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Vol. 2 Issue 20

May 8, 2013

1,000 POUND CHALLENGE EN3 Jonathan Helmus performs a squat lift as part of the 1,000 pound club challenge.

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he air is stifling and humid, filled with metallic clangs and heavy thuds. The forward gym aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68), as always, is a cluster of bodies in varied and precise sets of motions. There are some, though, who strive to stand above the rest. Their photos adorn a wall of the gym, a mute boast and silent challenge to all those exercising. They are the members of the 1,000 lb. Club.

FIRST TWO SAILORS TO JOIN ELITE POWER CLUB IN 2013 DEPLOYMENT Story and Photo by MCSN Nathan McDonald

Engineman 3rd Class Jonathan Helmus and Engineman 3rd Class Brian Bender were the first to join the illustrious club during this deployment after successfully completing the challenge April 28. “There are three areas you’re judged in,” said Melyssa Patterson, fitness director aboard Nimitz. “The squat, bench press and dead lift. You have to total at least 1,000 pounds from the three

to qualify.” Both Helmus and Bender started lifting weights in high school because of, or despite, the sports they played. “I played football, wrestling and soccer in high school, so that’s how I got into weightlifting,” said Bender. “I just wanted to get big,” said Helmus. “I played sports in high school, but they involved a lot of cardio. There wasn’t any muscle Continued on page 3


Commanding Officer CAPT Jeff S. Ruth Executive Officer CAPT Buzz Donnelly Command Master Chief CMDCM Teri McIntyre Public Affairs Officer LCDR Karin Burzynski

Editor MC2 (SW) Jason Behnke Lead Designer MCSN Kole E. Carpenter

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Nimitz News accepts submissions in writing. All. submissions are subject to review and screening. “Nimitz News� is an authorized publication for the members of the military services and their families. Its content does not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, the Department of the Navy, or the Marine Corps and does not imply endorsement thereby.


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building.” Once he started weightlifting, Bender found the desire to continue irresistible. “It’s like an addiction,” Bender said. “I love the results – seeing the change.” For Helmus, weightlifting has become an outlet, and an especially pertinent one while on deployment. “The motivation is to keep working, to keep getting bigger,” said Helmus. “Everyone has a vice and everyone needs an outlet. You put up with a lot out here on a cruise, so if you can find a way to release all of that negative energy and turn it into something positive, then that’s a good thing.” Patterson started the competition when Nimitz was dry docked in Bremerton, Wash. to fill a void in fitness competitions. “You see a lot of fitness challenges that are geared more towards endurance, like runs,” said Patterson. “We didn’t have a lot for power lifters, so I wanted something for them to be able to compete in and get involved.”

While strength is clearly necessary to succeed in the challenge, it is proper form that proves to be the biggest challenge. “Most people fail because of improper form,” Patterson said. “If their form isn’t right, the lift doesn’t count. That’s one of the most disappointing things for people if they can get the weight up, but their lift is disqualified because of poor form. ” Both Helmus and Bender offered encouragement and advice to those seeking to join them in the club. “Don’t get discouraged if you’re starting out,” said Bender. “It’s intimidating at first, but it shouldn’t be.” Helmus echoed Bender’s advice and offered his own take. “Everyone has to start somewhere,” he said. “Even if you’re starting small, you’ll get there. Just being there and trying is big. You get out of it what you put into it. It may not be instantaneous, but you’ll get there if you eat right and get on a good workout regimen.”

D.C. OLYMPICS : THE RESULTS OVERALL BEST

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SCORES WERE ADJUSTED FOR LEVELS OF EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE

3 FIREFIGHTING 7B FLOODING 7A INVESTIGATORS 7A DESMOKING MEDICAL EMERGENCY 7A UPPER MANAGEMENT 1B

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21-DAY Rotation Story and Photos by MCSA Aiyana Paschal

Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Jamie Cab, from Anaheim, Calif., stands by a mixer in the aft galley

Have you tried the stuffed shrimp? It’s part of a 21-day rotation of menus aboard aircraft carriers throughout the fleet that was implemented April 1, 2013.

said Senior Chief Delacruz. The customer isn’t the only one who benefits from having more items on the menu. “Having more items on the menu allows our culinary specialists to gain more experience with different recipes,” said CWO Delacruz. This past Sunday completed the first full rotation of the 21-day cycle. “With changes there are always new challenges,” said CWO Delacruz. “There are certain items we need to have in order to support these new menu items. You can see how that could be a challenge with the new menu being implemented as we were leaving for deployment.” Although the 21-day rotation of menus may have presented some challenges to the food service division, overall it has provided the crew with more variety and a chance for our culinary specialists to gain experience. “I’ve gotten a lot more positive comments on the menu, versus the last two cruises,” said CWO Delacruz. “That’s not only attributed to the 21day cycle, but the performance of the food service division as well.”

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here used to be a 14-day cycle where there was a menu set for breakfast, lunch and dinner for 14 days then it repeated,” said Senior Chief Culinary Specialist Glenmichael Delacruz, the leading culinary specialist on board the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). “Now it will be longer so our crew won’t get tired of what they’re eating.” Reports are made by food service officers (FSO) aboard aircraft carriers to the type commander. These reports contain information found through menu review boards that are held quarterly aboard carriers. “As the result of this information, the 21-day cycle was created,” said Chief Warrant Officer (CWO) Jonathan Delacruz, the FSO on board Nimitz. “There’s more variety and options in a three-week period than in a two week period.” Our comments and input have an effect on our menus. For example, tuna salad has been in the sandwich bar more frequently because of its popularity with the crew and positive feedback, Page 4

Culinary Specialst Seaman Chaz Foster, from Suffolk, Va., slices eggs for the salad bar


Who Wants to be a Liberty Risk? Story by MCSN Derek A. Harkins he aircraft carrier USS carried back to the ship.” Nimitz (CVN 68) is According to Keel, Sailors scheduled for a few different shouldn’t put themselves at port visits throughout its risk of disciplinary action at current deployment. While their first port call. That could visiting different countries, prohibit them from getting many of the ship’s crew may off the ship at any other ports indulge in alcoholic beverages for the remainder of Nimitz’ while in port. However, deployment. Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Keel believes that Sailors Class William Keel, Nimitz’ who choose to drink during Assistant Command Drug port calls should be even Abuse Prevention Advisor more cautious than if they (DAPA) urges Sailors to do so were drinking at home. Legal responsibly. incidents and disciplinary Keel wants to remind Sailors action are not exclusive causes that they have not consumed of liberty privileges being lost. any alcohol recently due to Sailors can still be labeled as being on deployment, which a liberty-risk if they display means that their tolerance will signs of irresponsibility that be lower than if they had been could put the ship’s security or drinking regularly. the Navy’s image at risk. This “Many Sailors go out [on port results in the precautionary call] and immediately drink as loss or limitation of their much as they would have back liberty for the remainder of the at home,” said Keel. “Before deployment. they know it, they’re getting Nimitz’ Sailors will have been

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DON’T BECOME A RISK OR AN EMBARRASSMENT DRINK RESPONSIBLY Page 5

on the ship for a considerable amount of time before reaching their first stop. According to Keel, many of these Sailors will have a lot of built up stress and energy waiting to be released. This means a greater risk for unruly behavior during a port visit. “They can run, or go to the gym,” said Keel. “They should find a way to handle their stress and release that energy before they get off the ship.” When Sailors get off the ship and enter another country, they not only represent themselves. They represent Nimitz, their service, and their country. “We really are ambassadors,” said Keel. “In countries where they don’t see [Americans] all the time, you’re all they see of us. They think that’s what [Americans are] all like.”


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Photos by

MC3 Raul Moreno (right) MC3 Linda S. Swearingen (below) MCSN Derek Harkins (Bottom Right)

USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7) steams alongside USS Nimitz (CVN 68)

Sailors heave in the tending line in the hangar bay

Logistics Specialist Mario Garcia Cantu, from Houston, Texas bands cargo

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An MH605 Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Indians of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 6 lifts cargo from the USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7)


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THE DEVIL INSIDE

DOOM

THE ROCK

CONTAGION

THE BEST EXOTIC M ARIGOLD HOTEL

THE SOCIAL NETWORK

0800 / 2000 CARS

FOOTLOOSE (2011)

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Nimitz News Daily Digest - May 8, 2013