Issuu on Google+

ROUGH RIDER USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT (CVN 71)

Underway

January 28, 2014 • DAILY

inside: Lending an ear and Showing our pride


Forget Stigmas, Talk to Someone

Story by MCSN Jenna Kaliszewski

U

SS Theodore Roosevelt’s (CVN 71) command psychologist has heard it all before. “It’s going to ruin my career.” “They’ll think I’m crazy.” “They’ll think I’m not strong enough to handle the military.” These might be common thoughts Sailors have about seeing a counselor or psychologist, yet they could not be further from the truth. TR mental health professionals and counselors can teach Sailors how to learn and cope with difficult and stressful situations. “In the ship environment people have this misunderstanding that people who come to see me are crazy or something’s wrong with them,” said Dr. Mathew Rariden, TR’s command psychologist. “The vast majority of my time I’m counseling Sailors. It isn’t that something’s wrong with them, it’s about the fact that they’re having normal reactions to an abnormal environment.” The population on the ship is very healthy, however, the environment is stressful, said Rariden. “In the military, you’ve entered an environment that’s very stressful, and you’re away from your established sources of support,” said Rariden. Rariden’s primary goal is to help Sailors stay effective and be ready to execute the mission. To do so, Sailors may need to develop new skills to keep them on top of their game. “My role here is to maximize resiliency and keep as many people fit for duty as possible,” said Rariden. Sailors and Marines of all ranks and backgrounds utilize this service provided by the Navy. “I’ve seen enlisted Sailors, officers, warrant officers, Marine Corps special forces, and Navy Seals,” said Rariden. “Very strong people under the right confluence of stressors get

Dr. Mathew Rariden, Command Psychologist aboard TR, works as a counselor on the ship for Sailors who need someone to talk to.

stuck. It has nothing to do with their mental fortitude or their strength of character. Everybody has their point and can get overwhelmed.” Rariden and his team have a strict confidentiality policy. “However, if someone shares thoughts, a plan and intent to harm themselves or others then safety measures will need to be taken,” said Rariden. Sailors who want to speak to someone can talk to Rariden, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Arkeshia Deveaux, psychiatric technician, Chief Personnel Specialist Tia Middlebrook, command Sexual Assault and Prevention Response (SAPR) Counselor or Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (equipment) 1st Class Mark Harper, Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program (SARP) Counselor.

The Pride of Colors

Story by MC3 John M. Drew Photo by MC3 Stephane Belcher heodore Roosevelt’s volunteer color guard has the honor of upholding a naval tradition that began more than 200 years ago. Colors is the tradition of raising the American flag in the morning and lowering it in the evening. The British military began the tradition in 1797. The U.S. Navy officially adopted the tradition in 1843 when it was entered in to the Rules and Regulations for the Government of the Navy. According to Navy regulations for Flags, Pennants, Honors, Ceremonies and Customs, “at morning colors, the ensign shall be started up at the beginning of the music (national anthem) and hoisted smartly to the peak or truck. At evening colors, the ensign shall be started from the peak or truck at the beginning of the music and the lowering so regulated as to be completed at the last note.” Sailors mark this time-honored tradition everyday on Navy ships in port and bases around the world at 8 a.m. and at sunset. “Performing colors means paying respect to my country and everyone who fought before me, served before me and to all the citizens of the country,” said Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Antonio Shelton, a member of TR’s color guard. “It’s a duty that shows respect. You’re honoring your country.” The color guard selects very few volunteers to participate in colors each year.

T

Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Shanice Houser and Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Antonio Shelton hoist the Don’t Tread On Me Flag on the flight deck during morning colors aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71).

“It’s an honor to do this every morning,” said Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Macy Nesbitt, a member of USS Theodore Roosevelt’s (CVN 71) color guard. “It’s an honor because you’re putting up your country’s flag. Not everyone gets to do something like this. It’s kind of special.”


F R O M T H E PA G E S O F

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014

THE MARKETS DJIA

D

NASDAQ

41.23 0.26%

15,837.88

D

44.56 1.08%

S&P 500 8.73 0.49%

D

4,083.61

1,781.56

EUROPE BRITAIN

GERMANY

FRANCE

FTSE 100

DAX

CAC 40

D

113.08 1.70%

6,550.66

D

42.80 0.46%

16.91 0.41%

D

9,349.22

4,144.56

AS I A / PAC I F I C JAPAN

HONG KONG

CHINA

NIKKEI 225 HANG SENG SHANGHAI

D

385.83 2.51%

D

473.96 2.11%

15,005.73 21,976.10

21.09 1.03%

D

2,033.30

A M E R I C AS CANADA

BRAZIL

MEXICO

TSX

BOVESPA

BOLSA

135.47 0.99%

D

D

86.33 0.18%

13,582.29 47,701.05

D

116.39 0.28%

40,863.41

Egypt’s Military Approves A Sisi Presidential Run CAIRO — The senior leaders of the Egyptian military have authorized General Abdul-Fattah el-Sisi to run for president, state television reported Monday afternoon, making it nearly certain that he would seek the post. Sisi, the military officer who ousted Egypt’s first elected president last summer and who has been serving as defense minister, was also promoted on Monday to field marshal. He is seen as all but certain to win the presidency. Nearly every other potential candidate has said that he would not run for the office if Sisi sought it. The government that he installed last summer has suppressed the largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, and cracked down on other dissenters. A revised constitution that was presented as a referendum on Sisi’s leadership was approved by more than 98 percent of the votes cast this month. The general has ridden a wave of popularity since he led the removal of President Mohamed Morsi. (NYT)

© 2014 The New York Times

FROM THE PAGES OF

Spy Agencies Scour Mobile Phone Apps When a smartphone user opens Angry Birds, the popular game application, and starts slinging birds at chortling green pigs, spies may be lurking in the background to snatch data revealing the player’s location, age, sex and other personal information, according to secret British intelligence documents. In their globe-spanning surveillance for terrorism suspects and other targets, the National Security Agency and its British counterpart have been trying to exploit a basic byproduct of modern telecommunications: With each new generation of mobile phone technology, ever greater amounts of personal data pour onto networks where spies can pick it up. According to dozens of previously undisclosed classified documents, among the most valuable of those unintended intelligence tools are so-called leaky apps that spew everything from users’ smartphone identification codes to where they have been.

The N.S.A. and Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters were working together on how to collect and store data from dozens of smartphone apps by 2007, according to the documents, provided by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor. Since then, the agencies have traded recipes for grabbing location and planning data when a target uses Google Maps, and for vacuuming up address books, buddy lists, phone logs and the geographic data embedded in photos when someone sends a post to mobile versions of Facebook, Twitter and other services. The eavesdroppers’ pursuit of mobile networks has been outlined in earlier reports, but the secret documents, shared by The New York Times, The Guardian and ProPublica, offer far more details of their ambitions for smartphones and the apps that run on them. The efforts were part of an initiative called “the mobile surge,” according to a 2011 British document, an analogy to

the troop surges in Iraq and Afghanistan. The scale and the specifics of the data haul are not clear. A secret 2012 British intelligence document says that spies can scrub smartphone apps that contain details like a user’s “political alignment” and sexual orientation. The documents do not address how many users might be affected, whether they include Americans, or how often, with so much information collected automatically, analysts would see personal data. “N.S.A. does not profile everyday Americans as it carries out its foreign intelligence mission,” the agency said in a written response to questions about the program. “Because some data of U.S. persons may at times be incidentally collected in N.S.A.’s lawful foreign intelligence mission, privacy protections for U.S. persons exist across the entire process.” Similar protections, the agency said, are in place for “innocent foreign citizens.” (NYT)

A Fed Policy Maker Urges It to Do More MINNEAPOLIS — Narayana R. Kocherlakota, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, was once a leading opponent of the Federal Reserve’s efforts to stimulate the economy. Today, he has emerged as the only senior official arguing publicly that the Fed should do even more. The Fed’s leadership, including incoming chairwoman Janet L. Yellen, decided in December that the economy was strong enough to start scaling back its long-running stimulus campaign. The Fed’s policy-making committee, which meets Tuesday and Wednesday, is expected to announce another $10 billion cut in the Fed’s monthly purchases of Treasury and mortgage-backed securities. But Kocherlakota, 50, spent recent months crisscrossing the Midwestern region served

by the Minneapolis Fed, telling audiences that persistent unemployment has created “a time of testing” for the Fed comparable to the rise of inflation in the late 1970s and early 1980s. So far, he says, the Fed is falling short. “As this goes on, there’s a temptation to think of this problem as being beyond what we as monetary policymakers can address,” Kocherlakota said. “We shouldn’t let the persistence of the problem lead us to the conclusion that we shouldn’t do more.” Kocherlakota’s outspoken advocacy for stronger action is particularly striking because he spent his first three years at the Minneapolis Fed, following his appointment in 2009, loudly arguing that the Fed should do less. Now, for the first time since Kocherlakota publicly changed

his mind in September 2012, he begins a one-year term as a voting member of the Fed’s policymaking committee. Kocherlakota, a former chairman of the economics department at the University of Minnesota, does not oppose reductions in the Fed’s bond purchases, but he wants to compensate by strengthening its plans to suppress short-term interest rates. That is a view he ruefully acknowledges has not gained much traction with his colleagues. Edward C. Prescott, who won the Nobel in economic science in 2004 and is on the Minneapolis Fed’s research staff, said Kocherlakota was misjudging the Fed’s abilities. Bond buying, he wrote, “is as effective in bringing prosperity as rain dancing is in bringing rain.” (NYT)

ONLINE: MORE PRICES AND ANALYSIS

Information on all United States stocks, plus bonds, mutual funds, commodities and foreign stocks along with analysis of industry sectors and stock indexes: nytimes.com/markets


INTERNATIONAL/NATIONAL

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014

Ukrainian Leader Faces New Pressures KIEV, Ukraine — Ahead of a special legislative session on Tuesday intended to help defuse Ukraine’s worsening political crisis, the majority party in Parliament issued a statement on Monday accusing protest leaders of directing a coup attempt against President Viktor F. Yanukovych and encouraging the occupation of government buildings across the country. Also on Monday, the justice minister, Olena Lukash, demanded that antigovernment demonstrators leave a main Justice Ministry building they have occupied, warning that if they did not she would urge Yanukovych to break off negotiations and impose a state of emergency in the country. The statements illustrated deepening exasperation among Yanukovych’s closest advisers and political allies over the government’s failure to contain the political crisis. On Saturday, Yanukovych offered to dismiss the cabinet and install two opposition

leaders in senior positions, along with other concessions, but the protesters rebuffed the proposal as insufficient. By early afternoon, protesters withdrew from the Justice Ministry building, but warned that they were prepared to seize it again depending on developments. The retreat was announced by Oleksandr Danylyuk, the leader of a faction called Common Cause. “If tomorrow the requirements are not met to restore constitutional order, organize presidential and parliamentary elections and stop the terror against the Ukrainian people, we will take over all administrative buildings,” Danylyuk wrote on Facebook. Mass protests continued to spread across the country over the weekend, including new attempts to seize regional administration buildings in eastern and southern Ukraine, areas that are typically strongholds of support for Yanukovych. In its statement, the major-

ity Party of Regions warned that Ukraine had been pushed to the brink of civil war, and blamed the three main opposition leaders, Arseniy P. Yatsenyuk, of the Fatherland Party who Yanukovych proposed as prime minister; Vitali Klitschko, the former boxer who was offered a post as vice premier; and Oleg Tyagnibok, of the nationalist Svoboda Party. “The whole country for three months has heard hysterical calls of this irresponsible trinity for an all-Ukrainian mobilization, the appeals to stand until the end, the calls to overthrow the regime and to take power into their own hands,” the party stated, adding, “Today, the very existence of an independent Ukraine is under threat.” The aggressiveness of the statement, even as Yanukovych has begun offering concessions, underscored the divisions that are certain to emerge as any compromise with the opposition takes shape. DAVID M. HERSZENHORN

Florida Congressman to Quit After Cocaine Charge WASHINGTON — Rep. Trey Radel, R-Fla., will resign from Congress effective Monday evening, according to a letter he sent to House Speaker John A. Boehner of Ohio. Radel, 37, a freshman legislator, pleaded guilty in November to a misdemeanor charge of buying 3.5 grams of cocaine in Washington and was sentenced to a year of probation. Though he had quietly returned to Congress in January after nearly a month at a private rehabilitation facility in Naples, Fla., Radel announced his resignation plans on Monday morning. Referring to his “personal struggles,” Radel wrote: “While

I have dealt with those issues on a personal level, it is my belief that professionally I cannot fully and effectively serve as a Trey Radel United States representative to the place I love and call home, Southwest Florida.” When he was first charged, Radel said he struggled “with the disease of alcoholism.” In his letter, Radel thanked his colleagues for their “tremendous support and encouragement.”

“As an eternal optimist, I know there are great things in store for our country when we find ways to work together,” he wrote. “Whether it is as a father, a husband, or in any future endeavor, I hope to contribute what I can to better our country in the years to come.” Radel, a former television anchorman and conservative talk show host, represents Florida’s 19th Congressional District, which includes the cities of Naples and Fort Myers. He won election in 2012 with 62 percent of the vote. The Southwest Florida district is solidly Republican, and his resignation is unlikely to benefit Democrats. ASHLEY PARKER

Maryland Mall Prepares to Reopen After Deadly Shooting COLUMBIA, Md. — The Maryland shopping mall closed since Saturday after three people died in a shooting will reopen Monday afternoon under tight security. Investigators said Monday that they were unsure why the man they believe was the gunman, Darion Marcus Aguilar, took a taxi to the Mall in Columbia on Saturday morning and shot Brianna Benlolo, 21, and Tyler Johnson, 25, in the skateboard and snow-

board specialty shop where they worked. Aguilar then turned the gun on himself, the police said. Aguilar, who lived in College Park, Md., with his mother, had written in his journal about being unhappy, the police said, though the authorities did not say what might have been behind the problems. Aguilar did not have a criminal record and the police said there was no known relationship between him and the victims.

On Monday, Zumiez, the skateboard and apparel store where the shooting occurred, was closed, and a temporary wall had been built at its entrance. A message on the wall said the shop would remain shuttered until further notice, in “loving memory” of Benolo and Johnson. A large banner, stretched along a railing of the mall, read, “Forever in our hearts.” THEO EMERY and EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS

2

In Brief Syria Peace Talks Appear Deadlocked The first face-to-face peace talks by antagonists in the Syria conflict appeared to deadlock on Monday, with enormous differences over the basic purpose of negotiations as well as a government relief gesture for civilians that the opposition denounced as a ploy. But both sides expressed willingness to resume talking. The negotiations in Geneva, overseen by Lakhdar Brahimi, the U.N. special envoy to Syria, adjourned Monday evening, and Brahimi conceded to reporters that the talks so far “haven’t produced much.” (NYT)

A Discredited Ruling Technically Stands The Supreme Court’s 1944 decision in Korematsu v. United States endorsed an executive order that required 110,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry to be removed from their homes and confined in detention camps. Justice Antonin Scalia has ranked Korematsu alongside Dred Scott, the 1857 decision that black slaves were property and not citizens, as among the court’s most shameful blunders. But Korematsu has never been overruled. The jurisprudential problem for the court is that it needs a proper setting in which to overrule a decision. The court will soon have a chance to do that in a case concerning a 2012 federal law that authorized the military detention without trial of people accused of providing support to terrorist organizations. (NYT)

Prisoner Release Despite American protests, the Afghan government has issued formal release orders for 37 prisoners who are regarded by the NATO-led coalition as dangerous insurgents. The release orders set the stage for a renewed confrontation between President Hamid Karzai and the United States. The Americans say there is enough evidence to prosecute the men, who are being held at Bagram. But Karzai called the prison a “Taliban-making factory” over the weekend, and told reporters, “God willing, I will close Bagram.” (NYT)


BUSINESS

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014

R.B.S. to Take Nearly $5 Billion Charge LONDON — The Royal Bank of Scotland said it would take nearly £3 billion, or about $4.97 billion, in charges to cover potential litigation claims related to mortgagebacked securities and other products sold before the financial crisis. That hit, on top of other charges announced last year, will likely produce a loss for the bank for 2013. Bailed out by the British government five years ago, Royal Bank of Scotland said it would take a £1.9 billion charge for potential claims related to mortgage-backed securities and other securities litigation in the United States. It also will take additional £465 million provision to cover claims related to payment protection insurance, a controversial insurance product that British banks

have paid billions of dollars in claims for being improperly sold, and another £500 million to cover claims related to so-called interest rate hedging products. R.B.S. had paid out £2.2 billion in claims and other costs related to payment protection insurance claims as of Dec. 31 after setting aside £3.1 billion to cover those claims. The bank had previously set aside £1.25 billion to cover claims related to the interest-rate products. “Billions of pounds have been spent to resolve conduct and litigation issues in recent years,” said Ross M. McEwan, the bank’s chief executive. “Costs on this scale were not predicted by anyone when R.B.S. was rescued in 2008. They come in addition to the costs of restructuring the bank’s bad assets and restoring its fund-

ing to prudent levels after the financial crisis.” The announcement comes about a little more than a week after Deutsche Bank reported its results earlier than expected, saying it had posted a loss of ¤1.2 billion, or about $1.64 billion, related to litigation and restructuring costs. R.B.S. is scheduled to report its results on Feb. 27. McEwan, who took over as C.E.O. in October, has already said he would not take a bonus for the bank’s performance in 2013 and 2014. On Monday, R.B.S. said that the eight other members of its executive committee would not receive bonuses for 2013. “We have to show we take accountability seriously,” McEwan said on a conference call Monday evening. CHAD BRAY

Liberty Global to Buy Dutch Cable Provider Ziggo LONDON — Liberty Global, the media company controlled by billionaire John C. Malone, has agreed to acquire Ziggo, the largest provider of cable television in the Netherlands, in a cashand-stock deal that values Ziggo at about €10 billion, or about $13.7 billion. The conditional agreement, announced on Monday, comes four months after Ziggo rebuffed a takeover approach by Liberty Global, calling that proposal “inadequate.” Under the deal, Ziggo shareholders will receive cash, plus Liberty Global shares. Based on Friday’s closing price of Liberty’s shares, the offer values Ziggo at €34.53 a share. The transaction represents a 22 percent premium

to Ziggo’s closing price the day before it announced that it had received a preliminary takeover offer from Liberty Global in October. Liberty Global already held a 28.5 percent stake in Ziggo that it acquired last March. The acquisition is the latest corporate move in Europe for Liberty Global after it bought a British rival, Virgin Media, last year for $16 billion. Liberty Global, the international broadband arm of Malone’s media and telecommunications empire, also owns Unitymedia in Germany and Telenet in Belgium. As a number of telecommunications companies and cable operators look to consolidate the industry in Europe, analysts say Liberty Global may face potential

competition issues, as European antitrust officials have taken a tough stance on cross-border deals. Regulators have raised concerns that these multibilliondollar deals may limit consumer choice and push up prices. The deal will combine Liberty Global’s existing Dutch operations, UPC Netherlands, with Ziggo’s business. Michael T. Fries, Liberty Global’s chief executive, said the combined operations would reach over 90 percent of Dutch households, “allowing us to compete more effectively with the other national telecommunications and satellite platforms in the Netherlands, and at the same time generate significant revenue and operating efficiencies.” (NYT)

3

AT&T Denies Pursuing Vodafone LONDON — AT&T announced on Monday that it was not in talks to buy the European telecommunications giant Vodafone. The denial came after speculation during the weekend that AT&T might be looking to acquire Vodafone, which agreed last year to sell its 45 percent stake in Verizon Wireless to Verizon Communications for $130 billion. The speculation was spurred by a meeting last week between AT&T’s chief executive, Randall L. Stephenson, and Neelie Kroes, the European commissioner who oversees the Continent’s telecommunications sector, during the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. While the two discussed AT&T’s potential future plans in Europe, the meeting also included broader issues like data privacy and recent government surveillance revelations, according to a person briefed on the matter, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly. AT&T added, however, that it reserved the right to make a potential offer in the future. Under British takeover rules, AT&T must wait at least six months before announcing any prospective plans. Speculation continues about the future of Vodafone. It is in early discussions to buy the Spanish cable operator ONO, which is considering an initial public offering, according to a person briefed on the matter, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly. Analysts said the deal could be worth about $10 billion, though discussions between Vodafone and ONO might not necessarily lead to a deal, the person added. (NYT)

Nazi Remarks Make an Elite Investor Persona Non Grata in Silicon Valley Thomas J. Perkins, an elite investor in Silicon Valley, provoked outrage over the weekend when he compared criticism of the wealthy to Nazi attacks on Jews. But amid the blog posts and tweets condemning Perkins, who is known as Tom, some commentators saw evidence of a more widespread attitude among the very rich. “Extreme inequality, it turns out, creates a class of people who are alarmingly detached from reality — and simultaneously gives

these people great power,” Paul Krugman wrote in his column in The New York Times on Monday. “Mr. Thomas J. Perkins isn’t that much of an Perkins outlier. He isn’t even the first finance titan to compare advocates of progressive taxation to Nazis.” Krugman was thinking of Ste-

phen A. Schwarzman, chief executive of the Blackstone Group, who employed an unfortunate analogy in 2010 when speaking about the Obama administration’s crackdown on finance, particularly a plan to raise the tax rate on carried interest. “It’s like when Hitler invaded Poland in 1939,” Schwarzman said that summer. He later apologized for the “inappropriate” analogy. Another venture capitalist, Mark Suster, wrote on his blog on Saturday that Kleiner Perkins

Caufield & Byers — often known as simply Kleiner Perkins — should consider shortening its name further. Perkins is a legend in Silicon Valley, an elite and fiercely competitive investor who was an early backer of Netscape and Genentech and who left a big imprint on his venture capital firm, which has made a number of bold bets over the years. But on Saturday, Kleiner Perkins sought to emphasize that Perkins no longer worked there. (NYT)


BUSINESS

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014

4

Bitcoin and the Fictions of Money How should we think about a currency like Bitcoin? The first thing to remember is this: Money is a sort of collective fiction. What money we choose to trust says much about how we Bits see the world. Above the simplest Quentin Hardy exchanges, most money has limited use. Gold, the most common historical currency, is almost only good for adornment. Paper is, of course, a proxy for the government issuing the money. How much we trust the government’s ability to collect taxes, pay debts, and so on is the collective fiction that gives a country’s money value. Paper or metal, money is worth something only if people continue to believe in it. And right now, an increasing number of people believe in Bitcoins and similar, emerging stateless currencies. Marc Andreessen, a venture capitalist whose firm has invested just under $50 million in start-ups related to Bitcoin, has written a helpful introduction to Bitcoin. It is also a defense. Mind

you, Andreessen has a significant bet on Bitcoin’s increasing use. The journalist Glenn Fleishman, with whom Andreessen has been spiritedly debating Bitcoin on Twitter for several days, wrote a strong critique of Andreessen’s thinking. Much of the argument is about the mathematics, or whether Bitcoin is deflationary, or the way in which the creation of Bitcoins burns electricity to no good end. So far, there is little discussion of what the collective decision to believe a fiction like Bitcoin might mean. In many ways, that is the more interesting phenomenon. Certainly, it is applicable not just to Bitcoin, but to Bitcoin proxies like Zerocoin or to other new stateless, math-based currencies, like Ripple. In the place of believing in a central bank, or its owner, a powerful nation state, what do we believe in when we believe in Bitcoin? Specifics around the algorithm, of course. More deeply, we believe in a borderless world of hyper-empowered indi-

Chipotle Blurs Lines With a Satirical Hulu Series During the Super Bowl on Sunday, advertisers will deploy talking animals and A-list endorsers, anything to reach the 100 million Americans expected to be watching. But Chipotle Mexican Grill is playing a different game. Chipotle next month will release “Farmed and Dangerous,” a four-part comedy series on the TV-streaming service Hulu that takes a satirical look at industrialscale farming. There are no scenes at Chipotle restaurants or impromptu testimonials to its tacos or quesadillas. Rather, “Farmed and Dangerous,” billed as a “Chipotle original series,” hopes to promote the company’s concerns about sus-

tainable agriculture and the humane treatment of animals used for meat. This stealth marketing strategy, Chipotle executives say, is not about “product integration,” but “values integration.” Starring the actor Ray Wise, the series is a full-throated attack on “industrial agriculture,” complete with a Dr. Strangelove-like scientist inventing eight-winged chickens and cash bribes being delivered in gift boxes. “ ‘Farmed and Dangerous’ is meant to strike large emotional chords — it’s not about selling burritos,” said Daniel Rosenberg, a former Hollywood executive whose New York-based company, Piro, produced the series with

WEATHER High/low temperatures for the 21 hours ended at 4 p.m. yesterday, Eastern time, and precipitation (in inches) for the 18 hours ended at 1 p.m. yesterday. Expected conditions for today and tomorrow. Weather conditions: C-clouds, F-fog, H-haze, I-ice, PCpartly cloudy, R-rain, S-sun, Sh-showers, Sn-snow, SSsnow showers, T-thunderstorms, Tr-trace, W-windy.

U.S. CITIES Atlanta Baltimore

Yesterday Today Tomorrow 59/ 45 0 54/ 24 PC 36/ 20 Sn 30/ 21 Tr 47/ 12 PC 18/ 8 PC

Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas-Ft. Worth Denver Detroit Hartford Houston Indianapolis Los Angeles Miami Mpls.-St. Paul Nashville

21/ 19 53/ 45 31/ -8 30/ 14 74/ 34 58/ 14 27/ 7 19/ 19 71/ 54 40/ 2 69/ 52 78/ 62 18/-16 64/ 25

0 0 Tr 0.04 0 Tr 0.14 0 0 Tr 0 0 0.03 0

inherently elitist, libertarian agenda. Alex Payne, another critic, wrote a piece slamming one of Andreessen’s partners that took it farther, saying that belief in Bitcoin was another symptom of Silicon Valley’s enormous selfregard. “People will decide what kind of things they want to hold,” said Chris Larsen, the co-founder and chief executive of Ripple Labs, a company that is associated with the Ripple currency. It may be, as Larsen says, that math-based systems have a kind of purity, “the exchange of value within the exchange of information,” without the messy stuff of nations getting in the way. It may also be that life stays messy, and these new systems learn how to accommodate that, possibly by agreeing to be taxed by one or another government. So far Bitcoin is spoken of in extreme terms, as a threat, or a bubble, or the empowerment of drug dealers. If it is taxed, and becomes normal, it may actually be more revolutionary.

viduals, alive mostly through the Internet. They are not gated by language, thanks to image sharing and Google Translate. Many have sent thousands of messages around the world, without ever using a sovereign nation’s stamps. Many have never done national service in the physical world. Even more do not expect their children to fight in a country’s wars, at least not as soldiers carrying arms. None of this bodes well for the relationship between the most wealthy, powerful and gifted, and their home nations. A few months ago, I asked three tech executives — an American, a Czech and a Romanian, the following question: If I threw down five passports from “good” countries, like Germany or Singapore, would you care which one you picked up? No one would. Their business is on the Internet, everywhere and nowhere, and they have friends all over the world. Charles Stross, the science fiction writer, wrote in a strong critique of Bitcoin that it has an

Chipotle. A restaurant chain’s production of a comedy series appearing on a streaming-video service highlights several recent media industry trends, particularly the blurring between advertising and entertainment or news. The company hopes that preaching the gospel of sustainable agriculture will translate into consumers buying food at Chipotle, whose slogan is “Food With Integrity.” It promises, wherever possible, to use produce grown organically, dairy products from cows that were not treated with synthetic hormones and meats from animals raised humanely and free of antibiotics. (NYT) 46/ 13 60/ 22 -2/-14 15/ -4 38/ 23 18/ 7 10/-10 38/ 7 61/ 30 5/ -8 70/ 50 82/ 66 -9/-20 28/ 10

Sn PC C Sn W Sn SS I PC Sn S PC PC PC

20/ 13 34/ 18 1/ -6 6/ -3 36/ 18 28/ 17 3/ -5 18/ 3 34/ 27 6/ 0 73/ 53 81/ 67 -3/ -8 20/ 5

PC SS PC C C PC PC PC Sn PC PC PC PC C

Study Puts Price Tag On ‘Too Big to Fail’ An analysis commissioned by the Green Party in the European Parliament estimates that the cost of the implicit guarantee that governments will back large institutions, known as “too big to fail,” was about €234 billion in 2012. To remedy the distortions of this subsidy, policy makers should go further in carving out the risky parts of banks, demand that the banks hold even heftier capital cushions and tax any remaining advantage, said Philippe Lamberts, a Green Party member of the European Parliament who commissioned the study. “It is urgent to eliminate the market advantage given to these institutions,” he said. (NYT)

New York City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Ore. Raleigh Sacramento San Diego San Francisco Seattle St. Louis Tampa Washington

28/ 25 69/ 60 28/ 25 73/ 54 34/ 15 45/ 33 52/ 42 64/ 37 68/ 58 66/ 48 47/ 35 60/ 10 65/ 61 35/ 28

Tr 0.01 Tr 0 0.05 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.01 0

41/ 11 77/ 57 43/ 10 73/ 48 19/ -5 48/ 38 60/ 23 65/ 44 67/ 52 63/ 50 48/ 41 16/ 2 73/ 58 52/ 12

W Sh W PC SS C PC S S C C PC Sh C

18/ 12 78/ 56 18/ 9 73/ 49 6/ -7 48/ 41 30/ 22 65/ 47 69/ 53 61/ 53 48/ 43 16/ 10 75/ 50 20/ 13

PC Sh PC S PC R SS PC PC PC R S Sh PC


MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014 5

SCIENCE

The Far-From-Over Fight Against Smoking “Even 50 years after the first surgeon general’s report on smoking and health, we’re still finding out new ways that tobacco kills and maims people,” Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recently told me. “It’s astonishing how Personal bad it is.” HealtH Frieden and public health specialists everywhere are Jane E. seeking better ways to help the Brody 44 million Americans who still smoke to quit and to keep young people from getting hooked on cigarettes. “Fewer than 2 percent of doctors smoke. Why can’t we get to that rate in society as a whole?” he wondered. Smoking rates are highest among the poor, poorly educated and people with mental illness, populations hard to reach with educational messages and quit-smoking aids. But when I mentioned to Frieden, a former New York City health commissioner, that the city’s streets are filled with young adult smokers who appear to be well educated and well dressed, he said television seems to have had an outsize influence. Focus groups of white girls in New York private schools have suggested a “Sex in the City” effect, he said: Girls think smoking makes them look sexy. In the last two years, middle-aged men, too, have begun smoking in increasing numbers after a halfcentury decline. Frieden cited “Mad Men.” Frieden said that an antismoking effort begun in 2008 by the World Health Organization “can make a huge difference in curbing smoking, and we should fully implement what we know works.” The program is called Mpower. M stands for monitoring tobacco use and the effectiveness of prevention programs like antismoking videos on YouTube. P for protecting people from secondhand smoke. Half the country still lacks laws mandating smokefree public places. The latest national health survey found that about half of children from nonsmoking households have metabolites of tobacco in their blood, Frieden said. O for offering help to the 70 percent of smokers who say they would like to quit. Medical aids for quitting smoking, which can triple the likelihood of success, should become available, without a co-pay, to many more people under the Affordable Care Act, Frieden said. W for warning about smoking hazards through larger and more graphic messages on cigarette

STUART BRADFORD

packs and paid advertising on radio and television. E for enforcing bans on tobacco marketing, advertising, promotion and sponsorships. In bodegas throughout the country, Frieden said, “tobacco ads are used as wallpaper.” Smoking is freely depicted in movies and popular TV shows. R for raising taxes, which studies have shown is the single most effective way to reduce smoking in the population, especially among teens. “A higher cigarette tax is not a regressive tax, because it would help poor people even more than the well-to-do,” Frieden noted. President Obama has proposed an additional 94-cent-per-pack tax on cigarettes, which would yield $80 billion to fund universal prekindergarten. Smokers ready to quit can choose from among a cornucopia of aids as wide-ranging as nicotine substitutes, low-dose antidepressants, hypnosis and acupuncture. But quitting smoking does not necessarily require assistance. As two public health specialists, Andrea L. Smith and Simon Chapman at the University of Sydney in Australia, have pointed out, “The vast majority of quitters do so unaided.” A Gallup Poll conducted last year in the United States found that “only 8 percent of ex-smokers attributed their success to [nicotine replacement therapy] patches, gum or prescribed drugs,” these experts noted. “In contrast, 48 percent attributed their success to quitting ‘cold turkey’ and 8 percent to willpower, commitment or ‘mind over matter.’ ” They added, “For many smokers, having a reason to quit (a why) was more important than having a method to quit (a how).”

Fruit Fly Brothers Tend to Cooperate In pursuit of a mate, male fruit flies often engage in combat. But when the flies are brothers, they are more likely to cooperate, researchers are reporting. In a new study in the journal Nature, Tommaso Pizzari, a zoologist at the University of Oxford, and colleagues write that brother flies live longer as a result. And there are clear benefits for females who live among brothers: They have a longer reproductive life span, a faster rate of egg production and a greater chance of laying eggs that mature to adulthood. The researchers exposed female flies in a laboratory to several different sets of males — three

Supporting one’s kin is an alternative way to pass on common genes. brothers; two brothers and an unrelated male; and three unrelated males. The most peaceful groups were the ones with three brothers, perhaps because supporting one’s kin is an alternative way to pass on common genes. “You can improve your reproductive success yourself or help individuals who also share your genes,” Pizzari said. Although fruit flies have been extensively studied in labs, the structure of their natural societies remain a bit of a mystery. Still, Pizzari suspects that in nature, brothers are supporting brothers to some degree. “Sex implicitly brings potential for conflict,” he said, “but population structure can modulate how much conflict there is.” SINDYA N. BHANOO

As Climate Changes, So Do Diets of Polar Bears As a warming climate causes sea ice in the Arctic to melt earlier each year, polar bears are spending more time on land — and changing their diets accordingly. A new study shows that the bears, whose traditional prey is ringed seal pups, are now eating more snow-goose eggs and caribou. Linda J. Gormezano, an ecologist at the American Museum of Natural History and the Hudson Bay Project, and her colleagues

studied the scat of polar bears in the western Hudson Bay and also captured video footage of the bears foraging. They reported their findings in three papers published in the journals Ecology and Evolution, Polar Biology and BMC Ecology. The researchers found that the period in which polar bears return to land increasingly overlaps with the nesting period of snow geese. “The bears can basically just

walk on land and pick up eggs,” Gormezano said. The bears’ interest in the geese may stem from the birds’ abundance in recent years. In the 1960s, there were fewer than 2,500 nesting pairs of snow geese in the region. Today there are more than 50,000. Samples of scat from different parts of the bay suggest that the bears are highly flexible and willing to change what they eat based

STEVE AMSTRUP/U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

on availability. “Bears along the coast are eating more grass,” Gormezano said. “Further inland they are eating more berries.” SINDYA N. BHANOO


MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014 6

JOURNAL

A Giant Photo Connects Fans to Ballet Stars dancers form a gigantic eye. The eye is the work of J R, the French street artist, who is internationally known for mounting large-scale public photography projects around the world, from the favelas of Brazil to Kenya to Times Square. He was commissioned to create it for the winter season as part of City Ballet’s new art series, which aims to draw more art fans to ballet. J R, who once wheat-pasted pictures on the streets of France, also wheat-pasted enormous ballerinas’ legs and toe shoes on the outside of the Koch Theater. But it is his floor photo inside that is generating buzz. “People are always more creative than I can even imagine,” J R, who goes by his punctuation-less initials, said in an interview.

Some richly attired New York City Ballet fans have taken to lying down on the floor at intermissions. Other well-heeled patrons are making the climb from the orchestra to the Fourth Ring for a better view. And social media sites are beginning to fill up with odd images, including several that appear to show Sébastien Marcovici, a principal dancer, partnering perfect strangers. The catalyst for all these strange doings at City Ballet is in the promenade of the David H. Koch Theater, where the inlaid travertine marble floor has been covered with a 6,500-square-foot vinyl photograph of more than 80 City Ballet dancers, roughly life size, who are arranged on a sea of crumpled white paper. From above, it becomes clear that the

CLASSIC CROSSWORD

PUZZLE BY ROBERT SEMINARA

ACROSS

45

1 In

___ (existing) 5 Amorphous mass 9 One of the Three B’s of classical music 13 Fox series set in William McKinley High School 14 Tibia or fibula 15 Singer Abdul 16 Original maker of a 38-Across 18 Moving about 19 Huge hit 20 Light horsedrawn carriage with one seat 22 Boxer who floated like a butterfly, stung like a bee 25 Japanese sash 26 Ingredients in a 38-Across 34 Weight-loss program 35 Amigo 36 Ranee’s wrap 37 ___ of Capri 38 Sweet treat 41 Deadly poison 42 Mascara problem 44 Dress (up)

46 50 51 52

57 62 63 66 67 68 69 70 71

Lone Star State sch. near the Rio Grande Ingredient in a 38-Across Steve Martin’s “King ___” Hullabaloo Joke you’ve heard many times before Fragrant wood Acoustic Ingredient in a 38-Across Haggard with 38 #1 country hits Sea creature with pincers Boutique “Hey … over here!” Sharer’s word Classic trees on shady streets

DOWN 1 They’re

bought by the dozen 2 Thin 3 Song word repeated after “Que” 4 Fish caught in pots 5 Original “Monty Python” airer

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE T M A N

A I M E

P O R T L A N D I A

O P E R A T I O N S

B L E C L R A C L E Y P O E H N A M E S T A S T M E N E N E D N A L R E S T L E G R E A A O E D L E R O E S S N S P A L E A T Y

Edited By Will Shortz

O G L E

T R E N D I I N O G S O P T I E A L T L E

H O R R O R S

A N T I B B O L D A Y C K A E R R P

S E G A M A R S A R E S L G A M A I O R L G N I A O R O N W O U T N E S S S P H D P E E K R A I N E R R Y

1

2

3

4

5

13

6

7

14

16

22 27

23

24

28 35

37

38

39

40

31

32

33

59

60

61

41 45

48

49

50 54

30

25

44 47

53

12

36

43

46

11

21

29

34

42

10

18 20

26

9 15

17

19

52

8

51

55

56

57 64

58

62

63

65

66

67

68

69

70

71 6/24/13 (No. 0624)

6 Brit’s

toilet 7 Burden 8 Gambler 9 Big party 10 Volvo or VW 11 Video segment 12 Tortoise racer 15 Freaks out in fear 17 Bygone head of Iran 21 Attorney’s org. 23 200 in the Indianapolis 500 24 Muslim leader 26 Gadget 27 Found a new tenant for

28 29 30 31 32 33 34 39 40 43 47 48

Mr. T’s TV group Draper’s material Afghani capital Muse of poetry Extend, as a lease Ooze Gossip, slangily Capital of Italia “Heavens to Betsy!” Worrisome engine noise Try for a political office Building material applied with a trowel

49

Bananas

52

Place to eat a 38-Across

53

Tints

54

Blunders

55

NaCl

56

Drive-___

58

“… or ___!”

59

Author Roald

60

Isotope, e.g.

61

Sales force, informally

64

Blade in a boat

65

David Letterman’s network

The New York Times Crossword Society. 12 classic Sunday puzzles delivered each month. Order now at nytstore.com/crossword. Use code: TDSUB1 to receive 10% off a one year subscription.

ANDREA MOHIN/THE NEW YORK TIMES

City Ballet fans posed with their favorite dancers in a giant photo installation on the floor of the David H. Koch Theater. He said that he had been dazzled by the photographs people have posted on Instagram with hashtags including #JRNYCBallet and #NYCBArtSeries: of a man lying on the ground who looks as if he is lifting a ballerina, of women lying on the hands of supine dancers as if being lifted, of shadows of walkers draping the dancers. Shortly before Saturday’s matinee, Paloma Bonnin, a 10-year-old dance student from Paraguay, got down on the floor and posed for some pictures herself, mimicking the splits and poses of the City Ballet dancers. At intermission, Philip Schweitzer, a ballet fan from the Bronx, couldn’t resist the temptation to bend down to touch the floor. Grace Zhang, 24, who works in advertising, climbed from her seats in the First Ring to the Fourth Ring balcony for a better view. “It’s like nothing I’ve ever seen,” she said. “This is specifically incorporating ballet — the beauty, the power, the vulnerability. It’s pure and beautiful.” J R, 30, said that he liked that his work was creating a reverse migration, where the patrons in the expensive seats were going up to the cheaper seats for the views. “Now you’re inviting everyone to come up there,” he said. “And I like that, that it breaks boundaries — that anyone should be on any floor, it doesn’t matter.” MICHAEL COOPER

620 Eighth Avenue, New York, NY 10018 • Tom Brady, Editor e-mail: digesteditor@nytimes.com • TimesDigest Sales Office phone: (212) 556-1200 fax: (646) 461-2364 e-mail: timesdigest@nytimes.com • For advertising information and to request a media kit contact InMotion Media: phone: (212) 213-5856 e-mail: info@immww.com • Home delivery subscribers who have not received TimesDigest should call (800) 698-4637 or e-mail customercare@nytimes.com


YOURNAVY IN THE NEWS

CNO Holds All Hands Call By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Abraham McNatt, Navy Public Affairs Support Element, East

The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert, and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens visited Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story (JEBLCFS) to provide Sailors an opportunity to speak with senior leadership Jan. 24. CNO addressed sexual assault, current and future maritime operations and budget stability. Greenert also reenlisted six Sailors and presented awards to five Sailors and one civilian. “It’s great for the MCPON and I to be here at Little Creek,” said Greenert. “What we get out of this most is listening and learning.” “This is how we keep our finger on the pulse - being here having conversations with

the fleet,” said Stevens. “If I don’t get the opportunity to do this, I would quickly become detached and not really understand all the challenges and issues and, just as importantly, the best practices that all of you use every day to lead your folks.” Geenert and Stevens then answered a myriad of questions on upcoming

events, manning, sea rotation, flight safety, administrative redundancies and budget stability. “We have a stable budget now,” said Greenert. “When you have a stable budget, you can plan ahead for maintenance, training and hiring. We have a lot more to look forward to in 2014 compared to the past 18

months.” The CNO’s conversation highlighted the importance of Navy and Marine Corps integration. “The nation needs the Navy and Marine Corps team,” said Greenert. “We’re absolutely unbeatable at what we do, which is amphibious operations and expeditionary operations. We are at our best operating together.” Greenert ended the conversation by thanking the Marine Corps brothers and sisters. He also thanked the Sailors for their amazing flexibility. His last words were of his gratefulness to the families who support the Sailors and Marines who serve and allow them to do what they do.

USS Denver Departs For Deployment

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Bradley J. Gee, Navy Public Affairs Support Element, West

Amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver (LPD 9), departed Sasebo, Japan for deployment in 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility Jan. 27. Denver is the second oldest deployable ship in the U.S. Navy behind the USS Constitution. “The oldest gator in the U.S. Navy, is what we call ourselves,” said Operations Specialist 1st Class Jamie Dixon, assigned to USS Denver. “It’s an older ship so we face different problems than other vessels in the fleet, but when it’s time to get underway we are always up for the challenge.” During this deployment, Denver will participate in

its Spring Patrol of 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility and the annual exercise, Cobra Gold, which is a joint venture between U.S. Navy and Thailand. According to Dixon, Denver and a ship from Thailand will cross deck Sailors, which

means members from each others navy will board the others ship. “We will train them on how we operate and they will do the same to our Sailors onboard their vessel,” said Dixon. Denver will be conducting these exercises and patrols

with the Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group, Amphibious Squadron 11 and reports to the Commander, Amphibious Force 7th Fleet, Rear Adm. Hugh Wetherald, headquartered in White Beach, Okinawa, Japan.


COMING IN

HOT

Photos by MC2 (SW/AW/IDW) Eric Lockwood

Sailors direct a T-45C Goshawk, assigned to Training Air Wing (TW) 1 and 2, on the flight deck of TR.


Staff Commanding Officer Capt. Daniel Grieco Executive Officer Capt. Mark Colombo Public Affairs Officer Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Evans Media Officer Ensign Jack Georges Senior Editor MCC Adrian Melendez Editor MC2 (SW) Brian G. Reynolds Layout MC3 (SW) Heath Zeigler Rough Rider Contributors Theodore Roosevelt Media MC2 (SW/AW/IDW) Eric Lockwood MC3 John M. Drew MCSN Jenna Kaliszewski Command Ombudsman Sabrina Bishop Linda Watford Michelle V. Thomas cvn71ombudsman@gmail.com The Rough Rider is an authorized publication for the crew of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Contents herein are not necessarily the views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. government, Department of Defense, Department of the Navy or the Commanding Officer of TR. All items for publication in The Rough Rider must be submitted to the editor no later than three days prior to publication. Do you have a story you’d like to see in the Rough Rider? Contact the Media Department at (757) 443-7419 or stop by 3-180-0-Q.

CHECK US OUT ONLINE! Facebook.com/ussTheodoreRoosevelt Twitter: @TheRealCVN71 youtube.com/ussTheodoreRoosevelt


*

Times

Ch. 66

Tuesday January 28

Ch. 67

Ch. 68

0900

SAINTS AND SOLDIERS: AIRBORNE CREED

THE BREAKFAST CLUB

FANTASTIC FOUR: RISE OF THE SILVER SURFER

1100

INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE

LIFE OF PI

OBLIVION

1400

JACK THE GIANT SLAYER

DOLPHIN TALE

STAR TREK 2: WRATH OF KHAN

1600

BLACK HAWK DOWN

WAR HORSE

THE HUNGER GAMES

1830

KICK-ASS 2

THE LUCKY ONE

X-MEN: LAST STAND

2030

SAINTS AND SOLDIERS: AIRBORNE CREED

THE BREAKFAST CLUB

FANTASTIC FOUR: RISE OF THE SILVER SURFER

2230

INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE

LIFE OF PI

OBLIVION

0130

JACK THE GIANT SLAYER

DOLPHIN TALE

STAR TREK 2: WRATH OF KHAN

0330

BLACK HAWK DOWN

WAR HORSE

THE HUNGER GAMES

0600

KICK-ASS 2

THE LUCKY ONE

X-MEN: LAST STAND

*Movie schedule is subject to change.


28jan14