C-VILLE Weekly | January 12 - 18, 2022

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VOL. 31 NO. 2 n JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T WWW.CAAR.COM HE CHARLOTTESVILL E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

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Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene,

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By hook or by Snook: City Council elects new mayor PAGE 12

Sweet as pie: Licorice Pizza is “light, laconic, funny” PAGE 25

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JANUARY 12 – 18, 2022 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

s e c n e u q e s n o c l ta ru b e th Live Arts’ Pipeline explores m te s y s n o ti a c u d e ’s a c ri e of racism in Am


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

A little

V.34, No. 2

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 www.c-ville.com WILL KERNER

Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

birdie

EDITORIAL

FEATURE 15

EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (434) 373-0073 editor@c-ville.com

Role with it

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

With a gripping play and a new artistic director, Live Arts hits the ground running in 2022. NEWS

told

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11 Bestselling author discovers her great-grandfather is from Canada...Virginia.

25 Screens: Licorice Pizza is a feel-good slice of '70s life. 26 Sudoku 27 Crossword

12 City Council elects Lloyd Snook new mayor of Charlottesville.

29 Free Will Astrology

13 Luminaries reflect on January 6 anniversary.

30 How are you coping with this winter weather disaster?

Q&A CLASSIFIED 31

CULTURE

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

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us...

21

23 Galleries: A look at what’s on view this month.

Real Estate Weekly Page 35

CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Maeve Hayden INTERN Kristin O’Donoghue CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins, Amelia Delphos, Carol Diggs, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Erika Howsare, Desiré Moses, Lisa Provence, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Courteney Stuart, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR Max March max@c-ville.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico

ADVERTISING advertising@c-ville.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Gabby Kirk (434) 373-2136 gabby@c-ville.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Chloe Heimer, Lisa C. Hurdle DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & MARKETING Stephanie Vogtman REAL ESTATE WEEKLY Beth Wood (434) 373-0999 beth@caarew.com PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com

BUSINESS PUBLISHER Anna Harrison anna@c-ville.com CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Debbie Miller debbie@c-ville.com

There’s a whole bunch of news you’re missing! Follow @cville_weekly, and @cville_culture to get the latest scoop on what’s going down in Charlottesville.

A/R SPECIALIST Nanci Winter (434) 373-0429 CIRCULATION MANAGER Billy Dempsey circulation@c-ville.com

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THIS WEEK

I attended Charlottesville High School not too long ago. It’s a busy, lively place, full of smart and interesting people, and I enjoyed my time there. But even as an oblivious high schooler, I could sense that the school reflected the inequities present in its city. In the hallways and cafeteria, I was surrounded by a diverse student body—a majority of the school’s students are people of color. Then I stepped in to my AP classrooms, and suddenly almost all of my classmates were white. A 2018 New York Times story on the school district quantifies that effect: “White children are about four times as likely to be in Charlottesville’s gifted program, while Black students are more than four times as likely to be held back a grade and almost five times as likely to be suspended from school,” the Times reported. Many people across the city are working to remedy the situation. For example, in 2020, the school got rid of its quasi-police school resource officers in favor of unarmed care and safety assistants. Still, the problems in the local education system can’t be fixed overnight, and there’s plenty of work left to do. This week, Pipeline, an original play that explores these dynamics in vivid detail, opens at Live Arts. Read our preview on page 16—and buy your ticket as soon as you can.—Ben Hitchcock

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

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“Black Virginians gave the governor a second chance, and I think he used that opportunity for good.”

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—Traci DeShazor, a Black staffer who continued to work for Governor Ralph Northam after the 2019 blackface scandal. Northam’s term ends this week.

NEWS Shine on

This week, the Albemarle Planning Commission considered a special use permit for a new hotel on Pantops. The plan was submitted as The Overlook Hotel—the same name as the haunted hotel in Stephen King’s The Shining. No word yet on whether the new lodge will be possessed by the ghosts of murdered twins.

Oh truck Just 10 days into 2022, the bridge on the Corner sheared the top off its first truck of the year. The 10-foot-high 14th Street bridge has long menaced unsuspecting trucks, but had a slow 2021: Only one vehicle got lodged under the metal overpass, according to truck-tracking CBS19 weatherman Travis Koshko. The bridge is determined to make up for lost trucks, it seems.

But today I am still just a bill Virginia’s 2022 legislative session kicks off Wednesday, January 12, in Richmond. Each legislative session, lawmakers are allowed to prefile a number of proposed bills before the session starts. Legislative tracker LegiScan shows that 268 bills had been prefiled as of January 10. Republicans, who control the legislature after November’s elections, have been the more active of the two parties in prefiling thus far. Below, take a look at some of the bills that Charlottesville and Albemarle delegates and senators have submitted. Delegate Rob Bell (R) House Resolution 2 honors the service of longtime Republican Delegate and Speaker of the House Kirk Cox.

City sued over land use map

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

Senator Creigh Deeds (D) Senate Joint Resolution 8 honors the life of former Waynesboro delegate Pete Giesen, who died last year.

Delegate Sally Hudson (D) House Bill 71 would prohibit public utilities from contributing to political candidates.

Senator Bryce Reeves (R) Senate Bill 127 would require presenting a photo ID to vote. Currently, voters with a non-photo ID can vote after signing a statement promising that they are who they say they are.

BLUE RIDGE HEALTH DISTRICT

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The Blue Ridge Health District has seen a record-breaking coronavirus surge in the last two weeks. On December 30, the district reported 482 new cases, topping the previous record of 453, which was set the day before. Before Christmas of 2022, the most new cases the department had reported in a single day was 245 in February of 2021. Vaccination and booster shot appointments are available all week long—visit vdh.virginia.gov to get started.

@cville_weekly

Delegate Matt Fariss (R) House Bill 51 would make it a Class 6 felony, punishable by one to five years in prison, to steal a catalytic converter. Currently, it’s just a misdemeanor.

COVID surges

The Future Land Use Map was approved last year.

UVA has moved its booster mandate up to January 14. Initially, all students, faculty, and staff were required to get a booster shot by February 1, but the school’s administration cited the dramatic recent surge in cases locally as the reason for the earlier deadline.

Delegate Chris Runion (R) House Bill 149 would add a hurdle to absentee voting by requiring witnesses to provide their name, date of birth, residence, and the last four digits of their social security number. Currently, witnesses only need to provide a signature.

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

Eleven anonymous plaintiffs have filed a lawsuit against the City of Charlottesville, alleging that the recently adopted Future Land Use map—which raises the maximum allowed housing density on certain parcels throughout the city—should be nullified for violating the Virginia code. One couple “purchased their property due to its location in a single-family neighborhood that was suitable for young children,” but the next owners of the property could build up to 12 units on the lot. Oh, the horror!

UVA boosts booster mandate

Next man up PAGE 12


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Author

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

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Janasha “Jay” Bradford is a financial advisor and entrepreneur residing in Charlottesville, Virginia. She is an HBCU Alumni who majored in digital marketing and advertising. She believes life experiences shape who we are. After her father passed, she witnessed her widowed mother’s mismanagement of money due to a lack of financial education and poor financial advice that ultimately led to the loss of their family home. This experience put financial literacy at the forefront of Janasha’s mind; she has set out to be the go-to person for financial guidance, especially amongst children.

Illustrator Meet Mahogany!

She knows her flying candy machine can be a big hit if she can make it to Wall Street. This is the 1st book in the Mahogany and Friends Series crafted to fill a void in financial literacy that is readily available to children in a story format. Educational, imaginative, and adventurous. Mahogany goes to Wall Street is a fun-filled, inspiring story that serves as an introduction to the Financial Market and amplifies the importance of making your dreams come true.

Dev Flowers is a self-taught Artist. She is an Afro-latina born and raised in Limón, Costa Rica. She enjoys making art in different mediums & styles and lives in Fort Hood, Texas with her Army husband & cat.

Join Mahogany and Friends for a Debut Children’s Book Reading at the Common House on Saturday, February 5th, 2022 11:00 am-1:00 pm during black history month. Meet the local author and illustrator and enjoy a fun-packed day with your children. This is a children-friendly event. -Book signing -Kid coloring station -Book and Doll sets are available -Fun photo booth -Lite refreshments

Open to all Common House members. For non-Common House members please email us at Admin@Mahoganyandfriends.com to be added to the list.


NEWS

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O Canada…Virginia? reports the Virginia Humanities’ Encyclopedia Virginia. Notable residents of Canada include Catherine “Kitty” Foster, who was freed from slavery in 1820 and bought two acres of land in Canada, near several other free Black households, in 1833. Foster passed her land on to her descendants, who continued to live there until 1906, before the community was destroyed. In the 1990s and 2000s, archeologists discovered 32 unmarked graves—including Foster’s—where the neighborhood used to be. A memorial to Foster, showing the outline of her house, now stands next to the cemetery on UVA’s South Lawn. “My family is up in Chicago on both my grandmother and grandfather’s side because of massacres and towns being destroyed,” says Kendall. “So [learning about Canada] wasn’t exactly a surprise, but it was like, ‘Oh damn. Not one of you escaped this history.’” Next week, Kendall will take a (virtual) trip to her great-grandfather’s hometown, when she speaks at the UVA’s Women’s Center about her feminist work. For over a decade, her work has critiqued modern white feminism, attempting to shed an intersectional light on issues faced by Black women

By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

UVA’s South Lawn is home to a memorial to Catherine “Kitty” Foster, a free Black woman who purchased the property in 1833.

Scholar Mikki Kendall has traced her roots back to Charlottesville.

and other women of color. She has coined several viral hashtags on Twitter, including #SolidarityIsForWhiteWomen, which called out white feminists who defended Hugo Schwyzer, a former college professor who preyed upon young women of color. “It was weird seeing what was supposed to be feminism centered on men,” she says. “I wanted the conversation to be about needs and not lipstick and last names.” In Hood Feminism, Kendall’s most recent book, she argues that basic human needs—including food, health care, safe neighborhoods, and a living wage—are feminist issues too, drawing on her own personal experiences. “[The book] highlights the ways that a lot of communities have the same problems, except the way that they’re discussed are different,” she adds. “Missing and murdered

Indigenous women and missing and murdered Black girls—this is the same problem.” At UVA, Kendall also plans to discuss the “unacknowledged work” of women, disabled individuals, and genderqueer folk within feminist movements. “We only talk Rosa Parks in the context of the bus, and never talk about her work to protect women from sexual violence,” says Kendall. “Movements honestly work better when we acknowledge the work being done.” Kendall is currently working on a book about her family’s genealogy, as well as the construct of America. And when it is safe to do so, she plans to make an in-person visit to the former site of Canada. Mikki Kendall will speak at the UVA Women’s Center on January 19 at 5 pm.

“I wanted the conversation to be about needs and not lipstick and last names.” MIKKI KENDALL

published in c-ville starting february 16th To book your space email: classyexec@c-ville.com

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r e C m a m m p u S Guide

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

STAFF PHOTO

B

efore the U.S. abolished slavery in 1865, thousands of enslaved Black Americans escaped from Southern plantations and fled to Canada, where slavery was officially banned in 1834. Many used the Underground Railroad—an extensive network of secret routes, safe houses, free and enslaved Black Americans, and white abolitionists—to make the dangerous journey to freedom. The former slaves settled in free Black communities across southern Canada. For years, feminist writer and cultural critic Mikki Kendall believed that her greatgrandfather was a descendant of the enslaved Black people who fled to Canada. Her family assumed he eventually immigrated to the United States, where he met her great-grandmother. But when Kendall went looking for her great-grandfather’s name in Canadian records in 2020, she came up empty. “My grandmother’s father has always been a little bit of a family mystery,” says Kendall, author of New York Times bestseller Hood Feminism and Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists: A Graphic History of Women’s Fight for Their Rights. “They changed their last name at some point…There were two different spellings of the name, and three different stories about where he was from.” After spending months scouring ancestry. com for records of her great-grandfather, Kendall finally stumbled upon records of his sibling and father. She was surprised to discover that his family was not from the country of Canada, but rather Canada, Virginia—a free Black community near the University of Virginia. Residents of Canada worked as “washerwomen, seamstresses, carpenters, and cobblers, mostly serving students and faculty,”

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Acclaimed feminist author uncovers local roots


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NEWS

Say Man on a “mmm.” mission Lloyd Snook chosen as mayor By Ben Hitchcock editor@c-ville.com

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WINTER 2021

Taste is everything. CAN’T-MISS SIPS: We’re starting with Lightwell Survey’s Strange Hybrid Moments. PAGE 17

VERY FINE WINES What to drink, where to drink it, and who to know in the world of Virginia vino

Meet

CHRISTINA MARTIN,

the baker with no bakery

SUSHI! Thai meets Japanese at the hands of the Tauchis PIZZA! A Lampo alum takes his slice of the local pie game BURRITOS! Lucky Blue’s Bar serves up something for everyone

When it comes to area eats, we let our cravings guide us. And in this quarterly magazine, you’ll find everything from a stack of pancakes to a plate of filet mignon. Each issue of Knife & Fork introduces readers to chefs, food trends, recipes, and, most importantly, the best meals around.

ON STANDS SPRING, SUMMER, FALL, WINTER

SUPPLIED PHOTO

“T

o be effective leaders of change, we need two things,” said Councilor Lloyd Snook during last week’s City Council meeting. “We need vision, and we need the ability to build a team to realize that vision.” Snook will now get a chance to lead that team-building effort. At the beginning of last Wednesday’s meeting, City Council members chose Snook as the next mayor of Charlottesville. Snook, an experienced local defense attorney, was first elected to City Council at the beginning of 2020, and will serve a twoyear term as mayor. Newly elected Councilor Juandiego Wade will be vice-mayor. In Charlottesville government, the five city councilors choose the mayor from amongst themselves every two years. The mayor sets the meeting agenda, but doesn’t have much more power than the rest of the councilors. The city manager, who is not directly elected, runs the government’s day-to-day operations. Snook was elected by a vote of 3-2. Brian Pinkston and Juandiego Wade voted for Snook, while Sena Magill and Michael Payne voted for Payne. Magill said she supported Payne because of his ability to express complicated topics in a clear manner, and because of his ability to reach many different people. “In my two years on council, I’ve seen firsthand that we are a divided community,” Payne said, “divided along race, class, ideology, education level.” Payne said he hopes efforts to stabilize the city government’s operations don’t mean sacrificing the progressive vision that has animated the city for the last few years. “I’ve seen us have critical, difficult conversations that we haven’t had in years,” he said. “I’ve also seen us make real policy progress,” citing the adoption of the Future Land Use Map and the city’s affordable housing projects, which represent “one of the highest per-capita affordable housing expenditures in the country.” “I think it’s vital for us going forward… to have stability with a mission and goal in mind,” Payne said. Pinkston, Wade, and Snook—the coalition that joined to select Snook as mayor— have all been involved in local Democratic Party politics for years. Snook and Pinkston have served as chair and vice-

New Mayor Lloyd Snook says filling Charlottesville’s city manager vacancy is among his top priorities.

chair of the Charlottesville Democratic Party, respectively, while Wade was been a school board member from 2006 to his election to council last fall. “I’ve worked with Lloyd for many years. I think he has the knowledge of city government to handle this position,” Wade said. “I think he has the time to take on this responsibility.” Two years ago, Nikuyah Walker was elected mayor 3-0, with Snook and Councilor Heather Hill abstaining from the vote. Snook and Walker clashed during the pair’s overlap on council; Walker called Snook “inept” during a meeting in September. Juandiego Wade was elected vice-mayor unanimously. “Juandiego Wade has courageousness but also humility,” said Pinkston after nominating Wade, citing his long school board tenure. “I’m grateful for his leadership in the city.” In his speech accepting the nomination for mayor, Snook emphasized the need for collaboration across city government, and said finding “a city manager who can lead Charlottesville for a decade or more” is among his top goals. “We have a lot of smart people in Charlottesville,” Snook said, stating that he’d like to set up advisory committees of residents to advise Charlottesville on matters like transit, historic resources, and more. “We have a good vision, we need to build our team, I’d like to be the next mayor to lead that rebuilding,” he concluded.

“I think it’s vital for us going forward…to have stability with a mission and goal in mind.” COUNCILOR MICHAEL PAYNE


NEWS

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Never again UVA Center for Politics holds panel on Capitol insurrection By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

J

@vaccinatevirginia

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JIM ACOSTA, CNN

get your flu shot today.

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“Trump is a loser. He is somebody that knows deep down that he lost the 2020 election.”

Protect the ones you love,

US HOUSE OFFICE OF PHOTOGRAPHY

ust over a year ago, the world watched in horror as thousands of rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol, spurred by former President Donald Trump’s false claims that he won the 2020 election. Though activists and watchdog groups had warned law enforcement about the attack for weeks, police failed to adequately prepare for the violent mob. Insurgents broke into the Capitol, and occupied the building for several hours, resulting in over a hundred injuries and five deaths. Last week, the UVA Center for Politics hosted a virtual conference reflecting on the January 6 insurrection, featuring an array of notable politicians, journalists, scholars, authors, and political scientists. “If our democracy is to survive, then this is something that we can never forget,” said Larry Sabato, political scientist and director of the UVA Center for Politics. After Trump canceled a press conference scheduled for the 2021 anniversary of the event, CNN Chief Domestic Correspondent Jim Acosta reflected on Trump’s relationship with the media. “Trump is a loser. He is somebody that knows deep down that he lost the 2020 election,” said Acosta, who served as CNN’s chief White House correspondent during Trump’s presidency. “He knows all too well that Joe Biden had the bully pulpit today, and he was going to get all of the television coverage…the major networks were not going to take his lies on air.” Polls have shown that as many as 68 percent of Republicans still believe that Trump won the election. However, some Trump supporters have been open to hearing Acosta’s perspective when he has talked to them one-on-one, he said. “If the truth can be told in a penetrating way, I do believe we can get through that Trump fog.” During the second panel, Sabato questioned whether the canceled press conference showed that Trump may now be listening to the people around him. “Psychologically, he is incapable of changing course,” said Mary Trump, psychologist, author, and niece of the former president. “There is a definite worsening of his state of mind, and that just suggests that nobody down the road Representative Liz Cheney was among the panelists is going to be able to rein him in.” at a UVA January 6 event.

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

The former president’s niece pointed out that most elected Republicans still support Trump, and would do all they could to make him president if he runs in 2024. In addition to Trump himself, there are currently at least two dozen people who participated in the insurrection, as well as at least 50 QAnon supporters, running for federal office, added Miles Taylor of the Renew America Movement, which tracks radical candidates. New York Times columnist and Charlottesville resident Jamelle Bouie emphasized the structural issues of our electoral system, most notably the electoral college. Since 1992, Republicans have only won the popular vote once during a presidential election. “The ability to win power without winning the majority of votes has created a reliance on that method of winning among Republicans,” said Bouie. At the same time, “The Republican party has come to believe that [it’s] demographically doomed, and that change in the demographics of the United States is going to make it impossible to win.” That mixture is “encouraging this toxic interaction with the personality of Donald Trump,” said Bouie. Senator Tim Kaine and Congresswoman Liz Cheney expressed hope for the ongoing House investigation into the insurrection. “I’m confident that we will, despite the efforts [of] people to delay and obstruct, get to the truth,” said Cheney, vice-chair of the January 6 committee. “We’ll have the facts and the truth to lay out for the American people.”


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C

RESTAURANT WEEK

FRIDAY, JANUARY 28THSATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5TH

R

W

3 prices:

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

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$19 $29 $39

BON APPETIT!

C-VILLERESTAURANTWEEK.COM

$1 per meal benefits the Blue Ridge Area Food Bank


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TAKING IT ON facebook.com/cville.weekly

WILL KERNER

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

Live Arts kicks off 2022 with new leadership and a thought-provoking play


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Poetry and motion Accidental actor Theater fixture Darryl Nelson Smith talks Live Arts and reluctant performances

Live Arts’ Pipeline spotlights real consequences By Julia Stumbaugh

By Shea Gibbs

D

arryl Nelson Smith had never been in a play when he uprooted his Richmond life for an office gig supporting the Charlottesville theater community. He figured he’d take the job with Live Arts for a few years. Twenty years later, Smith is a pillar in local theater—on and off stage.

WILL KERNER

C-VILLE: Describe your newly revised role at Live Arts. Darryl Nelson Smith: I was box office manager, but I felt like I was more like the face of Live Arts. Anne Hunter approached me about changing my title to represent more of what I do for the organization. I am now the audience experience manager, and along with box office duties, that includes community outreach, audience experiences, funPipeline, a new play from Dominique Morriseau, directed by David Vaughn Straughn (right), and starring Aiyana Marcus (left) opens on January 14 at Live Arts. The production will feature a reception for educators on January 22, and an audience talkback on January 27.

nition and echo, along with the characters’ struggles. Nya first brings the poem to the stage when she writes the words on a chalkboard for her students; later, Omari raises the same aching question as the pool players, faltering on the word “we” as he searches for belonging within two types of academic institutions, both of which threaten to fail him. “It’s a deep process, I think because a lot of us have some sort of proximity or closeness to the characters that we play,” says Marcus. “There’s a certain amount of labor that comes with that. For us, it’s a story, but it’s also a piece of our own lives. It’s not just, ‘Oh, we did this piece of theater;’ it could have, hopefully, very real consequences in our lives and the lives of people who look like us, and can really make a difference.”

“For us, it’s a story, but it’s also a piece of our own lives.”

AIYANA MARCUS

TRISTAN WILLIAMS

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

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I

n the early 1960s, African American Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Gwendolyn Brooks walked past seven boys at a pool hall, an experience she commemorated in the poem “We Real Cool”: We real cool. We / Left school. We / Lurk late. We / Strike straight. We / Sing sin. We / Thin gin. We / Jazz June. We / Die soon. When read aloud, the “we” at the end of each line fades to near-nothingness, a deliberate affectation that Brooks said in a 1970 interview was meant to signify the boys’ questioning of their own existence. That doubt comes to life in Dominique Morisseau’s Pipeline, named for the American “school-to-prison pipeline” that funnels children, especially children of color, from public schools into the criminal justice system. Under the direction of David Vaughn Straughn, the play is being staged at Live Arts from January 14-30. In her first major role at Live Arts, Aiyana Marcus leads the cast as Nya, a public high school teacher whose efforts to remove her Black son Omari (Asyra Cunningham) from the ominous pipeline seem in vain when he gets into a fight at his predominantly white private school. The conflict starts him down a path that Nya worries will lead him to the doom Brooks predicted in her haunting poem. “The cast is really great,” says Marcus. “Everyone shows up really ready to work, and really connected to the roles even from our very first reading. I felt that connection with the actor that plays Omari, my son in the show, and everyone seems to have a connection with the language and with their own characters.” Rounding out the cast are Tanaka Maria, Sarad Davenport, and Jamie Virostko. Brooks’ “We Real Cool” plays such a big role that Marcus considers it “almost a character” in its own right. The poem is woven throughout the production as a haunting backdrop, somewhere between premo-

draising, and development. And, since we’re a 100 percent volunteer organization, I have been onstage in a couple of Live Arts shows. If you’ve only recently been in productions, what brought you to Live Arts in the first place? A co-worker in Richmond was coming to do shows at Live Arts many years ago. I came to see one and fell in love. Then she took a marketing position here. One day, I got a phone call from her—”this might be weird, but we are looking for a box office manager.” Four or five months later, I packed up my suitcase and a moving truck. What is it about theater that you love? The cool thing about theater is it is always growing and changing. At Live Arts, we do six or seven pro-


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How were you convinced to finally perform yourself? I went to school for communications and advertising, and in Richmond I worked at museums mostly. But with Live Arts being a volunteer organization, someone was eventually like, “hey, by the way, we need a person and think you should audition.” I’d be like, “you’re crazy—I am not an actor.” But then after going out for a couple of beers, I’d be in. What’s the pandemic been like for Live Arts? We reinvented the wheel and did online shows—but you don’t get that immediate feedback you get with live audiences. We did dance parties to reach out and let people know we are here. It was kind of like, “how can we engage the community?” After our doors had been closed for a year and a half, I honestly started to wonder if I could do it again. But I had a chance to go to New York and work with a former director of mine and run his box office. I got to do what I love, and I thought, “I can do this again.” I love the interaction with the public— that excitement of people coming to a show. It’s so magical.

By Shea Gibbs

S

usan Evans knows nothing is permanent in the theater. Nor should it be—theaters must evolve to stay relevant, says Live Arts’ artistic director. “A successful theater is a theater that never stops examining itself,” Evans says. “I think that many theaters get stuck. And it’s easy to get stuck because of money.” Evans got her own taste of impermanence in August 2020. That’s when she was laid off as artistic director at the Town Hall Theatre Company in the San Francisco Bay Area. The change put things in perspective for Evans, who’s spent nearly 20 years working in arts direction. “This is my fourth artistic director position—I’m just hoping to get it right,” she says. Evans’ ouster on the West Coast was outside her control. The Town Hall Theatre told local media outlets the move was driven by budget considerations, and the theater’s leadership praised Evans, noting her “deep artistic vision and theater acumen.” But budget cuts have, indeed, meant curtains for many community theaters nationwide. According to data from the National Endowment for the Arts, theater, dance, and other performing arts companies lost nearly 60 percent of their employees from March to April 2020. Theaters owning, renting, or leasing space suffered most, with many having to shut their doors. Theaters in and around Charlottesville struggled like many nationwide. Staunton’s nearly 70-year-old Oak Grove Theater went to a virtual model for 2020 but returned for 2021. Barboursville’s Four County

On stage at Live Arts in 2022 Pipeline January 14-30, 2022 Written by Dominique Morisseau Directed by David Vaughn Straughn The Legend of Georgia McBride March 4-27, 2022 Written by Matthew Lopez The Children April 15-May 7, 2022 Written by Lucy Kirkwood Directed by Betsy Rudelich Tucker Accidental Death of an Anarchist May 20-June 5, 2022 Written by Dario Fo Directed by Susan Evans

Players has likewise returned to a live season for 2021-22, but Gorilla Theater Productions, which leased a multi-use space on Allied Lane off McIntire Road, announced it was seeking a tenant to take over the facility in July 2020. Bent Theatre, which used Gorilla’s space for improv comedy shows, has moved to virtual productions for the time being. Anecdotal evidence suggests volunteer organizations like Live Arts and more flexible theaters not tied to leased or rented spaces have had more success than others. The Charlottesville Players Guild, which performs at the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, announced that its 2022-23 Black Indigeneity season will include classes and a podcast that follows the production journey. And the Charlottesville Playwrights Collective is producing live plays in the Belmont Arts Collaborative theater on Carlton Road. For its part, Live Arts stayed afloat with streaming performances and general community outreach. “We reinvented the wheel,” Audience Experience Manager Darryl Smith says. As Evans sought a new position and Live Arts went through its own pandemic pains, the local theater advertised for a new artistic director. Evans had visited Charlottesville many times—her mother was at the Westminster Canterbury of the Blue Ridge senior living center for 15 years. But in all her visits, she had never heard of Live Arts. “It was completely new to me, but you can tell a lot about a company just by looking at the kinds of shows being done,” Evans says. What she saw impressed her. She credits Live Arts for doing, “for lack of a better word, edgier” shows from its inception up to now, and exploring topics that challenge audiences. In today’s charged political environment—and especially in a place like Charlottesville—Evans says taking on the big issues is more important than ever. At Live Arts, she says she won’t have to rework the theater’s vision. But she does plan to put her stamp on the lineup. The current season launched on October 15 with Every Brilliant Thing. Directed by Clinton Johnson, the single-actor play digs deep into mental health. The season also addresses LGBTQ+ issues, the environment, and politics; this week’s opening of Pipeline (see story on page 16),

Live Arts’ new artistic director Susan Evans brings vision and a desire to see the theater evolve to reflect the Charlottesville community.

by contemporary African American playwright Dominique Morisseau, has been highly anticipated. “We don’t want it to just be lip service—we have a commitment to talk about LGBTQ and under-resourced communities, and that needs to be expressed in the kind of work we do,” Evans says. “Are you putting on a play with an all-white cast or an all-male cast or an all-cisgendered cast? What stories are being told?” Evans will direct the season’s final play, Accidental Death of an Anarchist, a political farce by Italian Dario Fo that explores police brutality and government overreach. Directing pieces that speak to what’s going on in the community and nation is something Live Arts’ new artistic director plans to continue doing throughout her tenure. And while Live Arts’ current season has gone well so far, theaters across the country are still struggling with pandemic-related issues. Live Arts will require everyone other than active performers to wear masks in the space, but in some U.S. theaters, unmasked performers have drawn backlash. Live Arts will also ask volunteers and audience members 18 and over to show proof of full vaccination, practice social distancing where possible, and stay home if they are feeling sick or have a recent COVID exposure. As Live Arts navigates this next act, Evans looks forward to continuing to evolve along with the theater. “I have grown up with one artistic director model that’s fairly top-down, and I need to expand my own mind and view of diversified leadership,” she says. “More voices need to be heard.”

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What’s next for you and Live Arts? I’m going to be here as long as they want me. But you never know. My life goal is to end up in a cabin in Canada somewhere. Our first show this season was a one-man show, but we had three different actors available each night just in case. If someone gets sick, we have another actor who could go on. We also have a big ol’ musical coming next summer. And I always say I won’t be onstage, but you never know. I say no, then I’m up there singing and dancing.

Meet Live Arts’ new artistic director

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

What’s been one of your favorite moments at Live Arts? The last show before the pandemic was Men on Boats, which is an allfemale cast playing men characters. We ran for two weeks before the pandemic and kind of knew this was a big thing. For the last show, the audience just really wanted to be there and came to support us, and I think the actors felt the love. It was their last show, and they gave it their all.

Next act

SUPPLIED PHOTO

ductions per year, and there’s great excitement around opening night. But then after four weeks of doing the same show, you’re a little tired of it. Then, there’s all of a sudden a new show and group of people to engage with.


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THE

WINE

DOWN WHAT’S DELISH AT LOCAL WINERIES?

53RD WINERY AND VINEYARD 2019 Two Springs Red Blend Our Two Springs is a Meritage-style blend, and is only ever produced in years with exceptional crop! With notes of spiced red and blackberries, tobacco, and an earthy finish, it’s the perfect bottle for these chilly winter nights around the fire. Pair with beef bourguignon, ratatouille, or a robust pasta Bolognese for a wonderful dinner!

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Guide Map

Visit the winery this January! Whether you are seated at a fire pit, on the Veranda or indoors, sit back and enjoy live music on the stage in The Barn on Fridays and Saturdays. We also offer cider (hard & nonalcoholic), s’mores, paint & sip classes, yoga, events for families and kids, and more. See the upcoming calendar of events on our website for all of the details.

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January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

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2019 XOXO Blanc de Blancs

MADISON

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STANARDSVILLE

KILAURWEN WINERY HARK VINEYARD

340

ORANGE

HORTON VINEYARDS

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REYNARD FLORENCE VINEYARD

GORDONSVILLE

33 CROZET AFTON

64

KESWICK VINEYARDS EASTWOOD FARM & WINERY

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS

LOUISA

CHARLOTTESVILLE ZION CROSSROADS

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SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL SECTION

53RD WINERY & VINEYARD

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40 Gibson Hollow Ln • Etlan, VA 22719 (540) 923-4206 www.ducardvineyards.com

Saturday, January 15-16th Wine Club pickup weekend! Not a current member? Ask us about joining!

DUCARD VINEYARDS

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Saturdays- Music on the Patio (2:30 – 5:30 pm) enjoy a wide variety of artists each Saturday

EASTWOOD FARM AND WINERY

13372 Shannon Hill Rd • Louisa, VA 23093 (540) 894-5474 • 53rdwinery.com.

DUCARD VINEYARD

Open daily – Mon-Thurs. 12-5 pm Fri. 12-9 pm Sat/Sun. 12-6 pm

We are open 7 days a week, 11am to 5pm offering our 100% Virginia wine by the bottle, glass and tasting flights. Enjoy your visit at our intimate, meadow-like setting in rural Louisa County. we offer well-spaced indoor and outside seating and customers are welcome to bring their own picnic baskets, chairs and blankets. Children and pets are welcome, but pets must always remain outside of buildings and on a leash. Quality wine, friendly staff at a great escape! Visit our website, www.53rdwinery.com on our operating procedures.

Open 7 days a week, 11 am – 5 pm

WINERY

Saturdays). No reservation fee or minimum purchase. Walk-ups accommodated on a space-available basis. To order wine for local delivery or UPS shipping, visit our website!

Chardonnay and expresses notes of toasted almonds, brioche and tropical fruit. Soft small bubbles delight the palate with a bright acidity and touch of minerality. Every day is a celebration, so enjoy this wine at every chance! Our uncrowded rural Madison County area has mountains, streams and plenty of beautiful views along scenic back roads. The tasting room is near hiking and biking trails along the Shenandoah National Forest and is a perfect respite after your day out! Enjoy some peace and quiet relaxation in this challenging environment. Sit on our lawns and sip or pick up a bottle or three of our award-winning wines to take home. Reservations available and recommended (especially for

2020 Viognier Citrus, apricot, and white flowers like honeysuckle and a hint of jasmine are pronounced on the nose of our 2020 Viognier. It is deliciously dry, lightbodied with low acidity and a clean, floral finish. Pairs great with our Cheese & Charcuterie Board in the tasting room or try it at home with grilled chicken or fish and seasonal vegetables from your local farmer’s market. Virginia is for Viognier!

*New* Winery Hours: Wednesdays-Saturdays (12-8 PM), Sundays (12-5 PM) 2531 Scottsville Rd. (5 mi from Downtown Charlottesville) Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 264-6727 www.eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

HARK VINEYARDS 2018 Spark *Silver Medal winner 2021 Governor’s Cup Spark is our Bordeaux style blend, comprised of Cabernet Franc, Merlot, and Petit Verdot. After barrel aging for 20 months, you’ll find notes of dried fruit, dark plums and rich earthy spice. Enjoy now, or age for a special occasion! While this wine is perfect to drink on its own during the chilly season, suggested paring for this wine would be roasted duck, paella dishes with chorizo, or even a classic s’more.


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While we have a wide variety of wines to pick from, we offer different themed flights each month to highlight our wine throughout the year! Wine flights, glasses and bottles are available. To ensure time for a tasting please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to closing. Open Daily from 10 am – 5 pm Wednesdays- Wine Wednesday (77:30 pm) Join Horton Vineyards live on Facebook every Wednesday at 7pm to learn about a different wine each week!

Visiting Hark: Hark Vineyards is a family-owned winery focused on the belief that beautiful views and delicious wine can bring people together. We offer two tasting menus, poured as flights for you to take back to your picnic area. Each feature five wines, and provides experience with both the Hark and Jake Busching Wines brands. Our wines are also available by the bottle or glass. We welcome — and encourage — you to bring a picnic and enjoy the experience our estate offers. Some picnic foods such as cheese, charcuterie, jams, crackers, and chocolate are available for purchase in our tasting room.

Join us for Winter Wineland on Saturday, January 15th, 2022. We will have tastings, flights, and glasses of mulled wine available for purchase. Kaas & Cure Food Truck will be joining us with their charcuterie trays to pair with your wine. We will also be selling Horton Vineyards blankets throughout the winter. For every blanket we sell, we will be donating one to a local homeless shelter. Blue Bird Book Shop will be here selling books. Plan to stay for the day and get cozy with your wine and books in front of the fireplace in our outdoor pavilion! 6399 Spotswood Trail, Gordonsville, Virginia (540) 832-7440 www.hortonwine.com

Our grapes love it here. We think you will, too.

434-964-9463 (WINE) 1465 Davis Shop Rd, Earlysville, VA 22936 www.harkvineyards.com

Dio Resurection

Saturday, January 8thLive music by Matt Johnson Saturday, January 15thLive music by Sue Harlow 1575 Keswick Winery Drive Keswick, VA 22947 keswickvineyards.com • (434) 244-3341

KILAURWEN WINERY Kilaurwen Red A bold, luscious red wine crafted from Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Touriga Nacional grapes. Structure and balance enhance this deep hued blend. Complex layers of dark cherry, tobacco, leather and almond evoke a full mouth feel that ends with a lingering spicy finish. The wine pairs well with hearty stews and soups, with grilled or smoked meats as well as with a wide range of cheeses including Mozzarella, Fontina, Gruyere and Swiss.

KESWICK VINEYARDS 2020 Trevillian Red Primarily made up of Petit Verdot, this wine has an expressive nose, showing rich red and dark fruit tones. The palate has great entry with bright red and black flavors, with really vibrant acidity that leaves your tongue salivating. The palate extends towards the back, where you pick up the medium bodied but finegrained tannins, while the finish is quite long and lengthy. Pair this with hard cheeses, braised meat dishes and fatty

**Sip, Stroll, Sample, Savor**: Join us on the Hill for our newest Estate tour and wine tasting experience! Join us for a unique, in-depth exploration of our wines, vines, and land. The experience starts with a glass of awardwinning bubbly and a guided tour of our Estate vines. The tour is followed by an intimate tasting featuring a selection of six exclusive Reserve and Library wines and concludes with our culinary favorites such as our cheese & charcuterie board and seasonal burrata. Make your reservation on our Website! Plan to visit: Pippin Hill is a culinary vineyard in the heart of Virginia’s wine country. There are two types of standard reservations available: Indoor Table or Covered Veranda for table service. Walk-ins are welcome for lawn seating. Reservations via Resy are recommended for Indoor and Veranda seating. Hours: Tuesday – Thursday: 11 am – 5 pm; Friday – Sunday: 11am to 4:30pm Sundays- Live music on the hill! Each Sunday from 1-4 PM, Pippin Hill welcomes local musicians to perform on our Veranda. Check our website for varying artists. 5022 Plank Rd., North Garden, VA 22959 (434).202.8063 www.pippinhillfarm.com

Although our tasting room is closed as of the end of November, our B & B, The Loft at Kilaurwen, will continue to welcome guests throughout the winter months. 1543 Evergreen Church Rd Stanardsville, VA 22973 (434) 985-2535 www.kilaurwenwinery.com

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS 2019 Cannon Red Named for our sister property in Charleston, SC, Cannon Green, this wine’s smoothness may hide

SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL SECTION

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In Greek mythology Dionysus, the god of wine, was born of fire and nursed by rain, like the hard burning heat that ripe the grapes and the water that keeps the vines alive. DIO is a unique blend of several red grapes that grow well here in Virginia. For Horton this a resurrection of our founder, Dennis Horton’s vision for Virginia Wine. Although Dennis had passed when we put this dry blend together, the Hortons’s felt his presence as each barrel was chosen. Please enjoy what Dennis knew all along was possible in Virginia.

We look forward to continuing to serve all of our wonderful guests this summer during our daily hours of 10am-5pm. We offer first come, first served seating at our outdoor courtyard tables or open seating for those who wish to bring their own blankets and chairs to spread out in our designated lawn area. Wine is available by the flight, glass and bottle, and only our outdoor areas can be accessed at this time. A selection of prepackaged meats, cheeses, crackers, and spreads are available for purchase.

Happy Holiday Greetings! We are sending Happy Holiday Greetings to all our friends and family who have visited the Tasting Room during this unique and challenging year. We thank you for your loyal support. We wish you a fun holiday season and a healthy, happy 2022!

Hours: 12pm-6pm on Friday/Sunday and 12pm-8pm Saturdays

HORTON VINEYARDS

Tasting Room Hours

the fact that it’s also complex and whimsical, earning its reputation as “an easy drinking red for a serious red drinker.” Like Cannon Green’s charming event space, it’s worthy of a special celebration, and equally fitting for a weeknight supper. The nose has hints of leather and tobacco, the palate is full with blackberry, plum and blueberry, and the finish has the perfect combination of medium body and soft tannins.

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

A few important notes: We are a family-friendly property. Children are welcome, but please help us protect the grapes. Well-behaved dogs on a leash are allowed outside, but not in the tasting room. Smoking and vaping are not permitted anywhere on the property. Additionally, Virginia ABC laws prohibit the consumption of any outside alcohol while on our premises.

fish dishes


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434.328.8573 301 E. Main Street

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

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www.skooma.com

Superior Service, Personalized Attention


CULTURE

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PUBLICITY PHOTO

THURSDAY 1/13

BLUES BREAKERS 46 REASONS TO LEAVE THE HOUSE THIS WEEK

STICKERED PAST

@cville_culture

For author Henry Hoke, stickers do more than just stick— they have the power to recall a variety of emotions and memories. In his memoir, Sticker, Hoke uses several styles (including pink, glittery Lisa Frank, Mr.Yuk, and the bumper favorite “coexist”) to explore queer boyhood, parental disability, ancestral violence, and Charlottesville’s history with neo-facism. Hoke will be joined in conversation by Jocelyn Nicole Johnson, with live music from Diane Cluck. Free, 7pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

FRIDAY 1/14

PAGE 22

Indie blues-rock artists Jocelyn & Chris are inciting a new rock revival with their high-energy live performances, dominating guitar, and commanding vocals. The sibling act writes all their music together, and even graduated from Harvard a year apart. The duo’s new single “Sugar and Spice” charted on the Billboard Adult Album Alternative Top 40, and their next record, Favorite Ghosts, is due later this year. $12-15, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com

SUNDAY 1/16

MGM

There’s no place like…the Paramount! The historic theater is celebrating its 90th anniversary with a special offer—viewings of classic films for the price of a movie ticket in 1931. Up next: the beloved musical The Wizard of Oz. Featuring the award-winning “Over the Rainbow” and the cheerful “We’re Off to See the Wizard,” the movie follows Dorothy Gale and her motley crew as they journey down the yellow brick road to the Emerald City. 25 cents, 2pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net

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TWENTY-FIVE CENTS, OH MY!


CULTURE THIS WEEK

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Wednesday 1/12 music Hard Swimmin’ Fish. Performing roots and blues. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thewhiskey jarcville.com Music in the Atrium. Weekly live performance with Jim Richardson on vocals and guitar. Free, noon. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org The Mike Rosensky & Jeff Decker Quartet. Jazz tunes. Free, 8pm. Miller’s Downtown, 109 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. millers downtown.com

dance

K.C. Jones. Effortlessly moving between genres, traditions, and musical concepts, it’s clear Jones was born with an insatiable artistic curiosity. $18-20, 8pm. The Front Porch, 221 E. Water St. frontporchcville.org

The Wilson Springs Hotel with South River Strings. Enjoy a night of country, bluegrass, and folk with two bands. Free, 6pm. Pro Re Nata, 6135 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. prnbrewery.com

etc. Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. A 20-minute introduction to Indigenous Australian art. Free, 10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org

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John Kelly. Live music at the indoor tasting room. Free, 4pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarmand winery.com

Square Dancing. Enjoy a night of square dancing. All levels are welcome. Free, 12:30pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

Thursday 1/13

@cville_culture

music

Scuffletown. Calypso, bluegrass, reggae, and blues. Free, 6pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glass housewinery.com

Intro to Printmaking with Abigail Wilson. A two-part introductory printmaking workshop with artist Abigail Wilson. $20-30, 6pm. Second Street Gallery, 115 Second St. SE., Downtown Mall. secondstreetgallery.org

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

Friday 1/14

Bachata Fusion Class. Edwin Roa teaches a fun beginner-to-intermediate-level bachata lesson to get the party started. $6-8, 7pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

classes

www.mineralsandmystics.com Facebook.com/MineralsMystics 345 Hillsdale Drive Charlottesville VA 22901 434-284-7709

Wine Tasting. A brut sparkling wine flight with a complimentary cheese pairing. $15, 5:30pm. Cake Bloom, 705 W. Main St. cake bloom.com

Jocelyn & Chris. A new rock revival. $1215, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St., Downtown Mall. thesouthern cville.com Music in the Atrium. A weekly performance from Jazz 1-2-3. Free, noon. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

stage Pipeline. With language lyrical and potent, Dominique Morisseau’s new play dives into the painful truth of the school-to-prison pipeline. $20-25, 8pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. livearts.org

words CreativeMornings. A free, monthly lecture for the creative community led by local hosts Kori Price, Emma Terry, and Maureen Brondyke. Free, 8:30am. Online. creativ emornings.com/cities/cvl Henry Hoke, with Jocelyn Nicole Johnson and Diane Cluck. Celebrate the release of Hoke’s new book, Sticker. The evening will feature a Q&A with Johnson and live music from Cluck. Free, 7pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com

classes

Root Cellar Remedy. Soulful original music with a diverse array of covers. Free, 6pm. Pro Re Nata, 6135 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. prnbrewery.com

Yoga in the Orchard with Joanna Hughes. Let the serenity of the mountain air and the peace of the orchard views revitalize your body and prepare you for the day. $10, 9:45am. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarleciderworks.com

dance

etc.

International Folk Dance. Learn a dance or two, or just watch and listen to the music. Free, 2:30pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, January 12. Free, 10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org

words

Friday Night Bites: Wine and food pairing. A two-course meal from a savory winter menu with a wine pairing, popover, and slice of cake. $20, 5pm. Cake Bloom, 705 W. Main St. cakebloom.com

Artists in Conversation: “The Third Mind.” A virtual panel discussion where artists will discuss their recent collaborative work for “The Third Mind” exhibition. Free, 6pm. Online. secondstreetgallery.org In the Shadow of the Ivory Tower with Davarian L. Baldwin and Jalane Schmidt. Baldwin and Schmidt discuss how universities have become big businesses and the costs for those living in their shadows. Free, noon. Online. vabook.org

etc. Arts Underground. Artmaking, drinks, and karaoke inside The Looking Glass. Free, 7pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, January 12. Free, 10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org

Saturday 1/15 music Berto & Vincent. Enjoy brunch with some lively Latin guitar. Free, 11am. Tavern & Grocery, 333 W. Main St. tavernandgrocery.com Dropping Julia with Rebecca Porter. Infectious energy and sultry vocals. Free, 6pm. Pro Re Nata, 6135 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. prnbrewery.com Eli Cook. Live music at the indoor tasting room. Free, noon. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarm andwinery.com CONTINUED ON PAGE 24


CULTURE GALLERIES

23

JANUARY SHOWS Artistic Remedies for Creative Hearts 8767

Seminole Tr., Suite 101, Ruckersville. “Flight of Fancy: All Things Winged and Windborne” features work from ARCH members. Baker Gallery Woodberry Forest School, 898 Woodberry Forest Rd. “From the Moment” showcases new paintings by Darrell Rose. Through March 5. The Center at Belvedere 540 Belvedere Blvd. “Natural Public Lands of Virginia” features photography work by Ben Greenberg. C’ville Arts Cooperative Gallery 118 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. “The Studio Sale” features locally handmade, high-quality arts and crafts. Through January 31. Eastwood Farm and Winery 2531 Scottsville Rd. “Roads to Eastwood” includes works by Jessica Livingston and Andrea Ruedy Trimble. McGuffey Art Center 201 Second St. NW. In the Smith Gallery, “Connections: possibilities/impossibilities,” recent acrylic paintings by Susan Patrick. In the Hallway Galleries, “New Members Show,” featuring work from McGuffey’s latest group of artists. Through January 30.

Darrell Rose at Baker Gallery

Jessica Livingston at Eastwood Farm and Winery

New City Arts 114 Third St. NE. In the Welcome Gallery, “You can’t compromise my joy” features new works by Fall 2021 New City Artist-in-Residence, Kori Price. Opens January 14.

Top Knot Studio 103 Fifth St. SE. “Old Pass-

word” by Christopher Headings. Through January 31. The Wayne Theatre Exhibit Gallery, 521 W. Main St., Waynesboro. “Find My Bearings” by Ashley Sauder Miller features works made from unconventional materials, paint, marker, and oil pastel. Through February.

Ben Greenberg at The Center at Belvedere

held inside the jagged edges of a square. “Everything is splintered and in full agitation. The triangles push into each other and pull apart—confined in their squares.” The paintings are calm, yet full of struggle. “The triangles are ill matched, not able to create their own square and unable to leave the square format.” Patrick’s work also contains hidden messages. “These paintings are partially covering paintings made in the past,” she says. On the surface, “Sooner” looks bright and cheerful. Vibrant greens and blues color Patrick’s signature squares, rectangles, and triangles. But hidden underneath is a messy, emotional sprawl of words. “A poem, written over and over, densely covered the canvas with layers of words,” says Patrick. The poem was about leaving behind a difficult situation, and bits and pieces of it still shine through and can be seen in the finished work, memories of the past mingling with the present.—Maeve Hayden

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“By studying art and making art, we place ourselves into a centuries-long continuum of observers and visual speakers,” says art educator and painter Susan Patrick. “We begin to understand previous and current cultures through drawn, painted, and sculpted images.” Patrick, who is on staff at Village School, has decades of experience teaching art at public schools, and is a member of McGuffey Art Center, where her work is on display in the Smith Gallery. Her new exhibition, “Connections: possibilities/impossibilities,” showcases a series of acrylic paintings on canvas. The series was a way for Patrick to explore a simple but intriguing shape—the triangle. “I had seen an image of a painting broken into triangles, and liked the composition,” says Patrick. Triangles can be found scattered throughout her paintings. One of them, “December #2,” is a study of shapes where triangles are

@cville_culture

Shifting shape

Christopher Headings at Top Knot Studio

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

Studio IX 969 Second St. SE. “Marley in Wonderland’’ features work by Marley Nichelle as part of the Prolyfyck Exhibition Series.

IMAGES COURTESY THE GALLERIES

Northside Library 705 Rio Rd. In the lobby, acrylics by Ali Sullivan. In the Quiet Room, photography by Bill Shaw.


CULTURE THIS WEEK

24

There’s no place like

home.

C ONTINUED FR OM PA GE 22

Saturday 1/15 South Canal Street. Playing classic hits. Free, 1pm. Prince Michel Vineyard & Tap 29 Brewery, 154 Winery Lane, Leon. prince michel.com The Michael Elswick Gathering. Performing jazz, blues, ballads, and Latin tunes. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com

stage Pipeline. See listing for Friday, January 14. $20-25, 8pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. livearts.org

etc. Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, January 12. Free, 10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org Indie Short Film Series. Featuring six to seven screenings per block, followed by a moderated filmmakers’ panel discussion. $17, 7pm. Light House Studio: Vinegar Hill Theatre, 220 W. Market St. lighthousestudio.org

Sunday 1/16 music Beleza Duo. Enjoy brunch with some samba soul. Free, 10am. The Ridley, 1106 W. Main St. theridleyva.com Steel Peach. Country, rock, and alternative hits. Free, 1pm. Prince Michel Vineyard & Tap 29 Brewery, 154 Winery Lane, Leon. princemichel.com The Burkes. Half of the Jason Burke Band playing their rhythmic tunes. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

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Inside. Outside. Home.

Vincent Zorn. Enjoy brunch with live music. Free, noon. South and Central Latin Grill, 946 Grady Ave., Suite 104. south andcentralgrill.com

classes Paint and Sip with Catelyn Kelsey Designs. Sip on some wine while you learn a variety of acrylic painting skills and techniques. $35, 2pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarm andwinery.com Yoga in the Orchard with Joanna Hughes. See listing for Friday, January 14. $10, 9:45am. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarle ciderworks.com

etc. Paramount at the Movies Presents: The Wizard of Oz. Judy Garland stars as Dorothy Gale, a young Kansas farm girl who dreams of a land “somewhere over the rainbow.” 25 cents, 2pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net

Monday 1/17 music Monday Music Series. Enjoy delicious food and drink paired with live Latin music from Vincent Zorn, Berto & Vincent, or Beleza. Free, 7pm. South and Central Latin Grill, 946 Grady Ave., Suite 104. southandcentralgrill.com

dance English Country Dance. Partake in some English country dancing, or just come to enjoy the performance. Free, 1pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

etc. Monday Night Trivia. Hosted by Brandon “The Trivia Guy” Hamilton. Free, 6pm. Prince Michel Vineyard & Tap 29 Brewery, 154 Winery Lane, Leon. princemichel.com

Tuesday 1/18

FALL 2021

OM, AHHH

dance

SHOP HOP

English Country Dance. See listing for Monday, January 17. Free, 1pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

A zen box holds space for a local artist

Woodworker Tate Pray returns to form—and function

Three décor retailers we’re obsessing over

etc.

MIXING IT UP

Rethinking the performance of a family kitchen

Indie Short Film Series With an eye toward its second life, a designer reimagines a city cottage

To be continued

Central Virginia’s No. 1 home magazine has never looked finer. ABODE has given readers an inside look at the region’s most interesting homes for nearly a decade. From landscape to interior design, floor to ceiling, blueprint to fixture, each month our writers team up with the area’s top architects and designers to give you an insider’s view of the local homes you’ve always wanted to see inside. Look for ABODE at over 100 locations across Charlottesville, Albemarle, Orange, Lovingston, Crozet, Staunton, Waynesboro, and Fishersville at major grocery stores, gyms, restaurants, and online at c-ville.com.

Inside. Outside. Home.

Saturday 1/15 Vineger Hill Theatre

Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, January 12. Free, 10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org

This is our town. .com


CULTURE SCREENS

25

Flashback to fun Licorice Pizza is a light, bouncy love letter to the ’70s By Justin Humphreys arts@c-ville.com

MGM

W

Cooper Hoffman and Alana Haim roam from one bizarre adventure to the next in the light and funny Licorice Pizza.

where—Nixon on TV, Todd Rundgren on the radio, hideous wallpaper in the living room—but this appropriately funky window dressing never overwhelms the cast. American cinema of the 1970s is another trademark of Anderson’s vision. He has so superficially assimilated Robert Altman, Martin Scorsese, and Hal Ashby’s works that he can conjure their films’ look and feel without being openly derivative (although he does lift a scene from Taxi Driver, and also draws on Clint Eastwood’s Breezy). Altman’s influence on Anderson can be seen in his excellent ensemble casts, and Anderson’s

latest is no exception. Hoffman and Haim are endearing. The supporting cast shines, partic­ ularly Harriet Sansom Harris as a chain-smok­ ing agent. Sean Penn’s scenes as aging action hero Jack Holden, loosely parodying William Holden, is Penn’s best, funniest work in years. Bradley Cooper as hairstylist Jon Peters is a hilarious caricature of that era’s machismo, complete with a caveman’s hair, beard, and attitude. And the cast members who deserve special praise are the many child actors, who appear effortlessly natural and unforced. What does it all add up to? It’s an un­ disciplined, arrhythmic film, and essen­

tially just Anderson having a blast taking a sentimental journey. It’s not deep and it’s 20 minutes too long (like most current movies). But it succeeds as a light, laconic,

Licorice Pizza R, 133 minutes Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, Violet Crown Cinema funny film—the key word here being light—that hearkens back to 1970s film­ making, but doesn’t equal the richness of that decade’s cinema.

This warm recreation of the Valley circa 1973 nicely evokes the era’s look, feel, and looseness—of kids being kids, and adults usually behaving more juvenile than the children.

*Fabulous* specialty cocktails, as well as offer the $5 Raffle every 3rd Thursday of the month, with local goodies, and a Rockin Playlist!

Wearing rainbow and/or any outfit that makes you feel especially yourself will always be highly encouraged!

$1 from each cocktail sold will continue to help @cvillepride, along with the proceeds from our 3rd Thursday Raffles!

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Thursdays 5-9 pm at the Downtown Vitae Distillery tasting room!

@cville_culture

NIGHT

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

ith the current glut of super­ heroes, franchises, and remakes at movie theaters, a film like Paul Thomas Anderson’s Licorice Pizza stands out by default simply for being lowkey, unpredictable, and featuring normallooking people. It’s also low on narrative cohesion and depth, and still sticks out. In short, Licorice Pizza is enjoyable with a strong cast, and well worth seeing, but what’s it really about? The overriding an­ swer: P.T.A. loves L.A. Anderson’s films overflow with adoration for his native Los Angeles—usually, the San Fernando Valley—and its people, from Boogie Nights’ porn stars to Inherent Vice’s ston­ er beach bums. That deep affection shines through in every frame of Licorice Pizza, this time through an exuberant, youthful lens. This warm re-creation of the Valley circa 1973 nicely evokes the era’s look, feel, and looseness—of kids being kids, and adults usually behaving more juvenile than the children. (Licorice Pizza would pair well with Michael Ritchie’s The Bad News Bears.) An­ derson captures the uniquely surreal nature of the Valley’s deep ties to “The Industry,” where seeing aging movie stars or the Bat­ mobile is humdrum stuff. The film’s nominal plot follows two kids seemingly as incongruous as the film’s title: 15-year-old inveterate hustler Gary Valentine (Cooper Hoffman), and Alana Kane (Alana Haim), an aimless 25-year-old spitfire. Gary pursues Alana even more fervently than his endless money-making schemes, and the story finds the pair roaming from one bi­ zarrely comic, sometimes poignant, episode to the next, punctuated by their mercurial reactions. There are period trappings every­


26

CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


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CROSSWORD

Tattoo Removal BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS 1. Original airer of “Doctor Who” and “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” 4. Heavy-landing sound 8. Woodworker’s vise 14. Big part of a dachshund 15. Barn topper 16. Rob who directed “The Princess Bride” 17. Phys. for someone suffering from ennui? 19. Repeated cry in Buster Poindexter’s “Hot Hot Hot” 20. Tapered hairstyle 21. Study 22. It’s at the center of some court battles 23. Drool 25. Line of footwear sold by a company known for its personal lubricant? 29. Na+ or Cl-, in NaCl 30. Clark’s crush at the Daily Planet 31. Landmark 1973 Supreme Court case, informally 32. Nursing ____ 33. PETA pet peeves 34. It’s not a good look 35. What some lasers are used for ... or what’s seen in 17-, 25-, 44and 56-Across 38. Alternative to Venmo 39. Like refreshing agua 40. “The tongue of the mind,” per Cervantes 41. Flexible blackjack card 42. John Legend’s “All ____” 43. Self starter?

#3

1

2

3

4

DOWN 1. Gripes 2. Trite 3. Words to live by 4. “The whole family can watch” program rating 5. “Nashville” actress Panettiere 6. Completely anesthetized 7. “Marriage Story” Oscar winner Laura 8. Playing favorites 9. People people 10. Not be straight with 11. “Sorry, it’s ____ from me” 12. Blanc who voiced Bugs Bunny 13. Lead-in to calculus 18. Renaissance, literally 24. Dory, e.g. 5

6

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© 2022 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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M D I V A E D I L K I D E V A D A E E L S G G Y B O T R O M E F R A N T R E A T F R I C A A I T T S U N K N T S A A G A M I R R A F T

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O L O L A L D R I G E R R A S R T F O Z O R R E E C A S U T H A L A C P A R S A G O D G E S S E N S

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#6 solution

Parts unknown

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8

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#6

7

25. Home of the boy band BTS 26. Instrument with stops 27. Travel expense 28. “Comprende?” 30. Pulitzer-winning novelist Alison 32. More despicable 33. Much paperwork 34. Like maritime trade routes 35. Street food choice 36. Cream or eggshell 37. Warm up the crowd 38. Half-____ (request to a barista) 42. Seafood in a “shooter” 43. Quarter deck? 45. What kitsch lacks 46. Oil-bearing rock 47. Wide variety 48. Put on ice 49. German steel city 51. Slightly cracked 53. The Wildcats of the Big 12 Conf. 54. One ab crunch, say 55. “Eh, give or take” 57. Quickly note (down)

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

14

44. Something you get when purchasing 20 Scrabble sets? 46. Having feelings 50. Volcanic ____ 51. “THERE you are!” 52. Timeline spans 53. Skating great Yamaguchi 56. Poppycock coming from a “Star Wars” character? 58. Six-line stanza 59. Tina Turner, vocally 60. It might be brown or pale 61. Cry from a balcony, maybe 62. Common medical advice 63. Kyoto dough


January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

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28

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Thank you for all of your support in 2021. We’re proud of the work that we did, and also realize there is much more to be done. Thanks to you, we were able to provide emergency funding to individuals and businesses affected by COVID-19. We were able to offer our youngest learners high quality early education opportunities. We were able to provide reliable transportation for our neighbors so they could continue to work. And we aunched Envision, our largest, boldest initiative to date. As we begin 2022 we hope that you will continue to support, and engage with, our work! unitedwaycville.org @unitedwaycville


By Rob Brezsny

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Author Joyce Carol Oates has been very successful and has won several major awards. But she describes her job as arduous and time-consuming. “I work very slowly,” she testifies. “It’s like building a ladder, where you’re building your own ladder rung by rung, and you’re climbing the ladder. It’s not the best way to build a ladder, but I don’t know any other way.” I wouldn’t always recommend her approach for you, Aquarius, but I will in 2022. As long as you’re willing to accept gradual, incremental progress, you’ll get a lot of fine work done.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): I’ve selected a quote for you to use as one of your guiding principles in 2022. I urge you to undertake a specific action in the next 24 hours that will prove you mean to take it seriously. Here’s the wisdom articulated by Piscean rabbi and philosopher Marc-Alain Ouaknin: “People must break with the illusion that their lives have already been written and their paths already determined.” It’s reinvention time, dear Pisces.

Aries (March 21-April 19): The coming months will be an excellent time for you to explore the art of Soulful Bragging. Do you deserve any of the titles below? If so, feel free to use them liberally throughout 2022. 1. Practical Idealist with Flexible Strategies. 2. Genius of Interesting Intimacy. 3. Jaunty Healer with Boisterous Knowledge of the Soul’s Ways. 4. Free-Wheeling Joker Who Makes People Laugh for Righteous and Healing Reasons. 5. Skillful Struggler. 6. Empathy Master with a Specialty in Creative Compassion. 7. Playful Reservoir of Smart Eros. 8. Purveyor of Feisty Wisdom and Cute Boldness. 9. Crafty Joy-Summoner.

Taurus

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn biologist Robin Wall Kimmerer wrote a meditative book about moss. It was her response to questions she had been wondering about: Why has this inconspicuous plant persevered for 350 million years? While so many other species have gone extinct, why has moss had staying power through all the Earth’s climate changes and upheavals? And what lessons does its success have for us? Here are Kimmerer’s conclusions: Moss teaches us the value “of being small, of giving more than you take, of working with natural law, sticking together.” In accordance with astrological omens in 2022, Capricorn, I believe moss should be your role model. (Kimmerer’s book is Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses.) the astrological omens, you will have more power than ever before to escape any harmful addictions and compulsions you have— and begin reclaiming your full vitality.

Gemini (May 21–June 20): In May 1974, the Grateful Dead introduced a new wrinkle to their live musical performances. Playing at the Cow Palace in San Francisco, they amplified their music through a “Wall of Sound”: 604 speakers piled high, together channeling 26,000 watts of energy. Had any band ever treated their fans to a louder volume and crisper tones? I’d like to make this breakthrough event one of your top metaphors for 2022. According to my analysis, it will be a great year for you to boost your signal. I invite you to distribute your message with maximum confidence and clarity. Show the world who you are with all the buoyant flair you can rouse.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): Philosopher Emil Cioran said he despised wise philosophers. Why? Because they practice prudent equanimity, which he regarded as empty and sterile. In Cioran’s view, these deep thinkers avoid strong feelings so they can live in cool safety, free from life’s nerve-wracking paradoxes. I agree with him that such a state is undesirable. However, Cioran contrasted it with the lives of the normal people he admired, who are “full of irreconcilable contradictions” and who “suffer from limitless anxiety.” My question for Cioran: Are there no other options between those two extremes? And my answer: Of course there are! And you can be proof of that in 2022, Cancerian. I expect you’ll be full of deep feelings, eager for new experiences, and infused with a lust for life—with less anxiety and fewer irreconcilable contradictions than ever before.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1838, 29-year-old naturalist Charles Darwin was early in his career. He had not developed his theory of evolution, and was not yet a superstar of science. He began ruminating about the possibility of proposing marriage to his cousin Emma Wedgwood. If married, he wrote: “constant companion and a friend in old age; the charms of music and female chit-chat—good things for one’s health.” If not married: “no children; no one to care for one in old age; less money for books, loss of time, and a duty to work for money.” I bring this to your attention, Leo, because I suspect that in 2022, you may be tempted and inspired to deeply interweave your fate with the fates of interesting characters. A spouse or partner or collaborator? Could be. Maybe a beloved animal or spirit guide? Have fun making your list of pros and cons!

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): What were your favorite toys when you were a child? Now would be a good time to retrieve fond memories of them, and even acquire modern versions so you can revive the joy they gave you. In my astrological analysis, you’ll be wise to invite your inner child to play a bigger role in your life as you engage in a wide range of playtime activities. So yes, consider the possibility of buying yourself crayons, Legos, dolls and puppets, video games, squirt guns, roller skates, yo-yos, jump ropes, and board games. And don’t neglect the pleasures of blanket forts, cardboard boxes, mud pies, and plain old sticks.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In his novel The Story of a Marriage, Andrew Sean Greer asks, “Does

love always form, like a pearl, around the hardened bits of life?” My answer would be, “No, not always, but when it does, it’s often extra sweet and enduring.” One of my wishes and predictions for you in 2022, Libra, is that love will form around your hardened bits. For best results, be open to the possibility that difficulty can blossom into grace. Look for opportunities that are seeded by strenuous work.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “It is worth living long enough to outlast whatever sense of grievance you may acquire,” wrote author Marilynne Robinson, and I recommend her thought as one of your uplifting meditations in 2022. According to my reading of the astrological omens, the coming months will be a favorable time to dismantle and dissolve as many old grievances as you can. This could and should be the year you liberate yourself from psychic grunge—for the sake of your own mental, physical, and spiritual health as much as for the sake of others.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Some critics view author Diana Wynne Jones as a genius in her chosen field: fantasy novels for children and young adults. She had a generous spirit, asserting, “I have this very strong feeling that everybody is probably a genius at something; it’s just a question of finding this.” If you are still unsure what your unique genius consists of, Sagittarius, I believe 2022 will show you in detailed glory. And if you do already know, the coming months will be a time when you dramatically deepen your ability to access and express your genius. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, (877) 873-4888

Dream team

Wedding pros work together at The Bradbury downtown

Copy this

How to use styled shoots for inspo

Forever love

Don't toss the bouquet— a new way to keep it 'alive'

FALL/WINTER 2021

Plan on!

A month-bymonth guide to the big day PAGE 23

So much

joy

Four weddings—from itsy bitsy to Italian-inspired—that got every detail just right

O N

S T A N D S

N O W !

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HERE COME THE BRIDES

Capricorn

January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

(April 20-May 20): Most people who use tobacco products are at risk of having shorter life spans than they might have otherwise had. Smoking is detrimental to health. Those who smoke in their 20s and 30s may cut 10 years off their longevity. But here’s some good news: If you kick your tobacco habit before age 40, you will regain most of those 10 years. I bring this to your attention because I’d like it to serve as a motivational tale for you in 2022. According to my analysis of

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

29


30

Q&A How are you coping with this winter weather disaster? At least I still have a house. GAYLE MILLNER/FACEBOOK

Enjoyin’ the fireplace & books unread till now... sendin’ gorgeous photos to family in So California... @KELLYLYNMARSHALL/INSTAGRAM

Not very well! DENA BOWERS/FACEBOOK

My new philosophy is, “The sun will melt it eventually.”

Curled up in a ball, whimpering quietly. Pass me another Scotch.

PAUL BENDER/FACEBOOK

HANK HAGENAU/FACEBOOK

It’s hard. Power just coming back on. Now I have to go through my fridge and eliminate the spoiled food after my expensive grocery run last Sunday.

It’s not a disaster. It’s a failure of city services and power company preparedness.

NO power, fallen trees, ice and snow blocked roads BUT still better than the dangerous gray gravestone, Dewberry (many names more excuses) concrete wonderland ruin in center of beautiful C’ville—Fight back!!

@SOPRANODEXTER/TWITTER

@LUFFAKLEIN/TWITTER

Better than VDOT did!

Created new recipes for the grill from what’s defrosting in the freezer. Wrapped frozen corn in foil with a pat of butter and stuck on the grill. Chicken that was supposed to be roasted ended up grilled. Butternut squash on the grill. Grilled shrimp. Now I need to get more gas for the grill before the next big storm knocks out my electricity for a week again.

DENA BOWERS/FACEBOOK

@FODROD_OF_OZ/TWITTER

Didn’t have heat or water for three days and it’s snowing again. Have trees and tree branches down all over my yard from the first storm. Others still without power and this new storm could take more customers off line. Surviving.

redrum, REDRUM!

I’m not. ;)

By NOT thinking of it as a disaster! By remembering: it’s winter. This is what we expect, and prepare for! That said: Hope everyone is warm, and that power is restored to all very soon.

CEE REA/FACEBOOK

@MOTEASTER/INSTAGRAM

@LALALALALAFALALALA/INSTAGRAM

@HIRAM_ELY/INSTAGRAM

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January 12 – 18, 2022 c-ville.com

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Sitting in the dark. @RTRJNH/TWITTER

Disaster? You mean winter? Actually experiencing the season rather than 70s in January? We’ve been enjoying “winter” just fine. @ATKINBACK/INSTAGRAM

Still sitting in the dark...but I’ve got blankets! Luckily I moved my perishables into the snow (frozen stuff) and coolers for the things that shouldn’t freeze. Been catching up on reading and melting snow to flush the toilets. Trying to keep positive and tell myself it could be worse...because what else can I do???

So much crying. Gets me out of my sympathetic nervous system.

JESSICA PEURA/FACEBOOK

@MELLAMOSUZYQ/INSTAGRAM

So grateful for our woodstove! Our little flower farm and home are still without power…also getting in a good workout hauling buckets of water inside to flush toilets since we are on a well! @FOOTHILLSFLOWER/INSTAGRAM

Next week’s question: How concerned are you about the recent COVID surge? Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.


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EMPLOYMENT

We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet & C’ville!

We're Hiring!

bout Us

Want to apply your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so, The Arc has these opportunities to offer. Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, $15-$17/hr)

ur mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental sabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the ading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we ge you to consider the following career opportunities:

rect Support Professionals- Charlottesville Day Support ($13-$15/hr) ct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr) Direct Support Professional- Floater (overnights, $16/hr)

Direct Support Professionals Residential Services (FT and PT, $15 - $17/hr)

We're very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet and C’ville!

To see additional details and a full listing of all our positions or to apply, please visit our web site at http://arcpva.org/employment

addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience, The Arc also offers competitive ompensation, paid training, and - for full time staff - an attractive benefits package including paid ave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance. The Arc the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

For more details and positions, and to apply, please visit

http://arcpva.org/employment

434-977-4002 x124

arcpva.org

Apply now!

@arcpiedmont.va

The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

434-977-4002x124 arcpva.org • @arcpiedmont.va

Pre-payment Required. We accept all major credit cards, cash or check.

classifieds.c-ville.com

Email salesrep@c-ville.com

Mobile Developer Swift/XCode UVA seeks candidates for grant-funded position of Mobile Developer Swift/XCode, resp for (i)continued development/maintenance of mobile/web-based application re care of patients w/chronic illness. Must possess (i) BS in Comp Sci, MIS, Comp Eng or related (ii) 3yrs exp in job offered or related (iii) proficient with: 1 native iOS development w/XCode, Swift, & Cocoa pods; 2 iOS frameworks like UIKit, WebKit, AVFoundation, JTAppleCalendar, User Notifications; 3 data parsing forms like JSON, for dynamically displaying data on applications, & web service like RESTful API.; 4 Python, NLP, SQL, & Machine Learning libraries & frameworks like BERT,Vader, Textblob; 5 optimization/ performance issues across iOS software layers using REST APIs; 6 structuring databases/manipulating large data sets, & implementing models/visualizations using programming & scripting; 7 design for types iPhone screen sizes/orientations w/Auto Layout in storyboards; 8 GIT version control sys to connect to remote files in server securely; 9 CS fundamentals in algorithm design, problem-solving, complexity analysis, data structures, & object-oriented design; 10 Ensure performance/quality/responsiveness of apps & maintain code quality. Able to: 1 Collaborate w/Product Management, UX Designers, Backend, & Firmware developers to create exceptional mobile exp; 2 communicate clearly w/users/technical team/management to collect requirements, describe software product features & technical designs; 3 take project from scoping req through launch. Awareness of protocols in distributing the App in App Store incl understanding of App store requirements, iTunes Connect, & iOS Provisioning Portal, w/clear understanding of Apple’s design principles. Employer performs pre-hire background check. Job in Charlottesville, VA area. Full-time/M-F. Apply at https://uva.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/UVAJobs/job/Charlottesville-VA/Mobile-Developer-Swift-XCode_ R0030846 UVA, including the UVA Health System which represents the UVA Medical Center, Schools of Medicine and Nursing, UVA Physician’s Group and the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, are fundamentally committed to the diversity of our faculty and staff. We believe diversity is excellence expressing itself through every person’s perspectives and lived experiences. We are equal opportunity and affirmative action employers. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, color, disability, gender identity or expression, marital status, national or ethnic origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy), sexual orientation, veteran status, and family medical or genetic information.

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Offering competitive compensation, paid training, and - for full time staff Apply now! - an attractive benefits package including paid leave, health, dental & vision insurance, as well as life & long-term disability insurance.

QUESTIONS?

January 12 - 18, 2022 c-ville.com

Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population.

PRICING

Rates starting at $40. Email for specific pricing.

31


COME WORK WITH US! $2500 SIGN ON BONUS FOR NEW DRIVERS!* Paid out in three installments:

$500 paid after training completed (approximately two weeks after your start date).

$500 paid once your CDL has been issued.

$1,500 paid one year after your initial start date.

*Former employees are not eligible candidates for sign-on bonuses.

LEGALS

32

ESTATE OF FRANK S. NEOFOTIS

NOTICE OF TAKING OF DEBTS AND DEMANDS

Upon request of the Executor, I will be conducting a hearing for receiving proof of debts and demands against the decedent or the decedent’s estate on January 28, 2022, at 10:30 a.m., at the law office of Scott Kroner, PLC, 418 E. Water Street, Charlottesville, Virginia. Rebecca C. Hryvniak Commissioner of Accounts

Apply at www.ridejaunt.org

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE

January 12 - 18, 2022 c-ville.com

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RE: ESTATE OF ANNIE MARIE CARTER, DECEASED

Looking for a part time sales job or side hustle? Now hiring part time sales reps. to build and manage new business. Commission based, flexible job in a fun work environment that includes great perks. Perfect for an outgoing and energetic person who enjoys building relationships with local businesses. Must be 21+ and have both reliable transportation and a home office (computer and internet access). A good fit for a grad student, someone who works restaurant shifts in the evening or a stay at home Mom looking to ease back into the workforce. Sales experience is a plus (and yes, bartending and waiting tables counts!). Could potentially become a full time position for the right candidate.

Email your resume to anna@c-ville.com EOE

Estate File No. 2018-288 SHOW CAUSE ORDER AGAINST DISTRIBUTION IT IS ORDERED that the creditors of, and all others interested in, the estate do show cause, if any they can, on the 21st day of January, 2022 at 9:00 a.m. before this Court at its courtroom, against the payment and delivery of the Estate of Annie Marie Carter, deceased, to the distributees without requiring refunding bonds. It is further ordered that the foregoing portion of this order be published once a week for two successive weeks in Cville Weekly. a newspaper published in Charlottesville, Virginia, it appearing that a report of the accounts of Rosa Lee Carter, Executor of the estate of Annie Marie 8 Carter, deceased, and of the debts and demands against her estate has been filed in the Clerk’s Office, and that six months have elapsed since the qualification, on motion of Rosa Lee Carter, Executor. ENTER: Cheryl V. Higgins DATE: 12/17/21

I ASK FOR THIS: James B. Cox, III, Esq., Va. Bar #23021 Mitchie Hamlett, PLLC P.O. Box 298 310 4th Street, N.E. 2nd Floor Charlottesville, VA 22902-0298 Phone (434) 951-7230 Fax (434)951-7250 email : jcox@michiehamlett..com Counsel for Rosa Lee Carter, Executor of the Estate of Annie Marie Carter, deceased


SERVICES

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AUCTIONS ATTN. AUCTIONEERS: Advertise your upcoming auctions statewide and in other states. Affordable Print and Digital Solutions reaching your target audiences. Call this paper or Landon Clark at Virginia Press Services 804521-7576, HYPERLINK “mailto:landonc@vpa.net” landonc@vpa.net

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Photos only to: Deb Colony, 1100 Mill Pond Rd. Faber VA. 22938 Please no drop in’s. Pay: $150.00. Age 18 to 40, male & female. Partial nudity. See Deborah Colony Fine Art on Facebook.

Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debrisblocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-877-6146667 GENERAC Standby Generators provide backup power during utility power outages, so your home and family stay safe and comfortable. Prepare now. Free 7-year extended warranty ($695 value!). Request a free quote today! Call for additional terms and conditions. 1-877-636-0738 The Generac PWRcell, a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-833-688-1378 Dont let the stairs limit your mobility! Discover the ideal solution for anyone who struggles on the stairs, is concerned about a fall or wants to regain access to their entire home. Call AmeriGlide today! 1-888-510-0805

RECRUITMENT HIRING? We can help you fill your open positions! Promote job listings statewide! Affordable Print and Digital Advertising Solutions reaching job seekers. Call this paper or Landon Clark at Virginia Press Services 804-5217576, HYPERLINK “mailto:landonc@vpa.net” landonc@vpa.net

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Up to $15,000.00 of GUARANTEED Life Insurance! No medical exam or health questions. Cash to help pay funeral and other final expenses. Call Physicians Life Insurance Company- 844-509-1697 or visit www. Life55plus.info/vapress Portable Oxygen Concentrator May Be Covered by Medicare! Reclaim independence and mobility with the compact design and long-lasting battery of Inogen One. Free information kit! Call 888-608-4974

January 12 - 18, 2022 c-ville.com

COMMUNITY AND MISCELLANEOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS

DIVORCE-Uncontested, $395+$86 court cost. WILLS $195.00. No court appearance. Estimated completion time twenty-one days. Hilton Oliver, Attorney (Facebook). 757-490-0126. Se Habla Espanol. BBB Member. https://hiltonoliverattorneyva.com.

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Thank you for your support in 2021. The Charlottesville-Albemarle SPCA has placed over 3,000 pets in homes this year.

Help us continue our lifesaving work by adopting, fostering or donating to save homeless pets!

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VOL. 31 NO. 2 n JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

30

JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

35

YEARS OF REAL ESTATE

Country Home BY CARLA HUCKABEE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Find Your Vision and Your Dream in Your


JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

36

A DREAM HOME IS GREAT, BUT THE RIGHT ONE IS BETTER. Let an agent who knows guide you.

LOUISA COUNTY

Bev Nash

$299,900

434-981-5560

• Construction is underway on 5 wooded acres • 1400 sf, 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms • Similar to photo, covered porch, rear deck • Superior stick built construction • Conditioned crawl space • Paved State road • Granite counters, real fireplace • February completion

14 Tallwood Trl

$364,000

$139,900

Ruth Guss

NELSON COUNTY

434-960-0414

• 3 Bedrooms, 1 Bath, 1,078 Sq. Ft. • Charming 1930’s Updated Two Story • First Floor Bedroom, First Floor Laundry • Painted Wood Cabinets, Mahogany Kitchen Countertop • .46 Acres Within Walking Distance of the Rockfish River • 466 Riverside Dr Schuyler, VA 22969

500 DAVID RD

$765,000

SHADWELL ESTATES

Bev Nash

$89,900

434-981-5560

• The last vacant lot available • Located just East of Shadwell. • Beautiful mature timber on 1.5 acres • Paved private road • Just 10 minutes to Pantops shops 5 minutes to Keswick Golf Club and Glenmore

$69,900

UNDER CONTRACT

Dan Corbin

434-531-6155

• Exciting Listing at Lake Monticello • 2688 sq ft, 4 bd, 3 ba, Cedar Cape • Floor to Ceiling Stone Fireplace, Open Loft • Updates include Hardwoods, Appliances and Paint • 1st & 2nd Level BRs, Ample Closets, Huge Master Suite • Wonderful Home for Family and Entertaining • MLS 623551

Piney Mountain Subdivision, Palmyra

10+ acre Lots

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • Marshall Manor Community - very private & NO HOA dues • Minutes to UVA & Downtown Cville • Elevated on almost 5 Acres • Multi-Level Main Home with 5 BR & 3 Full BA • Updated Kitchen & Baths, Hardwood Flooring • Det. Cottage w/1.5 Baths, Large BR & Flex Office/BR • Private Wooded Views adj. to UVA Preservation Land • MLS # 623721

$340,030

14 ELM CT/TROY

Pat Burns

434-465-4444

• Sitting amidst estates and horse properties this beautiful 5 acre lot in Keswick area for sale to build your dream home. Convenient to Charlottesville, Gordonsville. $69,900.

FLATTOP MTN RD

$700,000

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

4 LOTS REMAIN

Dan Corbin 434-531-6155 • Gorgeous NEW 10+ Acre Homesites • No HOA, Common Sense C&Rs, Firefly • Close to the Lake, Dining, Shopping, Schools • Ready to Build? Be In Your New Home Summer 2022 • Your Choice of Remaining 4 Lots - $109,000 • Call for A Personal Tour - MLS 602021

434.985.0021 410 West Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22902 Downtown

Lori Click

434-326-7593

• To Be Built! The Brookwood, Similar to Photo! • 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Attached Garage, 1.66 Acres • Upgraded Siding Accent, Wide Window Trim, 10’x16’ Rear Deck • Master Suite with Garden Tub, Double Bowl Vanity • Kitchen with Granite Countertops, Stainless Appliances • Luxury Vinyl Plank Floors, Forest View s/d offer DSL, Fiber Optic

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • Live year round comfortably • Retreat style custom home • Hi speed century link internet • Double lot & never ending spring • 3 bedrooms 2.5 baths • Wrap around deck

434.974.1500 943 Glenwood Station Ln Suite 203 Charlottesville VA 22901


37

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

OLD TRAIL DRIVE

mountain views from the back deck. $430,000

REDBUD LANE

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville.

Highly desirable end unit townhouse in Old Trail. Immaculate condition. 3 bedrooms, 3 1/2 bathrooms and a large 2 car garage. Beautiful upgrades in the kitchen. Morning sun and

JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

Annie Gould Gallery

UNDER CONTRACT

Unique, contemporary tri-level home. Set on 2 acres with beautiful trees and mature landscaping. Home features; 3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, dining room, 3 Trex decks, paved driveway and a 500 sq. ft. carport. No HOA!

109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

Semi-Custom Detached Villa Homes Surrounding ainBelvedere Pocket Park! From $559,900 Tour our Newest Model Homes and Old Trail Village Tour Tour our our Newest Newest Model Model Homes Homes inin Belvedere Belvedere and and Old Old Trail Trail Village Village Be One of the First to Pick Your Homesite!

Currituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Belvedere Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 Currituck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 OPEN DAILY 12-5 Villa Model in |Old Trail Village | 406 Astel Crozet, 22932 Villa Model Villa Model in Old in434-987-6522 Trail Old Village Trail Village | 406 |Astel 406 Astel St, St, Crozet, St, Crozet, VAVA 22932 VA 22932 NorthPointe@craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com/northpointe MODEL HOMES OPEN DAILY | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com MODEL MODEL HOMES HOMES OPEN OPEN DAILY DAILY 12-512-5 | 12-5 434-973-3362 | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com

Conceptual images shown. Pricing and design subject to change

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Sales Center Now Open on-site off Rt 29 North!


FEATURE

JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

38

Find Your Vision and Your Dream in Your

Country Home

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

BY CARLA HUCKABEE

THEY PULLED UP IN THEIR AIRSTREAM from Georgia determined to stay until they found the perfect place for a new home. They thought about Richmond, then decided they wanted something less urban with a few acres. After weeks of searching, they found a five-acre lot in the Keswick area that matched their vision and moved in right before Christmas. The Airstream couple is not alone. The drive to rural areas is getting shorter and shorter with fewer barriers for people who always dreamt of owning a country home. It’s easy to point the finger at COVID for the surge in interest in country living. Or give all the credit to permission to work from home. Other factors coming into play are people with cash seeking a larger return or wanting to diversify out of the stock market. Or they just want to have a little more flexibility than they do in urban areas. It’s all those things and more. Whatever the reasons, people are still moving to the country faster than the market can keep up.

COVID a Major Driver At the onset of the pandemic, people exited cities in large numbers. Some left because the economic shutdowns took away most of the reasons they were living in town. Others wanted to put a little room between them and their neighbor to minimize exposure. While the mass migration has slowed significantly, country living is still drawing significant numbers of movers. “When office workers originally were sent home to work in March of 2020, nobody anticipated that we’d still have significant numbers working from home nearly two years later,” says Pam Dent, REALTOR® with Gayle Harvey Real Estate, Inc. “During this past year, it’s become apparent that some people don’t have to go back to the office five days a week, or even at all. And that group is reevaluating where they live. If they always dreamed of owning a country home, there is no better time to make the move.” Folks who bought second homes as a weekend escape during 2020 and early

2021 are beginning to look at those assets in a different light. Stephanie Woolfolk, REALTOR® with RE/MAX Realty Specialists, says, “Whether homeowners bought to have an escape from urban areas or as an investment, as the pandemic wore on they started to see the appeal of spending more and more time at their second home. That is certainly made easier as employers continue to offer options for employees to work from home.”

Real Estate Investment They had $400,000 sitting in the bank earning next to nothing. Leery of putting more money in the stock market, they started shopping around for real estate. Luckily, their Washington DC location put Louisa County within striking distance. And there, they found the perfect home, paid cash for it, and now spend more time there than in their primary home. These aren’t the only people Sharon Merrick, REALTOR® with Howard Hanna Roy Wheeler Realty Co., sees eyeing rural

properties for their next real estate investment. “Often we see potential buyers from the city looking for a second home and the opportunity for someone else to pay their mortgage through Airbnb. And it doesn’t always work out.” She was working with a client from California who owned a string of shortterm rental properties in the San Francisco area and several western states. He wanted to branch out into the Central Virginia market and had his sights set on a property in rural Albemarle County. Fortunately, Merrick was aware of his goals for the property and was able to advise him of the restrictions around operating short-term rentals in Albemarle County before he made the purchase. “It’s critical that both the buyer and their REALTOR® have a clear picture of how this property is going to be used and what the goals are, particularly for a buyer from out of the area who might not be aware of local restrictions. Even local buyers aren’t always informed of regulations that impact the potential use of a property they want to buy.”


39

JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

FEATURE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM


FEATURE

JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

40

Dent recently assisted someone from out of state wanting to buy a tree farm. Although that’s not a common buyer profile, it was Dent’s understanding of the critical nature of water, soil quality, and other landscape features in that kind of operation that led to a successful purchase. Whatever the goals might be, having the guidance of a knowledgeable REALTOR® is crucial for a rewarding real estate investment.

Affordable and Transformative Buyers shopping for country homes often are looking either for a change in their lifestyle or for affordability. It’s no secret that the Charlottesville real estate market drives many homebuyers further out to find a home they can afford. Rural Albemarle and all the adjacent counties are seeing interest from this Charlottesville-centric market effect. Woolfolk says, “Sometimes it’s the combination of affordability and lifestyle changes that puts these rural counties on a buyer’s radar. If you compare Louisa County to the Charlottesville area, Louisa is much more affordable. And you get more bang for your buck. “Comparing what $300,000 will buy in Charlottesville versus Louisa is like night and day. And on top of the reduced purchase price, you benefit from the ongoing cost savings in property taxes. All that comes with more space, a garage, and a yard for the kids to play. It’s easy to see why buyers are flocking to country homes.” Merrick is seeing the same dynamic with her clients moving from urban to rural areas for that lifestyle change. “I have buyers from DC, Maryland, and Northern Virginia who want to transform their lives. They want to trade in all the urban busyness, the commute, the chaos and adopt a calmer lifestyle closer to nature. COVID forced a lot of people outside and they realized they enjoy those outdoor activities and want to make them part of their everyday lives. “Many people are just looking for a little more space. Room enough to have a garden and not feel like neighbors are sitting on top of them. And views. Our rural counties in Central Virginia come with some of the best views. For someone moving from the city, it can seem like a dream when their dollars go further, their lifestyle is transformed, and they get these great views of the Blue Ridge Mountains or rolling hills and streams.”

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

But Can I Download? Sometimes, what is not there becomes the barrier to buying that otherwise dream rural property. Merrick says, “Buyers can sometimes be clueless about what’s not available. They didn’t even consider that internet service might not be available or as speedy as they are accustomed to. A client from Philadelphia who wanted to relocate to this rural property had to step back and re-evaluate once he realized he couldn’t get a fiber-optic connection and a download speed of 1,000 megabits per second. “That’s not an uncommon scenario. I was assisting a physician from Maryland relocating to Augusta County. He needed a powerful home connection to be able to

read radiology and other imaging files. Because of that, he was extremely limited as to where he could buy a home in a rural setting and still have the internet speeds needed.” But hang on, that’s all about to change. New grants of $2 billion will establish universal broadband throughout many underserved rural counties in Central Virginia. The Thomas Jefferson Planning District is partnering with Firefly Fiber Broadband to target Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, and other counties. This infusion of funds puts Virginia on track to be one of the first states to have nearly universal broadband. Dent expects this to make a real difference. “People who want to move here now, have to be very selective about how rural they really can be. This Firefly Fiber Broadband project is going to open up all these rural properties that people just can’t consider now, especially if they are working from home or operating a business. There is a lot of interest from people out of state and once the broadband is in place, I think we’ll see much of that pent-up demand turn into purchases.” While the expansion won’t happen overnight, the timeline is short. The entire construction project involves laying 4,000 miles of fiber and will take approximately three years to complete. Some areas will come online sooner than others. You can keep up to date on Firefly’s Regional Internet Service Expansion Project’s progress at www. fireflyva.com/rise. Greene County, for instance, is expected to be fully covered by 2024. So, 2022 might be the ideal window in which to buy a few acres in the country. You’ll be a bit ahead of the curve, buying while views of the Blue Ridge or the South River are still available. Because it won’t be too long before the folks from Philadelphia, Northern Virginia, and other urban centers realize they no longer have to choose

between internet access and all that rural Central Virginia has to offer. Aside from internet access, Woolfolk cautions new country dwellers not to romanticize rural life. If you’re accustomed to having Grit Coffee within walking distance for your morning joe and Marie Bette nearby for that irresistible pastry, the move can be an adjustment. “Living in the country can take some getting used to, not having everything within an easy walk or short drive. And larger lots mean more time and money spent on maintenance to care for the property. “If you are currently able to work from home due to COVID, what is the plan if you are called back to the office, even if it’s only two or three days a week? Are you prepared to make the commute from your new rural home? Or is there a plan B?”

Market Balancing? Like the rest of the real estate market in Central Virginia, country homes and lots for sale are in short supply. Dent says, “There are not nearly enough rural properties on the market to meet the demand. I know some sellers wait until after the holidays to list their homes, so we should be seeing a bit of a bounce now and over the next couple of months. Will it be enough to satisfy demand? Probably not, but any listings help buyers at this point.” Home prices continue to rise at double-digit rates while days on market continue to fall in almost every rural county in Central Virginia. Merrick advises “Buyers need to be prepared to act quickly when a property becomes available that fits their wish list or even comes close. “Everyone has a vision and a dream. And in most cases, they are looking for the perfect setting for the perfect home.” In this market, something even close to your dream might be good enough. Carla Huckabee writes about high-performing real estate.

Buyers shopping for country homes often are looking either for a change in their lifestyle or for affordability. It’s no secret that the Charlottesville real estate market drives many homebuyers further out to find a home they can afford.


BEST WISHES FOR 2022! Price Drop!

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Text 2022 to 434-337-3216

Find Homes REALTORS® are licensed to sell real estate in the Commonwealth of VA. Find Homes Realty Brokerage Lic # 0226033659. 145 Ednam Dr # 311, Boar’s Head Professional Ctr, Charlottesville VA 22903. 434-218-0221. Locally owned and operated. Fair Housing Compliant. If you have a relationship with another Realtor, this isn’t a solicitation.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

If you’re looking to buy or sell property, contact us today!

FEATURE

GE T YO UR HO M E SO LD HE RE !

Best of Cville Real Estate Agents in 2016 & 2017!

Sunday 1-3 pm 2808 Magnolia Dr

Peace & tranquility less than 15 minutes from Downtown! Enjoy this wonderful house on over an acre with beautiful mature trees. $469,900

434.305.0361 HONORABLE MENTION

in 6 days! Under Contract

Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhouse w/mountain views! Open floorplan, perfect for entertaining with private patio. $365,000

Buyers BUYERS & Sellers!

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Open House

JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

THANK YOU FOR A SUCCESSFUL 2021!

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JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers ROUND HILL

WOODFIELD

Rare opportunity to purchase an architecturallydesigned, gracious 3,530 square foot residence with 4 bedrooms and 3 baths on a secluded 4.59 acres in the heart of Garth and Owensville Road yet close to all Charlottesville/UVA amenities. MLS#623814 $949,000 Robert Mellen, 434.996.7386

GREENFIELDS FARM

Impressive 763-acre country estate approximately 25 miles south of Charlottesville. The property showcases a stately southern residence, built circa 1904, extensive equestrian facilities, recreation opportunities, creeks and a pond. MLS#623792 $6,295,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MOORELAND

Classic Virginia brick home, circa 1855, on 22 acres, just seven miles south of Charlottesville. Property includes a cottage, outbuildings, shared ownership in a beautiful pond. Lovely mature landscaping and mountain views. $985,000 MLS#624421 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.moorelandva.com

Magnificent panoramic views of the Blue Ridge Mountains and scenic Rivanna Reservoir frontage is offered from this spectacular 120-acre Albemarle County estate. Features a 5 BR manor home with wonderful indoor and outdoor spaces, 1 BR/1 BA caretaker’s quarters over 2 -bay garage, pool, barns, and 2 greenhouses. Land is gently rolling with approximately 85 acres of open lawn, fields, and pasture, about 35 acres of mature forests, pond, and several creeks. Excellent location close to Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport and the city limits! MLS#625402 $5,450,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

THE GLEASON

Open, extremely spacious floor plan with 4 bedrooms and 4.5 baths. Enjoy expansive mountain and city views from inside or from one of 2 balconies. Secure garage parking. Ting Available. Walk to dining, shopping, and entertainment! MLS#621646 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434. 981.1863

RAGGED MOUNTAIN FARM

Two wonderful estate parcels comprised of 185.01± acres in coveted Ragged Mountain Farm. Excellent elevated building site, complete privacy, and beautiful views. Murray/Henley/Western school district. MLS#621083 $1,895,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

GALLISON HALL

Set on 43 park-like acres, this Farmington gem features a 1931-33 Georgian house, indoor pool and tennis facilities, spectacular Blue Ridge views, total privacy, and an exceptional close-to-town location. On historic registers. MLS#617686 $8,450,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BLENHEIM ROAD

Newly renovated and move-in ready country home with 4 bedrooms and 2 baths on 5+ acres in a private, peaceful and relaxing setting just 20 miles from Charlottesville, and a quick 5 miles from the Town of Scottsville. MLS#625017 $399,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

GREY OAKS

Spectacular country estate offering complete privacy and total serenity from over 53 acres in Free Union with Blue Ridge views. The heart of the property showcases a stunning customdesigned residence with 6 BR, 6.5 BA, spacious chef ’s kitchen, lovely DR and breakfast room, cozy paneled den, and great room with soaring exposed-beam ceiling and FP. Property is fenced with 3-board fencing and a 1,800 sf barn. Located approximately 15 miles NW of UVA and Downtown Charlottesville. MLS#617485 $4,165,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farm house (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


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BLANDEMAR FARM ESTATES

25.4 acres with varying topography and amazing rock outcroppings. Unique design opportunities to create a stunning residence with magnificent views. Convenient to Charlottesville and the University of Virginia. Fiber optic available. MLS#593358 $554,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

RAGGED MOUNTAIN

4.32 acres, half open, with gently rolling, cleared homesite on a high plateau with lovely pastoral and mountain views. Situated in Ivy Valley, just off I-64 west of Charlottesville, less than 10 miles to the University of Virginia. MLS#622663 $465,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

EMERALD RIDGE

Spectacular 22-acre lot in Western Albemarle! Wooded, wonderfully private and offers the ideal location for an elevated building site with the potential for big year-round views. Western schools! MLS#621504 $295,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

SIMMONS GAP/ ESTES RIDGE

10 acres of mature woods. Property has long road frontage and consists of two parcels being combined and sold as one. No homeowners association! Design and build your dream residence on this very wellpriced parcel. MLS#621178 $189,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

MADISON

Over 560 acres of wooded land on Thoroughfare Mountain in Madison County. Three contiguous parcels, completely private, with endless possibilities. Hunt, ride ATVs, camp, build a weekend retreat or a permanent residence in total serenity. MLS#621697 $2,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

RIVER LAWN

Delightful combination of wood and pastureland with a spectacular bluff for a building site overlooking the James River in southern Albemarle County. Property is under easement with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. MLS#569753 $745,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MISSION HOME ROAD

146.88 ac. in Albemarle & Greene County. Privacy & protection adjacent to the Shenandoah National Park! Full division rights & multiple home sites. Extraordinary timberland. Views of the mountains, along with easy access to trails & Skyline Drive. MLS#620276 $1,200,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

WESLEY CHAPEL ROAD

Nice, mostly wooded residential building lot in Meriwether Lewis School District! Great privacy, 1.72± acres, beautiful rural setting in an area of large farm and estate properties. Located approximately 15 miles NW of Charlottesville. MLS#613685 $125,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BELLAIR

Rare opportunity to purchase a building lot of just under 1 acre in sought-after Bellair. Lush, mature landscaping, partly wooded, stream/creek. Minutes from UVA, shopping, dining, and entertainment. Western Albemarle school district. MLS#614627 $375,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FRAYS MILL

Mostly wooded preservation tract of 81.395 acres next to Frays Mill Subdivision in highly desirable northern Albemarle. This beautiful gently rolling land has a great, private homesite with Blue Ridge Mt. views, and creek on property. MLS#608509 $995,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

MEADOWBROOK HILLS

Lovely 3-bedrooms, 3-baths, circa 1958 brick home located in one of the City’s most desirable neighborhoods- convenient to all that Charlottesville has to offer! Walkable to Barracks Road & UVA, and just a short drive from Downtown. MLS#622783 $598,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

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Call whit douglas to see how you can take advantage of today’s market!

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JUMBO LOANS UP TO $10M ONE-TIME AND TWO-TIME CLOSE CONSTRUCTION LOANS UP TO $3M Loring Woodriff Loring Woodriff Real Estate Associates “Without reservation, I recommend Whit Douglas for your residential lending needs. “

Whit Douglas SENIOR LOAN OFFICER NMLS #203861

434-227-5101 Office 434-242-6964 Cell 434-566-0479 Fax wdouglas@fhmtg.com www.fhmtg.com/wdouglas

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

First Heritage Mortgage 675 Peter Jefferson Pkwy, Ste. 180 Charlottesville, VA 22911 Branch NMLS #1070047 Corporate NMLS #86548 www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org

Apply Online at www.fhmtg.com/wdouglas

This information is an advertisement and not a guarantee of lending. Programs, rate terms and conditions subject to change without notice. Terms and conditions apply

Karen Ball Nest Realty “Whit Douglas quickly became one of my go-to local lenders based on many positive experiences over the years.”


45 JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

WINTERGREEN

C U O N N D T E R R AC T

This exceptional 15,000sf custom home created with exquisite craftsman-ship and luxurious attention to detail, sits in the Blue Ridge Mountains near Wintergreen. Built by Robb Construction, the floor plan is open and perfect for entertaining. Eucalyptus flooring leads you past mahogany doors and foyer to the dining room with a wagon wheel ceiling and alabaster and bronze chandelier. The great room is stunning with a 19’ barrel ceiling and two-story Rumford stone fireplace. The gourmet kitchen with wet bar, custom copper vessel sink from Italy, and butler’s pantry will delight you. Floor-to-ceiling mahogany creates warmth and elegance in the study. A sitting area and fireplace compliment the owner’s suite, and a fireplace near the bath invites relaxation. Located on the first floor, you also find a pool, sauna, and gym. A media and billiard room are located on the second level with three additional bedrooms. Wine cellar, banquet room with full bar, and apartment are on the terrace level. Entertaining continues outdoors with fire pit and grill on the upper patio and fireplace on the lower patio. For the most discerning buyer, Cardinal Rest is the perfect mountain retreat, or year-round primary residence. MLS 622288 $2,292,500

BROOK HOLLOW, KESWICK

Exceptional details describe this custom-built, builder home. From the mahogany floors, the 60X96 kitchen island, exquisite moldings, spa-like primary suite to the private, park-like 10 acres. The floor plan is an entertainer’s dream, or, the perfect family home with an attached apartment. The apartment offers a spacious office/ game room, family room, one bedroom, one full bath, one half bath, kitchen and laundry. Sit on the beautiful gazebo overlooking your fenced, level yard including a 475’ zip line! Hardware River frontage for the water enthusiasts. Unfinished, walkout terrace level, detached 3-bay shop plus equipment run-in shed and gated entry. Geothermal heating and cooling and 75-year roof is just the start of a long list of impressive details featured in this home. MLS 622132 $1,695,000

Comfortable and manageable Keswick estate of 38 acres. Three separate parcels, English cottage style main residence with 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, attached 2-car garage, home office, separate guest cottage, 6 stall shed row barn and separate storage building. Spectacular setting, well back from the road, opposite Castle Hill and adjoins Keswick Vineyards. Historic, spring and pond. Glorious westward mountain views and gated entry. MLS 614993 $1,475,000

Steve White (434) 242-8355 info@stevewhiterealtor.com

stevewhiterealtor.com 28 Years of Specializing in Buyer & Seller Representation for Residential, Farms & Estates

1100 Dryden Lane Charlottesville

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

SOUTHERN ALBEMARLE


JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

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Live It Up

HOME SALES STATS ENDING THE WEEK OF JANUARY 9, 2022 THERE WERE 64 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 20 were in Albemarle with an average price of $415,203 n 5 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $358,600 n 1 was in Fluvanna with a price of $370,000 n 6 were in Greene with an average price of $369,667 n 7 were in Louisa with an average price of $491,974 n 1 was in Madison with a price of $323,000 n 6 were in Nelson with an average price of $337,417 n 9 were in Orange with an average price of $359,216 n 4 were in Staunton with an average price of $243,750 n 3 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $211,300

HOMES SOLD

VOLUME 27, ISSUE 4

A Publication of The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS®

www.caar.com

774 Acre Recreational Paradise Miles of shoreline along a spectacular 50 acre man-made lake including dock and your own island. Extensive network of trails and streams plus an abundance of wildlife for the recreational enthusiasts to enjoy hiking, horses, hunting, fishing, atv’s and more. SEE AD ON PAGE 12 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Steve White

(434) 242-8355 • info@stevewhiterealtor.com stevewhiterealtor.com

Homes of Distinction in Central Virginia Look for our latest issue where you pick up C-VILLE Weekly

THE 5846 WESTHALL DRIVE WESTHALL

1521 BROAD AVENUE HIGHLAND PARK

473 REVA LANE STANARDSVILLE

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.996.4019

350 ASPEN HILL ROAD MINERAL

6964 ROCKFISH RIVER RD SCHUYLER

LOCAL GOVERNMENT CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com

106 BELL CREEK DRIVE STAUNTON

(Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY.

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®.

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered.

www.charlottesville.gov Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 ci.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.92 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

fluvannacounty.org Real estate tax rate: $.884 per $100

greenecountyva.gov Real estate tax rate: $.82 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.71 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

nelsoncounty-va.gov Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

ORANGE COUNTY

orangecountyva.gov Real estate tax rate: $.804 per $100

Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47

4704 Klockner Rd | Gordonsville Private home on 16+ acres This spacious custom home was designed for comfortable entertaining with the kitchen’s central location and breakfast bar. Large screened porch, family room with gas fireplace, formal dining, living room with electric fireplace and office space on main level with doors for privacy. 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths. Home has attached in-law suite (20x20) with kitchen and separate bathroom and separate entrance if needed. Close to the town of Gordonsville. Convienent to Charlottesville.

JANUARY 12 - 18, 2022 ISSUE 3102

YOUR PLACE. OUR PURPOSE.

$650,000 | montaguemiller.com/VALA2000888 Missy Garrison | 540.661.2353

Langdon Woods Dr | Albemarle Proposed custom home To-Be-Built by European Homes of Albemarle on this beautiful lot in a community of nature in northern Albemarle County. Superior quality with open floor plan and spacious owners suite.

$875,000 | anitadunbar-realtor.com/617300 Anita Dunbar | 434.981.1421

Lackey Ln | Covesville Exquisitely restored antique log cabin nestled into a private hillside. Authentic, tasteful & historically sensitive renovations create a magically unique retreat property. The c.1900 cabin has exposed log walls, hewn beams, stone foundation.

$325,000 | cartermontague.com/619303 Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

2033 Elm Tree Ct | Charlottesville Come see Mountain Views from the deck or the new pavers patio! This bright and spacious Riverwood townhome has high ceilings and open floorplan, 3 BRs, 2.5 BAs, and a one car garage with extra space in the driveway. Near NGIC.

$325,000 | montaguemiller.com/624935 Jessica Saadut | 434.981.9968

736 Westwood | Stanardsville

106 Yorktown Blvd | Locust Grove

One level Rancher with 3 bedrooms and 1 updated bath and a 18X8 deck for grilling and entertaining. Large Eat In Kitchen and Living Room. Detached 2 car garage with workshop with a pull down attic for more storage.

Immaculate 3 BR, 2 BA home with hardwood floors in living, dining, kitchen. Oak cabinets in kitchen, laundry & baths and cedar lined closets. “Premier” walk-in tub w/ jets in Main Bath. Pella lead glass entry door.

One owner, gorgeous, impeccably maintained home in Greene Mountain Lake. Every detail of this home has been thought of, from the inviting screen porch to the professionally installed natural stone patio & landscaping.

$315,000 | montaguemiller.com/VAOR2001526 Karen Morris | 540.717.2478

$349,000 | montaguemiller.com/VAGR2000001 Edwina Hubbard | 540.948.6655

$125,000 | montaguemiller.com/335819 Sue Harvey | 434.426.3755

Whether you're buying or selling a home, locally or globally, searching for investment opportunities or just have questions, we're here to help. At Montague, Miller & Co., we take pride in our ability to educate and guide our clients to successful outcomes through professionalism and honest counsel.

MONTAGUEMILLER.COM | 800.793.5393 | CHARLOTTESVILLE | AMHERST | MADISON | CULPEPER | ORANGE

Proudly serving Central Virginia’s real estate needs for over seventy years!

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

234 Shelter Ln | Amherst


434.977.4005 lwoodriff@loringwoodriff.com

401 Park Street Charlottesville, VA 22902

A Selection of Distinctive 2021 Sales in the City REPRESENTED SELLER

REPRESENTED BUYER & SELLER

2033 HESSIAN ROAD Meadowbrook Hills

REPRESENTED SELLERS

425 NE 2nd Street North Downtown

550 WATER STREET Off the Downtown Mall

REPRESENTED SELLER

REPRESENTED SELLER

1835 UNIVERSITY CIRCLE Near the University

REPRESENTED BUYER & SELLER

526 N 1st Street HOLSINGER PENTHOUSE

North Downtown

On the Downtown Mall

WWW.LORINGWOODRIFF.COM


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