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Aug. 24, 2013

THE

T R E D D A L OF

E C R O F . BY STORY L MORENO JR U A R 3 MC

Vol. 2 Issue 87

he bad guys are everywhere. They could be at any port just waiting for someone to let their guard down. They could be out here right now, lurking the waters and watching ships waiting for an opportunity to strike. So, what does a Sailor do when challenged by a security breach? What steps does he or she take to ensure the best possible outcome? What can be used to minimalize injuries while at the same time offer control over a situation? According to Master-at-Arms 1st Class Sara Horvath, security training leading petty officer aboard Continued on page 3


Sailor of the Day

STORY BY MC3 CHRIS BARTLETT

I

nterior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Victoria Graham, from Puckett, Miss., was named Sailor of the Day on board the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Aug. 23. “Honestly, I feel honored,” said Graham. “I didn’t ever expect to be Sailor of the Day.” Graham’s outstanding performance as both food service attendant (FSA) for S-2 Division, and as maintenance technician for Combat Systems Department earned her Nimitz Sailor of the Day. While temporarily assigned to S-2 Division, she was appointed as night check supervisor, directly supervising five FSAs in the proper operation, maintenance and cleanliness of all food service equipment for the Chief Petty Officer Mess. As Commanding Officer CAPT Jeff Ruth

divisional calibration petty officer, she managed all the calibration equipment to include 25 indicators, meters and miscellaneous test equipment for the impressed current cathodic protection system and forward and aft switchboards. “I put in a lot of hard work cleaning up our calibration program for the division,” said Graham. She was a key in the repair more than 70 telephones, 94 general announcing systems, 21 flight deck announcing systems, and 20 signal call station faults in support of the ship’s daily mission requirements. “Make yourself stand out,” said Graham. “Don’t just do everything that everybody else does, do something that you love to make you stand out.”

Executive Officer CDR John Cummings

Editor MC2 (SW) Jason Behnke

Command Master Chief CMDCM Teri McIntyre

Public Affairs Officer LCDR Karin Burzynski

Lead Designer MC3 (SW) George J. Penney III

Nimitz News accepts submissions in writing. All submissions are subject to review and screening. ”Nimitz News” is an authorized publication for the members of the military services and their families. Its content does not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, the Department of the Navy, or the Marine Corps and does not imply endorsement thereby.


Continued from page 1 the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68), the Use of Force Continuum organizes everything in different degrees of intensity. “They are in that ladder of force for us to use the lowest level of force necessary to get a situation under control,” said Horvath. Aside from examples on the Use of Force Continuum, wide ranges of non-lethal deterrents also exist when dealing with vessels and vehicles. Two non-lethal deterrents aboard Nimitz, besides signal flares, spotlights and the ship’s whistle, are laser dazzlers and the long-range acoustic device (LRAD). Laser dazzlers are optical distractors that have reversible effects on human subjects, and according to the Department of Defense NonLethal Weapons Program website, provide an unequivocal, non-verbal warning and provide the target an opportunity to clarify intent. “All you do is point it at the subject and you’ll definitely have their attention,” said Masterat-Arms 2nd Class John Kuchler. “I almost had to deploy the laser dazzler once, until they used the ship’s whistle. I know if I were to have used the laser, it would have worked. It makes the message pretty clear.” The LRAD, an acoustic hailing device, can provide non-lethal support when dealing with anything from force protection to crowd control. It can be mounted on the ground, vehicles and vessels. When deployed, the LRAD can hail warnings

to incoming vessels while at sea. “It can deliver messages in hundreds of languages,” said Kuchler. “Depending on where we are in the world, we can easily communicate with small boats that get too close.” Simple and effective, the LRAD can direct comprehensible voice commands beyond 500 meters. “We don’t always know the intent of the vessels that are coming near to us,” said Horvath. “We don’t know if they are trying to hurt us, and to be able to communicate clearly in the host nation’s language is essential.” Non-lethal weapons are meant to effectively aid in deterring aggression while minimalizing harm to people. For Kuchler, more times than not, all it takes to assume control of a situation is verbalization. “Personally, I’ve never had to use the stuff that’s on our belts,“ said Kuchler. “My biggest deterrence is verbalization: just talking to them and bringing them down from whatever level they are. It’s non-lethal and I don’t have to hurt anybody.” The variety of non-lethal weapons is spread throughout all branches of the U.S. military. With new advances in technology, it isn’t a farfetched dream to see more of these weapons in the future. “Non-lethal weapons are great things,” said Kuchler. “The more options we have for whatever problem, the better outcome. Plus, more people will be able to stand back up without broken bones and bullet holes.”


QA

Photo by MC2 Dominique Pineiro

&

MCPON WITH THE

Story by Defense Media Activity-Navy

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens recently took a moment to answer questions from the fleet about executing the first year of CPO365. CPO-365 is a year-round training initiative that Chiefs Messes throughout the Navy take on to prepare first class petty officers to become chiefs. Phase II of CPO-365 begins when the chief petty officer selection board results are released, which occurred Aug. 1 this year. Q: Many commands have truly embraced CPO-365, and have viewed this year as really being the first year that the program has found its legs, what do you think of the program as a whole? A: I am very pleased with the process. I am not taking anything away from the training we have used in the past because it worked well for during its time. Society has changed and evolved, and if we want to continue to have the ability to train our reliefs, we must change and evolve as well. I think if you ask any CPO Mess that has been and is fully engaged in CPO-365, you’ll find that each Mess is brainstorming new and innovative ways to train our First Class Petty Officers to take their place.

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens speaks during an all-hands call at The Island Club aboard Naval Air Station North Island.

Q: Many of the Sailors participating in CPO365 are not even eligible for Chief, some won’t be eligible for three years, what do you want those Sailors to take away from the program each year? A: There’s enough change that occurs within our Navy every year that CPO-365 should never get old and stagnant. Think about our Navy programs, procedures and policies, they are constantly evolving. CPO-365 is first and foremost about helping a First Class Petty Officer be the best work center supervisor or leading petty officer that they can be because the Navy is forever evolving. The training will always change, day after day, week after week, month after month, and year after year. If First Class Petty Officers and Chief Petty Officers find themselves re-hashing the same old information time and time again, they must look within themselves to determine where the updates need to take place and effectively make the change.


Q: For those Sailors who saw their names on the list, what do you think CPO-365 has done to prepare them for their anchors? A: I think that CPO-365 has provided professional and solid training that these future leaders need in order to be effective Chiefs. CPO-365 Phase II is an opportunity for our First Class Petty Officers to display to the CPO Mess the skill-sets that they learned during Phase I. Q: Talk about the CPO-365 Stand Down... A: I received two letters alleging that inappropriate conduct is taking place during CPO 365 Phase II. Upon initial look, I think that we have a few CPO Messes operating outside of CPO-365 Guidance. I directed all CPO Messes to stop training from Monday 12th and resume on August 14th. This gave commands and all CPO Messes a chance to review CPO-365 Guidance and the Navy’s policy on hazing. We should never think that we are above the law, if we think that CPO selectee training cannot be shut down - we are wrong. If we want to be responsible for training our future Chiefs then we must do it in a professional manner. I want to reemphasize - I believe that the large majority of the mess is doing the right thing and for that I want to thank you, however, know that any formal complaints will be fully investigated.

Q: What do you say to the negative feedback you’ve received about CPO-365? A: Anytime you change something, there will be rumblings, make no mistake about it. Some folks can think back to when we de-segregated the military, the nay-sayers said that was the end of the Navy as we knew it! Our Navy thrived. Remember when we put women on ships. The nay-sayers hollered that was the end of the Navy! Women are now leading our Navy and have been become solidified members on the battlefield. It comes with the territory of being the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy. Not everyone will agree with your decisions. Q: Do you see any more changes to the program, or to the final few weeks of the program for selectees? Are you content with setting guidelines and letting commands determine the final chapter in the process? A: I have no intentions of making any significant changes to CPO-365 and want to provide every CPO Mess an opportunity to become experts at what we currently have in place. I place a great deal of faith and confidence in each CPO Mess to ensure the training that we are conducting rests within the guidelines provided.

Q: What is the ultimate goal with CPO-365?

Q: In your opinion, is CPO-365 the best way to train the Navy’s future leadership and why?

A: The ultimate goal of CPO-365 is to train our relief to the best of their ability. To have meaningful and practical training that reflects the times of our society and that will make our future leaders capable under pressure and able to successfully complete any mission they are called to do. Our leaders are held accountable as they should, and being a Chief Petty Officer isn’t for the weak of heart nor lazy of mind and body. It requires us to be “all in, all the time”. We are called upon at all levels of our Chain of Command and again, a few short weeks isn’t enough time to cram all of the wisdom within the CPO Mess into a CPO Selectee. It should be happening throughout the year.

A: At this particular point of time in our history, I believe CPO-365 provides us with the best training opportunity. However, I am also confident that in time CPO-365 will also change because that’s what we do, we constantly evolve. I’ll be a retired MCPON years from now and there will be a new name, a new process, and new way of doing business to train our Chiefs. I’ll trust that it was put in place because the times that our future Sailors will serve necessitate that. CPO-365 is about our moment in history more than it is about my belief that this is the absolute right way to do it. I believe it’s the right way to do it today, but I certainly can’t speak for the future.


THROUGHTHELE

A firefighting hose team approaches a simulated liquid-fueled fire during a mass casualty drill in the hangar bay.

HM3 Joel Escalona, left, and HM3 Amanda Damerow provide medical attention to an injured Sailor during a mass cassualty drill.

By MC3 Raul Moreno Jr.

By MC3 Derek W. Volland

HT3 Robert Frey welds a counter top into place in the pipe shop.

By MCSN Derek A. Harkins

AM3 Jose Trevino fabricates a repair part for an MH-60S Seahawk helicopter assigned to the “Indians� of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 6 in the hangar bay.

By MCSN Kole Carpenter

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ON THE COVER: MA2 Andrew Greer, left, instructs OS3 Tanya Salinas, how to properly use the LA-9P Laser Dazzler during an exercise on the fantail. (Photo by MC3 (SW/AW) Jess Lewis)


Nimitz News Daily Digest - Aug. 24, 2013