RANGER

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE

0600

LABOR DAY

VAMPIRE ACADEMY

ELYSIUM

*Movie schedule is subject to change.

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