Page 1


CONTENT IN GENERAL Page 4 Editorials Page 10 Contributors Page 12 Holly von Hoyningen Huene

THEME OF THE ISSUE: IRON

Commented CV

Page 15 Expats

Interview with Zoë and James, Founders of überlin

Page 22 Who is Berlin Mitte? A Neighbourhood Portrait in Tweets

EDUCATION 46 - 59 Downhill Interview with Mountainbiker

Hermes Schade

60 - 71 East Side Gallery One Situation from Three Perspectives 72 - 85 Gerontology An Introduction to the Course of Study


WORK EXPERIENCE

88 - 101 One Profession - Three Countries Carpenter

102 - 103

Our Picks: Wood

104 - 115 The Ocean Is My Calling Interview with Johnny Wikström

116 - 123 Heinz-Jürgen Gerdes Tool Maker, Sculptor, Designer, Consultant

124 - 133 Fulltime Freelancer Interview with Blogger Anne Ditmeyer

SKILLS 136/192

Forgotten Professions Engineers of Gramophone ­Records

Our Picks: Analogue

150/192

Iron Horses

152/192

Pitango Bikes London

INTERESTS

Page 166

The Successor

Page 176

Baiba Skride

Page 188

Google It!

Interview with Winegrower Dominik Sona

Interview with the Violinist

Iron


PUBLISHER

EDITORIAL

In General

In January 2013 the three of us founded the digital publishing company Carry-on Publishing. Ever since then, our aim has been to publish magazines, which cover relevant topics presented in a modern design allowing readers to enjoy tablet-based reading. Our first format, sisterMAG, launched over a year ago and by now has readers in Germany, Austria and Switzerland as well as in the UK, the US, Italy and France. This positive response and experience encouraged us to launch a second magazine. CVmag is our new platform to portrait people who have exciting stories to tell, who have mastered challenges in either their personal or professional life or are still trying to do so – and, most importantly, who have an unconventional way of approaching things. These portraits are supposed to serve as an inspiration to reflect how much fun it is to take life into your own hands and to take action. In an age of streamlined career paths it is our wish to show that literally anything can be the basis of something and that the next opportunity might be just around the corner. Not only did the standards in the work context change, but also people’s expectations in life. Perspectives keep changing at a dizzying speed and before you know a banker becomes a barista, a theologian a businessman, and a ballerina a doctor. While some among us reinvent themselves every three years, others spend decades trying to turn their passion into their profession, to set their boat to sail or to climb into the orchestra pit. Great times for people with verve, passion and flexibility. Great topics for CVmag. CV-mag.com / 4


Editorial

Just like sisterMAG, CVmag will be available for free. The costs for our contributors and designers, illustrators, photographers, and our editorial team will be covered by the integration of partners presenting their brands and products in our issues. There will be no covert advertising and all sponsored features will be marked as we intend to implement an integration, which does not bore or disrupt the flow of reading. Maybe we will be able to show that brand communication can actually be interesting, varied and worth reading? We utterly hope and wish that CVmag will enjoy similar international appreciation and is read just as intensively as sisterMAG is. That we reach a new (male) audience and get the chance to show many wonderful portraits. And not least, to get invaluable feedback from you in order to improve, develop CVmag further and turn it into a good magazine! A warm thank you goes out to our contributors for the fantastic teamwork on this first issue. Enjoy reading!

Yours, Alex, Toni and Thea

CV-mag.com / 5

Publisher


In General

EDITORIAL EDITORIAL LEAD

The most beautiful way of getting to know someone is through a conversation. In an open exchange, there are no fixed rules, no boxes to tick and no comment fields to fill in. It was with exactly this openness, that we approached the creation of CVmag. Our concept is simple and yet new: in contrast to many well-known portrait-magazines, we move our focus from specific fields and characters to a broader perspective which allows us to introduce various professions, stages in life and life designs. Interviews with extraordinary personalities, exciting insights into jobs and apprenticeships, unconventional perspectives – anything but stereotyped thinking. We did not need to go far to find the people, who are part of this first issue: Heinz-Jürgen Gerdes for instance is an old friend of my family, whose work I have long been admiring and whom I finally got the chance to portray. Israeli friends introduced me to Ilan Harari, founder of Pitango, whom I met in his garage in London. I still have a very vivid memory of how we found the photographer for this feature, Kris Elliot, when he responded to our desperate Twitter call in the very last minute. For some articles, however, it seemed nearly impossible to find and establish contacts. The »1 Profession – 3 Countries« CV-mag.com / 6


Editorial

section is a good example for that. Serendipitously, a well networked friend established contact with Mohammad who interviewed the carpenter Mohammad Atiya in Cairo while I got the chance to talk to a Japanese gerontologist via Skype. My inbox literally kept brimming over with news from all around the world! No less important are the contributors of this first issue: one of Thea’s school friends spent an exciting day in the forest with sport addict and mountain biker Hermes Schade and photographer Thomas Dietz and captured her impressions in a

CV-mag.com / 7

Editorial Lead


In General

wonderful article. Find the breathtaking shots from page 46. Emelie Ekborg on the other hand, set off with her camera and notepad to interview Johnny, whose life takes place mostly at sea. Finally, my university friend Sophie, my former colleague Ingo and my little sister Fiona assembled the different perspectives on the East Side Gallery. To find a central theme, despite this variety, turned out to be a major challenge. We picked ‘iron’ as the main theme and made use of the different interpretations attached to it: the iron discipline of a freelancer, iron strength, the ironlike taste of a wine, the age as well as the material itself. So no worries: this is not a Do-It-Yourself

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Editorial

magazine or a magazine targeted at sportsmen. Our umbrella theme is rather subtly entangled with our protagonists’ life stories. But there is more to this issue than these captivating portraits. For instance interior designer Holly’s annotated curriculum vitae. Just as in real life, we tried to create an issue similar to a CV: exciting, gripping and varied. An issue that integrates you as readers as for instance in our Twitter feature about Berlin Mitte and provides you with little gimmicks (i.e. pinnable section spreads and CV templates). Enjoy the read and whenever you have suggestions for people to portray, please just let us know – we are all ears! And of course we are pleased about your feedback and every share (you will find the respective social media plugins at the end of each article).

Yours, Victoria

CV-mag.com / 9

Editorial Lead


In General

CONTRIB TEXT & PHOTO

Sweden. Her blog is Kris Elliott

ventured

an inspirational forum out to North London for florists both in and to capture the inner outside Sweden. Thea Neubauer is one of the co-founders of

workings of boutique bike

manufacturer

Pitango Bikes. Cristopher Santos

Carry-On Publishing

has always been a

Mohammad AL Bdewi and one of the sisters is a young Syrian behind sisterMAG.

great

also CVmag. Originally

to Cairo after he got

from Canada he now

shot by the Syrian

lives in Berlin.

Army during a peaceful demonstration in his

TEXT

home country. In his

Sophie Gobrecht lives

mind and also in his he

keeps

seeking for humanity

of

sisterMAG and now

photographer. He fled

photos,

supporter

in Berlin and is studying

PHOTO

for her final exams

is - and doesn't give up Thomas Dietze a photographer and hope.

before

graduating

with a degree in law.

student from Leipzig. Ashley Ludaescher Emelie Ekborg is One of his specialties is is a lifestyle and a florist and blogger photographing down- wedding photographer from Gothenburg, hill and slope. from California, who has fallen in love with her adopted home city of Berlin. A contributor to sisterMAG we’re glad to have her work in CVmag as well.

CV-mag.com / 10

Writing for CVmag was a welcome change and an entirely new experience.


Contributors

B U TO R S of the first hour. She sports of all kind, wine Judith de Graaff

,

devoted herself whole- and coffee.

graphic designer, lives

heartedly to her new

with her husbnd and

project: CVmag.

their cats in France. Next to text & photos Thea Neubauer

Ingo

Hartmann

is

part of the creative

frequently visited and

process behind this

photografed the East

issue.

Side Gallery. Today the

DESIGN

designer is head oft he

Tina

creative department of

Bergs

studying

PlusQuadrat Projects

is

TRANSLATION

Publishing Sabrina B채cker

GmbH in Berlin.

Management in Leipzig

Fiona Kau

to join the Carry- Kathrin Geyer

but moved to Berlin

studies

English & Psychology in Munich. She enjoyed writing her first article for us.

On Publishing team. Alex Sutter

is one of

the founders of CarryOn Publishing. For the first issue he wrote an article on one of his

Tina Bergs

Victoria Kau Sarah M체ller Antonia Neubauer Thea Neubauer

favourite topics: wine.

Donata Proske

Sandra Wolff lives in

Tanja Timmer

Leipzig and is working towards a degree in Victoria Kau content

crator

is sport managment. Not and biking herself, she still

sisterMAG contributor loves the outdoors and

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PROOF Amie McCracken Antonia Neubauer


In General

Holly von Hoyningen Huene Holly shares her CV - with additional explainations for the most important pieces and key facts of her life.

Personal Nationality I was born in Canada but relocated to Germany in 2009. Changing my country of residence was the most exciting and scariest thing I ever did. I learn to embrace cultural differences and similarities. I learned that my husband is truly supportive and patient.

Mail hollyvonhuene@me.com Website

www.hollyvonhuene.com

Twitter

@hollyvonhuene

Work Experience Since 2013

The most important thing I learned is the value of sharing and connecting. It has shown me that I am resourceful and intrinsically motivated.

Canada, Italy

Search and Social Manager Fashion for Home

Since 2010 Blogger bicyclebabbly.com, thedesignchef.com, hvhinterior.com, wehearthome.com, homedsgn.com, busyboo.com 2009 - 2010

Live-out Nanny private family, Berlin, Germany

Here is where I learned how amazing children are and how much they can teach you about yourself. Truly humbling.

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CV

Holly von Huene

I discovered my passion for the scientific method and how to apply critical thinking skills - and that these are not only important in the lab, but also in my everyday life.

2008-2009 Research Assistant Center for Research in Human Development and Centre for Studies in Neurobiology at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada 2003-2008

Waitress & Bartender Restaurant Solaia, Newtown, The Claremont, Chateu Vaudeuil, Restaurant Clementine, Montreal, Canada

What I really learned here was how awesome it is to be part of a team, to work hard together and to help each other. I learned how to provide truly good service, and how rewarding that can feel. I also learned it's always best to own your mistakes, and that a smile goes a long way.

Education 2010-2011

Certificate in Interior Design Limperts Academy of Design, Richmond, United Kingdom

2005-2009

BA Psycology (Spec. Behavioural Science) Concordia University, Montreal, Canada

2000-2002 DEC Hotel & Restaurant Management Lasalle College, Montreal, Canada

I learned to make soup stock and how to filet fish.

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I learned that interior design goes beyond a nice looking space - it's about the environment you create and how it is meant to affect and reflect the inhabitants. Here I realised how important our perceptions are in shaping our reality.


In General

Language Skills English

Native Speaker

French

Native Speaker

Italian

Intermediate

German

Intermediate

Technical Skills 4/5

iWork

3.5/5

Photoshop

3.5/5

Live Interior 3D Pro 4/5 Blogger, wordpress 4.5/5 Tumblr

3.5/5

Magento

3/5

Personal Skills Teamwork

5/5

Communication 5/5 Organization

4.5/5

Creativity

4.5/5

Initiative

5/5

Interests Design, Blogging, Coffee, Photography, Neurobiology, Dance, Sharing Stories

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I took dance lessons for many years - jazz, classical and modern. Dance probably taught me the most about life and about myself. I learned about confidence, about discipline and determination, about expressing emotions without words, about the power and importance of the mind body connection, about creativity, about failing. There's so much more, too many to name here. I carry those lessons around to this day.

Microsoft Office


Expats

Zoë and James

NEWCASTLE - LONDON - BERLIN

expats

ZOË & JAMES Zoë and James moved from Newcastle via London to Berlin and document their new life in a foreign country on the blog überlin . While Zoë works as a photographer, James is the content mananger for überlin and community management for Factory (a co-working space in Berlin). For CVmag James explained why they made the move.

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In General

What is ĂœBerlin? We started the blog on the day we moved to Berlin, nearly three years ago, and I wrote my first blog post on the plane. It is the story of our Berlin experience. ZoĂŤ and I run the blog together, but I do most of the writing and commissioning of our writers as well as all the communications (PR and media requests, social media and web presence), while Zoe does the visual part like photos and design.

Where are you from? We are both from Newcastle in the north of England. We met while she was still in university and I'd graduated and was visiting friends - it was really random that we met in our hometown. When ZoĂŤ graduated we moved to London for five years before we moved to Berlin.

Why Berlin? The big, massive one is that Berlin is cheaper than London. It's a very creative city and with that a very interesting place to be. It attracts a certain kind of people with a passion who tend to be working on interesting projects. They may have a good job but spend their nights doing something else. It just feels like a place where people come to do what they really want to. When you meet people you

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Expats

ZoĂŤ and James

don't ask straight away: what's your job, what do you do? And that makes it feel a bit more open and free than London.

Had you been to Berlin before? We visited Berlin for the first time about six months after moving to London. We were here for a weekend during winter and it was really cold but we just fell in love with it straight away. So every year we came back and every time we could see that this was where we wanted to be. I don't feel like we moved to Germany, I feel like we moved to Berlin. It's just so different from the rest of Germany, a bit like London is very different from the rest of England.

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In General

Biggest challenge? The language. We've learned a lot of German but are pretty far from being fluent. It's a challenge to learn German when everybody speaks English. While we feel integrated into our lives and have friends, it's still an isolating position. Apart from that I think we've been lucky finding work, but there aren't a lot of jobs and they aren't very well paid. I don't think we would have moved if we couldn't have brought over freelance work from the UK.

most important person in this time of change? This is going to sound cheesy but I would say ZoĂŤ and I would hope that ZoĂŤ would say me. Although she might say her family. We went through moving to another country and on top of that changed our careers quite a lot. We didn't have steady work and at first it was a really scary thing. I was a lot more scared than Zoe was. She gets worried but is stronger than I am. I couldn't have made it without her.

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Expats

When did Berlin your real home?

become

It's a little complicated. Basically Berlin feels as much like home as anywhere else does. Zoe and I are both from Newcastle but our parents and lots of our friends have moved away. So it doesn't feel like home. London never really felt like home, and in Berlin we feel welcome. I never really look into the future and couldn't tell you how long we're going to be here. So, the concept of home is a tough one for me. But when we get off the plane after being somewhere else, I get the feeling that we're home.

3 products you really miss From the UK: ZoĂŤ: Nars (a cosmetics brand) , Barry M nail varnish, Twinings Tea.

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ZoĂŤ and James


In General

James: Irn Bru (Scottish Energy Drink), Murdoch London Hair Doh, Uni Qlo

3 products you Discovered in Germany ZoĂŤ: Bionade, Club Mate, Barcomis.

James: Sternburg (beer), Rhubarb Schorle (Rhubarb juice with sparkling water), Wunderlist

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Expats

What are your top expat tips for anyone following in your footsteps ? I'ld say learn the language. What seemed to work for us was landing here, a bit clueless, absorbing stuff for a couple of months and then starting to learn it. If possible, bring your work with you. That is rare, but for people who are in any kind of freelance job: line up clients and projects back in your home country and bring that work over with you. And put yourself out there in terms of making friends and networking because it took us a long time until we made some friends. And then, if I could go back in time and tell myself one thing, it would be relax! Because things have a way of working themselves out. There is so much about this experience that you can't control. So it's better to roll with it and take things as they come.

ÜBERLIN

TWITTER

FACEBOOK

SHARE THIS ARTICLE:

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ZOË

JAMES

Zoë and James


In General

n i l r e B ? e t t i M

Who is

her

w per son, ho itte were a If # B e r l i n M er/him? describe h would you

Ph

ud채sc L y e l h s A : otos

fa o t i a r t r o p rite a w o t t l u c has ffi e n o y It is di r e v e c au s e e b , d o o h r out b a s n o i n i neighbou p and o s n o i t a i c o ss ple o e p t n e different a r e d diff e k s a e w y h ll us, e t it . This is w o t n i l r e in B d n a d n u o r itte M n i l r f ro m , a e B # ribe c s e d d l u o omes c t i n h ow t h ey w e h w ow n n k s i s A . n nnen u r b d as a per so n u s e een G w t e b t c i r t ver O . r to the dis e ff i d s inion p o , n e t r a and s d n and Tierg e i r f o t ed out h c a e r e w of e u Twitter s s i t s r fi the r o f s e c n a t yered a l i t l a cq u a i n u m a ated e r c s u h t d ey h T . d CVmag an o o h r hbou g i e n e h t f al c o l m o r f p o r t ra i t o s icture p y b d e i n a er. a re a c c o m p h c s 채 d u L y Ashle r e h p a r g o phot

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Neighbourhood

Berlin Mitte

@cvmag_ Creative, chic, and with enough money to have a second apartment in New York! ¨j @uberlinblog

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In General

Drinking coffee, only eating organic meat, owns proprietary, Job something with med or politics.

@untenistoben

Young, hip & always reinventing itsel

@eventsofa

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Neighbourhood

b: dia

n

lf.

a

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Berlin Mitte


In General

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Neighbourhood

An art and fashion lover, someone who loves to discover smthg new in every corner @angelillaOchoa

Like a cross between a metrosexual, and a posh hipster? Good question : ) @parhaminc

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Berlin Mitte


In General

She pol at C ha w sh

@

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Neighbourhood

e (22), interested in litics, drinks her coffee CafĂŠ Einstein, tends to ave an image neurosis, without a Kiez, likes hopping at Lafayette

@jurischnoeller

Hmm tricky - Sleek, charming, creative, contented, sociable. @mysugarthumb

Hmmmmm... #hip & #trendy with a creative talent @BotanicArtHB

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Berlin Mitte


In General

, d e s s e r d ll e W . e n o h a smartp d n a o g to e e ff o c to ce n Addicted a r a e p p a e r o m y ll a cts, usu je o r p w fe a n o g in k r ;) te always wo it m e v o il # ty li a e r n tha

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Neighbourhood

g @minamokablo

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Berlin Mitte


In General

She would probably be doing smth. really important with fashion/ media, wearing black leggings/tight pants, boots, a bun, thinking her style is one-of-a-kind. @MeSuperMom CV-mag.com / 32


Neighbourhood

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Berlin Mitte


In General

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Neighbourhood

Berlin-Mitte is male, end of his 20s/ beginning 30s, buys at COS, works for a startup and originally comes from the Southwest of Germany.

@sebastianwaters

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Berlin Mitte


In General

A chic woman with a scar and a relent her h

@afr

Berl Sw tot creati

@ja

I can th and sk

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Neighbourhood

n, around 40s, r on her hand, tless sorrow in heart. Smiling.

rokakarue

lin is political, wabian, homo, tebag, mobile, ive, Electro ‌

anmussran

hink of pale kinny to add ‌ @plpppr

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Berlin Mitte


In General

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Neighbourhood

Berlin Mitte is the glamour diva out of the gossip magazine. When you meet her personally, she is wearing sweatpants & hair rollers and is holding a teapot. @tanjastweets

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Berlin Mitte


In General

Sporty, multilingual, with a racing bike, headphones and a soy latte to start the startup day :) @nadinika

I myself think about hipsters with laptops in designer coffeeshops or coffee »afficionados«, e.g. in »The Barn«. @jennifuchs

A pretty and somehow weirdly dressed Anglo-Saxon girl who works in a coffeeshop and has dark circles under her eyes. @S_ Pfeffer CV-mag.com / 40


Neighbourhood

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Berlin Mitte


In General

CV-mag.com / 42


Neighbourhood

Berlin Mitte

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Thanks so much to all Twitter friends, who were part of this issue. In the next CVmag we'll follow Sivan Askayo to TEL AVIV. If you want to be part of issue N째2 and tell us your opinion about Tel Aviv Nago, just tweet us @cvmag_ CV-mag.com / 43


Education

Downhill Interview with the mountain biker

Hermes Schade Text: Sandra Wolff Photos: Thomas

Dietze

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Downhill

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Hermes Schade


Education

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Downhill

Leipzig on a mild and cloudless Friday morning in June. It is exactly 8 o'clock and Hermes, in full attire and shouldering an almost fear-inspiring downhill bike, opens the door of a neatly doneup pre-war building. There's an impish smile on his face as he recounts the events of the previous evening: »I was planning on hitting the sack early, but then a couple of beers and a DJ battle got in the way!« Despite a mere four hours of sleep neither a hangover nor any tiredness stands a chance. We're on a mission and our destination is the Rochlitzer Berg. That's 60 kilometres dedicated entirely to Hermes and his passion: downhill mountain biking. Hermes never played football and he is not likely to take it up any time soon either: »My brother and his friends back home were always on their bikes and so one day I just joined them.« But ordinary cycling soon bored him and a need for more sophisticated tracks, higher speeds and more professional bikes arose. Weekend trips to perfect biking spots, improving his abilities or taking part in contests and proving his talent soon became his favourite past time. For Hermes nothing beats that special competition atmosphere: »Even when fierce competitiveness takes over and we're fighting for the best results, the good spirits never fall by the wayside. We enjoy our time together doing what we love best: speeding down the mountain on a bike.« After finishing high school in 2006, Hermes enrolled at the University of Leipzig. He's studying CV-mag.com / 51

Hermes Schade


Education

to become a teacher for maths and – you've guessed it – P.E. Despite the enticements of student life, the weekends are still reserved for downhill mountain biking only. We've reached Rochlitz, a town with a population of 6,000, on the Zwickauer Mulde and its imposing altitude difference of 353 meters. The Rochlitzer Berg is where the local riders both train and play. Hermes identifies what looks like a suitable track and carefully inspects its course. Full protection gear is donned, stray screws on the bike are tightened, and the helmet is put on. Then there is silence, focus, silence. Suddenly: Full tilt assault! Hermes puts all he has got into the pedals to gain speed. It's three minutes, straight downhill, across big rocks and small ones, stuck ones and loose ones, across protruding roots, across all sorts of natural kicks. Hermes is going for the maximum possible speed, but he remains vigilant and navigates dangerous impediments without ever losing control. He does well at competitions despite his lack of a personal coach and a strict training regime. »If I enter a race I want to win it! If that doesn't work, I am disappointed, but I can always win next time« says Hermes whose unselfconscious effortlessness and very conscious decision not to turn pro are probably his strongest allies in his successful mission CV-mag.com / 52


Downhill

to keep things fun. Nonetheless, when it comes to technical question regarding tracks, bikes, equipment or competition rules, a hitherto unusual seriousness takes over and he addresses all issues in an arduous and matter-of-fact manner. We spend the entire day going up and down the Rochlitzer Berg again and again until the early evening. Hermes never loses his high spirits, pushes his heavy gear up the mountain, tells jokes and, just a second later, is on his way back down again going for more speed than ever. By the time CV-mag.com / 53

Hermes Schade


Education

we make our way back to Leipzig, 10 hours have passed in this manner. In just a little while, Hermes will finish his university studies and start his training as a maths and P.E. teacher at a high school somewhere in Germany. He shares some thoughts he had over breakfast not long ago about this change not long ago. Wondering whether he'd still be able or even willing to engage in such a time-consuming hobby as a teacher, he realised: »I will have less time but far more money to travel to all the great spots in Europe and take part in competitions. A weekend here, another one, three weeks later, somewhere else.« This realisation struck him as most fortuitous. Until his move to the treadmill of working life in a few months, however, he is killing two birds with one stone: On a contract with US bicycle and cycling equipment manufacturer Specialized, he is testing their new models in the Alps while at the same time bagging some much needed cash for his big trip. Hermes is going to New Zealand to travel the breath-taking countryside in his VW bus for half a year. He is looking forward to a trip in his favourite, albeit somewhat quiet, company: »Just my bus, my two bikes and curd soap.«

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Downhill

Hermes Schade

Facts

Name Hermes Schade Date of Birth 10 December 1987 Residence Leipzig, Saxony, Germany Occupation University student (maths, P. E.)

Hobbies Downhill mountain biking, bouldering, bicycle racing, friends, fun

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Frame Seat Seat Post Saddle

Top Tube Lower Tube Seat Tube Chainstay Rear Brake Rear Sprocket Rear Derailleur

Chain Derailleur Chain Rings


Handle Bar Stem Head Set Steering Tube

Shock Absorber Front Brake Fork Leg

Wheel Valve Spoke Hub Rim Tyre

Pedal Crank (Crankarm) Inner Bearings


Skills

EAST SIDE GALLERY

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changing perspectives. edited by Victoria Ka


au

Perspectives

East Side Gallery

Imagine, you're in debt and tell three friends about it. One of them is a lawyer and wants to take a closer look at the sales agreement. The second one is a mafia boss and offers to find the money by the next day. The third one is a psychologist and worries whether you still manage to sleep at night. Depending on the profession, a situation can be interpreted totally differently. In this issue, we're looking at the East Side Gallery in Berlin. This spring the alleged demolition of the East Side Gallery for the benefit of a building project caused an uproar in Berlin . The former piece of the Berlin Wall with its artistic paintings is an important monument and tourist attraction in Berlin. Sophie Gobrecht, lawyer, Ingo Hartmann, designer, and Fiona Kau, psychologist, told us what they think about the issue. CV-mag.com / 61


Education

The arrival of excavators in spring 2013 was preceded by long administrative proceedings. It started with the approval of a zoning map that labels the area with large sections of the East Side Gallery as residential areas. Based on this, a construction permit was granted in 2008. Was

DESIGNER

ANFANG

LAWYER

START

The demolition of the East Side Gallery—the most well-known and the longest still existing part of the Berlin Wall— started on the morning of 28 March 2013 and was followed by a wave of indignation that swept through the city. The Wall as a tangible monument START

to remind us of the once divided Germany, of the unspeakable suffering of many families living in Berlin at that time and being separated overnight, and of the numerous attempts to escape that ended in death. The Wall as a symbol for an imprisoned and terrorized people that recaptured

Why do we tear down buildings? They are no longer of any use to us, they have become dilapidated and can't be saved, they are no longer pleasing to the eye, have become a nuisance or ought to make way for a »higher cause«. We are all aware of the reasons, some we accept, others we meet with stunned disapproval. Last Year, Kim Jong-un had his father's luxurious mansion torn down. Was he taking a stance? Or did he simply not like it anymore? We frequently hear

PSYCHOLOGIST

START

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Perspectives

East Side Gallery

it not foreseeable that this highly symbolic part of the Wall could not be torn down without the public's awareness? Would the authorities have had to include the public, us namely, in any way? As far as the legal proceedings up to the above mentioned construction permit are concerned, the public is to be involved in the event of urban designations—in this case the labeling of the street Mühlenstraße as a residential area. The respective plans have to be made available

CONTINUE

its right to freedom decades later. Is it going to vanish completely like many other important historic buildings? Can wiping out painful memories be seen as a positive sign for progress or is the city being robbed of a significant piece of its defining past? The East Side Gallery is more

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about entire villages and towns razed to the ground for economic reasons without a single thought spared for the people affected by it. No demolition, be it that of a building, memorial or landmark, for whatever reason is ever without consequence. First we see demolition equipment and machinery taking down the objects bit by bit. Then there's a gap serving as a vivid reminder of what used to be in its place. At some point that gap is filled with

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to the public. Once the zoning map is approved the way is basically paved for an application for planning permission that is solely examined by the competent authority and affects the applicant only. It is impossible to take action against the building project at a later stage. A lawsuit against the building project would require that someone's personal rights are violated by the construction. However, this is not the case here. Initiatives by citizens against

than a building of its time. It not only reminds us of the unbelievable actions that took place in former East Germany as the already demolished palace of the republic once did. It also stands for coming to terms with what happened. It stands for the combination of art and politics,

PSYCHOLOGIST

DESIGNER

ANFANG

LAWYER

Education

a new building, park or other form of construction and it gets harder to remember what used to give this place its distinctive character. ÂťDidn't there used to be a...ÂŤ people will soon say. And the next generation will merely be able to vaguely guess what that might have been.

Demolition always brings about change, but that can be good, too. If a state brings down a dictator or regime, it will want to get rid of any reminders of the dark past as soon as possible. Memories aren't easily erased but physical reminders stirring these memories, like architecture, are.

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Perspectives

East Side Gallery

administrative decisions, such as granting a construction permit, cannot override administrative decisions either. In terms of content, the competent authority has to consider during its examination of the compliance with building law whether reasons of heritage conservation that

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for freedom, creativity and the change of the presentation of art in open space. Graffiti and street art have already been a popular way of installing art in open space during the 80s. For a long time the city was considered to be the graffiti Mecca in Europe. But

CONTINUE

Architecture, like any other art, reflects the spirit of its time and holds a mirror to society. Demolishing something to take a stance is a balancing act. Do we want to rid the past of all ÂťevilÂŤ or should we preserve it as part of our history and as a sign? After the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 most of it was demolished; only six segments were kept as a memorial of which now only one, the East Side Gallery, remains. The choice between demolition and

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Education

PSYCHOLOGIST

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oppose the project do or do not exist. The results of the authority regarding this matter were negative. This certainly is legally justified, but whether to regard it as the ÂťrightÂŤ decision or not is another question. It remains open if there could have been other ways to include the citizens of

also the parts of the Wall that could be reached from the west served as a huge canvas for many spray artists. Shortly after the reunification, both sides of the Wall could not have been more colorful. The East Side Gallery was formed in spring 1990, when 118 artists from 21 countries

left their mark by painting their artwork over a length of 1316 meters on the east side of the Wall. The other side of the Wall towards the river Spree became the meeting point for the graffiti scene of Berlin. As teenagers we went there many times to gaze at the newest artwork of

the creation of a memorial was made more than 20 years ago. Since the decision was taken thousands of people every year come to see the East Side Gallery, take photographs and experience the sight, not least because it is a genuine part of history. If you fade out the other tourists, the heavy traffic and the O2 Arena you can almost imagine what the place looked like 20 years ago: The vast amount of concrete put there to keep the people inside their country, the effects

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Perspectives

East Side Gallery

our idols. At the same time, we were encouraged to deal with the Berlin Wall as an instrument of a regime and of reflective art in terms of the current political changes. The painting of the fraternal kiss was probably the one that ingrained itself the strongest in our memories. There

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this had on daily life and the suffering the people in the GDR had to endure. Authenticity is the key because people learn through experiences. These can be first hand, when something is experienced personally, or second hand through stories, pictures and virtual replications. Anyone whose parents warned them not to touch the hotplate will remember how much more commanding than the mere warning the experience to actually touch it

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Education

Berlin at a much larger scale. I am sure the competent authorities were aware of the importance of the East Side Gallery not only as a monument to the divided Berlin and the reunification of Germany but also as a tourist draw. Moreover, the demolition of the Berlin Wall for the benefit of constructing luxurious condos is a textbook example of the rapid gentrification and the defiance of the needs of the general public of Berlin. I believe that more importance should have

were, however, and still are, many small and big interpretations on both sides that make you reflect. Other than graffiti, which has remained an art niche, street art enjoys more acceptance and popularity among the public. Satirical posters on building walls, portraits made with stencils

and get burned was. First- and second-hand learning work in exactly the same way: human beings need to experience their environment. A learning experience is most impressive when it addresses several senses at the same time, for example hearing, sight, touch and smell. This way the brain will create more connections than it does when only one sense is addressed and something learned this way will be saved more thoroughly and hence remembered better. Visiting

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Perspectives

East Side Gallery

been ascribed to those aspects; by all means there was a need for better communication. However, despite the outcries against the demolition of the East Side Gallery, the facts and alternatives need to be taken into account as well. Is it really demolition or rather a relocation of parts of the

and stickers with polarizing statements today shape many parts of the Berlin cityscape. In street art, we often find a combination of artistic creativity and political commitment or a socio-critical attitude. Yet there are also seemingly na誰ve paintings of animals, fictional characters and other often comiclike creatures on transformer boxes, public toilets or on houses, without the intention of making a statement. This kind of apolitical art, just as the

CONTINUE

a historical building therefore is always infinitely more impressive than visiting a museum. No matter how much thought and effort went into creating an exhibition, visiting a place where history happened and can still be observed will leave a much greater imprint on a person's mind as it

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political, socio-critical or satirical kind, originated in the East Side Gallery, which undoubtedly has a strong influence on new Berlin art. This is how taking a walk in some parts of the city has become a visit to a gallery in the open. What the fraternal kiss and slogans mean to some,

Keith Haring for example means to others. The people of Berlin like to complain about the changes of their beloved home town. But without change there would not be progress. There is no stagnation in Berlin—and that is a good thing. Still, with all progressive change

is absorbed via several channels at once. The East Side Gallery was created and has been kept open for exactly this purpose: to create an authentic place which helps us remember the past and makes it actually sensible. One can't help but ask why this has now been forgotten. Do people actually think the effect can be created by assembling individual pieces of the wall in a park like objects of art? The East Side Gallery is more than just a work of art, it's

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SHARE THIS ARTICLE:

a piece of evidence from the past we can see, touch and experience. How much of that could you just END move to another place? 

TO THE NEXT PERSPECTIVE

Berlin must neither lose its identity nor its history. No museum could ever convey the same feeling that people have when standing on the actual ground of the East Side Gallery. With its demolition, Germany will not only lose part of its history but also part of END its art history. 

TO THE NEXT PERSPECTIVE

Berlin Wall? In the latter case the contiguity of the Berlin Wall will be destroyed but not the artworks that were painted onto the Wall in 1991. So how large is the affected part of the Berlin Wall really? END 

East Side Gallery


Education

course of study

Gerontology The science of aging is also called gerontology.

an introduction

In Germany only the University of Vechta offers a Bachelor as well as a Master degree. In other countries, such as the USA and Japan, gerontology is an established subject. According to the researchers Paul B. Baltes and Margret Maria Baltes, gerontology explores, examines and describes the physical, psycological, social, historical and cultural aspects of aging and age itself. Furthermore it delves into the analyses of the social surroundings and environments relevant to age or created through it. Especially for a society with a quickly changing demographic this is of great interest. Japan and Germany forefront these developments: in both countries the aging of the population and decling birth rate are cause for an increased number of the elderly.

CVmag interviewed two professors teaching gerontology in Tokyo and Vechta, respectively - an introduction to the course of studies, gerontology.

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Gerontology

Dr.Akiyama

Dr. Akiyama Gerontologist, Tokyo, Japan

ow did you become a professor in Gerontology?

Almost 40 years ago, I went to the University of Michigan in the United States as a graduate student. I had graduated in social psychology in Tokyo and wrote my thesis about the psychological aspects of aging. Before I came to Michigan, I didn't even know there existed the field of gerontology, which actually evolved in the US at that time. So I stayed there until 1997 and got involved in a lot of research programs and teaching. When I returned to Japan, I tried to talk to the head of the university in Tokyo about establishing a gerontology program, because the population in Japan was rapidly aging and their life expectancy is the highest in the world. Of course economist, medicals and other specialists were already researching in that area - e.g. housing and

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Education

Older people think it is absolutely okay to depend on other people – e.g. your family – when you e mp l o y m e nt grow old. systems, sicknesses etc. - but there was no gerontology institute at a university. But then, nine years ago, the president of the University of Tokyo thought the university should contribute to solving the social issues of an aging society. So I was asked to set up the Institute of Gerontology in 2006. What had been your personal background apart from your expertise as a psychologist?

I grew up in a family with three generations under one roof and I was the first grandchild. My mother always said that my grandparents stole me. They lived in the same house as we did, but in a separate area. We ate and did other things together, but I basically grew up in the grandparents section. So I was always around older people, like my grandparents, their friends and relatives. I was always very interested in their matters. I knew about their concerns and joys, and I've always felt comfortable being with older people ever since I was a child. When I majored in social psychology, gerontology still didn't exist. And looking at the textbooks it seemed as if all development ended at the age of 20. Could you tell us something about aging and the elderly in Japan?

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Gerontology

it is absolutely okay to depend on other people – e.g. your family – when you grow old. And if you are have who take care of you, you're very lucky and happy about it. But that is not very common anymore. Nowadays most old people live alone or with their spouses, and they are more and more proud to be independent and to be able to take care of themselves. They don't want to depend on their children or anyone else. Of course they still want to be respected. But the actual expectations are different. In Europe, the economical crisis changes the situation of families. Many young people move back to their parents' and grandparents' homes because they can't afford living on their own anymore. Do situations like these change the value of family?

Definitely. In Japan that happened with the tsunami in 2011, and not only in the areas where the earthquakes and flooding took place. After the tsunami, the families suddenly became important again. With the households getting smaller and smaller, and with the increasing number of people unmarried, the CV-mag.com / 75

Dr.Akiyama


Education

concept family had become a minor matter. But after a catastrophe like this, people moved together again. It really changed the human bonds and people started putting more value and attention to the idea of having a family. In what way does your institute face the challenges of an aging society?

My approach as a psychologist was always to understand the aging person or society understanding was the major process. Now, as a gerontologist, I deal much more with actual solutions. I used to do large national surveys and analyzed data, which is also really important. But now we're interacting with the society, the govern足 ment, the industry. It is quite different from what I used to do, but it's very exciting and rewarding. In our institute with 80 faculty members we have many different disciplines such as medicine, engineering, economics, educationalists - so it's very interdisciplinary! We are doing social

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Gerontology

experiments that include interventions in the community, both in the rural and the urban area. That requires a very broad range of expertise from all these fields, whether it concerns housing, financial systems, health or work. And all my colleagues have not actually graduated in gerontology; it is rather a sort of double degree. And these people have a very strong position in the job market. Can you tell us about one of your projects?

At the moment I'm responsible for a town project 30 kilometers from Tokyo. Years ago, 80% - 90% of the town's population commuted to Tokyo. Such a town is called Bed Town, as people leave early in the morning and come back late at night. But now these people, who belonged to the baby boomers in the 1960s and 1970s, reached retirement age, so now there's nothing to do in that town. And sadly, they don't even know anyone in the community. They tend to stay home and watch TV, maybe go out for a little walk once a day. So we started to program Work Places for the Second Life. We created new work places in walk or bike distance and they themselves decided when and how long they wanted to work. It's actually working very well! They get out, work and get wages. The difference to their old working life is that it's work sharing: 5-6 people make a team and share one job. And I noticed how well they also connect socially, although they didn't know each other before. In one team, We created new work

places in walk or bike distance. CV-mag.com / 77

Dr.Akiyama


Education

one person started to show early symptoms of dementia. But the whole team kept the same work schedule and somehow, very naturally, covered the work of that person. So this project showed that it's about more than just providing a job and staying healthy. It makes the whole society more tender and gentle – people suddenly overcome individualism and start to care for each other. That really impressed me! Apart from research and the university programs – what is a typical place of work for your graduates?

Many go into the industry, whether it's the financial, house building or auto industry. Those who graduated in law often go to work in governments and become politicians. Some also focus on individual aging, just like I experienced it in the U.S. But I think we need to focus more on the society, the aging population. In the 1950s, only 5% of the Japanese population was over 65. Now it's 24%, and in 2030 it is going to be 33%. The social infrastructure, the buildings and the transportation, employment and education systems were built up at a time when the population was much younger, so the current social infrastructure does not meet the needs of a very highly aged society. We have to change that, that's the job of our institute and that is why it is so important to work with all these different disciplines.

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Gerontology

Prof. Dr. Frerich

Prof. Dr.

Frerich

w

Gerontology, Uni Vechta, Germany

hen was the degree programme in gerontology introduced at the University of Vechta?

It has been run the way it is run now since the winter semester 2004/05 but it is not a new course. It has its roots in a course that was offered in the 1980s as a professional development programme for those working with senior citizens. Due to the increased demand, a university degree course was established in the mid 1990s which has now developed into a full Bachelor's and Master's programme. This process mirrors the professional development working with the elderly has taken. How we deal with and treat senior citizens has become a focal point of the current social debate. This has increased the need for scientific insight.

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Education

What is your personal

scientific background?

I read sociology and psychology at the Freie Universit채t Berlin in the 1980s. There was no degree course specialising in gerontology available back then so I took classes in all the different scientific disciplines that specialised in age research. Although experts researched the demographic development even back then there was no broad social debate yet. Which professional and personal experiences have influenced you significantly?

First of all my compulsory community service, which I opted for instead of military service and which I did at a retirement home. Some of the conditions were appalling with up to four elderly people to a room and hardly any time and space for private conversations and personal attention. I realised that this treatment of the elderly was clearly not fit for the impending future development and a change had to be made. During my time at university I developed a keen interest in how the subject of ageing is approached and dealt with. When I finished my degree in 1990 I was lucky enough to get the chance to work at a newly founded research institute for gerontology in North RhineWestphalia. We were able to exert influence on the situation of elderly people in a very practical way for instance by analysing the economic potential of senior citizens.

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Gerontology

Which changes have to be made in the treatment of age and ageing in Germany?

The social debate in Germany should be held in a more balanced way. Currently two extremes prevail: For the longest time ageing has been viewed only as a loss-making development. But recently the focus has shifted to a more successful ageing process. I advocate charting a middle course: We have to identify and harness the potential and skills inherent in the ageing process for example where voluntary work or the placement of elderly people in companies is concerned. But where a senior citizen's living situation is in crisis we must improve it. The need for the latter is made obvious through the current debate about poverty among the elderly: The number of elderly people who will not be able to grow old in a ÂťpositiveÂŤ way but will face a longer professional life and lower income will grow.

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Prof. Dr. Frerich


Education

In Japan they do not consider their society aged but rather long-living. This is a much more positive way of Japan is also intensely engaged putting it. in gerontological research. Do the Japanese treat ageing differently?

The Japanese have a different social perspective on ageing. They do not consider their society aged but rather long-living. This is a much more positive way of putting it as it focusses on an excess of life time which can be used and valued. How do nuts-and-bolts university projects support a change in how ageing is treated?

The Bachelor degree, for example, comprises three applied aspects: There is the classic work placement programme in which students go into professional institutions. Then there is the teaching research project which focusses on research in step with actual practise. One aspect of this semester is research into how travel agencies or providers of educational services adjust their offers to senior citizens and how tailored to their needs the resulting offers actually are and what still needs to be changed. Thirdly there is a study project for which the students develop their own offer in the area of modern work opportunities for the elderly. This facilitates a close exchange of ideas with stakeholders in services for the elderly with regards to education, the internet, media and politics. What are your students' personal backgrounds?

They tend to fall into one of three categories: There

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Gerontology

are those who have already dealt with this topic in their professional lives as care or social workers. They are looking to put their practical experience onto a scientific basis in order to increase their power to shape their professional field. Then there are students with a positive relationship with ageing and the elderly which is rooted in private and/or family relations and which they want to pursue as part of their studies. The third group is mainly attracted by the interdisciplinary character of the course. Even though the thematic focus is gerontology, there is a lot of latitude to gear research to a wide variety of topics. Why is there only one university in Germany that offers a degree course in gerontology?

Unlike social work or care and nursing sciences, gerontology does not have a defined occupational area. This has disadvantages as well as advantages as graduates can go into a wide variety of jobs. Graduates work as planners for senior citizen services at local government level, as quality assurance officers in care institutions or as consultants in intercultural senior citizen services. It is, however, a reciprocal process: The more the universities are involved in a topic the more jobs are developed as a result. How does your work at the university change your own attitude towards ageing?

I'm in my 50s now which makes me a so-called ÂťSilver AgerÂŤ. I now get to Gerontology does not

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Prof. Dr. Frerich


Education

experience all the signs of ageing I had only dealt with on a theoretical level before. Thanks to my work I also know how precious the process of ageing is. When I explain to my students how much life expectancy depends on your level of education, your social standing and your diet I am not discussing some abstract topic, it directly affects me and the people around me. If you look at a young person's diet or the way they move you are able to tell how they will age. This makes you more susceptible. Age concerns everybody! Which challenges and opportunities will Âťage and ageingÂŤ as a topic face in the future?

Due to the increased life expectancy in many countries there will soon be more and more people living far beyond 100 years of age. This will enrich society as a whole as those people command a much larger treasure trove of experience and can hence offer a different perspective. We still tend to focus mainly on the present and the past. A productive exchange with contemporary witnesses will prove beneficial.

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Gerontology

Karin Buchholz

Karin

E

Buchholz Student and Research Assistent, Gerontology, Uni Vechta, Germany

lderly people intrigue me and I find dealing with them fascinating. I had worked in care facilities for a while when I decided to flesh out my experiences with a scientific background. Ageing used to be considered from a care perspective only; but more recently it was geared to media and science. My studies included a two-week workshop in Tanzania focused on the exchange of research methods. During the excursions we also gained an insight into the living environment of the elderly. The demographic changes in Tanzania are very similar to those in Germany. They, too, live to be older than ever before. This changes the social set up and cooperation within the society. The different ways to approach these topics, politically and on an individual level, were a focal point of my studies in Tanzania.

Ageing should be seen in a more positive light. We have to change our perspective, shifting from a deficit centred view to highlighting the inherent potential. The elderly are more likely to take up volunteer work or support their families looking after the grandchildren. Furthermore several contributing factors are commonly ignored when discussing pension plans and care. This leads to the predominance of a very one-sided view of old age and also causes misunderstandings. Many senior citizens are surprised to find out that I research this topic at university. They marvel at the fact that a young person would be so interested in Âťold ageÂŤ. But I am convinced that growing old should be openly talked about from an early age. It doesn't just hit at 60, 70 or 80; everybody ages a tiny little bit every single day. One day everybody will be affected by how we, as a society, treat different generations and the framework of support, guidance and aid we create for the later phases of life. I wish for people to experience ageing as a positive part of life which could open up entirely new vistas. SHARE THIS ARTICLE:

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Work Experience

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One Profession

Three Countries

EGYPT

1 Profession - 3 Countries CARPENTER edited by Victoria Kau , photos: archive, Egyptian section: Mohammad AlBdewi

MOHAMMAD ATIYA CARPENTER IN KAIRO, EGYPT DIETER STAHL MASTER CARPENTER & RESTORER IN DORNSTETTEN, GERMANY ALEXANDER WAALER CARPENTER IN OSLO, NORWAY

In Germany, people eat sour dough bread, India is renown for Naan and Poppadoms, and in France, it's Baguette – each baker bakes differently! CVmag takes a closer look at professions and how they are different in other countries, whether due to geography, finances or the political situation. In this issue, we talked to three carpenters in Germany, Norway and Egypt.

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NORWAY

GERMANY

EGYPT

QUESTION

Work Experience

1

WHY DID YOU BECOME A CARPENTER?

Honestly, I didn't like studying at all and that's why I left school early. I wanted to become a carpenter! I was even escaping from my school in order to go to a nearby carpenter workshop, sit in front of the workshop and watch how he was working. I was so fascinated by wood and the

nice things he was doing and this is made me love this profession. After I started learning it I liked it more because I was learning new things every day. That's why I am still working and loving this profession, for now 37 years.

I practically grew into this job seeing as my father owned a carpentry business himself. I have always enjoyed working with wood and it is a wonderful feeling to see a new roof truss or a wooden house being put up that you made yourself. Houses and roof trusses are constructions you can look at and say: I made that.

I couldn't imagine having a job where I'd sit at a desk the whole day. After school I started studying economics for six months and I wasn't very good at concentrating. So I didn't want to risk having a job where I would sit behind a computer the whole day. I always loved building, and I knew I could easily find jobs. But basically, I've always liked building things and I'm not good at sitting still.

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In fact, I left studying when I was in the sixth grade in elementary school, so I did not study this profession. It would have been possible in one of the vocational schools in Egypt, which are good schools and free of cost, but I wanted to practice and not study so I preferred to learn the profession by working. I learn it from a carpenter directly and thus was working with a carpenter in Cairo for 12 years. At the beginning, that meant cleaning the workshop and making tea In 1974, I finished my three-year training that included about 40% theory and 60% practice. Today, the ratio is reversed. As a trainee you do not have to pay anything, because the training is financed by contributions levied on all carpentry businesses offering training. In the first year, you go to

NORWAY

EGYPT

2

HOW LONG DID YOUR TRAINING TAKE, WHAT WA BETWEEN THEORY AND PRACTICE AND HOW MUC APPROXIMATELY COST?

GERMANY

QUESTION

Work Experience

One typically has two options to become a carpenter: One can either attend a vocational school and first have two years of school; after finishing school, one then has two years of practice in a company and then a final graduation. During these last two years, the apprentice starts on a

very low salary, which increases every six months. I, however, had already graduated from high school and thus became an adult trainee. The apprentice then mostly learns practically for four years. In one of those years, one goes to school once a week. The apprenticeship program pays

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Three Countries

AS THE BALANCE CH DID IT

for my boss and afterwards he started giving me simple work. I was improving during those 12 years and now I have my own workshop. This is the typical way of learning vocational professions here in Egypt: If you want to learn a profession perfectly you have to leave school. This is how I learned

and I believe I did the right thing. I was making my own money while my school colleagues were still getting pocket money from their parents.

school four days a week and work in a business once a week. In the second year, you still go to school but work for about 850 Euro a month in a carpentry business. In the third year, you receive about 1,100 Euro for the same amount of work. After the training a journeyman receives approximately 13.50 Euro per hour.

for that as well as your salary during that year which is enough for making a living - about 1,800 Euro per month. After that year, one takes a theoretical exam. And after these four years, one takes the apprenticeship leave examination where one has one week to build and write about a special project, e.g. on the building the company works on currently. I also got lucky to take part in an exchange program in Berlin for four weeks during my apprenticeship. CV-mag.com / 93

NEXT QUESTION


NORWAY

GERMANY

EGYPT

QUESTION

Work Experience

3

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE REPUTATION OF YOUR JOB IN YOUR COUNTRY? AND IS IT ADEQUATELY REMUNERATED?

My career actually has a very good reputation. Firstly, because Egyptians love wood and wooden furniture. It has been in our tradition for a long time. Secondly, because wood has a special attraction for all people in general, and thirdly I think this profession has a very big artistic and creative side which

makes its reputation better than other professions. Regarding the payment: Before the revolution I used to earn good money. My income was good and I was very comfortable and I didn't worry about life expenses. I used to earn between 2,000 to 3,000 Euro which is very good income, even better

The profession has a good reputation, because the training is very demanding and carpentry in itself has a long tradition. Even in the Middle Ages, half-timbered houses were built by carpenters. Unfortunately, the payment is not as high as in industrial businesses. There are, however, good promotion prospects – you can for instance become a master craftsman, a certified restorer, a building energy consultant or you can do academic studies in the field of engineering or architecture. I often hear that a lot of people idealize my profession. People think it's nicer and more fun than it actually is, and they might say something like: »Wow, carpenter! I always wanted to build something.« Most times it's just as straight forward as other jobs. The reputation is good, it's better

than an electrician's or plumber's, although these professions earn more money. It's because wood has a better reputation in general: it's natural and ecological, and people think working with it is creative, since people associate houses and furniture with it. But in houses today there's actually more non-

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One Profession

than the income of most of school teachers or some government employees. Thank God I have a very good reputation and this brought me many clients. I used to work nine months every year, but now everything has changed. I still earn enough money to survive with my wife and our two children, but if it continues like this I am afraid that I won't be able to make enough living for me and my family. After the revolution and untill now people are so afraid and not secure

wooden parts than wooden ones. Carpenters don't only work with wood nowadays. There are actually a lot of other materials. Regarding the payment: Carpenters earn about the same as a kindergarten teacher. It naturally depends on whether you're hired in a company or are a freelancer.

Three Countries

CONTINUED

Typically, the more boring a job, the better paid it is. For example when you work in a big company, you get paid by project. If you're freelancing you get paid by hour. Generally, a carpenter in Norway earns about 4,400 Euro per month. (The average monthly income is 74.500 Euro per year)

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EGYPT

QUESTION

Work Experience

because of the political situation which is not stable since the revolution, and this has a huge effect on working atmosphere in general. It is not easy to find a job at the moment and everything is getting more expensive. On many days I'm opening my workshop the whole day without doing anything. However, I feel now that the country is getting better - slowly but surely .

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4

Three Countries

WHICH FACTORS INFLUENCE YOUR JOB THE MOST?

NORWAY

GERMNY

Well, we are in Egypt in an exceptional stage and the absence of security has a very big influence on all professions and specifically on my profession. Traditions also has a big influence on my profession because all people here prefer to make their own furniture instead of buying it ready from factories. It is traditional that when a man wants to get married he has to have a new wooden bedroom and most of my clients want to have something special and The weather definitely influences our job the most. In the Black Forest, it is difficult to work during the whole winter if you do not work on the expansion of a house or in a workshop trimming wood. In the summer, we often have to work outdoors at high temperatures ranging

from 35 to 38 degrees Celsius. Due to the law for energy saving, we also often renovate buildings. Sometimes we renovate more than we build new houses or roof trusses. It is necessary in this profession to constantly educate yourself about the physical characteristics of new materials

The weather in Norway – a lot of snow and a lot of rain – influences our style of building concerning the isolation and sustainability of a house. It's safest to build in the same style of what has been safe the last years. But still, materials have changed a lot in the last decades. A few decades

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EGYPT

Work Experience

different from the others, and I always try to do that. As for the materials they are always available in the market, but the prices are always changing due to

the political situation, which has an influence on the budgets of my clients. But I always try to do my best in the quality even with a limited budget.

NORWAY

GERMANY

in order to renovate properly. Many business owners and employed master craftsman have developed a second mainstay as building energy consultants.

ago, wood panels were still used a lot inside the house. Nowadays, the clients want white and clean walls, so now we work with gypsum boards – which makes my job a bit more boring. Until the 90s, the houses were built very standard and traditional. Today, the houses are much more

individual and creative - but thus more expensive. And generally, the Norwegians spend a lot of time at home: The winter is long and going out is quite expensive. So people invest quite a bit of money in making their home nice and cozy.

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Three Countries

NORWAY

One Profession

NEXT QUESTION

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NORWAY

GERMANY

EGYPT

QUESTION

Work Experience

5

PLEASE DESCRIBE A REPRESENTATIVE RECENT PROJ GIVE US AN IDEA ABOUT YOUR TYPICAL JOB LIFE.

I work only with my hands and don't have many electric tools in my workshop. The last work I did was for a friend of mine who wants to get married by the end of this month. I made almost all of the furniture in his flat: the bedroom and the kitchen and tables and chairs. I enjoyed it very much, and I was very happy when they liked what I did.

In March and June 2013, we put up a wooden front made of split shingles from a silver fir on the new gym in Dornstetten. In June and July we built a wooden house for a young family in a village nearby and also set, erected and tiled the roof. The wooden

walls and ceilings create excellent acoustics and a great atmosphere in the house. It was a lot of fun to see it all come together.

This summer, I extended a cabin by approximately 12 square meters which made the living room 30% bigger. I liked the job because it was very traditional with a lot of wood: I built walls with wood on both sides, lay the floor, put in windows and built a new terrace and the railing. It was 50% inside, 50% outside work. And also, I had to live at the cabin for a few weeks. I enjoyed living in the mountains for a little while, although one might get lonely. CV-mag.com / 100


One Profession

Three Countries

JECT OF YOURS TO

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Everything is Illuminated, DVD via Amazon , € 11,65

WOOD

Inspired by the article on carpenters in different countries we started collecting our favourite products and pieces with one key ingredient: wood.

Spiko, Radio by Singgih Kartono, via wooden radio , € 200,00

Keyboard, by Orée , from € 110,00

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Vanilla and Cedaerwood Bodylotion, by Kiehl's , € 26,00 Engraved Cutting Board, by Richwood Creations, via Scout Mob , € 25, 00


Our Picks

Wood

Sunglasses Leopold Sandal, by Kerbholz, via fab , € 108,00 Arrow Spoon Number 35, by Amelie Mancini , € 33, 00 Geometric Necklace, by Snug , € 24,90

Log Bowls, by Loyal Loot , from € 55,00 Handpainted Twig Pencils, by inkit , € 9,01

Ring with Copper, by about jewelery , € 49,00

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Work Experience

JOHNNY, THE CAPTAIN

THE OCEAN IS MY CALLING

text and photos Emelie Ekborg

interview with Johnny Wikstrรถm

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Captain

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Johnny Wikstrรถm


Work Experience

As a young boy he wanted to be a fisherman. At the age of 19 he joined the family business and started to work fulltime as a skipper. Today Johnny Wikström combines the love for the ocean with his interest for cooking. It is an early summer day and I am waiting for Johnny Wikström to come and pick me up with the ferry. Johnny is a skipper at Gunnars Båtturer and today I will go to Dyrön with him, the homeport of the small ferry company. He has just finished the morning route between three small islands, located on the Swedish west coast a little north of Gothenburg, and the mainland. The ferry arrives, a passenger is getting off and I board. At sea there is a strong but fresh breeze. »Originally I wanted to be a fisherman«, he tells me. »At senior high school I chose a program that focused on fishing. We did a lot of training on board fishing boats at sea.« In 1999, when Johnny was 13 years old, his father Jan Wikström bought the ferry company. »After I finished senior high school I started helping my dad with the ferries, it was a quite natural step.«

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Captain

After senior high school he studied maritime security at college and did captain training, even though he does not like to use the word captain. »Captain? No!« says Johnny and laughs. »I used to say skipper. When I meet new people and they ask what I do for a living, I say that I am a skipper at a small passenger-carrying ship. If we got into details I might add that it is a small, family-run business. But sometimes it's better not to say too much, then you will get too many questions. Like ›What do you do in the winter?‹ People tend to think that this is a summer's business and that you can only be at sea in the summer.« Then he continues passionately, »But in the winter time, especially when the ocean freezes

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Johnny Wikström


Work Experience

to ice, we are busier than ever! When it is that cold everything freezes and breaks so there is a lot of maintaining to prevent that. We also constantly have to check the weather and the weather forecasts. The weather and the ice can change rapidly so we always have to be prepared.« When I ask him about the advantages and disadvantages of his job he says firmly »To be close to the ocean! That's both the pros and cons! For example

»A winter day out at sea can be the most beautiful day, far more beautiful than a summer day. But a winter day could also be a day from hell.«

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Captain

a winter day out at sea can be the most beautiful day, far more beautiful than a summer day. But a winter day could also be a day from hell if it is a storm.ÂŤ Even though the breeze is quite strong, one hardly notices it onboard. On the horizon I can see a tall lighthouse. We round a headland and enter a small and peaceful archipelago with many islets and islands. The ferry stops at one of the islands and a lady is getting off. Johnny delivers a bunch of newspapers and puts them into a big box on the pier. Then he helps the lady with all her belongings. She is coming to stay for the summer and she

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Johnny WikstrĂśm


Work Experience

JOHNNY'S DAY

6:00am Leave the harbour of Dyrön

6:30am Pick up schoolchildren and drop them off for school 9:20am Start the morning route between the three islands Älgön, Brattön, Lövön and the mainland 10:00am Arrive at Rörtången, the harbour at the mainland. Pick up passengers and the morning papers and mail for the islanders 11:00am Back at Dyrön for some office time, service of the boats and lunch 2:00pm Pick up the children from school to bring them back home 5:35pm The evening route between the three islands and the mainland 7:00pm Back to the harbour of Dyrön - or if it is summer, a charter tour

brings not only bags but a big box of plants for the garden. »Gunnars Båtturer is divided into two parts« Johnny tells me. »Every day, all year round we are the public transport between the three small islands Älgön, Lövön and Brattön and the mainland.« The route includes not only taking passengers to and from the islands but also deliveries of post and

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Captain

newspapers, once in the morning and once in the evening. »We take some schoolchildren to school, as well« he continues. »They live on one island and the school is located on another one.« The other part of the business is charter tours and events. Johnny, his father and their staff take parties from 12 people up till 95 people along the beautiful coast of Bohuslän. They collaborate with many hotels and take the guests out sightseeing. They even arrange events like business conferences and weddings onboard the boats.

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Johnny Wikström


Work Experience

FACTS

Name: Johnny Wikstrรถm

Age: 27

Residence: Dyrรถn, a small island on the Swedish west coast

Family: Living together with girlfriend Kristin Carlsson

Occupation: Skipper and partner at Gunnars Bรฅtturer Interests: Fishing, skiing, cooking and being out in nature

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Captain

Johnny Wikström

For three years, Johnny has not only been an employee but also a partner. Together with his father, Jan Wikström, he now runs the business. »In 2010 we bought our largest boat, Drott, and I joined as partner«, Johnny tells me. M/S Drott af Dyrön can take up to ninety-five people and has a fully equipped kitchen and a small bar. »One of the conditions for me to join the company as a partner was a boat like that«, he explains. »Cooking is a big interest of mine and I really wanted something more than just another boat. With Drott I have the opportunity to combine two of my biggest interests.«

»When grew up I wanted to be a fisherman, but then my father bought this small ferry company and I became a skipper instead.« When I ask him what he would do if he was not in his current position, he says »Probably something within restaurant and catering, but to be honest I don't think I would work with something that has no connection to the ocean. Working as a skipper is a part of my lifestyle. I grew up on Dyrön and I love being so close to nature and the ocean. This job makes it possible for me to stay there but at the same time living there is a prerequisite for this position.« When we arrive at Dyrön, the harbour is quiet. Two old men are repairing a boat. A lot of fishing equipment is stacked outside a boathouse and there is a smell of fish and seaweed.

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Captain

Johnny Wikstrรถm

We have a quick photo session with Johnny posing in front of the boats. Then he runs off to serve lunch at Drott, where a company is having a conference while the boat is at berth. He catches up on some details with his father before it is time to get some lunch for himself, a quick coffee in the sun on the pier and then it is time to bring me back and for the next route. On my way home I keep thinking about what Johnny said about his job and lifestyle being so dependent on one another. He is lucky to be able to spend the days as he likes it best - at sea. It is a quite unique situation where everything fell into place perfectly.

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THIS

ARTICLE:


Work Experience

G

Tools of Innovation.

H

HEINZ-JĂœRGEN GERDES tool maker

sculptor

designer

consultant

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Heinz-J端rgen Gerdes

Text: Victoria Kau You won't find the reason why Heinz-J端rgen Gerdes is an exceptional management consultant on his website . You have to get to

Photos: Michael Bahlo, Ewald Freitag know him. His job titles themselves are diverse enough to slightly lose track. To truly experience the man you have to take some time.

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Heinz-Jürgen's office almost looks like a holiday home. Situated in a small street in Bremen it's surrounded by colourful window shutters, a big garden and trees in the wind. In addition to the three office rooms on the first floor there's a studio on the ground floor where Heinz-Jürgen works on his sculptures. After having welcomed me in his »Scandinavian kingdom« we sit down for a second breakfast. In 2009 the trained toolmaker founded his consulting firm, was zukunft hat (loosely translated: what has future). The website doesn't reveal a lot, in fact you see nothing but a picture of the sea and his contact details. It's supposed to spark the curiosity of potential clients, encouraging them to seek a personal conversation: »We are concentrating on companies who struggle to maintain their success in our changing world and who can't find solutions solely from an internal perspective. That's exactly what I have trained to do for years: To take a look from outside and to investigate how to make the right decisions for the future and create innovation.« The word innovation is mentioned a lot during our conversation. Throughout his whole life Heinz-Jürgen was driven by the search for it – according to him it comes naturally. His strengths: to approach problems without preconceptions while still considering basic human needs. »I'm drawn to projects when I sense CV-mag.com / 118


Heinz-Jürgen Gerdes

the potential for fundamental innovation.« His portfolio includes radical ideas changing the face of mobility or living, but also the restructuring of management teams or museum foyers. »What's most important is being effective. I dislike nothing more than unnecessarily complex devices or structures that are made aesthetical tolerable through design.« CV-mag.com / 119


Work Experience

A closer look at his past reveals where these approaches come from. Before he became a sculptor, Heinz-J端rgen was supposed to follow in his father's footsteps and take over the family business as a toolmaker. It quickly became apparent that this path wasn't for him. Instead he focused on his talent for drawing and sculpting, studying object. While at university he's already working as a sculptor. After graduation his company faced the task of redeveloping the train station in M端nster, a German city. While working with the Deutsche Bahn he left a lasting impression and they promptly offered him a job as the Design Manager. During this time he

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Heinz-Jürgen Gerdes

worked with many reputable design and architecture offices – an interesting but also highly demanding job. In spite of, or maybe thanks to, his long days he spent every weekend in his studio. »When I think about my career, this has always been the classical counterbalance. This polarity between being a professional consultant and a freelance sculptor – what I call the as-well-as-approach – had a profound impact on my professional life.« After three years at Deutsche Bahn he was longing for change. He moved to Berlin to his wife, then they both moved to Hamburg where he worked as a

Facts Heinz-Jürgen Gerdes was born in 1962 in Willich, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. After training as a certified toolmaker he studied product design and sculpture in Münster and Eindhoven (Netherlands). He then worked as Design Manager for the railroad company Deutsche Bahn and as Manager of the Design Center in Bremen. In 2009 he started his own consulting firm, was zukunft hat. Heinz-Jürgen lives with his wife and two children in Bremen.

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Work Experience

Heinz-Jürgen working on a sculptor.

freelance design consultant and manager. In 2003 he relocated yet again. In his new home, Bremen, he took over the management of the Bremen Design Center. Together with designers such as Dieter Rams and Reinhard Binder he planned exhibitions, supported young designers and initiated design concepts. After six years the contract expired. Heinz-Jürgen seized the opportunity and started his own business: »I accepted being employed when it appeared interesting to me. But I'm the kind of person who prefers to carry out projects independently.«

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Heinz-Jürgen Gerdes

It seems as if there is nothing more natural to him. Whether he is talking to a client, developing a strategy or has lunch: He observes everything around him in its wholeness - from the perspective of a thinker, creator, consumer and most of all a human being. Recently, he developed the Innosphäre for the Jade Academy in Wilhelsmhaven, a knowledge space for students of interdisciplinary subjects who develop marketable and sustainable innovations. How he comes up with all these ideas? Questioning the present and thinking in entirely new ways has always been a natural process for him. When he decides to take on a project he begins to sketch. Through visualizing he reduces the matter to the core problem. It is a pleasure to watch him, within seconds he creates a new world on a white sheet of paper forcing anyone to pause and reflect on the message. But he doesn't want to hear anything about admiration for his journey through life - on the contrary: »Most people don't acknowledge my concept of life as a successful one. People appreciate stringent biographies. No everyone likes my as-wellas principle.« His clients do. Who would want a consultant who only knows one side of the medal? Heinz-Jürgen Gerdes knows both – and most certainly also a third one. WAS ZUKUNFT HAT.

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Work Experience

Anne Ditmeyer FULL-TIME FREELANCER interview with Anne Ditmeyer edited by Thea Neubauer photos (this page) by Cristopher Santos

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Full-Time Freelancer

Anne Ditmeyer

As a graphic designer, teacher, writer, and consultant Anne Dittmeyer has to have an iron discipline and organizational skills to manage her life. She usually writes for her own blog, PrĂŞt Ă Voyager , about her travels of the world as well as design, but for CVmag she is focussing on an entirely different topic: her life as a freelancer and how she got there. Get an impression of Anne's adventures across the globe through the images she is posting on her Instagram , a small selection is featured in this article.

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For me it has always been figuring out what I do not want to do instead of what I wanted to. After my first internship at a design firm I figured out that I I didn't want to work in a corporate environment and I wouldn't like having to wear a suit. I think that I always wanted to be different but it wasn't until then, that I realised there actually was a possibility to do so. However I still never expected to end up as a freelancer. I went to the University of Virginia to study art history and anthropology and really got into the visual side of studying different cultures. Since I loved book covers, I thought about pursuing a career in design. Thus, after having been to France to teach English for one year, I started a Master of Publication at the University of Baltimore. In 2007 I saw the blogger community form online,

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Full-Time Freelancer

immediately wanted to be part of it and started my blog. From that day on, it has always been about travelling and design. I was working for an architecture firm in Baltimore, doing graphic design. When I asked for a modified raise – one reason of that being that I was only granted 10 days off a year, they declined. As travelling has always been my way of getting ideas and inspiration, this decision sealed the deal for me. I wanted to come back to France. Hence I went to study for a Master for Global Communication at the American University in Paris. The irony in this: I never wanted to have any advanced degrees, and now I have two. After my first Master's degree I had worked full-time, also on weekends and after hours. But when I came to Paris I wanted to be a full-time student again and I really loved the flexibility of setting my own hours. During that time I had tons of visitors! This lifestyle became natural and became the stepping stone into my freelance life. I got my first freelance job when I was working in the architecture firm in Baltimore. That's when I started freelancing for Design Sponge (a very popular blog around design run by Grace Bonney). As a voluntary city guide in Baltimore, I had a few nice encounters with Grace Bonney. A month later she was looking for an intern and within three weeks she took me on as a contributing editor. When I came to Paris this job was my little extra income and once grad school ended, I started working with a couple of small

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Anne Ditmeyer


Work Experience

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Full-Time Freelancer

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Anne Ditmeyer


Work Experience

businesses focusing on tourists visiting Paris. The fact that I was an American in Paris – understanding the American as well as the French culture – became a great asset to me. Paris itself is a great influence. Beside of Paris being beautiful, it became very practical to me. I was asked for information on the city so often that I started offering tours. I really enjoyed those more than I thought, because – once again – it had a tourism side to it as well as the possibility of cultural exchange. I could just unplug my computer and step away from my work. At that time, my freelancing jobs began to stress me out and make me sick. Relaxing for a couple of hours was very welcome. Besides being practical, Paris also has a very sensual and international side to it. I always wanted to have a job that allows me to work from anywhere in the world with the possibility to travel to the States to see clients at any time. I don't know for how much longer I'll be in Paris but currently I'm really happy. Being a freelancer I sometimes struggle to explain my job. When asked »Oh, what do you do?« I answer »Oh, c'est compliqué!« For me it all makes sense and it fits together like a puzzle: being a graphic d e s i g n e r, writer and CV-mag.com / 130


Full-Time Freelancer

Anne Ditmeyer

THREE MOST IMPORTANT PRODUCTS IN YOUR LIFE? IPHONE

My iPhone is like my first-born child. I take pictures and practically do everything with that. BOOKS

I am not a big spender but if I find a book that interests me, I will definitely pick it up. But books are also a kind of décor for me and add life to my apartment. a consultant at the same time. I usually use the tagline »connecting creatives across the continents«.

TRAIN TICKET

A train ticket to anywhere because I have to be out in the world - that is very important to me.

I don't use the title travelblogger too much anymore. It's a blog that talks about travel incorporating design. For inspirations of destinations I rely on my friends, as I like knowing somebody at my destination. Lately I also like to go to conferences, meeting new people and getting new impressions. Finding the time to blog is the hardest. Usually I post two to three times a week . However I have to prioritise paying clients and I am moving more into consulting and teaching these days. On Skillshare, an online learning platform, I taught a map making and InDesign class. I have about 1000 students from around the world

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Work Experience

and love the concept, even though preparing for my Skillshare classes is extremely time-consuming. Regarding the organisation of my days, I keep myself very flexible. The hardest thing for me is not to overbook myself and to do at least one social thing every day. I work from home which can be challenging but it is what my budget allows me. On the other hand it gives me the opportunity to work from a cafĂŠ whenever I want to. Every day is a little different that way.

ANNE'S

Right now my favourite project is called Studio Practice . It'll be a curated library of tips and tools to create businesses. My partner is Lauren O'Neil who is based in New York, making it an interesting exercise of working long-distance. It has been at least 1,5 years in the making and it should be launching this Christmas. We both come from an American perspective but the idea is that everybody can start to understand what questions they need to ask.

WORK:

I take a lot of strength form the lessons my parents

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Full-Time Freelancer

Anne Ditmeyer

taught me. I remember when my mum said: ÂťAnne Ditmeyer, you are not allowed to work for free anymore!ÂŤ This was a long time ago but the idea is still the same. She also taught me that nothing is a done deal until it's done: I once went to Morocco to teach and then Osama Bin Laden got killed. That was good news for the rest of the world, but they cancelled the class. So you never really know what life has to hold. MY LAST TIP FOR (POTENTIAL) BLOGGERS: If you have a blog you should not worry about not having enough content. The content you do have just needs to be really strong. Do whatever you want to and not what others expect you to. It's your voice that makes a blog interesting and desirable for potential clients. Bloggers are amazing people and share a lot of information but you have to be really careful what you publish. Even though it might be tempting to share certain content, you need to be cautious in order not to lose your rights.

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VAYABLE INSTAGRAM FACEBOOK GOOGLE+ TWITTER BLOG VIMEO


Skills

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Forgotten Professions

F

Soun

e e n i g d En

P n e t t o g or

h p o m a r G f o r

: s o t o h p u a ia K r o t c i text: V

Emil Berliner Studios

s n o i s s e f ro

s d r o c e R e n o

to n a S r ph e o t s i r C

s

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Skills

A hallway in Berlin, Köthener Strasse, close to Potsdamer Platz. A simple stairwell, narrow windows. Sound engineer Rainer Maillard claps his hands a couple of times. »This is real reverberation. We sometimes use it for recordings.« Only very few people in the world allow themselves the luxury of a reverberation room like this one. Two of them are Rainer Maillard and Evert Menting, Managing Directors of EMIL BERLINER STUDIOS, named after the inventor of the gramophone and the gramophone record, and one of the most renowned recording studios for acoustic music. The two men proudly show us around their renovated rooms. Apart from the reverberant stairwell they also have a stateof-the-art studio and the magnificent Meistersaal that is big and high enough to fit an entire orchestra inside. This historical concert hall, built in 1913, is equipped with a specially modified technical infrastructure and allows large-scale orchestra recordings. Kurt Tucholsky came to read here, and Zara Leander and David Bowie came to play and record at the Meistersaal. But that is not all, they have mobile equipment that is packed in numerous boxes and ready to be taken

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Emil Berliner Studios


Skills



 anywhere  in the world, from Caracas to Beijing, or Turin  to London to the legendary Abbey Road Studios.

Music can be recorded anywhere nowadays. With a cellphone, a laptop or a camera. The production of music in its broadest sense knows no boundaries. While some play an instrument in an orchestra, others mix audio tracks on their computers. And while some get hundreds of thousands of hits for covering a song on YouTube, others achieve the same with a kitchen-a-capella concert with empty yoghurt cups. The success of a piece does not necessarily depend on CV-mag.com / 140


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Emil Berliner Studios

y l l a le re b y a e e th b s o o « t i . s d h s a u u h st r y r n d i u l o o a b n n y I e r . r e g d v n a e i rd an nd o f A c o . e r ay l nd e i p u k g o e t lo n a w o n y o a r  h e , h v t g i e in w s es t v o n i t e the g r w t e I f o f . h di er w h s ' t o t o recording kn »I n a o t e n e v o a quality. Badly recorded h on y l e to r »concerts« can convince hundreds of thousands of YouTube fans as well. But especially in an era of absolutely democratic music making, new niches for true music enthusiasts open up. And EMIL BERLINER STUDIOS have discovered those very niches for themselves. The studios are run by two trained sound engineers. Rainer Maillard witnessed the golden age of the CD at Deutsche Grammophon during the end of the eighties, a time when this record label still produced more than 150 CDs each year. The recording department was one of the pioneers in digital music production: In 1979, they had the first digital multitrack recording, and in 1985 they started mixing digitally. »As a sound recordist, I was socialized on a completely digital basis.« Evert Menting, a Dutch native, had similar experiences. After his training in Den Haag, he immediately found a job at PolyGram and later at Universal. When the sale of classical records stagnated towards the end of the 90s, he accepted a CV-mag.com / 141


Skills

job at Deutsche Grammophon in Hanover and met Rainer Maillard. A management buyout eventually led to the founding of EBS Productions GmbH & Co. KG in May 2008. This independent company has kept the name Emil Berliner Studios. Since then, EBS have specialized in producing acoustic music and moved to Potsdamer Platz in Berlin. ÂťAfter moving to Berlin, we also wanted to offer something other than conventional recording that no one knows how to do anymore,ÂŤ Evert Menting proudly tells us. ÂťApart from the professional, completely analogue  recordings, we

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want to revive a recording technique that is rarely practiced today: the direct to disc recording of vinyl LPs.« During a direct to disc recording, the music is transferred in real time directly from the microphone to a cutting machine where a stylus »scratches« the vibrations into the so-called lacquer. However, pauses as well as any kind of editing or post production is impossible with this technique. The invention of magnetic tape and later of digital recording made cuttings and later editing possible, but the label Berliner Meister Schallplatten deliberately refrains from this technical invention for a simple reason: The shorter and more directly the acoustic signal is transmitted from the microphone to the LP, the less disturbances and distortions there are. Direct to disc recordings have an entirely different procedure than digital ones. The musicians have to be much more prepared, as they cannot record the music any number of times. Furthermore, all musicians have to be at the studio at the same time because a single audio track cannot be swapped later on. During digital recording, the musicians record their audio tracks as long as necessary and separately until every pitch is perfect—at the end, the sound engineer creates the music that eventually turns into an artificially made product. »Nowadays many musicians and singers depend on digital postproduction. It is different

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Skills

»If I limit the tools available for the production of music, I force people to concentrate on the essentials.«

with analogue recording. In our studios they really have to know how to sing, how to play. And everybody has to be able to rely on one another. It gives everyone kind of an adrenalin rush. And after the record is finished, we certainly have a party!« The two founders also inherited some old equipment when they moved to Berlin: a tube mixing console from 1957, old tape recorders, and a vinyl cutting machine. The location in Berlin with a spacious studio, the historic Meistersaal and other renowned recording studios such as the Hansa Studios in the same house, were perfect. But before they could produce their first record in the newly founded EMIL BERLINER STUDIOS in 2010, they had to completely renovate everything. Old wine into new wineskins? The old equipment sometimes seems a little lost in the new studios. But as soon as they are filled with music, the materialization of the music

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Skills

captivates its listeners. The stylus directly grooves vibrations into the master disc –just like Emil Berliner invented it more than 120 years ago. An original is made in the process that does not exist in the digital world anymore where everything can be duplicated thousands upon thousands of times without loss. »We live in a time of aesthetics of superficial perfectionism,« says Rainer Maillard. Everything can be readjusted, improved and beautified. »If I limit the tools available for the production of music, I force people to concentrate on the essentials.« A sentiment that musicians feel when they do analogue recording here. Because only then the true musical experience that making music together is all about can unfold. And you can hear it on the record. The sound engineers are certain that their step back to the past is a step

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Emil Berliner Studios

towards the future. Right now, the studios have six to eight analogue productions a year, and about 30 digital productions. They mostly produce classical music, but during the past years jazz, chanson and pop productions have become more and more popular. But word on the studio's expertise gets around and attracts musicians from all over the world. Anna Netrebko and Lang Lang have been here and materialized their music for eternity. According to Rainer Maillard, Âťthe LP is the only physical sound carrier that will survive. Tapes are already gone and CDs will disappear as well. But the stereo LP is almost seventy years old and hasn't changed a bit.ÂŤ

FACEBOOK

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WEBSITE


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3 FACTORS that have contributed to the revival of analogue recording at the EMIL BERLINER STUDIOS: EMIL BERLINER Emil Berliner was an inspiring example who influenced the music industry like no other and established the first recording studios in the street Markgrafenstrasse in Berlin as many as 113 years ago.

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AUTHENTICITY What you can hear on a direct to disc record is a long process of preparation and rehearsing. It is not a process of subsequent manipulation and further changes of the arrangement and record. Possible flaws and inconsistencies in conventional recordings can easily be eliminated today thanks to modern digital signal processing. Why play perfectly when you can fix it on the computer anyway? This attitude leads to an entirely different recording process than the one during a direct to disc recording where this possibility is deliberately denied. Sound experts want to bring those values back to the music production.

ORIGINALITY The music is directly recorded onto lacquer discs. Those lacquer discs are formed into stampers during the electroplating process. So every pressed record is an original copy of the recording. Since the lacquer discs and stampers wear out during the production and duplication, the pressed LPs are the reproductions with the best quality of a direct to disc recording. A direct to disc recording on an LP becomes a rare collector's item and makes music really precious.

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Emil Berliner Studios


Skills

ANALOGUE Digital is tightly woven into our daily routines, for CVmag it is a necessity. But sometimes even we have to unplug for a while. Here are the fitting products:

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Mechanical Watch, by Rotor , € 319,00 CV-mag.com / 150

Linea Pen, by Lamy , € 35,00


Our Picks

Analogue

Mixtape Print, by Wit and Whistle , € 13,00 Superia X-Tra 400 Film, by Fuji, via Lomography , € 5,90 Chalkboard, by Maped, via Amazon , € 7,75

LC-A+ Silver Lake, by Lomography , € 379, 00 Telephone, by Swiss Voice, via Amazon , € 30,29

Pocket Sundial, by Manufactum , € 46,00

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iroN text Victoria Kau photos Kris Elliot

HORSES Pitango Bikes in London create bikes.

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Pitango

Riding a bike is one of those things that give you a good conscience. Cyclists not only save the environment, but also improve their fitness. Politicians that cycle to work are more popular than others, and a bike bell makes a much nicer sound than a car horn. Let's face it: if everybody used a bicycle, the world might be a better place (at least that is a nice thought)!

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The city of London is not exactly well known for being cycle friendly, but it's definitely known for being style friendly, and that also applies to its bikes. The motto of their looks seems to follow the latest fashion: more colors but less knickknack. When I enter the warehouse of Pitango Bikes on Hornsey Road in London's Borough of Islington, bicycles are the only colorful things within my range of vision. Apart from a few bright models I can only see a lot of boxes, a few tools and a vintage sofa. Ilan Harari, one of the founders, apologizes with a smile and tells me: »We just moved in and hardly had time to get settled – the orders just keep coming!« These orders do not come from ordinary bike shops. They come from individual customers who pick the color of the frame, the tires and even the chain. They choose between different frames, sizes and gears. And they choose whether they pick it up at their local bike store or have it delivered to their home address. It's a dream come true for all bike fetishists.

I'm not exactly a bike fetishist, but I love my bike. And I know the fear that my bike might get stolen. In Berlin I always try to lock my bike to some lamppost or tree. However that doesn't stop bike thieves even during the day, Ilan and a few of his friends proved this with a smartly made video last year: they locked their bikes with various locks of different qualities all over Tel Aviv and arranged for »thief« Ilan to break them – all under the eyes of passing pedestrians and even policemen, who didn't seem to care about someone using a crowbar, bolt cutters or even an angle grinder to steal a bike. A sad story, but the video is a hit on YouTube.

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»People love biking,« Ilan says, »and most people want a beautiful bike, but they're afraid that it might get stolen. So we wanted to create a good looking urban bike which is affordable enough so it doesn't kill you if it gets stolen, while at the same time making sure that our customers are educated in proper locking methods and bike theft prevention, to try and minimize the chances it will happen.« When I take a closer look at the bikes, I'm not too sure whether I could easily say goodbye to a Pitango Bike. We decide to go for a test ride out in the yard and it feels like I'm riding a rainbow. The colors make me happy, while the simplicity and lightness make me wonder why I have such a heavy bike at home.

»So we wanted to create a good looking urban bike which is affordable enough so it doesn't kill you if it gets stolen.« Ilan Harari

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ÂťCycling is almost a meditative action and it makes people healthier.ÂŤ

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Riding and the risks of losing a bike – that's about all Ilan and his co-founders Simon Small, a schoolteacher from London, and Oriya Levy, a sous-chef from Tel Aviv, know about bikes when they started their business in 2011. Ilan, who was born in New York and partly grew up in his father's country, Israel, has a degree in Mountain Guiding (»He went to hippie university,« Simon throws in) and used to work as a carpenter. He came up with the idea of Pitango Bikes in December 2010 when his friend Simon assisted him on buying a fixie bike in London. »Cycling is almost a meditative action and it makes people healthier. CV-mag.com / 158


Bikes

»I love new challenges« And also I really wanted to be my own boss because I don't believe in employment. When you're hired in a company, you'll always try to do as little as possible for your salary and you're not responsible for your own actions.« Ilan immediately took responsibility and flew to Asia to look at factories only weeks after his first idea. His friend Oriya – who heard of Ilan's idea and decided to join – supported him from Israel with research and bureaucratic processes. Simon decided to give up his job as a teacher and built up the base of the brand in London: »I love new challenges. When you want to grow in life, you should either find a wise person to follow, or a project that is bigger than yourself.« Ilan, who lived in Israel when they started their business, soon realized how big his idea really was. »We went through a few typical problems in the beginning,« he reports. »The first container of bikes we ordered were not the greatest – the Chinese and Taiwanese factory bosses didn't really take me seriously in the start. By November 2011 when we finally perfected the bike, the season in the UK was running short.« In September 2012, Pitango Bikes received great recognition and many trade requests at a Bicycle Tradeshow in Birmingham. They then decide to change their focus from only selling online to also offering the individuals the ability to order their products in assorted bike shops in Tel Aviv and London. »Our idea is to sell the bikes cheaper in shops in order to support local bike stores and customer loyalty.« That decision finally smoothed CV-mag.com / 159

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ÂťWe really want Pitango to become an international brand that is associated with cycling as a lifestyle for urban people.ÂŤ CV-mag.com / 160


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the way for them and one month later, Ilan moved from Tel Aviv to London. Now, after two and a half years, the brand Pitango Bikes is a success. Since relocating their operations to London in autumn 2011, their sales increased by about 300% - they sell about 30-40 bikes a week all over the world and plan to expand across Europe, the US and even China. »We really want Pitango to become an international brand that is associated with cycling as a lifestyle for urban people, and we hope that the tools of fashion and urban cycling promotion will get us there.« When I was little, one of my favorite songs from the then famous German band »Die Prinzen« was their bicycle song with the following lines: »Only wallowers ride bikes, and they are always faster than the rest.« It's so simple and yet almost philosophical. Ilan, Simon and Oriya had a creative idea, which combines mobility, style and morality. Almost as if each of their professions – mountain guiding/ carpentry, teaching and cooking – found a perfect object to materialize in. Their bikes make the world go round. Each one with an individual look, but each one on the same mission: to conquer the world on two wheels.

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Interests

interview with Dominik Sona text: Alex Sutter

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Winemaker

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Dominik Sona


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Dominik Sona is Palatine by birth and by conviction. He cultivates his own vineyard and is the director of a wine-growing estate famous for its tradition and excellence in Riesling, Pinot Noir and Pinot Blanc. After his apprenticeship as a winegrower and studies at the renowned Geisenheim Grape Breeding Institute he gained practical experience at several wineries in the Saar region, France and California. Also having worked for wine visionary Ernst Loosen at his wine-growing estate J.L. Wolf, he was offered the management of the Koehler-Ruprecht winery in Kallstadt (Palatine) in 2010 at the age of only 29. We got the chance to talk to him about his job as a winegrower and estate manager, the expectations put on him as the young successor to an icon of Rieslinggrowing and his travels to global metropolises in the name of marketing as well as country life. CV-mag.com / 168


Winemaker

Dominik, looking at your CV, your path in life has had a dead-straight trajectory. It's been all about wine from the start. Why is that? My grandfather cultivated several grapevines in this region. Even though my father works as a civil engineer, the grapevines stayed in the family. Almost everybody around here owns a couple of vines, usually just for personal use or some supplementary income. I knew from a very early age that a desk job was not for me. I wanted a job that would allow me to be outside and also offer a lot of variety. So towards the end of my high school career I decided to dedicate my working life to wine. That sounds simple and conclusive. But how do you go about becoming the managing director of a wine growing estate as renowned as Koehler-Ruprecht? Sound and competent knowledge, as provided by your schooling, alone is probably not enough, right? Despite its internationality, the world of professional wine growing is rather small and extremely well connected. It's about networking, maintaining contacts and being in the right place at the right time. While I was gaining practical experience at a winery in California, the manager said: ÂťI know someone looking to sell their estate. It's right round the corner from where you live. You should go and check it out.ÂŤ I did just that and had a chat with the new owners, a family from Kansas in the United States. It went so well that I just had to take them up on their offer. After all,

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I thought, that's not the kind of opportunity that knocks twice. So I stayed in California until the end of the season and after the harvest went to work for Koehler-Ruprecht.

After WWII and up until the 1970s, German growers went for quantity instead of quality in wine production. Riesling from the Rhine and Mosel regions, which in the 19th century was known as the best and most expensive wine in the world, became a cheap, internationally spurned bulk product.

Digression

Bernd Philippi was a pioneer of the uncompromising philosophy of quality thanks to which growers have been able to reclaim the earlier success of German wine since the 1980ies. He sold his wines all over the world and also worked as a consultant for wineries in Portugal and South Africa. After a long and successful life as a wine grower he has a fantastic reputation in the industry. You were hired as the successor of former owner Bernd Philippi to lead the estate into the future. Your predecessor is seen as the pioneer of growing dry Riesling of the highest quality in Germany. What is it like, as a young man, to follow in the footsteps of such a legend? First of all, being able to produce great wine is not a question of age. Our head of operations, the cellar master, is only 25 years old. I'm in my early/mid-thirties, but we've both worked in the industry for a good 10 years, so we do have the experience. Mr Philippi is still an essential part of this year's wine production and we are working together to

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Dominik Sona


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preserve and develop the unique characteristics of the Koehler-Ruprecht wines and estate. How would you characterise the typical KoehlerRuprecht-style and how do you go about preserving it? Climate has to play an important part, but it is changing, as scientists and wine growers keep telling us. The last few years have actually been much sunnier than the 1980s, for example, so we are able to harvest many more ripe grapes. This is beneficial to the quality of the wine we produce. It's a Koehler-Ruprecht-trait to ferment the must spontaneously (i.e. we do not add cultivated yeast), age the wine in large wooden barrels and bottle it later than other growers. The way we work is similar to how it was done 100 years ago, when Bernd Philippi's grandfather grew wine. The result is a wine that's full of character which can be stored for a long time and which develops very nicely over time. Some of our choice products only go on sale five years after they're being harvested and can be stored for up to 20 years. It's a rather unusual approach. Most of today's wine is bottled quickly, sold immediately and drunk while still very young. Even our labels have a certain old school-style which we will definitely stick with. Seasoned wine lovers as well as those visitors with a new interest in the subject can taste the wines at the vineyard Weingut Koehler-Ruprecht. Advanced notifications via email info@koehler-ruprecht.com are recommended. If the way is too far you can also find the wines at a well-stocked specialised dealer. CV-mag.com / 172

WIne Tastting


Winemaker

You are responsible for the actual preparation of the wine as well as the estate, its management and its commercial success. What would be the more troubling problem for the American owners: mediocre wine or bad sales figures? Definitely bad wine! The owners have made it very clear to me that the quality of the wine is crucial and the Koehler-Ruprecht-style has to be preserved and developed. And I'm sure that our customers would not react kindly to us lowering our standards either. You are only 34 years old and have already worked as the managing director for three years. Have you already fulfilled all your ambitions - is this the job of your dreams you will continue doing for the next 30 years? Let's put it this way: Once Mr Philippi leaves next year, continuity within the estate is going to be an important task. We're also still creating new lines of wine in the typical Koehler-Ruprecht-style and trying to tap new markets. Add to that the challenges nature provides for us each year and you know that this job is not ever going to get boring. Also, we're looking to establishes something that will last. A team that is constantly changing, be it the managing director or the head of operations, would not facilitate that. I am very content here and I think this job will keep me happy for a very long time to come.

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Many people judge their happiness not just by their professional success but also take the so-called worklife-balance and a full personal life into account. How do you balance family, friends and free time and what is it like to live in Kallstadt, a community of just 1,200?

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I love engaging in anything to do with our wines and I have only taken a grand total of 12 days off over the last few years. Which I admit is probably too little. On the other hand I have already travelled all over the world for more than four months this year in order to maintain contacts with our customers and merchants. So I do get around. Last year I had a slipped disk while in New Zealand of all places. I have only recently started exercising again. I cycle and go for swims. I also plan to take up archery as it helps with your focus! There are times in your life when you just go for it. A period when your job is your first priority. I don't have the time for a relationship right now. But I do have good friends with whom I can talk about the great variaties of cultivation practiced on wine estate. But I admit it's a past time with a lot of professional focus. Life in Kallstadt is very quiet and the next metropolis is very, very far away. On the other hand, if you are in a city like New York you need to go to a park or some other quiet place to escape the cacophony just to be able to make a simple phone call. In the long run I think I would miss the tranquillity. Not just acoustically but also visually.

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Baiba Skride Violinist

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Violinistin

text

Baiba Skride

Victoria Kau CVmag meets the violinist at the music festival

photos Thea Neubauer

in Schleswig-Holstein, the northernmost of Germany's 16 states

Respect and a little bit of envy – that is how I feel when meeting highly talented musicians. As a child I received musical training, my parents were very eager for us to start learning a musical instrument at an early age. I played in several orchestras during school and university

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but I have never gotten any farther than playing the second fiddle or performing at family reunions. Sometimes I wonder why I did not practice harder. But as I listened to Baiba Skride's biography and musical career it became clear: I had too many options to choose from.


Interests

»All musicians are sort of homeless. I still do a lot of travelling, right now am performing at about 60-70 concerts a year. I get my entire strength from my music.«

I have a meeting with Baiba Skride on the occasion of the music festival of Schleswig-Holstein in a small town called Elmshorn, about 35 kilometers northwest of Hamburg. The evening concert at which the soloist is performing together with the Baltic Youth Philharmonic takes place in an old indoor riding arena. The hall is surrounded by riding stables and pastures, it smells like horse and once in a while you can even hear them neighing. I meet Baiba in her changing room that offers a great view of the new Fritz-Thiedemann-Hall. The soloist seems relaxed. She laughs a lot and takes the time to answer all our questions until shortly before the concert. As I told her that our magazine is more about unique life stories and outstanding personalities than career and profession, she admitted happily: »I'm glad that I don't have to talk always just about music.« Although, there probably doesn't exist a single moment without music in her life. In 1981 she was born in Riga, Latvia. At the age of three she took the CV-mag.com / 178


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Baiba Skride


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Baiba Skride

violin of her elder sister and tried playing it for the first time in her life. Even though her sister corrected her fingers and posture, Baiba played her own way - and almost ruined her fingers. It took her years of practice to learn the right techniques which are essential for being able to play without any restrictions. Together with her two elder sisters she started giving concerts as a child. »There has never been any other option for me. That's why I am so grateful for my talent. What would I have possibly done if I had not made any money as a violinist? Lucky me, I never had to ponder over that!« Growing up in a family full of musicians – her mother is a pianist, her father a choral conductor – Baiba Skride has always been surrounded by music. Thanks to her talent, she quickly became financially independent and began her studies at the Conservatory for Music and Theatre in Rostock at the age of 14. Six years later she won 1st prize in the Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels – a turning point in her musical career. Overnight her face was put on the cover of popular magazines back home in Latvia. The start of a turbulent life - from then on Baiba Skride travelled from concert to concert and country to country. Her only harbour was a bed at her sister's place, who back than lived in Hamburg. At that point music became her only anchor in life: »All musicians are sort of homeless. I still do a lot of travelling, right now am performing at about 60-70 concerts a year. I get my entire strength from my music.« CV-mag.com / 181


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Strength – but also trust. That's what she loves about being a soloist. Performing with so many different orchestras requires the ability to build up trust within seconds. There is hardly ever time for long rehearsals. We, the musicians and the conductor, don't necessarily have to talk. We understand each other also without words. Actually, our work is quite intimate. As soon as I start playing the violin I put my entire soul out there. So, compared to other professions, I have to create a profound connection to all my colleagues. A connection that goes beyond national borders and language barriers. Baiba Skride still likes to travel to her home country, Latvia, even though none of her family members CV-mag.com / 182


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Baiba Skride

live there anymore. The small country lives by its musical and cultural tradition. This summer she will be visiting the Latvian Liederfest which takes place every five years. All songs that are being played at this festival are about old Latvian stories and myths. Once the choir with 17.000 members starts singing, the entire city of Riga is taken by this music. When music determines an individual's life to that extent – how do you put up with the tedious banalities of everyday life? Asking her that, Baiba Skride had to smile. Sometimes I really can't, as a matter of fact. I don't do my tax return myself, I don't like talking on the phone and my husband does the cooking at home - lucky me. Yet, I am down to earth, simply CV-mag.com / 183


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because of my two sons. At first I enjoyed all the glamour that came with my profession, I even wore an evening gown to the Echo Classic. But today I don't find it as important anymore.« Travelling comes right after her family. Often she tries to add some holidays to her tours so that they can travel a bit as a family. »However, there are some countries where I am not allowed to play concerts, such as Peru or Cambodia. Hopefully I can go there some time for a private journey. Travelling inspires me the most.« Then I asked her whether she has any other hobbies than music: »I like to go diving in the sea.« Her husband knocks on the door. It is about time to change into her stage outfit. She met him one day at a music festival. He himself plays the piano and also loves classical music but is no professional musician. And that might be even better for their family management. When she is at a concert it's mostly him who takes care of the children. For now, her sons – five years and one year old - are still too young to listen to concerts. But both are already interested in

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music. »The youngest keeps singing 'I follow Rivers' by Lykke Li«, she tells me and starts laughing, »or is at least humming the melody.« Right before the concert starts we have a quick photo session with Baiba Skride who holds her precious Stradivarius, built in 1725, in her hands. And only some minutes later we get to listen to it. The Double Concerto A minor, Opus 102 by Johannes Brahms is a true delight! After every musical piece she smiles at the cellists with

»At first I enjoyed all the glamour that came with my profession, I even wore an evening gown to the Echo Classic. But today I don't find it as important anymore.«

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whom she performs together. It is a great pleasure to watch and listen to her performance. Admiration and little bit of affinity – that's how I feel as we part. It seems as if Baiba Skride's love for music, travelling and her family have given her the right balance in life – and her serenity certainly is the key to all that. Because everyone knows that talent can also be a burden. Baiba Skride always knew what her professional life would look like – and that's meant in a positive way. Especially nowadays, in a time where many of us have the feeling of going in the wrong direction in view of all the freedoms we enjoy, a true vocation is worth its weight in gold. And if a talent comes as natural that you don't even have to think about it, then it is a true gift.

Baiba Skride (...) holds her precious Stradivarius, UPCOMING built in 1725, in her hands. (...) The Double Concerto A minor, Opus 102 by Johannes Brahms is a true delight! CONCERTS After every musical piece she smiles at the cellists with whom she performs together. It is a great pleasure to watch and listen to her performance. SHARE THIS ARTICLE:

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Interests

GOOGLE IT ! IRON text: Victoria Kau

Google it – my standard reply whenever somebody asks me something I don't know. Our theme iron winds its way through this issue, ranging from unmissable footprints to subtle hints. I challenged myself to dive deep into web to find out more about this topic, following my own advice.

Iron Man, of course. The movie Iron Man 3 with Robert Downey Jr., Guy Pearce and Gwyneth Paltrow crossed the one billion dollar mark after only 23 days in the cinemas.

One of the most famous titles is the Iron Lady, Margaret Thatcher. A Soviet journalist gave her this nickname which became associated with her uncompromising politics and leadership style. After beeing banned from playing in Chile in 1992, Iron Maiden just broke the record for the largest audience by a British band in Santiago playing in front of 60,105 fans.

Woodkids debut song »Iron« has been viewed over 23 mio times on YouTube.

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Google It!

Iron

A lot of websites advise eating food rich in iron, as iron helps make red blood cells, which carry oxygen around the body.

Quite famous is also the Iron Throne, seat of the king of Westeros. It's worth doing a picture search on that one! On the first page, I found a reference to »Iron Chef America«, an American cooking and culinary game show.

Symbol: Fe Number: 26 Density: 7874 kg/m3 Category: Transition Metal

Melting Point: 1,538°C

Boiling Point: 3,000°C

Share of Earth Crust: 4.7 %

Molar Heat Capacity: 449 J/(kg · K) CV-mag.com / 189

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The Ironman Triathlon however is a series of long-distance triathlon races held annually in Hawaii since 1987.


MAST HEAD CVMAG – WRITING LIFE www.cv-mag.com eMailmail@cv-mag.com Twitter @cvmag_ Facebook fb.com/digital.cvmag Editorial Lead

Victoria Kau

Contributing Editors (Text)  Sophie Gobrecht, Ingo Hartmann, Fiona Kau,  Victoria Kau, Alex Sutter, Sandra Wolff Contributing Editors (Text & Photo)  Mohammad AL Bdewi, Emelie Ekborg,  Theresa Neubauer Contributing Editors (Photo)  Thomas Dietze, Kris Elliot, Ashley  Ludaescher, Zoe Noble, Cris Santos Design  Logo Design 

Tina Bergs, Theresa Neubauer Judith de Graaff

Translation Sabrina Bäcker, Tina Bergs, Kathrin Greyer, Victoria Kau, Sarah  Müller, Donata Proske, Antonia Neubauer, Theresa Neubauer, Tanja Timmer Prrof Amie McCracken, Antonia Neubauer CVmag is published quarterly by Carry-On Publishing GmbH, ­GustavMeyer-Allee 25, 13355 Berlin. Re-use of content is only allowed with written permission of p ­ ublisher. There is no liability for unsolicited manuscripts and photographs.

Management

Antonia Neubauer, Theresa Neubauer, Alex Sutter

Sales Design & Editoral Team

Marketing

Alex Sutter (Sales Dir.) Theresa Neubauer (Art Dir.), Tina Bergs

Antonia Neubauer (Marketing Dir.), Donata Proske

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W EB SI TE TW IT TE R FAC EB O O K

CVmag Issue N°1  

The first issue of the new portrait magazine "CVmag", which deals with all sorts of lifelines and personalities. The first issue includes a...

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