Issuu on Google+

OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

1A

Board of Directors of COOCVE Meets THIRD TUESDAY of the Month at 9:30 a.m. in the Party Room Official Monthly News/Magazine of the Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida

OCTOBER 2008

SECTION A, 48 PAGES

VOLUME 32, NUMBER 1

BIDEN HOLDS TOWN HALL MEETING AT CVE By: JUDY OLMSTEAD

On Tuesday, September 2, 2008, Senator Joe Biden, Democratic nominee for Vice President of the United States of America, spoke in the party room of our Clubhouse before a standing room crowd of over 800 residents and guests. An overflow crowd of more than 100 also watched the proceedings on closed circuit TV in the theater. Senator Biden stopped in the theater of the Clubhouse to greet those people before his appearance in the party room. Senator Biden’s town hall meeting was

simultaneously shown on CSpan and in full, or in part, on other television stations across the country. This meeting came together through the hard work of the Recreation Committee, Eva Rachesky from DRF, Inc. and Angel Torres, from United Security. Nancy Giordano, acting chair of the Recreation Committee was contacted by Kathy Richards on Saturday, conferred with her committee and all agreed that this would be a great event for the Village to host. Nancy, Donna Dowling,

and Danielle Lobono, from Recreation, Eva and Angel, along with Harvey Lebowitz, also from United Security, all worked hard with the Obama/ Biden campaign team to coordinate the event and to disseminate the information as best they could on such short notice to the residents. Bernie Parness, President of the Democratic Club, announced the event at the Club’s Labor Day picnic and distributed tickets to residents and guests on Sunday and Monday. They are all to be congratulated on

putting together such a successful event, especially since they only had the holiday weekend to prepare for it. Although the Party Room in the Clubhouse could not hold all of the people who wanted to see the Senator, the Obama team chose the Party Room over the theater. This may have been because it enabled Senator Biden to be surrounded by the audience, rather than speaking down to them from the stage or from the front of the theater. The Senator fielded ques-

tions from the audience which were not pre-selected or prescreened. His team had also requested that we close off the athletic area of the Clubhouse for the Senator so that he could work out and shower after the town hall meeting. Regardless of party affiliation, it was an honor to have a candidate for Vice President request the opportunity to address our residents and showcase Century Village East, Deerfield Beach as one of the settings for a town hall meeting.

dynamics of the transition to take place January 1, 2009. Mark stated that much of the

groundwork is currently in motion and expects a smooth

First Presidents Club Meeting, Very Digestible By STEVEN H. FINE, Editor-in-Chief Despite some confusion signing in attendee’s, the first Presidents Club Meeting was an event considered by most very productive. The meeting IN THIS ISSUE: starts on 3A Board of Directors ..................... starts on Village Minutes........................... 4A Mayors Message........................ 6A starts on Letters to the Editor.................... 6A starts on 16A Condo News.............................. News & Views............................ 17A starts on Consumer Interest...................... 26A Political Scene............................ 34A Our Commissioner...................... 34A starts on 36A Remembering the Past.............. Sounding Board ......................... 41A starts on Up Front/Personal...................... 42A Fiction ........................................ 45A Health Matters............................ 3B starts on Observations............................... 12B starts on You Should Know........................ 17B starts on Arts/Entertainment...................... 23B

Photos by JULES KESSELMAN

was sponsored by the law offices of Mark Bogen, Seacrest Services, National Group and Insurance Loss Advocates. The goal of the president’s club is to provide information, education and access to the decision makers that affect the community. The festivities began with a delicious box lunch for all. A choice of corned beef or turkey sandwiches was the fare du-jour. After lunch the meeting began. COOCVE President, Ira Grossman was the first to speak. Ira complimented the efforts of the many volunteers who gave much of their

time to help sort out the whereabouts of the insurance money that was owed to the buildings and the role Mark Bogen and his law team played in helping to facilitate the recovery effort. Attorney Bogen then delivered his legal report. Mark discussed the obstacles he had to overcome to reach the point we are currently at with much help from Senator Ted Deutch. Senator Deutch was on hand to discuss the vital role he played negotiating with FIGA. Seacrest Services president, Mark Wade discussed the

Welcome Back Seasonal Residents!

See PRESIDENTS, pg 3A

FREE BAR CODES FOR WEATHERED STICKERS NOW AVAILABLE


PAGE

2A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

COOCVE Board of Directors Meeting September 16, 2008 President Ira Grossman called the meeting to order at approximately 9:35 a.m. After the Pledge of Allegiance and Minute of Silence, Sergeant-of-Arms Arthur Dove announced that there were 141 directors in attendance, not enough to constitute a quorum for official business. President Grossman directed the directors’ attention to a sign-up sheet for the Nominating Committee, to recommend candidates for office, which cannot be anyone running for an office himself. President Grossman asked 2nd Vice President Steve Fine to read a letter from Roslyn Nehls, who has taken on her own initiative to find bus service for the handicapped in our Village, to ease their situation once the five routes now coming into the Village, cease to do so as of January 11, 2009, as announced by Broward County. After the letter was read aloud, the Chair invited Roslyn to address the assembly. Roslyn explained that handicapped transportation service is available from the TOPS program (Transportation Options) of Broward County, under the provisions of the Americans with Disability Act (ADA).

She invited directors to come after the meeting to get materials to enroll riders for this program. Next, Ira gave the floor to Broward County Sheriff Al Lamberti, who along with a number of deputies made themselves available after the meeting to answer some of the residents concerns. Sheriff Lamberti announced that his office will be sending a “Shreddathon” truck to the Village on November 1, 2008 (Saturday), from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., for residents to bring all our dated papers with confidential info for shredding. It is a free service with no limitations. Phil Russo of Durham H told the Sheriff that it has become almost impossible to exit the East Gate during the construction work on Hillsboro Blvd., due to traffic backed up on Military Trail from the detour to 95. Sheriff Lamberti said “we’ll take care of it” right away. After several other questions and responses, the Sheriff concluded his presentation. Next, Steve Fine read COOCVE’s letter of termination to Century Maintenance & Management, dated August 19, 2008, drafted by our counsel Mark Bogen, and sent

by various delivery methods to ensure confirmed receipt before the Sept. 30th notice deadline. After the reading of the letter, a number of Directors asked questions about the transition from Century M&M to Seacrest. Several directors noted that their associations maintain reserve accounts with Century M&M, which counsel Bogen encouraged them to get released back to their buildings as soon as possible. Mark Bogen announced that there is a “big problem” with Century M&M, as many sprinklers are inoperable and have been that way for years. Bogen said he has threatened Century M&M with legal action about this problem. Andy Miller of Upminster H said that the grass around his building is so over-grown and decaying, that he called Ken Brown, the President of Century M&M. Andy reported that Master Management had told him to stop watering there. Charlie Parness President of Master Management acknowledged he had asked Century M&M to give priority in allocating their workers to assist Master Management in testing and locating the 2,400

sprinkler valves throughout the Village, many of which have been sunk into the ground, or are not where they are supposed to be according to the plans. Several directors complained about taking away resources from regular watering and grooming of our landscape. Counsel Bogen opined that Master Management cannot interfere with the contract between COOCVE and Century M&M on behalf of the Associations. Donna Capobianco, an ex-President and current Board member of Master Management, said that the Board was not aware of this redeployment by Century M&M, and asked the other Board members of Master Management to stay after the meeting to meet to discuss this matter on an urgent basis. At this point, Basil Hales of Tilford S, spoke from the floor about the increasing number of delinquencies in condo payments by unit owners, stressing that we need to get more financial information about prospective buyers. President Grossman said that the problem is the push by brokers to make sales, no matter the consequence to the Village afterwards, and cited a case where a broker living in the Village tried to sell a unit to someone well under the 55 year old minimum. Ira urged directors to be vigilant to keep our community’s 55+

CVE REPORTER

Presidents

PAGE

continued from pg 1A

transition. Several concerns of the presidents were fielded by Mr. Wade who then continued to answer many of the questions after the meeting ended. Other speakers included Teresa McCoy representing National Group and Rich Michelson of Insurance Loss Advocates. Jim Hammon presented an insurance report and Donna Capobianco discussed Master Management’s status with Broward County Transportation (BCT). The meeting concluded with a raffle. After the meeting concluded some of the sponsors stayed around to answer the many concerns of the building presidents on an individual basis. The future looks very hopeful for Century Village East. Ira said, “We are moving in the right direction.” Kudos to Mark Bogen for ochestrating the first of hopefully many such meetings. Mark was personally responsible for saving CVE millions of unaccounted dollars in over billing by Group One. Thank you Mr. Bogen. status and the quality of life that that affords us. Ken Barnett next gave the Treasurer’s Report. Ken noted that cash, the principal See COOCVE, pg 5A

Important Meetings - October and November 2008 OCTOBER 2008

Wednesday, October 8 9:30 AM Council of Area Chairmen Activity Center, Room B Tuesday, October 14 Recreation Committee

Monday, October 15 COOCVE Executive Committee Thursday, October 16 CVEMM Board of Directors Tuesday, October 21 COOCVE Board of Directors

9:30 AM Clubhouse Room A General Purpose Room 9:30 AM Activity Center Room A

9:30 AM Activity Center, Room A

9:30 AM Clubhouse Party Room

NOVEMBER 2008 Monday, November 10 COOCVE Executive Committee

9:30 AM Activity Center Room A

Tuesday, November 11 Recreation Committee

9:30 AM Clubhouse Room A General Purpose Room

Wednesday, November 12 Council of Area Chairman

9:30 AM Activity Center Room B

Thursday, November 13 CVEMM Board of Directors

9:30 AM Activity Center Room A

Tuesday, November 18 COOCVE Board of Directors

9:30 AM Clubhouse Party Room

The CVE Reporter Is Now Delivered Directly To All Buildings By Outside Pubs, Inc., On Monday Or Tuesday, Prior To The Second Friday Of Each Month. Copy Deadline For All OCTOBER 2008 Meeting Minutes, Due By October 27th. Meeting Minutes Must Adhere To Format As Outlined By The Reporter Board of Directors Resolution Of April 21,2008

3A


PAGE

4A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Village Minutes Council of Area Chairmen September 10, 2008 Chairman Joe Rubino call the meeting to order at 9:30a.m. Representing their areas were Joe Sachs, Nora Wolf, Carol Masciantonio, Norman Kaplan, Brenda Pomposello, Eleanor Wollman, Philip Norris, Tony Marino, John Caliendo, Rhonda Pitone, Jules Kesselman, Clarence Diggs, Jack Trobman, Jack Galit, Basil Hales, Sandy Knoller and Bruce Gursey. Also attending were James Quintano and Bill Dellinger of Century Maintenance and Management; Andy Miller and Steve

Fine of COOCVE and Nancy Giordano of the Recreation Committee. James Quintano announced the passing of Larry White who had been with CMM for many years. He will be remembered by residents for his work on pest control in the village. James also said there would be no irrigation except as requested for flowers while work is being done to locate all the irrigation valves for Master Management’s proposed update of the system. He also said spray-

ing for white flies had been completed along Hillsboro Boulevard and the next major area to be sprayed would be along SW 10th Street. As was determined at last month’s meeting, CMM is responsible for this spraying per Schedule A. If buildings require spraying for white flies they should contact CMM. Joe Rubino questioned the scheduled cutting of hedges and weeding around buildings. He pointed out that his and other buildings had a real scraggy look and several other chairs said they had the

Master Management Commentary By: CHARLES K PARNESS, President/ Master Management Irrigation I attended a meeting on Sept. 9th and advised both the Master Management Board members as well as our legal counsel of a serious problem. Our Director of Operations Bob Kratchoff and I attended a meeting earlier this week with Mike Perkins and Van of Irrigation Design Group and James Quintano and Remy of Century Maintenance. The Irrigation Design Group is the firm performing an evaluation of the existing system and to do the preliminary design of an automated system. The major problem that was uncovered was the incredibly poor condition of the irrigation system valves. To evaluate the system, the Irrigation Design Group had to have portions of the system turned on. This involved pumps and valves, which had to be turned on by Century Maintenance. Working from valve location charts, some valves were not where they had been reported, and some could not be found. Unfortunately, many of the valves were buried indicating that they had been inoperable for a long time. When they did find a valve (not always found), in some instances, the valves stems broke when they were turned on, further indications of a system that for some time has NOT been properly maintained by Century Maintenance. While the valve problem was reported in the Harwood section, Mr. Quintano stated that the problem was probably the same throughout the village. What exactly does this mean for your condo and this village? Just this - when Century Maintenance says they are watering, the actual amount of water your building receives is only a fraction of what you should be getting. They are watering at night. This means that in addition to the workable valves

that are not turned on because they miss them at night, we have a large number of unworkable valves. The valves are unworkable of course, because they were not properly maintained. Of course if they did find an unworkable valve, naturally they don’t do valve repair or replacement at night. All this notwithstanding, our lawns are green. This is the rainy season, and the green color means we are getting enough water with or without the relatively small amount from our irrigation system. One of the additional problems of having an irrigation system with many, many broken or lost valves is the ability for Irrigation Design Group to effectively evaluate our system. Part of their task is to find what works, and if possible, use a portion of it for the new automated system. The more we use, the less it will cost you and me and everyone else. Six months ago, Century Maintenance assured us that the system was in working order, which allowed us to contract with the Irrigation Design Group to evaluate our system. Considering that it was the rainy season, and that the effect on the grass of any additional water supplied by our irrigation system is questionable, I asked Century Maintenance to redeploy their men to work on locating and fixing or replacing these valves. This was to be for

only a few weeks and to accomplish two functions: first, to allow Irrigation Design Group to properly assess our system and second, find and repair the same valves which when we resume watering at each building, each building would get more water. This is an absolute necessity, especially when the rainy season ends. Unfortunately, upon hearing that the watering was being halted as inadequate, as it was due to night time operations and broken valves, some residents voiced some apprehension, and one even imagined his grass had turned brown. We have rescinded my request and are working on alternatives to get the job done. The Other Century Villages: Last month, I invited the leadership of the other Century Villages at Pembroke Pines, Boca and West Palm to a discussion meeting with some of the leadership from CVE. Our participants included Bill Morse - CVEMM Treasurer, Nancy Giordano - head of the Recreation Committee, Ira Grossman - COOCVE President, and COOCVE officers and aides - Jim Mc Clear, Andy Miller; and myself. The meeting took place on Sept. 18th in our conference room. The approximately twenty participants discussed many things including how each village was administratively structured (some have a single entity running their village while we have three); their club houses seating capacities, ticket sales and how to promote advance ticket sales; security; insurance; internal transportation; and code changes. There were as many similarities as there were differences. It was interesting to hear how each village handled some of their tasks. One participant made a suggestion which I liked, which was to form small

same problem. James said he would check into this. Bill Dellinger reported there were still 134 units delinquent in their building insurance payment and they were being handled by Master Management. He also pointed out the coupon delinquencies were at their highest for the year. These are difficult times for many owners but buildings must work on eliminating these delinquencies. After the CMM portion of the meeting, President of COOCVE, Ira Grossman introduced Anthony D’Amato and Toby Hebert of Seacrest Services. They advised they already have staff in training for the January 1 takeover of

our management and maintenance services. They also are in the process of locating an office in the area. There were a number of questions concerning the handling of coupons and building assessments. Seacrest said they would work with individual building associations to make a smooth transition. Building associations were schedule for several meeting in September with Seacrest to go over the necessary preparations for the changeover. The meeting adjourned at 10:45 Respectfully submitted by JOE RUBINO

groups to exchange information on specific topics. One of the other topics discussed at this meeting, were the new condo rules that will probably go into effect in January. Florida HB 601 is a complete re-write of 718.111(11) and includes some interesting changes. 1) The association will be required to insure A/C and compressors. 2) The association shall require each owner to provide evidence of the currently effective policy of hazard and liability insurance (condo or home-owners insurance)… Upon the failure of an owner to provide a certificate within 30 days, the association may purchase a policy of insurance on behalf of an owner. The cost may be collected in the manner of collection of assessments. 3) All reconstruction work after a casualty shall be undertaken by the association. A unit owner may repair only with written consent of the board and after method, qualifications, etc., was approved by the board. The owner shall get the permits. 4) Unit owners are responsible for the cost of reconstruction of the property for which the unit owner is required to carry casualty insurance. 5) Of course, if a unit owner has made improvements, an association is not obligated to pay. Sounds complicated? You are right, it is complicated. Towards the end of this year, we are planning community wide meetings to provide explanations of these rules by condo law experts and how it affects everyone. To improve our villages, the participants at this meeting agreed to keep in touch and continue to share information. Annual Open Meeting Have some thoughts or ideas on how we can improve our community. Come to our annual open meeting. The meeting is scheduled for

Thursday, December 18, 2008 at 9:30a.m. in the Party Room at the Clubhouse. Resident Communication As you should know, every Master Management meeting is open to the public. The meetings are held in Room A of the Activity Center (behind LeClub) at 9:30 a.m., on a Thursday, five days before the COOCVE Board of Directors’ meeting. In addition to letters mailed to us, and notes you can hand at the office desk, we provide residents the opportunity to address the board. Unfortunately, we usually have a crowded agenda, and with fifteen board members offering opinions and ideas, we sometimes run out of time. I have offered to stay after our regular meetings, with any board members who are able to do so, to hear residents present their problems or suggestions. You can now view our meetings on Channel 98.


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

5A

Village Minutes Board of Directors of Master Management September 11, 2008 Chairman, Charles Parness called the meeting to order at 9:30 am on Thursday, September 11, 2008. In attendance were Donna Dowling, Jules Kesselman, Jack Kornfield, Bill Morse, Charles Parness, Donna Capobianco, Anthony Falco, Mel Schmier and Susan Koser, via phone, Ira Somerset and Marilyn Lane Guests present were Robert Kratchoff, Director of Operations; Mark Bogen, Legal Counsel; and Ira Grossman, President of COOCVE After the Pledge of Allegiance and a moment of silence, a motion was made and passed to waive the reading of the August 14th meeting minutes. Treasurer’s Report - Bill Morse The CVE Master Management Financial Report prepared by Bill Morse was e-mailed to all Board members and discussed in detail. For the month of August, Net Income is $30,063, Total Income is $697,114 and Total Expenses is $667,050. For the YTD Jan-Aug Net Income is $217,531; Total Income is $5,615,547; and Total Expenses are $5,398,015. Total Assets are $2,207,661; Total Liabilities are 1,195,487 and Total Equity is $1,012,173. Net status of assessments receivable from monthly coupons is that there is now $93,982 in arrears coming from unit owners; Net status of prepaid assessments from coupons is $319,027 in prepayments from unit owners. A question was raised as

COOCVE

continued from pg 3A

component of our Balance Sheet, was $298,458 as of August 31, 2008. There were no material liabilities. Through the first eight months ending August 31, 2008, we collected $67,872 in dues from buildings, and recognized $3,910 in interest income, for total income of $71,782. Expenses through the first eight months were $67,188, including the $6,000 donated to charity earlier this year. Mark Bogen then gave the Attorney’s Report. He noted the action by the Ventnor B Association served on COOCVE. Mark also stipulated, that in the event of a legal conflict between Master Management on the one hand, and COOCVE or the building associations on the other, he would represent COOCVE and the buildings and recuse himself from his legal representation of Master Management. Mark also noted that he was hosting a lunch the following day for the Presidents

to the authorizing of cost of living increases as of January, 2008. The Board will look at past minutes to see if any increases were approved by the Board. There was a discussion on delinquencies on the payment of insurance coupons that were due on January 1st. The amount is approximately $85,000 and represents approximately 134 units. President’s Report Charles Parness Hurricane Preparedness Roads and security – If CVE loses all its electricity, a landline phone has been set up and the phone number given to all area chairs as well as Charles Parness’ cell number so that they can report any trees down, electrical wires and fences that are down. If there is no electricity at the Clubhouse all unassigned security will report to the MM office and the security guards will then be dispatched to the areas requiring assistance. The generator has been tested and is ready to be used. The mitigation efforts will be discussed at another meeting. Irrigation System – Mike Perkins has been here looking at all the systems. By doing this he is turning on the valves and finding that many of the valves are damaged. Century Maintenance is required to maintain irrigation systems and has not been maintaining the valves. Century Maintenance indicated that these problems were there for about 5 years.

Mark Bogen has suggested contacting Century Maintenance and either send a letter to them asking them to fix it; submit a claim against them and or withhold payment. After a thorough discussion, the Board agreed to have an executive meeting immediately following today’s meeting to discuss issues with Century Maintenance and other legal matters. Correspondence - Susan Koser Letter from Roslyn Nehls - regarding Trolley #157 and reinstallation of stop signs Letter from Alice Winepol - regarding maintenance of roadways Letter from Don Winstone regarding Comcast service Letter from Shelia LaBella - regarding irrigation system/ pump repairs

of most of the buildings. After the Attorney’s Report, several directors returned to the subject of obtaining financial and criminal background information on prospective condo buyers. One director noted that her building charges a $50 fee, paid either by the seller or the buyer, to cover the costs of the investigations. Donna Capobianco spoke next on behalf of Master Management’s Transportation Committee. She informed directors that after extensive research into how to replace the curtailed bus service by Broward County, the committee had determined that private companies offered the best mix of cost and convenience. We cannot obtain continued public service as before in the current budgetstrapped environment, as our routes show the lowest ridership. Donna noted that our top transportation priority is to the Deerfield Mall/Publix, which accounts for 90% of our ridership, and that there is a

big drop in usage for the next biggest destination, North Broward Medical Center. Our eventual solution will respond to our actual needs, and we have the budget to pay for it. Dan Glickman asked to add to Donna’s report, that there will be a public hearing on the bus service cutbacks, on September 23rd at 2 p.m., at the Broward County Government Center. Dan noted that although the County is required by law to publicize this meeting to affected citizens, it had not posted announcements on the buses themselves. In response to directors’ questions, Donna said that the City of Deerfield Beach does not have the money to subsidize bus service, and that the chances are “slim to none” that the Public Meeting will change the current plans to curtail bus service.

Committee Reports Transportation Committee - Donna Capobianco At 10:00am on September 23rd a public hearing will be held at the Broward Government Center on the BCT changes. Implementation date is scheduled for January 11th, 2009. Proposed BCT bus #48 will enter CVE – Hillsboro to Beach; Beach to 441. No stops inside shopping centers. Bus will be a pay as you go. Monthly passes for seniors/ disabled will be $23.00 - Oct 08. Oct 09 fare will be $26. Monthly regular fare will be $40.00 – Oct. 08. Oct 09 fare will be $52.00

Open-mike followed. Several directors noted nonworking lights in key locations by the Clubhouse or at entrances. Dan Glickman

Deerfield Community Buses are currently available. M-F 8-3:50 Express #1 Service to and from Focal Pt. Palm Apts., B’Nai Brith Apts, Winn Dixie, Sawgrass Promenade, Target, Albertsons, Deerfield Mall, Century Plaza Express #2 Service to and from Focal Pt. Palm Apts., B’Nai Brith Apts, Praxis Apts., Highland Gardens, North Broward Med Ctr., Fed Hwy Winn Dixie/Target, Hillsboro Square Publix, Cove, ML King Blvd, Focal Pt. The Committee is investigating why CVE is not part of the Deerfield Community Bus stop. Currently have three viable bidders for all routes – inside and out. We are hoping to get information to the board for discussion by next week. Community Partnership Program – A program to partner with local businesses to help defray the cost of private bus service – Conversations were had with the Deerfield Mall, Cornfeld Group and Colonial Properties. The businesses did not like the swipe card as it appeared to be too cumbersome. They are willing to explore options of a partnership program as it would help everyone. They stated once we know the cost variance, they would be willing to meet and discuss options. Management Replacement - Donna Capobianco Currently we have three bid categories; these categories were bid separately and priced separately. Business Management, Landscaping and Irrigation, Janitorial and Maintenance. Maintenance and Management expenses

are approximately $257,000 without a professional business manager and required administrative staff. Currently have two bidders – originally had six. Comparisons and data recommendation will be provided to the Board by the end of next week and a special Board meeting will be called to discuss both Management Replacement and Transportation bids. Director of Operations Report - Bob Kratchoff White Fly issue – is currently being addressed by Century Maintenance Service. Hillsboro Blvd. area and the Clubhouse have already been sprayed at no cost. The head supervisor in charge of spraying died last week and they are looking at hiring a new spray tech. Irrigation – About 25% of the valves located in Harwood were damaged. CM is making an attempt to repair the valves. Tilford Pool – Currently have three bids and will put a package together and present to the Board. Paving of P&Q – an RFP is being written by an engineering firm and will be brought to the Board by next week. Aquatic Systems – Bob has spoke with them and they have stopped spraying along the banks. Adjourn: A motion was made to adjourn at 11:00am. Respectfully submitted by DIANE DAVIS

announced that there will be a public hearing concerning S.W. 10th Street, to be held on October 16th at 9:30 a.m. in the Broward County Government Center, and gave a copy of the announcement to Steve

Fine for publication in the next issue of the CVE Reporter. There being no further business, the Meeting adjourned around 11 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Ken Barnett, Secretary


PAGE

6A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

The Mayor’s Message

By Al Capellini - Mayor/City of Deerfield Beach

Editor-in-Chief STEVEN H. FINE Assistant to the Editor Betty Schwartz Editorial Staff Seymour Blum Judy Olmstead Betty Schwartz Activities Editor Sandy Parness Production Norman Bloom Sid Goldstein Christie Voss Photo Journalists Sid Birns Jules Kesselman Al Miller Advertising Consultants Susan Dove Arlene Fine Estelle Sabsels

Office Staff Norman Bloom, Carol Carr, Susan Dove, Arlene Fine, Bea Litner, Sandy Parness, Toni Ponto, Betty Schwartz, Gert Schwartz, Estelle Sabsels, Sandy Schmier Staff Cartoonist Alan G. Rifkin Alvin Sherman 1913-2000

Art Director Christie Voss

Columnists and Regular Contributors Shelly Baskin, Harvey Beaber, Sid Birns, Evelyn Bloom, Norman L. Bloom, Sy Blum, Mayor Al Capellini, Mary Catherine Castro, Herb Charatz, Marion G. Cohen, Richard William Cooke, Senator Ted Deutch, Arlene Fine, Jack Galit, Max Garber, Commissioner Steve Gonot, Gilbert Gordon, Rolf Grayson, Broward Commissioner Kristin Jacobs, Harry L. Katz, Louis Kaufman, Jules Kesselman, Richard Koenig, Rosalind Lerman, Jess Levin, Dory Leviss, Bea Litner, Dr. Norma Locker, Rosalind Mandell, Pauline Mizrach, Judy Olmstead, Nelia Panza, Lori Parrish, Charles Parness, Phyllis Pistolis, Commissioner Marty Popelsky, Eva Rachesky, Gloria Shomer, Rosalyn Spitzer, Helene Wayne, Carl Weitz, Lucille Weitz, Jerry Wolf, Robert Winston, Janice Zamsky. Business Manager Steven H. Fine

Hello everyone! Our City Budget has been approved and we are going to have a small decrease and no increase to the fire assessment fee either. As mentioned before, my major concern is next year’s budget and some expected shortfalls. Please don’t misunderstand, this shortfall will be because revenues will be less than expected due to the current economy. So what are we going to do to make sure this is not a problem for you next year? We are going to be positive and proactive. First, I suggest no new automatic hires or replacement of employees unless the department has been evaluated by the City Manager. I have also directed the City Manager to review the need for all positions and to make sure we are balanced so current employees can be shifted around and equalize the work to the staff. Second, I believe we need to review the money we spend for events. Possibly reduce and eliminate some of the events next year. At

least until the economy gets better. We need to direct that money to more needy causes that help the people. We need to look at both outsourcing tasks and doing other work in-house. We must evaluate the cost savings of each. We cannot add people to do short term work when we can outsource. At the same time some work can be accomplished more efficiently by our own staff. It is a balance. Third, we will be more aggressive in seeking Federal and State funding. That means we don’t play partisan politics. We need money from both sides of the political aisle. In the past we have been very successful in Washington as well as Tallahassee. Fourth, I want to review all enterprise funds such

as garbage and water. As you know water rates were increased several months ago because of shortfalls and new improvements required. We cannot change those rates on a monthly basis because we have bond obligations and coverage requirements to meet. However, we can review the appropriateness of those rates next year and see if the revenue will increase or decrease and if sufficient coverage can be provided which may result in a reduction. This week we were notified that some funding from Florida Community Trust was earmarked for Deerfield Beach. We submitted several grants. One was to purchase the Melrose property along the pier. The other was to purchase the golf course property at Tam O’Shanter at Crystal Lake. Based on the results it appears almost impossible to purchase the golf course and somewhat possible with negotiations to get the Melrose property. The following table illustrates the results:

I want to thank County Commissioner Jacobs for her help with County money. She has always been there and helpful. At the last meeting the commission decided to go forward with the funding ($ 17 million) for the expansion of our water plant. This is a positive move and will secure

our future water supply needs and update our east water plant facility that is 48 years old. I know this a financially difficult time for many and I will do my best to keep cost down. I am looking into some relief to the County bus transportation. I will be working with Management, County,

State and City officials to resolve the issue to the best of my ability. I would like to have a meeting with some key individuals at Century Village. If you are interested please call City Hall 954-480-4263. God Bless you all and I will talk to you soon.

Circulation Proofreaders Outside Pubs., Inc. Sid Goldstein, Bea Litner Barbara Turner Betty Schwartz, Norman L. Bloom Seth Turner

The CENTURY VILLAGE EAST REPORTER is published monthly and distributed,without charge, to the residents of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida. It is published for the edification of said residents, and contains reports of the monthly meetings of the corporations, Board of Directors and its Committees, as well as news, bus and theater schedules, and contributed articles of current interest to the residents. The Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Inc. aka COOCVE,a not-for-profit corporation, its officers, directors, editors, staff, any committee people are not responsible for typographical errors or misrepresentations in any advertisements or article. They are not responsible and assume no liability for the content of, or any opinions expressed in, any contributed articles which represent the author’s own opinions and not necessarily the opinion of COOCVE. Acceptance of advertising for products or services in no way constitutes an official endorsement of the product. Residents are advised to check with the person they are hiring to be sure he is licensed and insured.

From the President By IRA GROSSMAN, President COOCVE The representatives from COOCVE all wish you and yours a very Happy New Year. We are looking forward to the return of the winter residents, and moving on with the business at hand. A luncheon was held in the Party Room for the Presidents, sponsored by Mark Bogen, Seacrest, and National Group. It was informative and provided options for all the issues that concerned the operation of the buildings. Seacrest will be in charge as of January 1st, 2009. They are presently having meetings with the buildings to discuss how the financial control will be handled. Be sure to read the contract in order to intelligently discuss legal ramifications. All applications can be picked up at the COOCVE Office if any board needs a copy. Applications for COOCVE

B officers 2009 are now available at the reception desk. Applications must be notarized and a biography detailing your experience should be attached. The newly formed Nominating Committee will contact you and arrange an interview date. Please make sure the paperwork is submitted by December 1, 2008. We anticipate many positive changes in the coming year. Get involved. Be a part of the growth and development of our wonderful village.

The Mail Bag

y far the most popular and widely read segment of our publication is the Letter-tothe Editor columns. We encourage letters that enable our readers to “sound off” on any subject. However, we will not print letters from the same person on the same subject in two consecutive issues. Also, letters must be from CVE residents, must be signed and, if possible type-written double-spaced. Please include your phone number. When we receive letters about applicable contracts, please remember the Reporter does not endorse any single company. Residents are free to make their own choices each year.

WE WILL MISS HIM To the Editor: On Tuesday. September 16, 2008, Harry Funt passed away at the age of 94. He enjoyed 33 years of living in the Village and was still going to the Clubhouse the week before his death. He will be missed by those of us who knew him. Harvey and Susan Lebowitz and Mark Scherer, Markham K

THANKS To The Editor: Thanks for online edition. I can now keep informed no matter where I am. Good presentation and easy access. Keep up the good work. I Arron Cambridge E Editor’s Note: We will always strive to improve the Reporter’s accessibility to the residents of Century Village.

IT’S FOR THE BIRDS To The Editor: Last month, Judy Olmstead, of the editorial staff of the Reporter, wrote under News & Views, an article attacking pet owners in our Village. Quoting Section 12.1 of the By-laws governing her Association, under the heading, BY-LAWS RELATION TO USE AND DECORUM RULES AND REGULATIONS…even if the pet is not a walking pet or animal, no See LETTERS, pg 15A


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

7A

Village Minutes COOCVE Recreation Committee September 9, 2008 COOCVE Recreation Committee Meeting, September 9, 2008; 9:30 a.m. In attendance were: Shelly Baskin, Donna Dowling, Nancy Giordano, Don Kaplan, Danielle Lobono, Bill Schmier and for DRF: Dan Cruz, Eva Rachesky and Monica Wells A motion was made and passed to waive the reading of the minutes from the August 12th meeting. Nancy Giordano began the meeting by reading correspondence received by the committee from various residents/building officers within the CVE community. There was a thank you and compliments directed toward the Recreation Committee and Cen-Deer Communities from residents of Oakridge V concerning the new pool furniture and refurbishments at the Lyndhurst South pool. An additional thank you with regard to the work that has begun on the Grantham pool came from Bill Goddard – Grantham Area Chair, Brenda Pomposello – CoChair and Fran Strickoff – Pool Chairperson. In addition they expressed concern about the condition of the two year old chairs allotted to the Grantham pool area, citing that they are extremely discolored. (Nancy advised that the chair issue would be addressed later in the meeting.) Nancy read a note that asked a question about signs that had been changed out in the handicapped parking behind the clubhouse. Eva responded that the signs that were removed stated “Van Parking Only” and had been replaced with “Van Accessible”. A brief discussion was brought up that saying “Van Only” denied parking for other handicapped persons and created issues concerning discrimination, ADA compliance and created liability concerns. Nancy said she wanted to extend a “Thank You” to Eva, Angel, and all who were involved for their efforts before and during Senator Biden’s appearance in the Village. Even though there was just 48 hours notice, the event went off smoothly and Recreation Committee members have been receiving a great deal of positive feedback from the residents. This was a very positive event for the entire community. Nancy then said that she wanted to address a misconception that has surfaced on various websites in the Village. She stated that at no time did the Recreation Committee make any decision to remove Jeff Chester as Chairman of the Recreation Committee. She said she is

very disappointed at the rumors. Any decisions that have been made have been as a group, Nancy stated that she has made no decisions on her own, and the only decisions that the Committee has made have been in an effort to make the community better, there is no “hidden agenda”. Nancy continued that her personal wish is for the Committee to give back to and do as good a job as possible for the community. Bill Schmier responded that he has seen some of the “stuff” on the internet. He stated that he wanted everyone to know that Nancy has done a superb job and did not ever make the sole decisions as decisions are made by the Committee as a whole. Bill added that “we all work together for the betterment of the community”. He concluded with the statement that the stories that have appeared on the internet are totally unwarranted and unfounded. Shelly Baskin stated that Jeff has done a wonderful job, but he is gone for at least 25% of the year and the Committee is moving along, getting a lot done and addressing problems as they come along. He also said he wanted to complement Nancy and the rest of the Committee for the job everyone has been doing. Nancy expressed her appreciation for their comments and remarked that the committee members are working well together and trying to get things done. She stated that “What you see is what you get”, there is nothing going on behind the scenes. She announced that the Committee is working on the budget for 2008/2009 and possibly the third week in September the Committee will be meeting to discuss and sign the budget. The meeting will be announced on Channel 99. Nancy asked if there were any Committee reports and Bill Schmier responded, reporting that he goes around with Eva and Tom from T&M on a regular basis to inspect the pool areas and anything that needs to be done is addressed. Don Kaplan reports that there has been great improvement in the work being done around the pools and even inside the pool itself. Nancy added that there is a new pool person who has been doing a wonderful job. Nancy announced that T&M is going ‘Green’ and has hired a person specializing in this field. He would be willing to go to Area Chair meetings or to individual building meetings to discuss with the residents how they can go ‘Green’. Nancy also advised

that there has been vandalism done to a sink in the bathroom at Berkshire pool (she held up a photo revealing the damage) and queried DRF regarding other incidents. Dan concurred that there had been several incidents – the sink was broken probably by a hammer or crowbar, a handicapped shower seat was pulled out of the concrete wall and a toilet bowl had been broken. Nancy requested residents to report if they see vandalism as these actions cost all residents money for repairs. DRF Reports: Monica Wells: Annual insurance renewal took effect in August 1, 2008. Historically a single master policy covered all four villages because a better price could be achieved this way. In the last several years – due to rising premiums and windstorm deductibles – it was decided to allow any village that wished to do so to pull out of the master policy and have their own ‘stand alone’ policy. This was with the understanding that they had to replace the master insurance with insurance of the same level of coverage. For the first time, effective with this new policy, the West Palm Beach Century Village has elected to pull out of the master program and has chosen to have a ‘stand alone’ policy. The three remaining villages have a single master policy. The policy covers casualty or property insurance, general liability, inland marine and an umbrella policy. Anon and Zurich had been our insurers but for the past several years Zurich has been difficult to deal with in regard to premiums and deductibles as last year the windstorm deductible was at 8%. This year we received quotes from three different companies: Aon & Zurich, Plastridge and Brown & Brown. The proposal from Aon & Zurich was slightly lower than last year but the windstorm deductible would be 10%. This would mean that the deductible could be in excess of two to three million dollars and none of the villages have a reserve that could cover that amount. The Plastridge proposal came in as an incomplete proposal because, although they had a proposal for all the other coverage, they were not able to come in with a quote on casualty/property insurance. This disqualified them for consideration. Brown & Brown presented a complete proposal and it is much better coverage than what we have had in the past. There will be a 5% windstorm deductible per building (as opposed to a deductible of 5% based on

the value of all buildings) and the windstorm deductible for the clubhouse will be $954,000 (as opposed to the 2.3 million dollars before). Also, the general liability will be one million dollars per occurrence as opposed to one million aggregate for all four villages. The umbrella policy coverage will be 25 million for each community. In the past it was 30 million spread over all the communities. Brown & Brown’s proposal offers much better coverage and at a slightly lower cost than we paid out in the past. Danielle asked Monica to inform the committee on the research she had done on Brown & Brown. Monica stated that she had researched them on the internet and various resources she had available to her. In addition, Aon informed her that they were an exceptional firm to work with and Aon could not come close to offering the package that Brown has presented to the Century Villages. Plus, the Pembroke Pines Century Village has done work with them in the past and was very impressed with the company. Don asked if a copy of the policy would be made available to the committee and could they pass it on to their attorney for review. Monica said she would provide a copy of the policy as soon as it arrives and although it is a ‘bound’ policy the committee may present it to any one they wish for review – attorney, insurance company, whatever. As there were no further questions she continued with her report. Hurricane Wilma claim – the committee gave approval for Monica to present a ‘partial proof of claim’ to Zurich and a check for $136,844 claim adjustment was received in mid-August. Additionally, a public adjustor – Rich Michelson – has reviewed the claim and believes there is a possibility for an additional $40,000 that could be recovered. Rich was sent to Monica by Mark Rosenberg, through Mark Bogen. Rich is interested in pursuing this for 1/3 of the recovery amount plus what ever out-of-pocket expenses he might incur. Monica asked if the committee wants to engage this person, or any other person in pursuit of this. The committee expressed interest but concern regarding the expenses, particularly since he resides out of state. Monica will request a written proposal that covers what can be expected for expenses. She will email the proposal to the committee members for review and a decision. The committee hopes to make a decision within two weeks. Reserves – Monica expressed concern about reserves being built up to cover a catastrophic storm or event of that nature. Deer-

field is the only Century Village that is not providing for reserves. Monica requests that the committee seriously consider in this upcoming budget approval process, a small increase of one or two dollars beginning with the January coupons so we can begin to build up a reserve fund. She estimates that when this fiscal year ends there will be approximately a $200,000 surplus left to carry over, and the past three years have, collectively, provided $270,000 so that at the end of the year there should be approximately $470,000 that could be applied to this sort of emergency. Committee members asked what arrangements have been made at the other Villages. Monica informed them that Boca has already approved their budget and is setting aside $5 for Recreation and $2 for Master Management in a general reserve, Pembroke Pines is setting aside a couple of dollars in a general reserve and has also set up a renovation reserve because they are going to be doing a four million dollar renovation, and West Palm Beach has established a shoreline restoration reserve. Committee members expressed determination that any money set aside for a reserve fund should not be used for anything else. They also said that the $470,000 should be separate from the reserve monies. Monica agreed and assured them that she sets up reserve funds in a separate account that would not be used or drawn upon for anything other than a catastrophe. She also stated that the amount of the coupon payment being applied to the reserve fund would appear on the resident’s coupons. There was some general discussion, including: lack of reserve can cause special assessments, applying for lines of credit and interest charged on loans. All committee members present expressed interest and agreement that a reserve fund is needed and determined that a decision would be reached at the budget approval meeting. Eva Rachesky: The August profit and loss for the theater was $2200 which is typical for this time of year. The 42 inch flat screen has not been installed although the electrical and cable has been run. When the screen was taken out of the box it was discovered to be damaged and had to be returned. It will be mounted as soon as we receive the replacement. We are not going to be turning it on until November. The Ticket Office will be responsible to turn the TV on and off. The bathroom partition installation will begin this week. The schedule will be for See SEPTEMBER, pg 8A


PAGE

8A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Village Minutes September

continued from pg 7A

the upstairs men’s and ladies bathrooms will be done, next week will be the downstairs men’s and ladies rooms will be done and the following week will be the men’s locker room. That will be down a little longer because there are plumbing issues. The Copa insurance money has been received which totaled $8100. The advanced season ticket sales dropped again this year. Last year there were 1967 advance orders, this year we had 1838 advanced ticket sales, total advanced sales this year was $324,496. It is anticipated that sales will be made up through box office sales. Many people complained about their seat selection via the computer. This is why a request for a new ticket program is in the upcoming budget. Property taxes will stay the same for this year. Committee members mentioned that taxes for the condo buildings had gone down. Wouldn’t taxes for the recreation facilities be reduced also? Eva responded that commercial properties are different and Monica observed that Pembroke’s recreation property taxes actually increased by $16,000 although the value of the property remained the same. The Markham and Grantham pool area renovations have been started and paver installation has begun. The pool furniture has been delivered and distributed, we still have to make the change out at Oakridge. Members wanted to know where the old chairs are. Dan advised them that about 20-30 of the old chairs are in storage, the rest were too worn and would be unsafe for use. He said he would be getting a count on the newer chairs and would provide that information to the committee. Don Kaplan stated he wants the usable old chairs to be offered to Master Management for their use. Eva said she would contact Bob Kratchoff to see if MM was interested in the old chairs. Nancy asked about the problem with staining on the newer chairs. Eva said the problem is at the Grantham, Westbury and Durham pools. Durham has five lounges that are stained, Grantham and Westbury have about 35 each that are stained. Tests revealed that the stain is actually iron deposits caused by water from sprinklers being blown by the wind onto the furniture. The company providing the new furniture recommended a cleaner that should be good for this problem and Eva plans to provide this information to

T&M tomorrow. She does not think they will be able to clean the rust stain off the affected chairs, instead the chairs would probably have to be re-strapped. A question about warranty was raised. Eva informed them that the older chairs had a warranty of one year on the strapping and two years on the framework. She said the EPA has stepped in and made the companies change the chemicals they use to create the strapping, consequently the strapping does not last as long. The company that the new chairs have been purchased from is a much larger company and their warranty on the strapping is five years and ten years on the framework. Dan interjected that the warranty would not cover fading or wear & tear, it would cover strapping breaking or snapping. There was considerable discussion about the problems in maintaining the pool furniture. Eva and Dan said that T&M was going to be more active in wiping down and cleaning the pool furniture; Eva advised that residents needed to become proactive in maintaining the furniture, for instance, by using a towel on the chair to protect it from sunscreen and skin oil. Nancy asked residents to observe and inform the committee or recreation whenever they see a problem or something that needs attention. Eva continued her report. The areas where the propane tanks were removed has been built back up and sod put down. Eva would like the committee to consider doing something about the hedges at Westbury and Lyndhurst North. After extensive discussion on the pros and cons of hedges, plants and fencing – including costs and maintenance issues – the committee decided that more information was needed. Nancy appointed Shelly as point person to work with Eva and gather information about options and costs. Eva presented the proposed new pool signs. Nancy read the proposed pool rules aloud. Don asked about security’s responsibilities when there is a problem at the pool. Eva said that security tries to resolve the issue but when they can’t BSO is summoned. In the discussion that followed, Eva and Dan informed the committee that warning letters are sent out to residents who have violated rules and a resident’s ID can be pulled preventing their access to the Clubhouse. With regard to the designated smoking, most pool areas have been able to resolve this situation amicably but a few pools were not able to do so. For those pool areas a desig-

nated smoking area has been assigned and signs posted. Nancy asked if the other committee members were ready to vote, they agreed. Nancy made a motion that new pool signs for the satellite pools and the Clubhouse pool be purchased and installed at a cost of approximately $3,500. Motion was seconded by Bill Schmeir. Motion was passed unanimously. Eva presented the proposed stenciling that would be used to paint the pool names on the pool buildings. The stencils can be used multiple times and will help people to identify which pool they are using. No motion was needed to move forward on this item. The trees planted at Richmond are showing new growth. Trees on Recreation property are being aerated by Phil’s Tree Service. The White Fly problem was probably exacerbated by the fact that the trees and shrubs have not been receiving fertilization and so were weaker and not as able to fight off the infestation. Regular fertilization will occur as a new company will be doing the landscaping. Eva will work on new signs for the tennis courts and present them at the next meeting. Nancy and Don stated that people were skating on the tennis courts and when asked to stop there was an unpleasant confrontation. Eva said she will make sure the signs state “Only Tennis Related Activities Allowed”. Dan Cruz: Dan discussed the progress at the Markham pool. He stated that work had begun and they are presently waiting on permits. There had to be a change in the plans and he met with the architects to resolve the issue. There has been a change in the coding and because of hurricanes steel doors are required. There will be a coating on the doors to protect them. There has to be a structural change in the support wall at the Markham pool house and the architect is meeting with the contractor to resolve this. With the architect on retainer, there will be twice monthly site visits, plus additional inspections as needed; and the architect will inform Monica if payment is approved before monies are issued to the contractor. Unfinished Business The Bar-B-Q at the Clubhouse: Nancy stated there has been a lot of positive feedback on this. Eva says it appears that there is room for approximately six grills. The grills would be placed away from the awnings. The company that did the awnings at the Clubhouse pool could do vinyl awnings for the shuffleboard area. The awnings

are guaranteed for up to 75 miles per hour winds and the framework can withstand winds up to 150 miles per hour without the awnings. Nancy asked Monica and Eva about the insurance responsibility. The Bar-B-Q pits would be surrounded by the parking lot, golf course and Clubhouse so there should be no issue of safety. All the other Villages have Bar-B-Q pits and they are very popular. Procedures will be established and safety measures (water) will be in place. There was extensive discussion regarding rules, cleaning, resident responsibility, reservations and safety. Channel 98 film: the committee would like to make commercials that could be placed on Channel 98 to run between the presentations of the Recreation and Master Management meetings. Shelly and Donna would be in charge of creating this film. Shelly stated that the aim was to film a variety of activities around the clubhouse and community. He hopes other committee members would agree to participate in the filming and also various clubs. He also wants to film some of the vistas available in the Village, film of lakes and trees, etc. It was suggested that improvements throughout the Village could be presented so people could see what can be done. And it could be updated from time to time. It would be day to day life in the Village. Eva advised the committee that the meetings will be shown on Channel 98 Monday through Friday, with the Recreation meeting being shown at 9am, the Master Management meeting at Noon and the Commissioner meeting at 3pm. As things are added times might have to be shuffled a bit. Seacrest is requesting addresses: Nancy has had several requests from Seacrest for Cen-Deer to provide names and addresses to aid the upcoming transition. She is opening this up for discussion. Don stated that COOCVE has this information and the information should be coming from COOCVE and Master Management. After some discussion, including comments from the audience, it was agreed that this issue would be tabled for now and Nancy would contact Mark

and Ira about this issue. Seacrest bid: they did not provide a breakdown. Eva is going back to them to request a breakdown of the bid. Shelly brought up children being admitted to the Clubhouse (this had been briefly discussed at the August meeting). He was concerned because during the event with Senator Biden children accompanying Democratic volunteers were admitted. Eva acknowledged that she had not been aware that children would be coming as part of the event and considers this a “lesson learned”. Should such an event ever occur in future, she will be sure it is very clear that children are not allowed in the Clubhouse. Shelly said that two years ago his grandchildren were at shuffleboard and needed to go to the restroom and the security guard would not allow him to take them into the Clubhouse. Eva told Shelly she had discussed this issue with Angel and all security guards at the West door now know that they should direct residents with children to go to the back of the Clubhouse as children are allowed in the ping pong area and can use the restrooms located there. Nancy made a motion to adjourn the meeting and it was seconded. Nancy offered to take questions from the audience. A resident said she wanted speak to the committee about the signs at the back of the clubhouse that had been for vans only. She was upset because the ‘Vans Only’ signs had been removed and replaced with ‘Van Accessible’ signs. Eva and Dan explained again that handicapped couldn’t be prevented from parking in those spaces and for liability purposes the van only signs had to be replaced. Dan further stressed that all handicapped parking is on a ‘first come, first serve’ basis and that is the way it is wherever one goes. In addition he pointed out that the other handicapped spaces are very large and can accommodate van parking. A brief question and answer period followed the meeting. It was requested that the pool signs not have ‘(designated areas)’ on them, the exception being those areas that do permit smoking. Respectfully submitted by MEREDITH HARRIS


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

9A

Village Minutes COOCVE Recreation Committee August 12, 2008 In attendance were: Shelly Baskin, Donna Dowling, Nancy Giordano, Don Kaplan, Danielle LoBono, Bill Schmeir, with Ira Grossman representing COOCVE and for DRF: Dan Cruz, Abby Koffler and Eva Rachesky Nancy offered to read the minutes from the July meeting. A motion was made and passed to waive the reading of the minutes from the July 12th meeting. Nancy announced that there was one change in the minutes. Jeff Chester’s name appeared as ‘Kessler’. This will be corrected. Other than that change the minutes will stand as they appear. Don Kaplan requested to make a statement prior to commencement of meeting. He stated that he was pleased to see that Mark Bogen was in the audience so Bogen could receive his statement in person. He extended a personal apology to Mark Bogen and to all present because at the July meeting, things were brought up and said in error without factual support. He further clarified that any information provided to Mark by Judy Kirshner concerning COOCVE was appropriate since he was COOCVE’s attorney. He also said that Mark Bogen was performing his duties responsibly and that the Real Estate building actually belongs to Mark Levy and therefore Levy cannot be charged for the use of the building. Also before Mark, there had been no $138,000 return in insurance monies or the $15,000 settlement to be paid during the next three years. He said that Mark Bogen was communicating with the Chairman of the Recreation Committee and was working for the Recreation Committee, yet has not billed the committee for any time spent on the committee’s behalf. Don mentioned that Jeff never signed a contract with Mark Bogen, although Ira did sign a contract for Bogen to represent COOCVE. He further stated that a motion should be made and voted upon immediately to confirm Mark Bogen as the attorney for the COOCVE Recreation Committee and a contract should be signed. Mark Bogen requested an opportunity to respond to Don Kaplan’s statement. He stated that he has heard a lot of criticism concerning not being at meetings and he acknowledged that he hasn’t been here for the past couple of months, but he hasn’t billed the Recreation Committee for any time. He stated that during this time he has been in communication with the Chairman, Jeff Chester and that it is not his fault if Jeff

didn’t relay that information to the other committee members. He came to today’s meeting in order to share with the committee members that he has been working on trying to get money for the Real Estate office and that there has been an offer to cover the expense of the utilities for the building based on the costs of operating the Real Estate offices in Boca and West Palm. As soon as he has an offer in writing he will present it to the Board. He also stated that he has not been involved in the $138,000 insurance settlement but is working to try and get more money related to Hurricane Wilma. General Discussion: Nancy stated that she has had a problem communicating with Mark Bogen. She said that since Jeff Chester hasn’t been here, Bogen should have been communicating with her. His office was informed that, with Jeff’s absence, Nancy is now the Acting Chairperson, but she has received no call-backs, emails or response of any kind. Nancy has been effectively out of the loop as Jeff Chester has not communicated or responded to any calls and emails from her or other Recreation Committee members. She requested that Bogen keep the committee informed by sending her emails when appropriate. The committee will make a decision before the next meeting on whether Mark will be retained as the Recreation attorney. DRF Reports: Abby Koffler reported that there was a $2,200 loss in the theater for the month of July which is typical for this time of year. She informed the committee that the DVD system can begin in November and showings can be in captions. She queried the committee on whether they want to run captions on the first day of every showing for the hearing impaired. This arrangement is already in place in West Palm Beach. Each movie will be shown five times so that would leave one captioned and four without captions. After discussion it was decided that the first showing will be captioned for the hearing impaired and this information will be conveyed in the monthly Happenings. Abby states the cost for the upgrades for the theater will be $41,210. She asked if the committee wants to approve the purchase. Nancy Giordano made a motion to purchase the additional equipment costing $41,210 for the theater. Motion seconded and passed. The old sound board from the theater is too large to be

used in the Party Room. Steven did evaluate the speakers in the Party Room. He says they are probably original to the building and are adequate only for public speaking. The cost to upgrade would be approximately $20,000. Nancy asked if the committee wanted to table this improvement for next year and they concurred. The committee members want a Century Village Idol contest based on American Idol. Residents will be able to compete, there will be ten finalists and Abby will hire professional musicians to work with the finalists before their final performance at a Sunday matinee. A budget will need to be determined for the musicians, prizes, etc. Eva Rachesky reported that the Party Room Dance floor was finished and while doing that, the Party Room and theater stages were done as well. Scaffolding had been set up in the theater to inspect the metal ceiling fasteners and retape a portion of the ceiling where moisture had seeped in. Eva readdressed the edict “No shorts during dances in the Party Room”. Security and Recreation staff can maintain some control of this rule, and residents themselves will play a large part in enforcing the dress code. There will be a sign posted at the door as well. After discussion a motion was made that there will be no shorts in the Party Room during dances. Motion seconded and passed. There was discussion regarding Recreation staff (William Daniel) taping COOCVE & Master Management meetings. The consensus was that if meetings are held in the Clubhouse, Recreation will absorb the cost; but, if the meetings are held elsewhere the cost will be the responsibility of Master Management and/or COOCVE and William can bill them as an independent contractor. There was some discussion also about the possibility of filming some of the classes and activities around the Clubhouse and pools as a way to acquaint new residents and others of the variety of activities available in the Village. Donna Dowling will meet with Eva and William to discuss these proposals. The 42” plasma screen for the waiting area between the ID Office and the Ticket Office has been purchased and additional lighting for the end of the Balcony aisles has been installed. Eva reported that the Card Room A air handler replacement and the separation of the

air handler for Clay Sculpture and the ID office have been completed. There was discussion between committee members and Dan regarding the A/C systems in the meeting rooms. Eva requested a motion be made to accept the insurance monies being offered from the Hurricane Wilma claim. Discussion ensued and Nancy stated that only Monica Wells had been working on this claim and Monica should receive credit for successfully pursuing the claim that resulted in the monies that will be awarded to Recreation. Nancy reported that a deal has been worked out with the insurance company that will enable the Recreation Committee to accept the check and yet leave the remaining issues open for negotiation. Nancy Giordano made a motion to accept the $136,844 check from Zurich Insurance for hurricane Wilma damages. Motion seconded and passed. Replacement landscaping has been planted at the tunnel entrance. DRF was able to establish that Century wasn’t irrigating properly due to irrigation problems. James at Century worked to resolve the issues and Century agreed to change out a month’s worth of Century Maintenance fees (equaling approximately $1800) resulting in no cost for replacement plants. Eva is waiting to receive this in writing from Century. The committee, Eva and Dan discussed the placement of stanchions at the tunnel entrance. The propane tanks at pool areas have been removed. DRF has bids for laying sod but before moving forward it needs to be established which pools have viable irrigation. James at Century is going to check the irrigation at the pools and advise DRF of his findings. Discussion brought up shallow holes existing from some of the removed tanks. It was acknowledged that there had been some settlement, particularly after the recent rains. DRF will fill in the holes as necessary. Dan reports the well for the Markham pool irrigation system is moving forward. The cost will be $6000 for a 3” well, 120’ deep. DRF is waiting on the permit process, which takes time. Eva has a bid for pool area signs. After considerable discussion, committee members requested Eva email sign verbiage to them for review before next meeting. The first delivery of pool furniture will be this week and this first shipment will be 80 chairs, 90 lounges, and 30 tables. Bill Schmeir offered to be present to inspect and count the furniture. Nancy

stated there is a 10 year manufacturer’s warranty on the frames and a five year warranty on the strapping. There was discussion about the conditions and problems with old chairs and the distribution of the new and old chairs, as well as problems with smoking and non-smoking areas at the pools. Trees have been planted at the Richmond pool for the smoking area. There was discussion concerning the tree plantings and proper irrigation. Dan stated that DRF can’t move forward on landscaping at the pools until the irrigation systems are working properly. Dan is going to inspect each pool area and determine what the irrigation needs are for each area. Then DRF can move forward on landscaping. Don Kaplan asked when is Recreation going to be contacted about the irrigation study. Nancy said she had been in touch with Perkins and has provided the phone numbers for herself, Dan and Eva. She advised that the plan is for Dan to meet with Perkins to establish what will be expected from the new irrigation system. Eva continued her report: o The Rubber Plant trees at Newport pool have been trimmed back. o The Bocci Court framing is completed. o A problem with the Emergency Phones at the pools was so widespread that Melissa contacted Kings III and was able to get them to give us approximately one month’s service credited. o Reflectors have been installed on the circular drive. o As of August all passes will now be issued at the ID office. This information is appearing on Channel 99 and will also be in the Reporter. o The Tai Chi instructor is gone and a new instructor will be starting in November. The new instructor is a resident of Century Village. o The Berkshire pool deck repair and patchwork to Diamond Brite has been completed. Committee members requested Dan to advise them of the status for the Markham and Grantham pool house bids. Dan states he has three bids: CJM Construction, Degville Brothers Construction and M. D. Ward Construction. After discussion at last meeting, Dan advised bidders of changes desired to bring down the costs. Nancy advised that the bidding companies had been thoroughly checked out. They checked on insurance, checked with the Better Business Bureau, etc. All three bidders had good credentials. CJM provided See AUGUST, pg 10A


PAGE

10A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Village Minutes Quarterly Meeting with Master Management and Area Chairs September 12, 2008 The meeting was called to order at 9:30 a.m. To follow up on a request made at the May Area Chair Meeting, Joe Rubino said we have not seen nor heard anything from Comcast explaining why we have no programming on Channels 8 and 15. Before the channel lineup, we had programs on Channels 1 through 79. We understand they have the right to change channel content but question their right to reduce the number of channels that should be part of our contract with them. We ask that a written

explanation be obtained from Comcast so we can intelligently answer unit owner’s continuous questions on this matter. Since Master Management’s attorney is handling insurance delinquencies, Joe Rubino asked that any letters sent to unit owners on this matter be copied to building associations. A good portion of the meeting was devoted to transportation, which has become an important concern to unit owners since the announcement that Broward County

Transit was making changes in the service to Century Village. Donna Capobianco, Chair of the Master Management Transportation Committee, gave a comprehensive report on what has been done and on work in progress to solve this problem. There will only be one BCT bus that will come into the Clubhouse and it will run along Hillsboro from Rt. 441 to the beach. Details on this Route 48 will be announced. The committee has solicited bids for transportation within the Village and for

transportation outside the Village. They are also working with merchants in the area to come up with solutions to the transportation concerns of our residents. As a follow up to the meeting between Mike Perkins and area chairs and vice chairs, MM President Charles Parness said work was being done to locate irrigation valves in the Harwood area. Many problems have occurred so Century M & M has started work in other areas so they will be ready for Mr. Perkins to move into those areas.

Quarterly Meeting with Recreation Committee and Area Chairs September 15, 2008 The meeting was called to order at 9:30 a.m. Recreation Committee Vice Chair Nancy Giordano, in her report, asked that problems with pool furniture be reported in a timely fashion while the items are still under warranty. Renovations at the Grantham and Markham pools will begin this month. All other pools will undergo similar renovations under the committee’s long range program.

Installation of the new DVD equipment for the showing of movies in the theater should be completed by the end of the year. Viewing and listening quality will be greatly improved for those who attend the movie showings at the Clubhouse Theater. While Area Chairs were pointing out some repairs required at their pools, William Schmier asked the Chairs to occasionally check the emergency boxes at their pools.

A recent inspection found a number not in working order. Some time was spent discussing the proposed barbecue area behind the shuffleboard court. This idea has received great approval in the Village and it is hoped it will be available late this year. The Recreation Committee will keep us informed on the progress of this Village addition. Since both the Recreation Committee and Master

Management are involved in Channel 99 programming, Joe Rubino asked that they have the Channel Lineup corrected to show the new listing that went into effect several months ago. He also asked that information in Clubhouse Happenings be reworded as to admission to the movies. Donna Dowling reminded the meeting that Clubhouse Happenings can be viewed on the Village website at cvedb.com. Joe Rubino stated the

August

continued from pg 9A

the lowest bid, with a reduction of over $100,000. The bid for Markham was $201,800 and for Grantham, $184,984. Both pools would be worked on simultaneously and the timetable for the construction would be 90 days (if there are no complications). Dan and committee members had an extensive discussion concerning the various aspects of the remodeling for the two pool areas, the changes requested to reduce costs and the fact that the pool houses had to be made ADA compliant. Their discussion established that the monies for the two pool house remodels had already been budgeted and would not require any type of additional assessment from the residents. Dan further stated that these two pool houses were the absolute worst of the 13 and he had been trying to put through these improvements for over 10 years. Eva advised that the plans for improvements to the Village pool houses would probably be spread out over a 10 year period to lessen the financial impact to the residents and to other necessary projects needed for Recreation. Dan added that ongoing pool house remodeling would be on a worst case basis. Nancy Giordano made a motion to accept the bid from

Jack Kornfield reported on the erosion problems along our waterways. He pointed out that there have been changes in the spraying along the canals that will help. It has been recommended that a swath of one to two feet at the edge of the waterways not be cut when grass is mowed. This request will be followed up with CMM. We thank the members of Master Management and guests who attended and look forward to our December meeting. The meeting adjourned at 11:05. Respectfully submitted by JOE RUBINO

Council of Area Chairs is in need of a secretary who can take the minutes for our monthly meeting and prepare a report for the Reporter. Anyone interested can contact Joe Rubino at 954-418-0768. Joe Rubino thanked the members of the Recreation Committee and guests who attended and look forward to our December meeting. The meeting was adjourned at 10:20. Respectfully submitted by JOE RUBINO CJM Construction for $386,784 for the completion of the remodeling of the Markham and Grantham pool houses. Motion seconded and passed. Discussion concerning the proposed Bar-B-Q area was tabled for the next meeting. Eva and Dan opened discussion with committee members concerning pool deck pavers for the Grantham & Markham areas. There was some general discussion of needs at other pool areas and it was stated that there are plans to address these issues in the new budget year. Dan announced the Markham pool did not need new coping but Grantham did. The cost for installation of pavers at the Markham pool area would be $44,426; the cost for pavers for Grantham would be $44,426 and replaced coping would be $10,179. The new partitions for Clubhouse bathrooms have been ordered. A question was raised concerning allowing children 12 years old and up to come to movies with their grandparents. Eva advised that the age restriction in the Clubhouse was in the Condo Documents. There was a brief discussion concerning alternatives for the entertainment of resident’s underage grandchildren. The meeting was adjourned Respectfully submitted: Nancy Giordano


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

11A


PAGE

12A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

13A


PAGE

14A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Village Minutes Area Chairmen and COOCVE Executive Committee September 8, 2008 President Ira Grossman called the meeting to order at approximately 9:30 a.m., and the attendees Pledged Allegiance and observed a Minute of Silence on behalf of those serving in our country’s Armed Forces, and victims of recent hurricanes. Ira welcomed back returning directors. Ira pointed out a Sign-Up sheet for volunteers to serve on the Nominating Committee, this Sign-Up sheet will also be displayed at the next Board of Directors meeting, September 16, 2008. Ira specified that per our by-laws, no member of the Nominating Committee can be a candidate for office. Ira then read the Notice of Termination that COOCVE’s attorney Mark Bogen sent to Century Maintenance this month, which provides the requisite 90 day notice so that the Century contract is terminated as of the end of the year, paving the way for the Building Associations to engage Seacrest as of January 1st, 2009. Our letter also requested that Century Maintenance cancel all automatic

payments from unit-owners’ bank accounts, upon deduction for monthly payments due December 1st, 2008. Ira further recommended that unit-owners notify their banks to cancel the debits in favor of Century Maintenance. Ira then noted that the Village Pharmacy in Century Shopping Plaza had closed, and it had sent all prescription information to Walgreen’s at S.W. 10th Street and Military Trail. Ira then presented Charlie Parness, President of Master Management to talk about our Administration’s preparations for hurricane. Charlie distributed two phone numbers to Area Chairmen, for them to contact him and Master Management during a storm. Charlie noted that one of the numbers is a landline, for greater reliability even during a power outage. Charlie asked that Area Chairmen not distribute these phone numbers to others, and that they use these numbers to contact Master Management only about certain specific problems that Master Management is responsible

for: 1. If roads are blocked, such as by falling trees or power lines. Master Management will be coordinating response with the City of Deerfield Beach. 2. Security concerns, such as if any fencing is blown down. Charlie noted that the Security personnel who are not stationed at the gatehouses, will be stationed at Master Management/COOCVE’s offices, and dispatched from there. Charlie noted that the Master Management/COOCVE offices are now equipped with a working generator and battery powered lights, to enable the office to work through a black-out this time. He emphasized however that his office is designed to work as a Command Center to carry out the above-mentioned functions, and is not a shelter or hurricane relief center, nor a substitute for 911. Charlie advised Area Chairmen not to go out during the storm to assess conditions, but rather collect information from the building Presidents in their areas. A

useful precaution for building officers is to take beforehand a census of who is actually in town in their buildings, and give the City Fire Department a list of who is handicapped and therefore might require special assistance. Joe Rubino asked if Channel 99 could carry only emergency announcements during a hurricane, and if our Village website could also serve as an information source. Charlie said he would look into that right away. President Grossman then asked Area Chairmen to make comments or ask questions in turn. There were several questions about insurance. Andy Miller, Chairman of the Insurance Committee, said they expected to get offers from a minimum of three companies, and expected to have a report ready about this in 10-12 days. There were also questions about billing procedures under Seacrest. President Grossman promised that we will come up with an arrangement with Seacrest to replace Master Management’s prior role as “big daddy” to cover

failures by some unit owners to pay on time their share of building insurance. Ira said that Mark Bogen will address this issue in a lunch with building Presidents to take place on September 17th. One question concerned the operation of the irrigation system, which is Master Management’s responsibility and previously entrusted to Century Maintenance. Charlie Parness said that Master Management is sending out its own termination letter to Century Maintenance this month, and that they are considering Seacrest and one other company to take over the irrigation contract. A Chairman praised how well our Village carried out the speech of Vice Presidential nominee Joe Biden in the Clubhouse, September 2nd, which received national coverage. There being no other comments, the meeting adjourned at around 10:40 a.m. Respectfully submitted by Ken Barnett


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

15A

The Mail Bag Letters

continued from pg 6A

other pet may be kept without the written consent of the Association and no animal or pet may be harbored within a unit that would create a nuisance to any other unit owner. Furthermore, she states “that the determination that an animal or pet creates a nuisance is made by the Board and is conclusive and binding by all parties.” Ms. Olmstead used the aforementioned to state that she had read the police report (not by researching information herself) of an incident due to a bird making so much noise, that two unit owners became physically involved, and the BSO had to be called. Many would like to think that a police report is the truth and nothing but the truth without thinking that law enforcers may base their reports by interviewing unit owners and residents since they (the BSO) were not present when the incident occurred. But what if the unit owner, elated to be interviewed by the BSO, did not like the individual in question, giving his version of what happened? For our protection, we have a judicial system which includes the right of trials, lawyers and courts…What happened to me? All charges dropped. Get familiar with facts, not fabrications and hearsays. I, too, had been a free-lance reporter in New York. In fact two years ago, I wrote a monthly column for the

Reporter. However, unlike Ms. Olmstead, I had to get my facts straight. Although there is freedom of the press, there are also law suits. Obviously Ms. Olmstead did not do her research, since the facts of this incident were totally incorrect. I should know. I was one of the owners involved in this juicy incident. I can assure you that the incident that occurred was not due to screaming birds, but to delusions that I was letting air out of my neighbor’s tires, causing me to be a Murderer. (Why wasn’t I written up in the National Enquirer?) This has been going on for the last few years, prompting this person to move his car to the other side of the parking lot, continuing to accuse other unit owners of doing likewise. Except this time he became violent. What do the RULES AND STATUES SAY ABOUT LIVING WITH PEOPLE LIKE THIS? Myra Mahl Harwood I SLOW DOWN To the Editor: As a former chairman of the Construction, Road and Signs committees, I still take note of road conditions and the driving habits of our drivers. Recently I experienced once again the poor driving skill of a driver on the neck of the S-curve on West Drive. The 15 mile per hour sign is ignored by almost every driver. They usually reach the curve at that spot at a speed of 25 mph or higher.

The 3-way stop sign at the Newport/Prescott intersection, if observed, should slow down any driver before he gets the speed up when reaching the S-curve. If not, when he reaches the neck of the S-curve, he will usually go over the yellow middle line before correcting the overdrive. This means that I have to ride the white line bordering the grass on the right side far too often, if I see that oncoming driver soon enough – which is what did happen one afternoon several years ago. However, the driver behind me wasn’t so lucky. I heard the clang of a fender bender as I kept driving away. We simply need to slow down! Jack Galit SwanseA A KUDOS TO THE REPORTER To The Editor: Steve, you are doing a great job. I really enjoy reading the paper and look forward to getting it once a month. I hope people appreciate you and the volunteers who work with you, and appreciate the hard work that is put into the paper. This year is the first time that we are receiving the paper in the summer. Great job! Anita Hersh Ashby A WOMEN COUNT TOO! To The Editor: We are not Area Chairman and Vice Chairman. It should be Person or Chairwoman.

However, it is stated more women are holding offices or positions in CVE. This is a changing society and such changes should be reflected in the Reporter as well. More than half are women. Mary Ann Giachitte Newport O Editor’s Note: Thanks for the heads-up. Correction will be made in all future Reporter publications. OUTDATED CARTOON To The Editor: You published an outdated cartoon by Alv Sherman in the September issue. ALL paper goods are now permitted to be deposited in the Newspaper bin. That includes all junk mail, cardboard cereal boxes and such, magazines, catalogs, soft cover books, etc. Norma Locker Berkshire C Editor’s Note: You are correct. My oversight. DOES NOT SOUND SIMPLE To the Editor: Last month a letter to the editor stated that the Clubhouse sound system is poor and should be replaced. I wish it were that simple. The sound is especially bad for those of us who wear hearing aids. Replacing the electronics might help but that cannot improve the basically bad acoustics of the auditorium itself. Movie sound has never been clear. Lately it has become much worse leading me to believe that some

changes for the worse have been made. The problem appears to be the way the sound is read and processed off the film before it reaches the main amplifiers. Acoustics are bad because the auditorium walls are hard. They appear to have plaster surfaces so that sound reflects off of these walls producing multiple echoes. These echoes experience different time delays so that the sound that reaches the listeners’ ears is a composite. The resultant cacophony is appalling. The ceiling may also produce multiple echoes. The echo effect is quite apparent when one compares the sound quality when sitting close to the wall with the sound quality closer to the center. The solution is to first install sound absorbing materials along the walls and then improve the electronics if necessary. Improving the electronics alone will not suffice. I have seen many theater auditoriums equipped with drapes to improve the acoustics. I dealt with a similar problem at a government facility before I retired. I gave my name in writing weeks ago at the DRF office offering my advice. I have heard nothing since. Evidently they can do without my free professional advice. I believe that there are many informed people at CVE who could offer free advice in many areas. This should be encouraged. To ignore this resource is foolish. MARK MERRIAN Berkshire E


PAGE

16A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Condo News Cen-Deer – Most Commonly Asked Questions By EVA RACHESKY

Administration/Cen-Deer Communities Office I am handicapped and drive a van, when I come to the Clubhouse where is there a place for me to park? The handicapped parking spaces in the main Clubhouse parking lot are large enough to accommodate vans and there is one van accessible handicapped parking space behind the Clubhouse. All handicapped spaces are on a first come first serve basis. Staff Office A Reminder: The Staff Office is presently taking room reservations for Area and Building election meetings and would like to remind all CVE Officers that, if they wish to hold their meeting in the Clubhouse, they will need to contact the Staff Office to make a reservation. Rooms are reserved in the Staff Office Monday through Friday from 9am to 5pm. Area Chairmen or Building Presidents requiring room reservations for their annual election or business meetings may come to the Staff Office during these hours to make their reservation and receive a reservation slip. ID Department

If I have relatives that live outside the Village what kind of pass can I get for them? Only three gate passes are issued per household. A relative living within a 50 mile radius who is a frequent visitor of a CVE resident can be issued a gate pass by providing the following information to the ID Office: 1) show a Florida Driver’s License 2) a signed Gate Pass Form from the CVE resident 3) Gate Pass Form must also have the Building President’s signature and building seal. The cost is $5.00 per year. Athletic Department What is Body Cardio? Body Cardio is designed to burn calories fast and give you a slim, trim and healthier body by improving your cholesterol level, as well as improving your blood pressure. Recreation Maintenance What do we do about maintenance issues at the Clubhouse, pools, tennis courts, and etc.? You are the eyes and ears of Recreation Maintenance and we depend upon you to alert us to any problems or concerns you may encounter. We take each report very seriously and do our

utmost to respond in as timely a manner as is feasible. Class Office When will the Copa resume and what is the next theme? The Copa will resume on October 31, 2008. The theme is a Halloween Bash, including a costume parade. Tickets are on sale in the Class Office. If you have any questions, please call 954-428-7696. Evening/Weekend Staff Office When can I buy show tickets on the weekends? The box office is closed during the day on the weekends and advance tickets are not sold in the evening or on the weekend. The box office opens 1 hour and 30 minutes before each show to sell tickets for that show only. At this time residents can buy tickets for themselves and for as many guests as they wish, provided there are seats available. Ticket Office When does Season start and how long does it run? ‘Season’ starts November 1st and runs through March 31st. However there are shows and movies scheduled in the theater year round.

10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

17A

Condo News News & Views By JUDY OLMSTEAD

The Markham and Grantham pools are currently under renovation and will be closed for the next few months. The white concrete is being covered with pavers and the changing rooms have been completely gutted. The pool facilities will soon be handicapped accessible, cleaner, and brighter. This is just one of the actions being taken to improve the appearance and usefulness of our recreation facilities. Ongoing capital improvements are necessary to keep the Village updated and the Recreation Committee is acting responsibly by budgeting for two pool renovations a year. You may have seen the notice in The Observer advertising the Deerfield Beach Democratic Club stating that meetings “are free and open to all” and are held at Le Club in our Village. I have verified that Security has been instructed to admit anyone from the outside through the West gate who says that they are going to these meetings after license number is record-

ed. I am appalled that our own families must be called in at the front gate, but an exception has been made for people allegedly attending the Democratic Club meetings. It is the duty and responsibility of Master Management to put a stop to this irresponsible behavior, especially since no one else is permitted to enter the Village through the East or West gates without an ID or gate pass which must be approved by an association president. Post Trenchi, all rules and regulations are to be applied equally to all persons and organizations. This includes political events and the rules disallowing anyone

under 18 in our Clubhouse. Both Recreation and Master Management need to make appropriate motions at their next meeting and see that the rules are enforced by Security personnel. We all know that politics can sometimes be antagonistic to the needs and welfare of the people. Many residents who went to the September Democratic Club meeting were interested in hearing from Broward County Commissioner Kristin Jacobs on the subject of bus transportation in the Village. Her office asked Donna Capobianco, Chairman of the Master Management Transportation Committee, to be present to respond to questions related to what Master Management is doing about transportation, as neither she nor Chris Walton of the BCT could address those. It appears that because Donna is now running for Commissioner, that she was not permitted to speak at that meeting. It is upsetting that, even in our Village, some people are putting politics ahead of meeting the needs of the residents.

Coalition For CVE Homebound By MARION G. COHEN

Even though the COALITION has been in existence since 1986 and has helped so many of the residents of this Village we still have an identity problem. Our column has been in the REPORTER since its inception, and each month there is a detailed explanation of the services rendered to our community. But if you would question your neighbor or a friend in the Village to ask for an explanation of the services of our one community fundraiser, probably you would find that person does not have the answer. And yet every year there is a mailing sent to every resident in the Village requesting a contribution to this worthy cause. So this year we will attempt an educational program by addressing the directors of the buildings and by posting articles in each building and in the Clubhouse. Why? We want to keep you informed. We want YOU to use our services when you have a need. We want YOU to inform an ailing neighbor or handicapped friend in the Village about the availability of help for them. This is our mission….to assist our needy residents. It is your mission to spread the word about our

services. Many of our patrons have left the Village. We want to accommodate new residents or uninformed residents that we are here for them. THE COALITION FOR CVE HOMEBOUND offers the disabled and elderly, who do not need 24-hour medical supervision, the option of continuing to live at home in familiar and comfortable surroundings for as long as possible. When help is needed, the program provides a professional case manager at no cost to the patient, who will work with the patient and family to establish the kind of care that is needed, who will determine what the charges will be and will develop a reasonable payment plan. Patients who meet eligibility guidelines are accepted in the program and charged fees on a sliding scale basis. The mission statement of Broward Homebound Program is to allow the elderly and disabled residents of Century Village to live independently, at home, with dignity. When the Coalition makes an annual appeal to residents for financial contributions, it is a request for a modest amount. Some residents give $1 per month or a total

of $12 per year; others give as much as $150, and some clubs, temples and building organizations have donated more. If every household in Century Village would make a contribution to the Coalition, we could fulfill the needs of the many residents who are eligible to seek our services. Every month I sit in at the meeting of the Broward Board of Directors of the Homebound Program. At some of these meetings, case managers report on some of the members of their caseload. The tales told of the needs of these clients, the conditions under which they live, the pain and agony suffered, and the respite offered by our program is most touching. If you or your neighbors are in need of our services, please contact the Broward Homebound Program at 954-786-2484. Please read the summary of services rendered by the Coalition for CVE Homebound. You are invited to learn more about our program by linking up with our website at http://www.browardhomebound.org.

Nobody asked me but…. By HARVEY BEABER

I’m back! I don’t know if anybody missed me, but I just went through a very serious period in the last two months. Without going into details, I had open heart surgery. Thank the Lord and your many good wishes, I seem to be doing quit well, so lets get down to business. A lot of important things have happened in these past two months, nationally, locally, politically, economically etc., etc. Since I’m not supposed to discuss politics, we’ll stay away from that subject. How about oil. More specifically the price we pay for gas at the pumps for our automobiles. It has been said that in the good old USA, the big oil companies have NOT built a new cracking plant (the name of the facility that turns Oil into gasoline) in over 30 years! Why should they! After all, their profits wouldn’t go as sky high as they have gone. Big Oil says that it’s not their fault they can’t (or won’t) get gas at the pumps at a reasonable price. They say the automobile industry has grown too fast, especially the desire for those big gas guzzler’s. Low and behold…a MIRACALE! Without new cracking plants the price of gas at the pump has gone down drastically. I hate to say this, even think it, but did this happen because our Presidential election is almost upon us? Now everyone, Republicans and Democrats are talking about off shore drilling. Regardless if this is right or wrong, all these experts admit that the result of this new drilling will not give us relief

(supply and price wise) until about seven years from now. We need additional gas and lower pump prices now! My suggestion is, that the powers to be, Presidential and Congressional, release the oil they say we have in reserve, NOW! This will cut our dependency on foreign oil, bring the price down and the supply up. This released oil can be replaced in the near future, as we pump more of our domestic oil. Believe it or not, we here in the USA have plenty of oil, off shore and domestically. It is well known that Big Oil has thousands of oil well leases in Oklahoma and Texas that have been drilled and capped. Yes! Capped! Now they want the off-shore opened up to them for future profits. This is NOT in the publics’ best interest. Big Oil gets billions of dollars (BILLIONS) in tax breaks every year. Why don’t they invest these profits in new, up to date, modern cracking plants here in the good old USA and make more jobs for our middle class workers; our citizens. Remember, it’s been about 30 years since a new plant has been built here. We need jobs and the economy returned to America. Last but not least, we have to remember to VOTE on Tuesday, November 4, 2008. Besides the Presidential race, there are some very important other issues to be decided. Be informed! Get involved. Yes, your vote will count! Yeah! I know, nobody asked me, but…. God Bless You All!!! God Bless America!!!


PAGE

18A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Condo News On May1, 2008, Governor Christ signed legislation adopting changes to Florida Statute 718 (The Condo Act) which are enforceable as of October 1, 2008. The following is a summary of the changes:


OCTOBER 2008

Condo News

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

19A


PAGE

20A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Condo News COOCVE Appointed Committee Members for 2008-2009 By IRA GROSSMAN

GRIEVANCE Chairman-James McLear Caral Falco Andy Miller Bill Schmeir Jack Kornfield BUDGET & FINANCE Lloyd Berrin Nancy Giordano Elaine Kesselman Gloria Olmstead CIVIC & CULTURAL Bob Bender Jack Kornfield Barbara Nathan-Marcus Judy Schneider

ADVISORY Jeff Chester Irving Ginsberg Marilyn Lane Harvey Masef CONTRACT Arthur Dove Anthony Falco Caral Falco Marilyn Lane Judy Olmstead Filippo Russo Joe Sachs

INSURANCE Andrew Miller James McLear Karen Wade BY-LAWS Chairman Jack Kornfield Eugene Goldman Bruce Gursey Fillipo Russo Ira Somerset AUDIT Chairman Al Bakelman Bruce Gursey Gloria Olmstead Bernard Pittinsky

Nominating Committee 2008-2009

Chairperson: Joe Sachs Cecile Baskin Norman Bloom Susan Dove Edward Gallon Mary Ann Giachetti

Bruce D. Gursey Rhoda Jarmark Beverly Kornfield Melvin Medway Sandra Parness Norma Weiner

Seniors May Qualify For A Power Wheelchair Medicare’s regulations now make it easier for seniors and others with debilitating conditions such as arthritis, stroke, heart and breathing problems, or diabetes, to obtain a power wheelchair at little or no cost. MIRACLE on WHEELS is trying to increase public awareness about the assistance options that allow seniors and the disabled to remain independent in their own homes rather than undergo difficult surgery or other expensive treatment, or resort to moving into a nursing home. These assistance options are available to anyone with problems getting around their home, or who are in danger of falling due to their medical condition. But they may become more limited in the near future, since Medicare may cut the amount they will allow for power chairs by 10 percent next year. So those who are suffering from any condition that severely limits their mobility should call Miracle on Wheels at 1-866-2006924 toll-free to learn about qualifying now for a power wheelchair at little or no cost.


OCTOBER 2008

Condo News

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

21A


PAGE

22A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

1 Bed / 1 Bath – Garden Apt Tilford L - Great water view, furnished, bring offers………………………….…….…… $37,000.00 Westbury G – All tile, next to pool, walk to plaza……………………………..………… $37,000.00 Keswick A – Cozy, first floor, beautiful view of foliage from patio…………..…….…… $39,900.00 1 Bed / 1.5 Baths Oakridge C – 18” diagonal tile, newer appliances, clean………………………………… Cambridge F – Includes Piano, all tile, many extras…………………………………… Westbury F – Fabulous water view, extra large 1 bedroom deluxe………………………. Durham P – A nice area. Walk to pool and clubhouse……………………………………. Prescott E – Designer furniture, wood flooring many extras…………………………… Durham B – Best location, with fantastic lake view, near clubhouse…………………... Durham I – Association claims rentable bldg, furnished, nice……………….…………… Lyndhurst M – Tile & Wood flooring, Newer appliances, encl patio ....………………… Westbury E – Best condition for least amount of money………………………………..…. Markham H – Remodeled, ceramic tile, first floor……………………………………….. Cambridge C – Immaculate, ready to move into with beautiful lake view……….....…… Tilord N – Clean, 2nd floor, corner, great location, a must see…………………………… Westbury E – Pleasant, first floor, newly painted……………………………………… Newport N – Beige Carpet, Great view, unfurnished …………………………………… Markham A – Spacious corner, encl patio, motivated seller……………………………... Newport B – Immaculate condition, carpet, Bldg claims rentable……………………….. Newport Q – Galley kitchen, new carpet, encl patio…………….…………………..……

$59,000.00 $60,000.00 $59,900.00 $43,000.00 $59,900.00 $67,500.00 $54,000.00 $73,000.00 $36,500.00 $49,900.00 $62,500.00 $42,000.00 $55,000.00 $59,450.00 $44,500.00 $49,900.00 $49,900.00

2 Bed / 1.5 Baths Tilford J – First floor, furnished, private, quiet location……………………………..… Tilford X – Remodeled with new cabinets & appliances, great water view………….…… Durham S – Beautiful corner with view of lagoon, clean, near clubhouse………….…… Prescott E – Corner, garden with new carpet, cabinets, & patio windows………………. Swansea B – 1,000 SqFt, Encl porch, corner unit, new a/c ……………………………… Markham R – Plenty of sunshine, cheerful, priced to sell, bring offers…………………. Durham V – Waterfront unit, newer appliances, close to clubhouse…………………… Farnham P – First floor, corner, new cabinets, shows well ……………………………. Tilford S – Upgraded, new tile in kitchen & dining room, new carpet………………… Keswick B – Cottage quaint, corner, remodeled, on golf-course…………………………. Swansea B – Located near front gate & plaza, with new roof………………………..…… Newport D – Corner, completely tiled, low price………………………………….......

$55,000.00 $85,000.00 $74,500.00 $63,500.00 $63,000.00 $59,900.00 $63,500.00 $59,500.00 $56,900.00 $95,000.00 $82,500.00 $59,900.00

2 Beds / 2 Baths Upminster J – Immaculate, close to plaza, spectacular view……………………………... $89,000.00 Oakridge D – Newly renovated, with wood cabinets & Granite tops in kitchen………. $98,000.00 Oakridge U – 1100 SqFt, luxury, furnished …………………………………………….. $149,900.00 2 Beds Executive Harwood D – Executive unit. Rarely available, totally remodeled…………………….... $196,000.00


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

23A


PAGE

24A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

25A


PAGE

26A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Consumer Interest The Pitfalls of Socialized Medicine

By ROLF GRAYSON

By JOEL HIMELFARB For all the life-saving technology and drugs available to Americans, the U.S. health care system has serious problems. Many medications, especially prescription drugs, are prohibitively expensive. Quality of care varies widely from hospital to hospital and region to region. The cost of individual or family health insurance policies are on the rise (more than $4,000 per year for an individual and more than $12,000 for a family of four), and are usually not tax-deductible. Many working Americans are effectively locked into employerprovided health plans that provide little or no choice. Plans typically provide firstdollar coverage or affordable co-pays for routine medical examinations, but not the cost of prescription drugs or lifesaving surgeries. A common argument is that America needs a staterun health plan. Indeed, critics point to health care in other countries that appear to provide for citizens in ways that the U.S. system

does not. These arguments do not stand the test of reason. Based on the track records of other countries with staterun health care, socializing medicine in the United States would likely be a tragic mistake. Arguments for a ‘National Plan’ For the political left, along with some elements in the health care and business community, the solution is to create a government-run, single-payer system. Failing that, their aim is to solve our country’s health care woes through further increases in federal and state spending. This could include new mandates requiring businesses to provide a government-dictated minimum amount of care to their employees. A number of nonprofits, including a group called Physicians for a National Health Program, lament that the United States is the “only industrialized country without national health care.” Controversial filmmaker Michael Moore’s movie Sicko

As I see it: Health care

points to problems with the American health care system and suggests it is inferior to those in Great Britain, France and Canada. New York Times columnist Paul Krugman prefers those three systems to the American one. Even some major U.S. corporations seek a national health care plan. Indeed, socialized medicine is their answer to soaring retiree health care burdens resulting from ill-considered union contracts. Irredeemably Flawed? In making the case that the American health care system is irredeemably flawed, advocates for a national plan sometimes play fast and loose with the facts. They overlook major difficulties in foreign systems while exaggerating the problems with our own. In Sicko, Moore cites a study released in 2000 by the World Health Organization that ranks the U.S. health care system 37th in the world — behind countries like Saudi Arabia, Morocco and the See PITFALLS, pg 29A

A short time ago the health care issue addressed in the Reporter concluded that an industry created for profit can never dispense health care to the public in an equitable manner. Unfortunately the died in the wool free marketers and the unlimited media blitz bombarding the people continues to obscure this conclusion. The newest and latest revelation, however, not only supports this conclusion but, takes it a step further. United Health Care, the largest health care provider in the country and standard bearer for AARP as well as other companies, is being investigated about their questionable business practices in dispensing health care. This investigation is geared to pinpoint the prevailing rate, a standard which is applied by the insurance company capriciously and totally unrelated to individual situations. Now that the presidential election is in full swing, and much to their credit, once again, the Democratic platform makes health care a cornerstone of their hoped-

for administration. We all remember the failed national healthcare plan offered by the Clinton administration, scuttled by an advertising blitz financed by the health care industry. How can we forget the heavily-televised kitchen table conversation between Martha and Harry, “…we will no longer be able to select our own doctor.” The result of the failed Clinton attempt, however, brought HMOs engineered by insurance companies and sold as the pie in the sky solution for health care costs. “No costs to you” was the catch phrase and, indeed, the government pays these companies handsomely for their service. What was not divulged, however, was the fact that personal doctor selection is non-existent and disregarding doctors recommendations, medical decisions are made by clerks engaged in looking at cost charts. If that were not enough, unscrupulous doctors willing to cooperate are being paid bonuses if they reduce prescriptions See HEALTH, pg 32A


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

27A

Consumer Interest Discussion of Fair Housing Act and CVE Documents which require permanent occupancy by one person over age 55 By JUDY OLMSTEAD My prior News and Views discussion of the Fair Housing Act and the over 55 requirement in our association documents raised questions among the residents of Century Village. I am NOT offering this as a legal opinion. If your Association has a problem or other questions on this issue, PLEASE contact an attorney knowledgeable about these issues. This is just my interpretation, reached after reading several articles and internet sites on the Act and the 1990 amendments to my building’s documents. While I believe that all of the associations’ documents were amended at the same time, your Board of Directors needs to have a copy of these recorded amendments before making decisions approving or disapproving new purchasers or renters. The building documents in my possession show that Markham S amended the Articles of Incorporation and Declaration of Condominium

on November 8, 1990, recorded on November 19, 1990 to comply with provisions of the Fair Housing Act. The Fair Housing Act is actually part of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 3601-3619 (the Act) which exempts “housing for older persons” from the Act’s prohibitions against discrimination because of familial status. My discussion centers around both our condo documents and the Housing for Older Persons Act of 1995 (HOPA) which amended the requirements for qualification for the “housing for older persons” exemption established in the Fair Housing Act. The confusion that I see is that many people (including building presidents and the real estate agents trying to sell units in a down market) appear to believe that the federal laws somehow prevent Century Village from implementing or enforcing our own documents which state very clearly that at least one permanent resi-

dent in each unit must be over 55 years of age. (Article 9.1 of the Markham S Declaration of Condominium, as amended reads, in pertinent part, as follows: “Permanent occupancy shall be by at least one person 55 years of age or older ….” (Emphasis in the original). The identical statement can be found in Article V. 1. of the Articles of Incorporation, as amended in 1990. As stated in one of the comments in the Federal Rule implementing HOPA, “There continues to be confusion concerning what is referred to as the 80/20 split. HOPA states that the minimum standard to obtain housing for persons who are 55 years of age or older status in that ‘at least 80%’ of the occupied units be occupied by persons 55 years or older. There is no requirement that the remaining 20% of the occupied units be occupied by persons under the age of 55, nor is there a requirement that those units be used only for persons

where at least one member of the household is 55 years of age or older. Communities may decline to permit any persons under the age of 55; may require that 100% of the units have at least one occupant who is 55 years of age or older; may permit up to 20% of the occupied units to be occupied by persons who are younger than 55 years of age; or set whatever age or older. Communities may decline requirements if they wish, as long as at least 80% of the occupied units are occupied by one person 55 years of age or older, and so long as such requirements are not inconsistent with the overall intent to be housing for older persons.” (Emphasis added). In the Congressional Record, Senator Brown described the purpose of HOPA as “making the law clearer and more workable for seniors *** to protect seniors so that they can, if they wish move to housing where they are protected in their safety and their privacy.” While

younger people may not understand why we would choose to live in a community without younger people, our legislators obviously realized the protection that the Act provides to seniors. If you look at your association records, even the application process asks if the owner realizes that the unit must be occupied by at least one person over 55. This is because of the age requirement found in our Association’s documents. I know that exceptions have been made and our documents allow for such exemptions, so long as the Board of Directors adopt reasonable rules and regulations consistent with the Act. As I explained in a prior News and Views column, before anyone is permitted to reside in a condominium unit who is under the age of 55, the Board must be aware of the limitations found in the Fair Housing Act and should be using those limitations See FHA, pg 28A


PAGE

28A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Consumer Interest SW 10th Street Meeting By DAN GLICKMAN SW 10th Street overpass to be discussed at Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) on Thursday, October 16th at 9:30 a.m. in the Broward County Government Center, 115 S. Andrews Blvd. Fort Lauderdale. This project impacts residents of Century Village. The meeting is open to the public. Those interested may attend.

FHA

continued from pg 27A

and the exemptions allowed by our documents only in exceptional circumstances. An exemption is permitted by the Amendments only after rules and regulations have been adopted which are “consistent with the purpose and intent� of the Fair Housing Act. In other words, the rules allowing an exemption must protect the “security and privacy� of older persons, as defined by the Act. I have heard horror stories in other over 55 communities where exceptions were made for persons who subsequently had children and it took years of litigation to remove these families because prior approval had been given. While our documents limit the amount of time children under the age of 18 may visit and allow for no residency by children, the cost of litigation can bankrupt small associations such as ours. In addition, persons in their 30’s and 40’s prefer a lifestyle different from older generations. In my opinion, even if someone in their 30’s or 40’s inherits a unit, the Board cannot approve them for occupancy without violating the intent of the Fair Housing Act and jeopardizing the entire Village as we now know and enjoy it. (Editor’s Note: I would like to note that, although Ms. Olmstead graduated with a Juris Doctarate Degree cum laude from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, she is currently retired and not licensed to practice law in Pennsylvania or Florida. She is not rendering a legal opinion on this subject and you are cautioned to consult an attorney with any questions or problems that you may have. )

ATTENTION PEOPLE WITH MEDICARE:

We cordially invite you and a guest to our

*f\9ffmYd;YjfanYd@]Ydl`>Yaj Celebrate with physicians and staff of Unimed at Century Village Main Clubhouse Deerfield Beach 4UESDAY /CTOBERTHsAMnPM

Bgafmk^gj^j]]_Ye]k$hjar]k$^gg\j]^j]k`e]flk 4ORESERVEYOURSEAT GETMOREINFORMATION ORFORACCOMMODATIONS OFPERSONSWITHSPECIALNEEDSATSALESMEETINGS CALL

$EBBIE7RIGHTs   4$$    -ONDAYn&RIDAYAMnPM –Medicare –Group Health –Individual Health –Dental, Life, Vision

Medicare-approved HMO, PPO, PDP and PFFS plans available to anyone entitled to Part A or enrolled in Part B of Medicare through age or disability (for MA plans, individuals must have both Part A and Part B.) Enrollment period restrictions apply, call Humana for details. A sales representative will be present with information and applications. M0006_GHA01T6RR

BRO 10/08


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

29A

Consumer Interest PITFALLS

continued from pg 26A

United Arab Emirates and barely ahead of Slovenia. But the study has serious problems in evaluating the success of the American system. As Michael Tanner of the Cato Institute notes, the WHO report utilizes subjective criteria such as fairness which is not strictly related to a country’s health care system. For example, one of the criteria is tobacco control. Others include the lack of a sufficiently progressive tax system. Moreover, the WHO study penalizes the U.S. for adopting Health Savings Accounts and for the fact that patients pay out of pocket for health care. Other WHO criteria, such as life expectancy, are heavily distorted by factors such as violent crime, tobacco use, and obesity—factors resulting from behavior, individual choice, and other influences unrelated to the functioning of the health care system. Advocates for a national plan also skew U.S. infant mortality data, which is often used in cross-country comparisons. For example, in the U.S., some high-risk pregnancies have a greater chance of being brought to term using the latest medical technologies. However, some of these infants die soon after birth, boosting the infant-mortality rate. But in European countries such as Austria, Germany, and Switzerland, fetuses must weigh at least one pound to count as a live birth; in Switzerland, the fetus must be at least a foot long to be counted. In Sicko,” Moore cites low infant mortality rates in Cuba,

suggesting that the Communist nation is a model for the U.S. to adopt. But Tanner notes that Cuba has “one of the world’s highest abortion rates, meaning that many babies with health problems that could lead to early deaths are never brought to term.”” Better Care Abroad? Moore, Krugman, and other advocates of more government control over the American health care system maintain that socialized medicine abroad results in higher quality health care and more access to new technologies. However, a large body of evidence calls these assertions into question. In the 1970s, Great Britain invented the CT scanner, and for some period of time exported more than half the CT scanners used in the world. But today it has half the number of CT scanners per capita than we have in the United States. Canada faces similar problems with CT scanner shortages. Canada and the UK suffer from other similar shortages compared to the U.S. “Among people with chronic renal failure, only half as many Canadians as Americans get dialysis, and only a third as many Britons on a per capita basis,” writes John Goodman of the National Center for Policy Analysis, who spent more than two decades analyzing the performance of world health care systems. “The American rate of coronary bypass surgeries is three or four times what it is in Canada, and five times what it is in Britain.” Statistics compiled by the Paris-based Organization for

Cooperation and Development (OECD) in June 2007 show that the United States compares very well with 11 other industrialized countries in the number of MRI units and CT scanners per one million people: The United States, with 32 CT scanners and 26 MRI units, led virtually every other nation (with the exception of Japan) in almost every category. An article published last year in the British medical journal The Lancet strongly suggests that the United States is also outperforming the world when it comes to surviving diseases such as AIDS, heart disease, cancer, and pneumonia. For example, approximately 63 percent of Americans diagnosed with cancer survive for at least five years. This tops the survival rates in countries with staterun national health care, including Italy, Spain and Great Britain. It is often argued that countries with state-run health care outpace the U.S. when it comes to ensuring access to drugs. For example, Tanner points out that only 44 percent of Americans benefit from statins, drugs which reduce cholesterol and protects against heart disease. That’s bad news—until you compare it to Germany, where just 26 percent have access to statins; or Great Britain, where 23 percent get them, or Italy, where just 17 percent do. North of the Border Some Americans believe that government-run health care is right for the U.S., based upon their limited experience with the Canadian system. Indeed, if one travels north of

the border, flu shots and prescription drugs are wonderfully inexpensive. But again, this is a skewed picture. What most Americans don’t know is that Canadian drug prices are kept artificially low through price controls. Moreover, the U.S. health care system is a safety net for many Canadians. Indeed, they flock south of the border to obtain care that their own system denies them. Thousands of anguished Canadians have had hellish experiences getting the proper care they desire in their country’s affordable health system. Consider the example of Jane Pelton of Ottawa, whose teenage daughter Emily was told she had to wait up to three years for a governmentpaid operation to repair her torn knee ligament. Rather than leave Emily in pain, the family decided to pay $3,300 for arthroscopic surgery at a private clinic with no help from the government. “It’s like somebody’s telling you that you can buy this car, and you’ve paid for the car, but you can’t have it right now,” said Pelton. “Every day we’re paying for health care, yet when we go to access it, it’s just not there.” Shockingly, the average Canadian family pays nearly half of its income in taxes each year, much of it to the health system. In 2005, the Canadian Taxpayers Federation estimated that citizens in the Ontario province were spending about 40 percent of their tax dollars on health care. By 2035, that figure could reach 85 percent. In Alberta, a nonprofit organization called Friends

of Medicare (Canada’s health care system for the elderly has the same name as the American one) emphasizes problems with the U.S. health system and defends Canada’s as the “most moral and the most cost effective health care system in the world,” adding: “Is your sick grandkid more deserving of help than your neighbor’s grandchild?” The answer to that question is “yes,” replies arthroscopic surgeon Brian Day, if the child needs urgent care and cannot get it at a governmentfunded hospital. Day told the Associated Press that he became so frustrated with the long delays in getting authorization to perform surgery at public hospitals in Vancouver, he built his own private clinic. Several years ago, Day testified before Canada’s Supreme Court on the myriad failings of Canada’s health system. The case involved 73-year-old George Zeliotis, who suffered excruciating pain and became addicted to painkillers during a yearlong wait for hip replacement surgery. His doctor, Jacques Chaouli, claimed Zeliotis’ constitutional rights were violated because Quebec failed to provide the care he desperately needed. On June 9, 2005, the court ruled 4-3 in favor of Zeliotis, noting that as a result of delays in obtaining tests and undergoing surgery, patients have suffered or even died. The case was one modest step for common sense. It underscored the reality that the Canadian system can place severe limits on access to care that most Americans wouldn’t tolerate. Prescription To be sure, the U.S. health care system is far from perfect. But it provides the overwhelming majority of Americans access to the best care in the world. Moreover, many of the flaws in the U.S. system result not from a private marketplace, but from flawed tax and regulatory policies implemented by the federal and state governments. It is telling that even as Moore and Krugman seek to push the United States in the direction of a governmentrun, single-payer model, European nations are trying to integrate market practices into their own health care systems. Indeed, they seek to emulate the American system. Adopting the MooreKrugman approach would only guarantee massive tax increases, rationing, and even denial of care.


PAGE

30A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

31A


PAGE

32A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Consumer Interest “Ask Lori…Parrish on Appraisal”

Broward County Property Appraiser Lori Parrish Answers Your Questions… Dear Lori:

portion of taxes. Instead these savings are deducted in the

I just received my “Do

mathematical calculation used

Not Pay” proposed tax notice

to reach the total proposed tax

from your

amount listed at the bottom of

Office. I have a hard time

your TRIM Notice. Look for

understanding what hap-

the upper right hand box on

pened to that second $25,000

your TRIM Notice for a list-

Homestead Exemption

ing of all qualified property

Florida voters approved in

tax exemptions. It will state

January. How do I know I received it? M.M., Dania Beach, FL Our office has been deluged with questions asking where the additional $25,000 Homestead Exemption is. Our office automatically applied the 2nd Homestead to all qualifying properties this year. Amendment 1 provides an additional

stead Exemption plus the full $25,000 additional Homestead. The second $25,000 is NOT printed in the “Base Exemptions” box at the top of your “TRIM” (Truth in Millage) Notice. By law, “Base Exemptions are only those exemptions which apply to all taxing authorities: $25,000 Homestead, Widow/Wid-

“2 Homestd” if you qualify. Taxpayers may look up their properties on our website at www.bcpa.net for a more detailed explanation of the property values, exemptions and taxes, or contact us at 954.357.6830 and we will provide an explanation to you. Sincerely,

Lorri Parrish, CFA

ower, Disabled Veteran, and Disability. The second $25,000

If you have a question for the

Homestead Exemption of up

Homestead, The Senior’s

Property Appraiser, please email

to $25,000 applied to assessed

Additional Exemption and

Lori at lori@bcpa.net or write

value above $50,000. If your

the Florida Combat Veteran

to her at the Broward County

assessed value is $75,000 and

Disability exemptions are not

Property Appraiser’s Office, 115

up, your exemption will be

“Base Exemptions” as they do

S. Andrews Avenue, Room 111,

the original $25,000 Home-

not apply to the School Board

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301

Health

continued from pg 26A

and treatments. Surgery is often ignored by both doctors and HMO administrators although it could, in many instances, save lives. Non payment of procedures performed causes many families to face financial bankruptcies and lengthy court cases or media exposures occasionally force reluctant insurers to pay up. By the same token, neither can pharmaceutical corporations be expected to adequately consider patients’ needs. After having reaped billions of dollars in profit from medication, at the expiration of the patent rights, they pay generic manufacturers additional millions to keep their cheaper version off the market. This may be immoral, maybe, but is completely legal under our current laws. This is not intended to be an attack against an industry which is organized and operated on a for profit basis as a sole means to exist. To remedy this situation is so simple and elementary that it is amazing people do not seem to understand it. It is

Exp. 10/31/08

Exp. 10/31/08

Exp. 10/31/08

necessary to revamp the way our health care and medication distribution is organized. The pressures of profit and responsibilities to shareholders must be removed from these two items. Corporations engaged in such a vital public service must be controlled by the government or the everspiraling health care costs will leave millions of Americans unable to protect themselves against illness. This will, in the long run, create a national health crisis overwhelming our national economy as more people will be unable to buy medicines and health insurance. The result will be an ever-larger percentage of the population dependent on Medicaid, straining an over-burdened treasury to a breaking point. If some of my readers should accuse me of having socialistic ideas, a term insurance companies and politicians have successfully demonized to scare people, I say this is nonsense. All I am asking is for the people of this country to receive the same socialized health care as do our elected representatives.


OCTOBER 2008

My presence in the Village

By MARTY POPELSKY, Commissioner District 3 What’s doing at City Hall I have been able to secure at this time an additional $80,000 for elevators in the Village. When more money becomes available, I will fight for more. As I mentioned in last months article, the City has prepared a procedure for the eligibility criteria: 1. Limited to 2-story

buildings 2. Greater than 50% of the building occupants have to be Florida residents 3. At least 75% of the Florida residents in the building have to vote “yes” to having the lifts installed and to be responsible for annual maintenance 4. At least 75% of the

Florida residents in the building have to meet HUD lowmoderate income limits.

From the Senate By TED DEUTCH

With the fall season upon us, many are already gearing up for the holiday season. From the Jewish High Holy Days through Thanksgiving, many of us will be traveling to see family and friends, but there are several important things to remember when away from home. TRIM (Truth in Milage) notices were sent out in August to notify homeowners of changes to their property taxes for the upcoming year. Don’t forget your annual property taxes will be discounted if paid in November. This November 4th is also Election Day. Not only do

we have the opportunity to vote in an historic Presidential election, but there are also many state and local races, and several important constitutional amendments. If you have not yet registered to vote, remember the deadline is October 6th. If you cannot make it to the polls on November 4th, you may vote early beginning October 20th, or vote by absentee ballot. For information on voter registration, early voting locations, and instructions on obtaining an absentee ballot call the Palm Beach County Supervisor of Elections Office at (561) 656-6200 or visit their

website at www.pbcelections. org. The Florida Legislature will resume committee meetings in the beginning of 2009. With a new Senate President, Speaker of the House and potentially dozens of new members, I am excited to get back to work on the serious issues facing Floridians. Over the next several months, I will

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

33A

Community Development Division staff contact building associations on the waiting list until we get four that qualify. Additional lifts may be funded if money becomes available in the future. At the City Hall budget meeting we agreed not to raise the millage rate for the entire city. That means that most likely your City taxes will not increase in 2009. Call me with any questions

or ask how you can help. As

be working on legislation for the 2009 Legislative Session. As always, I welcome input from my constituents and would encourage you to call my office with any legislative

issues or concerns we may address. I wish you all a safe and happy holiday season. It is an honor to serve you. Ted Deutch

your Commissioner I want you feel free to contact me in any way you need assistance. City Office Phone:

954-480-4218 City Assistant Phone

954-480-4263 Home Phone:

954-427-7272 Regards & Good Health


PAGE

34A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Phyllis’ kitchen By PHYLLIS PISTOLIS Italian Ranch Chicken Strips 2/3 cup cornflake crumbs 1 tsp Italian seasoning ½ tsp garlic powder 1/3 cup ranch salad dressing 1 tsp water ½ lb boneless skinless chicken breast – cut into strips In a shallow bowl, combine the cornflake crumbs, Italian seasoning and garlic powder. In another bowl, combine

Lemon Pudding Cake 4 ½ tsp. butter, softened 1 cup sugar 1/3 cup lemon juice 1 egg yolk 3 tbsp all purpose flour 2 tsp grated lemon peel 1/4 tsp salt 1 cup fat free milk 3 egg whites

lemon peel and salt. Mix

spray with non-stick cooking spray. Bake, uncovered at 400° for 12 to 15 minutes or until juices run clear.

Serve warm.

crumbly. Beat in lemon juice, egg yolk, flour,

greased baking sheet. Lightly

minutes till golden brown.

butter and sugar till

chicken into dressing mixture, Arrange chicken on a

into it. Bake 325° for 40 to 45

In a large bowl, beat

dressing and water. Dip then coat with crumb mixture.

ing water into a larger baking dish and set the smaller dish

well. Gradually beat in milk. In another large bowl, beat egg whites till stiff peaks form. Gently fold into lemon mixture. Pour into ungreased baking dish. Pour boil-

Destiny Hearing Aids virtually eliminate feedback. With its advanced technology, Destiny is designed to automatically adapt to the sound changes around you while virtually eliminating buzzing, screeching and whistling.

EXTRA! EXTRA! YOU CAN NOW VISIT THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE OR YOUR CVE Reporter from the comfort of your home

cvereporter.com

30-Day, No Risk Guarantee On All Destiny Hearing Aids

Our promise to you. We promise to provide you with outstanding customer care and state-ofthe-art hearing instruments to help you hear better. Satisfaction with your new hearing instruments is our top priority.

FREE HEARING TEST Make Your Appointment Today!

Deerfield Hearing Center

Craig Drucker, BC-HIS • Service Is The Difference

1648552

Papers for the entire year wil be available for viewing 24/7

“Destiny hearing aids will not only improve your hearing, they’ll change your life.”

1822 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach • 954-570-9631 Century Plaza Shopping Center (SW Corner of Military Trail & Hillsboro) www.deerfieldhearingcenter.com


OCTOBER 2008

Sailing, sailing, over the, WHAT? By NORMAN L. BLOOM

When you learn to sail a boat, you also learn many of the special names used to identify sections of the boat, plus the sails and the rigging. I sailed my boats for about 25 years and I know most of the nomenclature, but I must admit, I never did learn to what the term Bounding Main referred. I supposed I could find out if I took the time to look it up, but, in all honesty, I do not care. It was enough that the lilt of this song would often run thru my head thru pure exhilaration when I was actually sailing and had caught a good wind. There is a personal joy and satisfaction in being able to handle a sail boat that is unmatched in any other sport, and sailing is definitely a sport if you are not hauling goods for a living. To feel the wind on your face and to be able to control the speed and the direction of your boat based on that wind is a very pleasurable sensation. Little by little, a sailor learns what he can do to harness the wind so as to get the most out of his craft. The boat needs to heel over (tip, or lean) just so for each direction and for each level of strength of wind. The sails have to be the proper tautness and/or the proper fullness, and they must be sheeted (pulled over) to the correct side of the boat depending on varying wind directions. The proper mix of sails must be laid on as determined by the current wind conditions. The sailor has to determine the best direction of sail, that will give his boat the longest tack (direction of travel) be it upwind or downwind. Adjusting for these variables well and quickly is vital to the progress of the boat. It is often crucial to the

control of the boat, that certain commands are followed out without hesitation. All those special names for the things on a sail boat are necessary because they allow the sailors to know precisely what action has to be done when another crewman, or perhaps the captain, issues a command. With all of these elements and many more, having an effect on the speed of the boat, is it any wonder that two boats of about equal size, going in the same direction, will find themselves in an impromptu race as they each try to show they can get more out of their craft then the other guy? It was quite common hundreds of years ago, as it is now, to find a formal race of many sailboats of the same design, in any good size body of water near land. I raced my 22 foot Catalina, which is really a family boat, against 15 to 18 other 22 foot Catalinas, for many happy years on Lake Hopatcong, in New Jersey. Whenever I could recruit a steady crewman or better still, two crewmen, I did very well in the races and I have trophies to show for my successes. The hardest job was to get someone to come each weekend for the races. It was critical as repetition would allow you to build up a rapport with each other over what had to be done to keep the sailboat moving at its best speed during the races. While the races were fun and exciting, I enjoyed also, just sailing slowly around the lake and enjoying the peace and tranquility of a motorless craft. This was only possible in the morning as the motor boats would arrive about noon every day and spend the rest of the day speeding about

in every direction for no good reason except to speed. The sailors looked at the power boater with disdain as running a motor boat required no skill. Most of my contemporaries were playing golf in their spare time. For me, any free morning was an excuse to throw some food and drink and my bathing suit in a bag, call my dog, and go up to my boat for a few hours of gliding over the sparkling waters under press of sail. My house was only 20 minutes away from the lake where I had my slip, so as long as the weather held, I went sailing quite often. I treasured the few months after Labor Day, when the weather was still warm enough to go to the Lake, as most of the motor boat owners pulled their craft out as of Labor Day. I do not know what their reason for such haste was, but I was certainly grateful for the scarcity of power boats on the Lake for those few months. One year, back about 1988, we had an unusually large turnout all summer for our Saturday morning races. At least three other one-design groups were racing at the same time as we, so the lake was just filed with the glorious sight of sailboats in every direction. It was quite a sight as seen from the shore and the homes that sat lakeside were invariably full of guests invited to see the sight. Each of the fleets, that were racing that day, would put out two floating markers in about the center of the lake and in a carefully designed pattern. During the race, the sailboats would be required to pass one of the makers on starboard (right), and one on port (left). While waiting for the start of the race, the sailboats would all maneuver behind the starting line, just before the

Together we are one

CVE REPORTER

pre-prescribed start time, in hopes of being the first across the line, A good start was often critical to the finishing position in the race. The boats would try to out-maneuver their competition and to box them out of superior locations or better wind gauge locations. In sailing rules, a boat with a starboard wind has the right of way over a boat with a port wind, so the captains would try to bully their way to the starting line, by approaching it at a high speed, from the starboard position. The captains would shout out, “Starboard!” to claim the right of way and any boats on Port tack would have to give way. A starter’s pistol on a committee boat would give the signal to go across the Starting Line/Finish Line, which was an imaginary line between the committee boat and some easily seen point on the shore. The boats would all sheet in (tighten the sails) and make a mad dash for the starting line. Some times that mad dash was really a slow dash as the winds would slow down and be too light to move the boats. The boats would flounder and often lose their precious positions, drifting without wind, but they had to wait for the wind to pick up again so they could pass that starting line. One Saturday, that summer, I had recruited two crewmen and I was able to establish a good position waiting for the start of the race. Another boat approached my position on Port tack, with the obvious intention of working its way into a starboard tack. As the winds were light, I did not want to give up my superior location, so when the other boat approached me, I shouted out, “Starboard” to alert the other captain that he would have to maneuver around me. Unfortunately, this captain was not very skilled in handling his boat and we collided bow to bow. The collision dented the hull a little and destroyed my bow pulpit. The offending boat and I were both left behind by the rest of the fleet that continued on with the race. I went forward and inspected the damage to my boat, which fortunately, was not very severe. I hollered over to the other captain that I had starboard position and the collision was therefore his fault. He admitted the blame and said he would take care off the repairs. So we both went back to get into the ongoing race, although we were far behind. Since I had no chance of catching up to the other boats by following their same route, I sailed across the lake to the other side in hopes of catching a better wind. Sure enough, the winds were much stronger on that

PAGE

35A

side of the lake that day, and my boat was moving at top speed for a very long tack. “Sheet in! Let go the Boom Vang! Ready about”? Hard a lee” I shouted to my crew as we roared thru wind. When we converged with the other boats at the first marker, I was surprised to find we were in the lead! We rounded the marker and headed for the 2nd marker. Then we took our special route back to the finish line and lo and behold we had won the race, and by a large margin. My boat looked beat up with the bow pulpit hanging over the side of hull, but we had, “snatched victory from the jaws of frustration,” that day. After the race, the captain who had collided with my boat, had a change of heart and decided to try to avoid the responsibility for my damage. He told me to use my insurance policy to pay for the work. I told him my rates would go up and he should put it on his policy or pay cash. Then he began to claim the collision was not his fault, even though the captains from several other boats who saw the collision all agreed with me that it was his fault. In the end, I had to take him to small claims court to get him to pay up. The Judge heard that two sailboat owners were contesting a bill for damages, and said “I don’t need rich yachtsmen tying up my court. You two go straight to arbitration!” Our sailboats were certainly not yachts, but we went to the arbitrator and the dispute was settled. I was so annoyed with the other captain for forcing me to go to court, that I copied his check to me and posted it on the bulletin board at the dock for all the other sailors to see. I do miss sailing. Sheet in – Take in the slack in the line controlling the forward – jib sail Boom Vang Cinched down when going upwind – into – the wind , this gadget attached to the bottom of the boom, keeps the boom from lifting up and spoiling the angle of the main sail. When going downwind, we release the boom vang to create a large pocket for light air situations Ready about? When the captain is about to turn the boat for the opposite tack, he asks, in this way “Are you ready for me to come about?” Sailors have specific duties to prepare for, and reset after, a tack Hard a Lee When using a tiller to control direction, it is necessary to swing it hard toward the lee side of the boat. This command simply warns the crew that someone is about to swing this heavy handle in a wide path, to the opposite side of the boat.


PAGE

36A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

37A


PAGE

38A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

Now it Can Be Told By JERRY WOLF

The war years we call, World War Two affected millions of young men around the world, who were drafted in all of the warring nations. Most of these involuntary soldiers, sailors, and aviators, were exposed to battles that resulted in huge amounts of casualties among their ranks. There was no relief or furloughs for the lower ranks. They only stopped fighting the enemy when they themselves were injured or killed. Very few made it all the way through the war in one piece. I attempted to control my destiny during that time, by volunteering to join the United States Army Air Corp as an aviation cadet. Although I was a firebrand and expressed my desire to shoot down Nazi pilots in their ME 109’s with our P 41’s, I washed out of flight school. I had too much difficulty landing the clumsy training plane which was the PT19. Since I had been through Officers Training School at Maxwell Fields, I hoped I might be commissioned as a navigator or a bombardier, but no such luck. I was busted back to PFC and sent for six months training at Radio Operator School, in Elgin Illinois. Then the service decided radio operators also needed training in aerial gunnery, so I was moved again to Yuma, Arizona. I was moving West with each step and had no time off other than a few three day passes I, as yet, had no record of service that would create an opportunity for promotion. The only rank lower than a Private, is Private First Class who gets his single stripe if he is capable of breathing. So, it was a great surprise to me one evening, when I was given orders to dress in My Class A uniform and to report to my squadron commander, Captain Michaels. After I saluted him he said, “I am sorry to have to advise you so late in the day, but your mother had a heart attack and may not make it. I am authorizing a thirty day furlough for you on compassionate leave. Further, I have ordered transport for you by the Air Corp to get you back home to Brooklyn. And, the American Red Cross has advanced me a loan of fifty dollars for your expenses.” At first I was jubilant as I had never had a furlough in the two and a half years I had been in the service and the

sudden freedom from military routine was euphoric. It came flooding back me why I was getting this time off. I had deep concern for my mother’s health, and I could not get any details about that heart attack. In those days there was no such thing as a long distant call from Arizona to Brooklyn and, of course, the internet hadn’t even been invented. I went back to my barracks, packed and waited to be called for my flight home. At 5:00 a.m. I was summoned to the flight line and ordered aboard a C 54 transport plane going to Olathe, Kansas. From there, I was placed on a B 17 bomber going, ironically, to Floyd Bennet Field in Brooklyn. Then I simply grabbed a bus to our apartment which was on Kings Highway. Concern about my Mom was now filling my thoughts. I went up the elevator and tapped on our door. Imagine my surprise when the person who answered the door was my Mother looking happy and full of life and with a big smile for me! “What happened, how did you recover so fast?” I asked dazedly. She responded, “I learned that they were transferring some air corps soldiers to do infantry service at the Anzio beachhead. There were 20,000 casualties there in less than four months and I was afraid that you might be included in the group going there. I went to Doctor Lazear, our family doctor, and I pleaded with him to write a report about a medical condition with me, that would insure your return here.” It was all a ruse! Nothing was wrong with my Mom. Well, I felt a little guilty, but after confirming that my mother was indeed, quite healthy, I sure enjoyed that furlough. My Aunt Sylvia lent me her Plymouth on my first day back, and I drove off to visit some of my old haunts in and near West Orange, New Jersey. As I drove, I reflected on my Mother’s ruse. It might have saved my life as I had avoided the posting to a battle zone. Was it unpatriotic, unethical, and illegal? Yes, quite likely, and it could lead to a jail if sentence discovered. “O well, what the Hell. Who should I look up for tonight? Ruth? Elaine? Judy? Life is short enough, so I’ll just enjoy the breaks.”

CVE REPORTER

Second Chance By NELIA PANZA

I looked up at the ceiling, begging God to let me die. I saw no reason to go on living. I had no way to kill myself. I could only hope he heard me and would answer my prayer. Have you ever wondered why anyone would want to die; at the age of 26; with a 20 month old child? You probably would say to yourself, “You have everything to live for… why do you want to die?” I never thought I would…… I was lying in my bed, in the isolation ward at Fordham Hospital, in the Bronx. I had been stricken with Spinal Meningitis, paralyzed from the neck down. I could not move, but I could see and hear clearly. I did not know where my husband was. When I had complained of unbearable pain in my head and neck, instead of trying to help me or find a way to ease the ache, he got out of bed, dressed and left the apartment, after calling my mother at 5 a.m. to inform her, “Your daughter is sick!” All I remember is my baby crying in her crib and my mother arriving by cab. When she cried out, “My God, what’s wrong with you?” I replied, “Ma, I’m dying!” My mother called the police and they, in turn, called Fordham Hospital. I was diagnosed as having Spinal Meningitis. Shortly after the ambulance arrived, I went into a coma. When I came to, I found myself in the hospital, paralyzed, but still experiencing unbearable pain which spread from my forehead to my shoulder. Without my husband or my child, I was inconsolable. I kept falling back into the coma, and at one point, I heard the priest administering the last rites. I also heard the doctor saying to him, “Father, she can’t answer you – she may be dying. If she passes the crisis, she’ll live, although we don’t know what shape she’ll be in. If she doesn’t pass the crisis, she will die.” I heard it all so clearly, but strange to say, I was not afraid. All I could think of was that I would never share my child’s life, would not see her go to school or grow up into a lovely young lady. I felt so sad. I had wanted a child so badly and now I would no longer be in her life. “God, how could you do this to me?” I asked. When I came to, once again, I was told I would have to undergo a spinal tap. I was also informed I could not see my child for eight weeks, at least. She would be with my

mother-in-law, a very fine woman, until it was considered safe for my daughter to return to my care. During my hospitalization, I only had visits from my parents. I had no idea where my husband was and I became quite despondent. My helplessness, the fact that I could not be with my child and did not have the love and support of my husband, tormented me. How could he be so insensitive? I reached the point where I lost the will or desire to live. What made it so exasperating was the fact that I could not do anything to end my life. I certainly could not ask anyone to do it for me. The only thing I could do was to pray to God that I would not wake up the next morning. “Please, dear lord, hear me. I can’t go on living this way any longer. Help me!!!” As the weeks went by, I slowly recovered. I could start feeling my arms, my feet, my legs, and finally, my whole body. However, my only visitors continued to be my parents. I was completely overwrought! I could not call what I was going through living. That night, I dreamt that I was laid out in my casket. Suddenly, my daughter came up to the coffin, touched my cheek, and pleaded, “Mommy, please come back…I miss you!” I awoke, my heart beating rapidly. All I could think of was that I had to live for my baby. She needs me! The next morning I asked if I might speak to my daughter on the phone and the physician in charge replied, “that won’t be necessary, you’ll be going home soon and she can then visit you.” I could not believe it! I was finally going home! Upon discharge, I went to my parent’s home. Once there, I then spoke to my mother-in-law and she promised to bring my child to visit me since clearance had been given by my doctor. I could hardly wait to see her---it had

PAGE

39A

been eight weeks since we had last been together. When she arrived with her grandmother, I put my arms out to her and said, “Oh, I’m so glad to see you again! Come honey, let mommy hold my baby!” She moved away from me, and clinging to her grandmother, implored, “Please, Grandma take me home---I don’t want to stay here!” My heart was broken! I called my physician and asked for his advice. I was crushed! He suggested that I take it slowly, occasionally calling her on the phone, and letting her get used to me again. I held on to the dream I had had, telling myself she really needed me, yes, she did, and I had to be patient, but god, it was hard! When I was finally allowed to go outdoors, my doctor suggested I take my daughter out for an hour or so—just the two of us. I took her to a nearby shopping area, where there was a carousel. We had been talking on the phone daily and it helped to rekindle a sort of relationship. All I kept hoping was that she would bond once again with me and be my baby once more. Only she could revive in me the will to live. When we reached the carousel, I put her on one of the horses and, as I was walking away she called out, “Mommy, please ride with me. I don’t want to be alone!” I turned back, got on the horse with her and held her, my arms around her waist, my head close to her. “Are you alright now, honey?” She turned her head and replied, “I love you, mommy!” Now, I knew why I had to live, my child needed me as much as I needed her! Thank you, dear Lord, for giving me a second chance!” Yes, God works in mysterious ways.


PAGE

40A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Sad Ending for a War Hero By JERRY WOLF

I remember fondly the holiday of The Fourth of July in the year 1973. On that day, to my great fortune, I met the lady who would become my bride. I wrote of my wife in a story that ran in this newspaper, under the title, “Paean to a Mixed Marriage”, and I will say no more except to repeat that we have been happily married for thirty one years. This story is about another person I also met that day. His name was Elmer Grade. He and my wife-to-be and other “Ticas” (Costa Ricans name for themselves) were square dancing under the auspices of the Costa Rica Post 10 of the American Legion. I first noticed Elmer as I watched him dance. He was a square dance whiz. Elmer was a short, mild mannered guy with a farmer’s face and an “aw shucks” attitude that when combined with an accent, would lead us New Yorkers to deem him a “hick.” But if you simply looked into

his warm, grey eyes, you just knew you could trust him. Elmer had built a little farm house in Santa Ana, a suburb of the capital city of San Jose. There he lived simply, including washing and pressing his own clothes and other chores that the women usually did. Living alone on his little plot of land satisfied him until he met a pretty girl named Marlene. She was a twenty three year old Tica, and, it turned out, she was not very intelligent and was far too attached to her Mother. Not only had she never held a job, she was lazy and did not even help her sister and mother with housework. But love is blind and shortly after meeting her, Elmer leased out his little farm and moved to San Jose to be nearer to Marlene and her clan. One day, what she felt was a great opportunity, presented itself to Marlene’s Mother. There was a death in her family of a relative who

Gefilte Fish and Girdles By GLORIA DONNELLY

As a child, I was constantly bombarded with horror stories about the Depression – from relatives, friends of relatives, relatives of friends ad infinitum, ad nauseum. I not only refer to the financial hardships, but the shattered dreams and broken hearts. It was THE GREAT DEPRESSION!! which caused all experiences to be measured by its emotional impact and economic consequences. They were life altering, long lasting and highly toxic. Despite being a generation

removed from its inception, I was most surprised at its residual power to strike fear into hearts and minds many years into the future. Back to Grandma Annie and her urgent need for work. The construction company was kaput but fortunately, because of her excellent sales skill, she talked her way into a job at Munchicks Fish Market. What was omitted was that her only experience with fish was making gefilte fish at home. She appeared at work and was told to skin,

owned a company with two busses, and the bus company had become available. All that the lady lacked was money to pay for the operation. The Ticas all seemed to believe that every American who lived in Costa Rica was a millionaire so she and Marlene pressed Elmer for a loan, but he refused. He needed his savings he told them, along with his Navy pension, to be able to live comfortably. Marlene went behind his back anyway, and forged a check for her mother to make the purchase. When Elmer learned of the betrayal, he left Marlene and went back to his original home in Prairie Lane, Nebraska .He stayed a year, until loneliness brought him back once again to San Jose and, ultimately, to the charms of Marlene. Elmer resumed his interest in the Legion and we resumed our mild friendship. I remember teasing him about stains on his pants as I too was in the habit of getting food stains on my trousers far too often. I told him that he,“ate all over

his pants.” Then, after a time, he stopped showing up at the Legion meetings at all, and no one knew why. After several months went by, I happened to see Marlene on the street and asked her about Elmer. She replied, “We buried him a few months ago.” I was aghast and blurted out, “You should have let the Legion know and we would have had a squad of Legionnaires give the appropriate ceremony.” She replied, “I just didn’t think of it.” Then some interesting fact about Elmer came to light. As Legion Adjutant, it was my duty to submit a report to the Department of the Panama Canal, of routine demises of our members. In looking over his discharge papers, I was surprised to note that Elmer had reached the rank of Chief Petty Officer, and that he had received the Navy Cross. I was then further astounded to discover that there was a reason why such a seemly insignificant individual had received so much interest from his superior officers.

On March the 15th, in 1942, General Douglas MacArthur escaped from doomed Corrigador in the Philippines by PT Boat and submarine, and fled to the Southwest Pacific Command in Australia. There he took over as Commander In Chief. His family and entourage were also secretly shipped out on a squadron of four Torpedo Boats, to a safe location thousands of miles away. My mild mannered, little friend Elmer, it seems, was a crew member of that squadron and they had all risked their lives on that mission. There was tremendous danger in crossing the Pacific which was still controlled, at that time, by the Japanese navy ships and prowling submarines. With typical modesty, my friend Elmer never spoke about his brave actions, but he did very much deserve a ceremony over his coffin. Perhaps my writing about him here will make up for missing, sadly, our final thank you to our friend Elmer Grade - a hero we barely knew.

gut, clean the fish and then, wait on the customers. And, she needed to bring her own apron. At the onset of her employment, she was woefully unprepared and unskilled. She was a quick study but it still took her time to figure out how to handle the fish properly but, until then, that job was most hazardous to her health. Her hands and fingers were constantly being stabbed by the fish bones and she wiped them on her apron. By the time she completed her workday, she looked like she had been to a chainsaw massacre. The sight of those bloody, gory aprons so traumatized my mother Alice that she could not erase that image from her mind for the rest of her life. But, remember, it was THE GREAT DEPRESSION!! Once she mastered the job, she did well at the market until a new opportunity arose, one better suited to her skill level. Thus, she embarked on her new career as a corsetiere for a national company named Charis. I can easily visualize readers scratching their heads, wondering, What the hell is a corsetiere? Without being too graphic, I will now expound upon ladies’ lingerie styles in the 1930’s. Annie’s job entailed door-to-door selling, custom fitting, altering and delivering corsets to customers. The most ridiculous portion of the job was modeling the garments. My Grandma Annie was the predecessor

of Victoria’s Secret models. However, in lingerie, she was hardly a tall anorectic hottie and neither were her clients. Annie was short and chubby and her customers were zaftig, politely referred to as fullfigured. She was required to wear wraparound dresses so while selling her products, she could strip and verbally and visually describe all its features. Those corsets were big, heavy and fitted with bones, straps, laces, panels and every gizmo designed to suck in blubber. As a young girl, I had a theory (which I did not dare express aloud) that women were deemed the weaker sex only because of wearing those idiotic contraptions. Ladies were so cinched up, they became partially paralyzed and unable to breathe properly. How could they possibly be productive and compete with men? Around 1970, I burned my last girdle and vowed never to wear one again no matter how jiggly I was. That was my permanent contribution to the budding feminist movement of that time. Annie successfully worked for Charis for more than twenty years. At one point, she was the #3 sales producer for the entire U.S. and Canada. As we got deeper into the depression years, my mother Alice was getting antsy to get out of school and find a job. In 1937, Alice graduated from high school and thus, became the first person in our

immediate family with a high school diploma. She found her first full-time job as a bookkeeper for a used car dealer. She was thrilled that her new found wealth could be used to contribute financially to the family household. It was a real plum of a job—six days per week, salary: $8 per week. As always, Mom’s primary motivation was achieving financial security, she began taking civil service exams and got a job with the New York State Insurance Fund. Starting salary: $18.75 per week. What a big bump in pay. Freed from schoolwork and household chores, Alice thoroughly enjoyed the single life. She lived at home, had a nice job, a social life and a stylish wardrobe. At that time, there were very specific rules and regulations governing how a young lady was expected to dress. Life had improved. FDR’s radical economic policies were having their desired effect and the Depression loosened its stranglehold on the nation. Of course, that was simply a brief respite for the U.S. as we went directly from THE GREAT DEPRESSION into WORLD WAR II, with the Japanese attacking Pearl Harbor and Hitler committing unspeakable atrocities in Europe. More to come.


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

41A

Sounding Board The Art of Football By SHELLY BASKIN

The Pittsburgh Steelers. That’s my team and the team of countless Northerners turned Floridians. Of course, the Miami Dolphins are followed also. Every Sunday, during the winter, all other activities cease while the pigskin is thrown around and kicked about, as are the players. Monday evenings, also, are not exempt from this popular sport and mayhem. Every fan has a hat or two of their favorite team and maybe even a jacket or shirt. The real fan wears the entire outfit. And, this is the theme of my piece. The cap. Mine is black felt and tan leather with the Steelers logo of three diamonds in gold, red, and blue. It can be spotted in a crowd. And, it is. At a game you also should have, in your possession, a yellow towel or a terrible towel. This is the mark of a true Steelers fan. It is meant to be waved if a nice play was completed or, used to wipe away the tears if the ballgame is lost. Wherever you wander, the football cap is recognized. Recently, in a store, a clerk asked, “are you a Steeler’s fan?” He retorted that he was a lifelong supporter of Pittsburgh, gave me first class help and then escorted me to his register and rang up my sale. The other cashier had about ten folks on her line and they all looked my way. Maybe, they knew that the football fan was getting a pass. It was personal and wonderful—for me. However, there have been times, actually, many situations where another person favoring a different team such as the Giants, Jets, or the Cowboys would snub my choice in teams. These people don’t recognize you but, instead, ignore you to whatever degree the store manager allows. A reminder. Don’t wear a Washington Redskin’s shirt or a Colt’s cap to a Dolphin game. I found that you might be in grave danger by advertising the wrong team in the home stadium. When the Steelers are occasionally in a Super Bowl, the pace picks up. Thankfully, they won at the big dance in 2006. Getting there is rough, however. Actually, almost impossible, as any team has a chance on any given Sunday. Or, Monday night. Sixteen games. Sixteen weeks of torture. How many more wins do they need? If they

lose today, will they still have a chance? Does it depend on another team losing? This year was theirs. Do it for the coach; the owner; for each other. Do it for the Bus; do it for Bettis. You can be in big trouble, though, if you are wearing a Pitt hat and the salesperson is a Giant fan. At the game, wear a Steelers cap and a Dolphin shirt. In this way, at least, you have something on from the home team. I fortunately met a guy at the auto dealership, and naturally he spotted my Steelers cap. He was very talkative and said he is first, a Dolphin fan or a Dolfan. His team from the North was the Steel-

ers especially since the Fish team is not in playoffs. Last week I entered the Post Office which seemed quiet enough. The customers were waiting for next in line and the postal people were asking everyone if they needed extra stamps. That was it. Suddenly, the place lit up. A patron said “nice hat.” A female clerk asked if I “was going to watch the Steeler-Dolphin game tonight, on T.V.” A few others asked about the quarterbacks on both teams. It felt as though I was having a beer with some friends. Folks, that’s what wearing a football cap will get you. I feel that there is probably more chatting with a Steeler cap, however. I’m getting more introductions wearing the cap than I

did since I met my wife, 41 years ago. Then, you were introduced and started from scratch or the beginning. Wearing a Steelers topper, you already have a friend and are almost part of the family. Too bad my wife wasn’t wear-

ing a Steelers logo in the 60’s. I could have saved several dates. And, believe it or not, my wife introduced me to this wonderful sport. Where else, but in New Jersey.


PAGE

42A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

A Dog Person Turned Cat Lover??? By A. GUERETTE

I have always been a dog person. I love dogs all kinds, colors, and shapes. I especially like medium and smaller sized dogs. I have always had a dog, who camped and travelled with my late husband and myself. When we travelled and stayed at a Motel, we were given the “Doggie” room which more than often had fleas and certain Doggie odors. But we were dog “Lovers” and did whatever it took to keep our beloved pet with us. Our dogs were loyal and caring and we loved them. I am now in a relationship for almost eight years with a lovely Tabby cat named Delsie. How did that come about? My last dog Tabitha came to me through the Humane Society. She was one of those “puppy mill” dogs used for breeding. She was a beautiful Pomeranian, black and white who hadn’t bred well. At the age of six years old she was discarded. She was thin and had rotten teeth. I adopted her, had her spade, and most of her teeth pulled, and fed her soft food. Her coat got brighter, she gained

weight and turned out to be a loyal and loving dog who thought I was her “saviour” or the “cats meow”. I had her for five years and took her to the Veterinarian to have her anal glands drained. She came out of the anesthesia and walked wobbly.I took her home and made her a soft bed for her to recover in. I checked her every half hour or so. A couple of hours later I went again to check on her and she had come out of her bed and was headed for the living room. I picked her up gently while talking soothing to her, petted her and brought her back to her bed. The next time I checked on Tabitha, she had started to leave her bed again and I found her dead on the floor. I was hysterical and called the vet, screaming loudly on the phone “You killed my dog!” He claimed the dog had been fine when he left the vet hospital. He wanted to do a biopsy. When I refused he stated Tabitha had probably died of heart failure He never did send me a bill for his services. I buried Tabitha in my back yard along with her favorite

toy and blanket. I was devistated and cried for nearly a week. This was in October of 2000. I wanted to get another dog but my husband died from lung Cancer in December of the same year so I put off getting another dog. Finally, in March of 2001, I went to the Humane Society to adopt another dog. To my disappointment, no small dogs were available for adoption. Just before I left the Humane Society, the woman in charge told me they had some lovely cats in the cat room and would I care to have a look at them. I said a hasty no and started to leave. “ Why Not” I thought, “I could always look at the cats.” I looked into each cage until I reached the last one. A female Tabby cat “six months old” rubbed her chin against my fingers. I looked into her beautiful green eyes and I was hooked. I told the lady I would adopt the female Tabby cat. I heard the woman next to her whisper, “This cat had already been adopted once but was brought back because of behavioral problems.” Undaunted, I filled out

the necessary papers, paid my fee, made arrangements to have the cat spade and brought her home. My girl cat Delsie definitely had a mind of her own. I wanted her to be an indoor cat. She kept scratching my screens and tearing them until I finally relented. Delsie, the name I decided for her, turned out to be an outdoor, indoor cat. Delsie proved to be an amazing hunter. Lizards, squirrels, even birds didn’t have a chance when she was around. She stalked her prey and waited, and waited, and waited and usually won out in the end. When indoors she proved to be a loving cat who loved to be petted. She slept at the end of my bed. I was surprised that such a fierce hunter could be so gentle with me, her owner. Thus began my new relationship with a cat. She has been with me almost eight years and we are inseparable. We have been separated by sickness on my part, surgery and re-hab. Delsie instinctively knows that I will come back for her and I always have. Now I am a cat advocate. I still like dogs but

cats are now my cup of tea. Are cats different from dogs? Most certainly. Delsie is shy and doesn’t want anyone to watch her eat, use her cat box, or go into the closet to hide or under the bed. She is not a lapcat, but will lay beside me on the bed fully relaxed and let me pet, brush, or massage her. She also gets angry when I leave the house. When she sees me getting my going out clothes and put them on the bed, she parks herself on them so I can’t get them. When she doesn’t want me to leave, she puts out her claws, catches my clothing, and tries to keep me home with her. If I leave her overnight she punishes me by not coming out to see me right away when I come in but meows and expresses her displeasure at being left alone. If I forget to feed her, she brushes up against me and lets me know it. Am I a confirmed cat lover, I guess you might say that. I have cat clothes and jewelry. I enjoy stuffed talking cats. Dogs will always have a place in my heart, but the rest of it is filled with a cat named Delsie.


OCTOBER 2008

Last One, I Promise By HELENE WAYNE

An act I saw at our Clubhouse recently, stirred up a memory of another performer about whom my parents spoke with great affection. He billed himself as Baron Munchausen, an obvious stage name, and he was definitely before my time as I never saw any reference to him or his act, when I was growing up. But my Mom and Dad would often talk about how funny he was, and that he had a droll approach which made the audience think about what he was saying. My parents commented that you had to be “with it” to enjoy his style of humor. The performer who was the feature act that night at our

Hurricane Season Be Prepared

Clubhouse, was a gentleman named, Timothy Hawkins. He advertised himself as a singer/comedian/magician. The memories of my parent’s comments about the comic they loved came flooding back to me as I watched his act, as he was so like what I imagined the Baron must have been. He told tall tales with such finesse and aplomb, that each story seemed completely believable and truthful. Between stories, he sang beautifully and only interrupted himself to tell us that he had grown up in many places as a result of his father having written the song he had just performed and many others..

He did this several times and many members of the audience could be seen looking at one another in shared amazement, at the apparent talent of this man’s father, to have written all these hugely popular songs. Slowly, it began to dawn on the audience that he was lying and had been lying all along, about everything he had said, all evening! He was such a good liar, that it was not easy to believe that he had been lying so completely! But it was now clear that he had been making us think and that it was up to us, the audience, to catch on to his style of humor. He was skilled at building a rapport with the audience and he got us involved in his act. Audiences love being part of the act, although there were a

CVE REPORTER

few members of this audience who never did get the point and gave up trying. They seem satisfied to just talk to one another during the act. That was annoying to others seated nearby, but I felt sorry for them. Life seemed to have excluded them. Mr. Hawkins finished his act with a silly magical trick that tickled the audience and he was given a big round of applause as he exited the stage. I realize that this seems like an after-thought, but the opening act that evening, which I have not mentioned until now, was not, as you would expect, the lesser act of the pair. This fellow, Misha, came out wearing clothing like a Russian Gypsy. He was not only a fantastic accordionist, he also had a

PAGE

43A

beautiful singing voice. He sang an interesting variety of lively songs with some warm chatter in between I would tell you the name of the few songs I recognized, but I don’t know how to spell those obscure titles like, perhaps, Orchachonia. Misha was accompanied by a pianist and a drummer. His was an opening act that could have carried the whole evening, with no complaints from the audience. He was that good. Yes, it was another show for which you would pay at least $50 elsewhere, and we paid just $5.00! So many of you missed it. I hope I have whetted your appetite for our off-season shows by now. If not, I am sorry and I won’t bother you again.


PAGE

44A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

The Big Move to Florida By HERB CHARATZ

We spend years accumulating all this great stuff? Our children leave the nest as well they should, but their stuff lives on, their souvenirs, their photos and trophies of their childhood. When they leave for college they get a new wardrobe, new books, new techno stuff and all their old stuff remains at home. After graduation the laundry comes home but never leaves because an entire new kind of wardrobe is now required for the business world. The double garage has accommodated them each time; each time a computer required a different type of set-up the old one was swallowed along with that year’s stuff. My daughter Renee, and her husband Mark, were in the midst of planning a large, white-glove wedding for their older daughter Robbin, and her sweetheart, Drew, on July 12th of this year. In addition, many relatives arranged to take their vacations at this time so that following the wedding we would all spend the following few days around their beautiful swimming pool, cooking favorites on their built-in barbeque, relaxing and enjoying our family reunion. About six weeks before the wedding, Mark and Renee decided it was time for them to think about semi-retiring to Florida. This would require putting their four-bedroom ranch home up for sale, in this poor real estate market. They received the shock of their lives when the very first prospective buyer actually bought it – with the condition that they vacate the house by July 30th, this was just a month away – a month which included a Friday night dinner preceding the wedding. This huge wedding they were hosting on Saturday way into the wee hours and also the Sunday Special Breakfast for 80 choice guests. Also included, as part of the wedding, a family reunion spent at Renee and Mark’s pool and grounds. Could they really be out on time??? They had recently purchased a 2/2 Condo in Century Village so there was no problem with where they were heading, but they did not anticipate having to complete the move in two weeks! What were they going to do with all this stuff? First, the first child, the bride Robbin and her Drew, rented a storage room and packed all their engagement gifts, in addition to her other stuff, and filled a 17 ft. U-haul to capacity, in the heat of early July. It wasn’t until they had loaded

it and were exhausted that Robbin hit Drew with the fact that they were not through. There was still enough stuff to fill another truck since there were many pieces of her parent’s furniture she planned to take – she had already put yellow post-its on her selections. They would have to arrange for some time, somewhere in their hectic schedules, as they were still working full time, taking courses for which final exams and final papers were due, however they had to make time to do it, and they did – but – there was no way for them to make the return trip to Saddle Brook from Old Bridge to unpack. So after they left for their honeymoon her dad, Mark and her Poppop, me would have to help out and, of course, on one of the hottest days of the year. When Mark and I returned to Renee and Sandy we looked like zombies. They gifted us with permission to sleep a few hours before starting to load the truck for daughter #2, Courtney (who was home for the wedding from Boston), with her roommate, Ann. Ann’s brothers also volunteered to do the heavy work, in exchange for a swim in the pool and a barbeque. The brothers packed all the furniture that had Courtney’s pink post-its on them and all her stuff, plus a couple of couches to be dropped off in Albany, for her cousin, Matt. It was exciting watching our 25 year old Courtney driving away, all by herself, in this huge, 14 ft. Uhaul truck, packed to the gills, preparing to drive 400 miles. “All went pretty smoothly,” she said later, making light of the fact that she, when she finally arrived at her apartment at 3:30 a.m. realized that she did not have her house keys. They were in her car, which was being driven back from New Jersey to Boston by Ann, who was not expected to arrive until 10 a.m., in time to help unpack the U-haul. Courtney ended up calling a taxi and going to a hotel. When they finally unpacked and were ready to return the U-haul – guess what? It had a flat tire and she had to cope with that problem. It was rewarding to realize that Courtney handled everything – efficiently – and with a sense of humor the same as her sister Robbin and her new brother-in-law Drew. Now they were down to their last four days – but one was needed to visit the various cemeteries to say goodbye to our dear departed – and to spend a few precious

hours with my sister, their Aunt Mildred, in Brooklyn. Returning to New Jersey at the end of the day, we found Robbin and Drew, back from Hawaii, spending the remaining days of their honeymoon helping to pack for the Big Move. They had completely packed their own car with the rest of their stuff, and totally exhausted, were ready for instructions of how to proceed. Mark and Renee were taken out to dinner by a group of neighbors who had become close friends through the years. Then one of their friends opened her home to an open house farewell party for the whole community. Another evening of beautiful memories but now only three days left to pack – where to begin??? Renee agreed that only essentials were being packed, but you know how it goes. This candy dish is soooo pretty and then we came to something which Sandy had originally given to her when we moved and now hated to part with; and so on and so on. To make a long story just a bit shorter, suffice it to say that when they ran out of room on the 17 ft U-haul truck they had rented, they still had a half-garage yet to pack. Mark had to go back and upgrade to a 26 footer and it was our scheduled time to fly back to Florida. Needless to say, they were not out by 3 p.m. on Wednesday. The new occupants showed up with their moving van and could not wait because the moving van was committed elsewhere for the evening and they had to drop off their stuff now. So picture this scenario – their moving van unloading their stuff through the front door

as Renee, Mark, Robbin and Drew continued to transfer their stuff from the first, toosmall moving truck to the new, larger truck, to make room for the remaining stuff in the garage. And they were soooo tired. But a miracle happened. On this hot, sticky day when most people would prefer sitting inside their cool homes, they came out instead to help their neighbors in their dilemma. A parade of people appeared to help transfer packages and furniture from the smaller U-haul moving truck to the larger one. Although this was what one could consider a pretty lousy day, my kids will never think of it this way. What they will remember are all the kind deeds of their neighbors. When they became aware how tough things were going, they pitched in to help. If they could not come themselves, they sent a teen-age boy or girl to help. And they were a marvelous help, smiling all the time – their faces come to mind when Mark and Renee recall the hectic hours of packing. This was their final memory of having lived 25 years in a lovely development – the Going Away Party they threw for them the weekend before and now their rising to the occasion when their help was needed. New Jersey – they loved every minute they were there. And now on to Florida. P.S. In last month’s issue I wrote about Our Special Wedding. I’d like to take this time to correct a senior moment. The correct name of our beloved rabbi who presided is Rabbi Henry Weiner.


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

45A

Fiction After the egg By JEROME ALLEN GONICBERG A world famous doctor developed a chemical that allowed a woman to pass a hard shelled egg after three months and develop it outside of her body, eliminating the need to be pregnant for nine months. Needless to say, there was pandemonium when the news got out. Pat Robertson was the first to speak out about the happening. He called it blasphemy, obviously a conspiracy of liberals and those on the left. He beseeched his television audience to hold prayers to erase this evil that has befallen the human race. He was quoted as saying, “Women are supposed to suffer to have children!” In Rome the Pope held a special prayer Mass. He placed the blame definitely on the atomic age which has sent lethal radiation around the world. Benny Hinman offered any woman who was pregnant to exorcise the devil within them on this television program. He also assured them that when they fell backwards, someone would be there to catch them. HMO’s agreed to pay for incubators figuring the small cost would more than offset the usual costs of having babies in hospitals. In Israel, Orthodox Jews were meeting at the Wailing Wall to pray to have this terrible curse upon mankind reversed. They stoned hundreds of women who also came to pray in the hopes that they could also give birth to an egg. In Greenwich Village in New York, the Gay and Lesbian Coalition held a march to celebrate this new found freedom for them that would now allow them to adopt an egg as their own without having to go through the normal adoption agencies where the powers that be had always been prejudiced against same sex marriages and adoptions. The Feminist movement felt that this would liberate them from the necessity to have to carry a fetus nine months. This would give them the opportunity to not have to wear fat clothes. Maternity clothing manufacturers are now offering a garment for eggs. The FDA would not give approval to the new drug claiming that they had insufficient data on it. In Tijuana, Mexico five clinics opened up offering the process. Sweden also was considering opening clinics to offer the service as well. The anti-abortionists were up in arms as to what to do, since their picketing of abor-

tion clinics would be meaningless, as women now able to have eggs could simply crack them and dump them in the garbage disposals if they so choose. Their pro-life stance now involved picketing invitro fertilization clinics, since they would no longer have any control over what they believed was their God given right to decide about women’s rights. If they no longer had control, then they did not want women to have babies. Pro Abortionists felt that this was the new millennia and they praised the new birthing method. And the guru of fashion who became a household name on television as well as for a major chain of stores, was the first one to design a special incubator for the eggs. It came in blue or pink as well as a neutral color for those who would rather not know the sex of the egg until it was hatched. She had it specially designed with a tamper proof lid, a lock-down device to attach it to a floor, a built-in burglar alarm system that could be connected to any alarm company and a battery backup should there be a power failure. Stock in her company rose almost 1000 percent as soon as it was placed on sale. The incubator was equipped with a tape recorder that played the entire Encyclopedia Britannica narrated by Jodi Foster and Tom Cruise. The first day of trading on the NASDAQ had the stock go from an initial offering price of $25 to $500 a share. Wal-Mart stores came out with a cheaper version, but without a battery backup and

alarm system, it ran a poor second in the race for dominance of the market. McDonalds came out with a giveaway toy egg that when cracked revealed a tiny baby doll. They felt it was an educational tool but quickly withdrew it off the market place, offering free meals if the egg was returned. It seemed they were being sued by five prospective mothers after reports had come in of children picking up eggs passed by their mothers and cracking them open to see if there was a toy baby inside. Maury Povich interviewed Pro and Anti Abortionists on his program about their feelings on the subject. Unfortunately the program was never shown since the anti’s started throwing eggs at their opponents. Ricky Lane had a panel on to discuss the implications of having eggs, three of the women were in their third month of pregnancy and one of them passed an egg while she was being interviewed. Instead of using human decency, the cameras filmed the entire process, causing her program and her contract to be canceled. Jerry Springer brought out three women who claimed that the eggs they carried onto the stage were the result of their boyfriends who denied they were the fathers. One of the men, later arrested, took the egg that his girlfriend carried and dropped it deliberately on the floor. Arrested, the police really have no idea

what to charge him with. They wanted to use illegal abortion, but his lawyer had a field day before the Supreme Court. On the Regis and Kathy show, they had Doctor Ruth on the show. The doctor felt that this was indeed progress in the entire field of reproduction. However Regis felt that this was a blasphemy against human nature. Doctor Ruth stood up to her full five foot height and asked Regis to stand as well where she proceeded to apply a sound kick to the groin. Kathy applauded her actions, and the show has been canceled, since Regis, after his hernia operation, no longer would speak to Kathy, instead, facing his high chair away from her on the show. Sally Jesse Raphael, showed an egg that she has adopted, since she and her husband had been empty nested so long, she felt that they wanted another child. On the egg, she had stenciled a pair of her trademarked red eyeglass frames. Dave Letterman, on his show, had a crate delivered to him during the show. He opened it and removed an egg, saying that he had purchased it from an adoption agency in Australia. He said that it had cost $10,000 and that the Australian Agency claimed that they had the legal authority to export it to him. He carefully placed it into an incubator on his desk and ignored it for the rest of the show. Suddenly he heard a noise, opened the incubator and while the camera focused on it watched the egg open up and baby EMU emerge. Letterman looked aghast and

said that this was the last time he would deal with a company called Egg Martial Union or EMU for short. A new magazine called Human Husbandry come on the market. It was well illustrated, showing how to make your own incubators, how to ensure that the egg was properly candled and how to be especially cautious in handling the egg. There was also an article on cracked eggs that did not necessarily mean that the egg had to be destroyed. There were articles on How to Pass an Egg Easily, and So You’re Going to have an Egg. There were also want ads for eggs and ads offering to lay an egg for infertile couples, ads offering to laser etch the owners name on the shell without any injury to the fetus. There were articles on doctors who were able to operate on fetuses with potential physical problems by carefully sawing open an egg and performing miracle operations. In Rhode Island, the maternity division of Rhode Island Hospital made plans to close the division, laying off some 10 doctors and 20 nurses. Harvard, Brown and other medical schools eliminated obstetrics as an elective course. A company in New York developed an incubator that could not be opened except by the owner. The IPO on the stock increased almost 300 percent before they finally figured out what to sell it for. A Florida man was arrested for selling potential baby eggs when it was determined that he had been using ostrich eggs and passing them off as human eggs at $10,000 an egg.


PAGE

46A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08 10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08

10/31/08

EARS ARE NO DIFFERENT. T “For years, I was having trouble hearing clearly. Everyone around me knew it. Even myy grandkids. g But like manyy of us,, I was stubborn and avoided the issue.

NOW HEARx

Finally, I got smart and visited the pros at HEARx for a complimentary screening. They helped me realize that proper ear care is no more intimidating than proper eye care.

T H I S: Buy a Pack of Batteries and Get a Pack FREE *

Today, my new Siemens hearing aids work just like glasses for my ears. Fantastic.”

Limit one per customer

*Offer expires 11/14/08

Not valid with any other offer or discount.

NFL HALL OF FAME

COACH DON SHULA Hearing aid wearer since 2007 Hearing aid candidate since 1999

“…just find out! I’m glad I did.” Call today to schedule a complimentary screening!

Your insurance plan may provide full or partial payment for hearing aids. Call today to inquire about coverage.

DEERFIELD BEACH 954.571.2144

Deerfield Mall Shopping Center 3864 W. Hillsboro Blvd.


OCTOBER 2008

Garden 1/1 Tilford M Ventnor F Farnham L Prescott N

Gr.Floor, Quiet Area, New Carpet & Appliances, Furn. Tile & Carpet, Fresh Paint, Quiet Area, Clean Unit Gr. Floor, Tile & Carpet, Furnished, Encl. Patio Great 1st. Floor, Furnished, Water View From Patio

$ 34,900 $ 47,000 $ 70,500 $ 35,000

Highrise 1.1.5 Newport U Swansea B Swansea B Berkshire A Harwood D Ellesmere B Cambridge B Cambridge A Harwood F Newport Q

1st. Fl. Unit, All Tiled, Furnished, Water View Bright & Airy, Newer Terrace Encl. Steps To Pool Lowest Priced In Swansea, Newer A/C & Patio Encl. Motivated Seller..2nd. Fl. Near Pool & Plaza Spotless Unit, New Carpet & A/C In 2007, Encl. Patio Completely Renovated, Encl. Patio, Golf View Gr. Fl. Furnished, Walk To Plaza, Water View Reduced For “Quick Sale”, 2nd. Floor, Tiled Excellent Location, Water View From Encl. Patio Encl.Patio, Tennis & Pool View, “A Must See Unit”

$ 85,000 $ 49,000 $ 49,900 $ 54,900 $ 89,900 $ 82,500 $ 87,900 $ 52,900 $ 85,000 $ 39,900

Garden 1.1.5 Ventnor M Prescott A Tilford Q Lyndhurst L Durham T Tilford S Tilford S Durham H Ventnor A Westbury D Lyndhurst L Prescott N Newport O Harwood J Tilford T Durham U

1st. Fl. Updated Unit, Water View From Pato Affordable Unit, Needs Some TLC, 2 A/C’s Corner Unit, Sunny, Bright & Clean, Furnished Fully Furnished, View Of Back Of Clubhouse Corner, All Updated, Furnished, Wood & Tile Short Sale, Corner Unit, Lift Installed, Near Pool Gr. Fl. Newer Appliances, Tiled, Near Pool & Tennis Corner Unit, New Kit. & Appliances, Move-In Porcelain Tiled, Recently Painted, Furnished Corner Unit, Many Updates, Near Pool & Plaza Totally, Totally Renovated, Walk To Clubhouse Immaculate Unit, Furnished, Water View, Move-In 2nd. Fl. Corner, Lift Installed, Fresh Paint, “Must See” 1st. Fl. Corner, White Tile & Carpet, Encl. Patio Newer Appliances, Updated Kit. & Master Bath, Nicely Tiled, Lift In Place, Water View, Near Pool

$ 49,500 $ 64,900 $ 59,800 $ 49,000 $ 67,000 $ 40,990 $ 79,900 $ 88,000 $ 59,300 $ 49,900 $ 59,500 $ 55,000 $ 34,900 $ 69,900 $ 69,900 $135,000

Highrise 2.1.5 Grantham F Do Not Miss This Newly Renovated Unit, Near Pool Ellesmere B Golf Course View, Immaculate Unit, New A/C

$115,000 $ 68,900

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

Farnham N Newport G Ashby C Islewood D Newport G Newport S Newport S Grantham F Harwood E

Gr. Fl. Fabulous Water View, Near Pool, Move-In Newly Remodeled, Kitchen & Baths, Water View, Water View, Tiled, Rental Bldg. Great Location Totally Renovated, Water View, Just Move-In Corner Unit, Many Upgrades, Carpet & Tile Magnificient Water View, Priced To Sell Totally Renovated, This Is A “Wow” Unit, Come See Great Location, Steps To Pool, Encl. Patio Corner Unit, Water View, Needs Some TLC

$105,900 $96, 425 $89,900 $114,900 $121,000 $ 65,000 $ 89,900 $110,000 $ 74,900

Garden 2/1.5 Tilford T Farnham L Durham S Upminster H Ventnor S Markham G Markham R Tilford V Durham Y Upminster I Prescott L Oakridge P Oakridge T Richmond B

New Appliances, Updated Kitchen, Walk To Pool Gr. Fl. Corner, Short WalkTo Pool, New A/C In 2007 Corner Unit, Water View, Immaculate, Furnished Lift In Place, Fully Furnished, Spotless, Near Plaza New A/C, Ready To Move-In Water View, Near Pool Gr. Fl. Corner, Rentable Bldg. New Appliances Upgraded Kit, & Bath, Walk To Pool, Encl. Patio Corner Unit, Water View, Rentable Bldg. At This Time Lift Installed, Furnished, Rentable Bldg. Corner Unit Priced For Quick Sale, Near Pool, Tennis & Plaza 2nd. Fl. Corner, Water View, Lift In Place 1st. Fl. Corner, Great Location, Encl. Patio, Make Offer Probate Sale Court Confirmation Required,Needs TLC Great Location, Near Pool,lYnd Tennis And Plaza

$ 69,900 $ 95,000 $ 74,850 $ 85,000 $115,000 $ 84,800 $119,000 $ 79,500 $ 74,000 $ 58,500 $ 64,900 $ 59,000 $ 49,900 $ 59,900

Highrise Units 2/2 Luxury Ventnor H Price Just Reduced, Tile & Carpet, Some Upgrades Lyndhurst J Prime Location, Steps To Pool & Clubhouse, Tiled Ventnor H Golf Course View, Encl. Patio, Tile & Carpet Oakridge D 2nd. Floor, Great Location, For Immediate Purchase Lyndhurst N New Designer Kitchen, Tile Throughout, Near Pool Grantham A Water View, New Kit. & Bath. Walk To Pool Oakridge F Totally Remodeled, Water View From Living Room Lyndhurst K Redone Kit. & Baths. Tiled, Golf Course View Richmond F Pristine Unit In Mint Condition, “A Must See Unit” Lyndhurst K Great Location, Walk to Clubhouse, Encl. Patio Oakridge U Water View, This Is A “Wow” Unit, Come See

$150,000 $174,990 $102,500 $ 85,000 $189,600 $132,500 $124,000 $139,845 $ 99,900 $ 99,900 $ 92,000

We Have What You Are Looking For. Stop By And Speak To One Of Our Experienced Agents.

47A


PAGE

48A

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

OCTOBER 2008

SECTION B, 40 PAGES

New Pool Furniture Has Arrived By STEVE H. FINE, Editor in Chief Photos by JULES KESSELMAN

CVE Symphony Orchestra By WILLIAM P. BRYAN Ph.D., President

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

1B

VOLUME 32, NUMBER 1

As shown in the photographs taken at the Ventor area pool, most of the new pool furniture has now been delivered to the Village and the old furniture replaced with new and sturdier chairs and loungers. The Recreation Committee with the assistance of Eva Rachesky examined several models and carefully chose the furniture depicted in these photographs. While suntan lotion and natural body oils may still result in discoloration if towels are not used, the strapping is warranted for five years and the framework for ten years. Iron from the water coming

out of sprinklers was also contributing to discoloration of the strapping and different cleaners may alleviate this problem. The chairs for the Markham Area pool have been put in their storage room until renovations are completed and the Oarkridge Area pool furniture still needs to be delivered. Otherwise, everyone in the Village should now be enjoying the new furniture which is not only sturdier, but more pleasing in appearance. Once again, the work of the Recreation Committee is moving forward and is greatly appreciated.

Construction begins on new CVE Reporter office By STEVEN H. FINE , Editor-in-chief Photo by JULES KESSELMAN

Our orchestra was founded in 1981 by Mrs. Stella Lass, a music teacher from New Jersey who retired to Century Village. The CVE Symphony is now in its 27th season with our conductor, Dr. Clark Mc Alister who has been with us from the beginning. This orchestra attracts retired professional musicians who have played with some of the finest professional orchestras in the United States, such as the New York Philharmonic,

the Juilliard School and Eastman Schools of Music, thus enhancing both its sound and its stature. We are considered the finest Community orchestra in South Florida. We would welcome string musicians to join our group. We have openings in the first violin section and viola section. We rehearse on Sunday mornings during the season and we perform four concerts in our auditorium from December through the end of

March. If you are interested, please get in touch with: Mary Ellen Sorce at 561-395-5645 or Ruth Cousin at 954-426-2028. To add to this, we have a very active Music Guild that raises funds for us. There are hundreds of music lovers here in Century Village who take an active part in their activities. There are two open meetings a season with musical entertainment.

ALL PASSES (Guest, Companion & 30 Day) Will Now Be Issued By The I.D. Office They Will No Longer Be Available at The COOCVE Office

Future home of CVE Reporter After several months of planning, construction is finally underway for the future home of the Reporter. Many months of frustrating red tape, getting permits, planning layout, getting prices quoted, etc. the papers are signed and the construction is officially underway. The additional space will enable us to expand our work force and will allow the staff

to work in an environment conducive to producing a quality publication. The goal is to streamline the production of your paper and to position the CVE Reporter as one of the finest community papers in the country. The entire volunteer staff anxiously awaits completion of the office which should take place by the end of October.


PAGE

2B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

The Importance Of Multi Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation By ELLEN KAMHI, PhD RN

As a nutritionist, I am well educated in the pivotal role that vitamins and minerals play in maintaining health and wellness, as well as in reducing the risk of many diseases. Unfortunately, many individuals do not get the optimum amount of nutrients that would benefit their overall well being, and protect them from many illnesses. This is due to several factors: 1) The soil is devoid of nutrients, due to agri-business farming practices 2) People eat out or prepare food with cooking methods that destroy nutrients 3) Processed foods have a very low level of nutrition, and also directly deplete antioxidants 4) People do not adhere to the USDA’s recommendations of eating many servings of fruits and vegetables daily (9-10 per day) 5) Toxicity is rampant in the environment; this requires more antioxidant protection 6) As people age, they absorb less nutrients from the digestive system 7) When one gets sick, the body requires a higher amount of nutrients 8) The typical diet does not even provide the minimum amount of vitamins and minerals needed on a daily basis. 9) Many vitamins and minerals need to be replenished daily since they are water soluble 10) Virtually ALL prescription medications deplete nutrients such as Vitamin B, Vitamin C and Co Q 10 from the body The USDA 2005 Dietary Guidelines for adults who consume 2,000 calories per day recommends five servings of vegetables and four servings of fruits per day. Government food surveys report that average Americans don’t get anywhere near this amount. In addition, when they DO eat vegetables, their choices do not match the recommendation that MOST of these should be dark-green and orange. As science delves into the link between diet and disease, it has become crystal clear that the top four causes of death - cancer, stroke, heart disease and diabetes, are directly linked to a deficient nutritional status. A ground breaking study was published in the July 19, 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association,

entitled Vitamins for Chronic Disease Prevention: Scientific Review and Clinical Applications. The authors of this study, which was done at Harvard Medical School, concluded that all adults should take a daily multivitamin. Daily use of a Multi Vitamin and Mineral can help to balance your body chemistry. This is especially true in mature adults, where the use of a daily Multi Vitamin and Mineral can ensure optimal nutrient status. In addition to the well documented avoidance of nutritional deficiency diseases, the use of a Multi Vitamin and Mineral has a protective effect against the development of many health issues common to those approaching their golden years. A good start is to select a high-potency formula which supplies a broad spectrum of important vitamins and minerals in optimal amounts for maximum benefits. When choosing which brand to useREAD THE LABEL CAREFULLY. There are two things to consider- First- read the Other Ingredients. If you see a lot of chemical additives and fillers- don’t buy it- these include substances such as Lactose, Polysorbate 80, FD & C Blue #2 Lake, FD & C Red 40 Lake, FD & C Yellow 6 Lake and other equally questionable ingredients. Believe it or not, these substances are COMMONLY added to widely available ‘main stream’ brands of vitamins. Better quality brands avoid the use of these potentially toxic additives. However, the usual adage will apply “ the

nicer the nice, the higher the price.” In addition, when you are reviewing the individual nutrients, take note of the form. For example Calcium Carbonate is cheap, but it is the lowest quality calcium, and is poorly absorbed. Look for Calcium Citrate, or Microcrystalline Hydroxyapatite. Lower quality supplements will often include ferrous sulfate, an inferior form of iron that is poorly absorbed, and sometimes causes stomach upset. Choose one that offers Ferrous Fumurate, or in the case of most men, iron free.The best thing to do is to be proactive in maintaining or regaining health. Take the necessary steps to improve your diet. Start by eating 9-10 servings of vegetables and fruits per day, including those that are dark green and brightly colored. In addition, take a high quality comprehensive Multi Vitamin and Mineral. And of course, daily exercise is of upmost importance- Stay Healthy! Ellen Kamhi PhD RN, The Natural Nurse®, can be heard on radio daily. She is the author of several books, including ARTHRITIS, the Alternative Medicine Definitive Guide. Dr. Kamhi has been involved in natural health care for over 4 decades. She answers consumer questions at www.naturesanswer.com, and has a private practice on Long Island. www.naturalnurse.com 800-829-0918

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

3B

Helpful health hints By DR. NORMA LOCKER

Potassium Researchers measured potassium in the urine of nearly 380 men and women aged 65 or older. Those with higher potassium levels also had a higher percentage of lean muscle tissue than those with lower potassium levels. The findings: Potassium-rich fruits and vegetables may impede the muscle loss which occurs after age 50. The body appears to break down muscle to neutralize acid residues left by breads, cereals, meat and poultry. Fruits and vegetables may leave enough alkaline residues, (mostly potassium bicarbonate) to spare your muscles. The recommendation: eat more fruits and vegetables which are low in calories and rich in fiber, vitamins and minerals. The people in this study got 26% of their potassium from fruits and 19% from vegetables. Other research suggests

that potassium may lower the risk of stroke, bone loss and kidney stones. Do not supplement with potassium unless your doctor recommends it and supervises you. Meat and blood pressure Researchers tracked more than 28,000 middle-aged women for 10 years. Those who ate a serving of red meat such as beef, pork and lamb less than once a day were 25% more likely to develop high blood pressure than those who ate no red meat. The risk was roughly 35% higher for women who ingested red meat at least once a day. Poultry eaters had no higher risk. Decrease if you are a meat eater and increase your intake of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, seafood, poultry and low or non-fat dairy. You will not only be healthier and feel much better, but also if overweight your weight will stabilize.


PAGE

4B

CVE REPORTER

Active CVE Republican Club New and regular members call for updated meeting information. Call or fax Ron Goldfarb at 954-596-5198. Alzheimer’s Association Support Groups. Free for families and caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s. Locations in North, Central and South Broward. For a group in your area, call 954-726-0011 or 24 hr. helping hotline at 1-800-272-3900. American Red Magen David for Israel (ARMDI) Freedom Chapter of Deerfield Beach meets the fourth Wednesday of the month, 11:30 a.m. in Temple Beth Israel. For further information call Rose Trugman 954-4286627 or Rose Vaupen 954-426-2392. Americans United for Separation of Church & State New chapter being formed. Primary mission is to educate public regarding constitutional guarantee of church and state separation. We are concerned about book banning, schools teaching religious theology disguised as scientific theory. For further information, call Barbara Miranda at 954-422-5958. AMIT (Americans for Israel and Torah) meets second Monday of every month at Young Israel Synagogue at 12:30p.m. AMIT is sponsoring a bus trip to the newly-opened Holocaust Museum in Hollywood on Monday,

OCTOBER 2008

November 17. For information about this trip call Dorothy 954-571-8673 or Norma 954-428-2386. For information, call Ellie 954-698-6075 or Norma 954428-2386. Art Club of CVE meetings will be held on the second Friday of each month (November thru April), from 10 a.m. to noon in Clubhouse Room GP-A. Membership is $12. We have interesting programs, trips & don’t miss our annual Art Expo on March 7th & 8th, 2009. For Information call Evelyn Bloom (October through April) at 954-428-3728. Astronomy Club will meet each month beginning Tuesday, November 13 at 7 p.m. in room E. A telescope will be used for observation. Call Norma 954-480-8938 or Jerry 954-4289381. Ballroom Dance Club meets every Thursday in the Exercise Room at 7:30 to 9 p.m. at no charge. Singles and couples welcome. For information, call Ernie Feder 954-418-8895. B’nai B’rith Unit #2995 for Men and Women. For information, call Dave Polak at 954-420-0096 or Jack Galit at 954-428-6029. Bible Study Group meets every Thursday in the clubhouse from 1 - 3 p.m. Study the old and new

testaments. All welcome. For further information, call Roslyn Nehls at 954698-6184. Billiard Club of CVE If you are interested in joining, call Al Feinberg at 954-428-7624 for further information. Bowling Club of CVE meets every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. at Pompano Bowl, 2200 Federal Highway, Pompano. All welcome. Come join us and have fun. For information, call Betty Schwartz at 954-427-1157. Brotherhood Temple Beth Israel Monthly Breakfast Meetings second Sunday of each month. For information, Al Freiman 954-429-0663, Temple 954-421-7060. Broward Council of Na’Amat USA (formerly Pioneer Women) meets fourth Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Na’Amat Council office, 1721 N. State Road 7, Suite H, Margate. For information, call 954-327-0770. Broward County Support Group meets every Thursday in Clubhouse, Room C, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Broward Homebound Program your donations will enable elderly and disabled residents to live independently at home with dignity. For further information, call Diane or Marie at 954-786-2484.

Cameo Drama Club will meet again in December 2008. Meeting takes place the first and third Tuesday of the month in Room G. If you are interested in auditioning for a role in the next play, please call 954-570-8884. Canadian Club of CVE. The Canadian Club of CVE is a social club for Canadians wintering in Century Village. Monthly meetings are held on the second Thursday of each month, December 11, January 8, February 12 and March 12 at 10 am in the Club House party room, with an informative or entertaining program. The Club organizes several social events, including a welcome brunch, December 14 and a closing Bar-B-Q on March 5. Outings to various activities, including an NHL hockey game on December 29 and a cruise January 23, are part of the activities. Membership is $5. a person per year. Registration takes place every Friday between 10 am and noon in the CVE clubhouse upper lobby beginning November 21. For more information, contact CoPresidents Dorothy Stober (Montreal 514-485-6362, CVE 954-426-4097) or Sidney Margles (Montreal 514-4859388 or CVE, 954-596-0179). Catholic Social Club meets the third Tuesday of each month at 2:30 p.m. to 4.00 p.m. in Clubhouse room GPA. Open to all denominations. A


OCTOBER 2008 Vigil Mass will be held at 6:15 p.m. every Saturday in Le Club Activity Center, Room A. Father James, Pastor of Our Lady of Mercy will celebrate Mass. For further information, call Gloria 954-571-6925, Mary Ann 954571-2266. Center for Group Counseling’s SAGES (Senior Adult Group Experiences) meets at the Clubhouse Room D, Thursdays from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. to share thoughts, feelings and concerns in a private confidential setting. It is open to everyone and is free of charge. For Information call Paul Greenwald, Ph.D. 954-483-5300. Century Camera Club meets every Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. in Room F, at Clubhouse. Demonstrations, lectures, competitions, instructions, exhibits, shows and field trips programmed. All who are interested in photography are invited. For information call Jerry Raines 954 427 6785. Century Juniors Club of CVE. Active, couples only, social club meets at 7 p.m. second Thursday of each month in Clubhouse, Room N, accepting new members. For information call Harriet at 954-426-3008. Choraleers CVE produced and directed by Cecile Berger, meets every Wednesday, 9 a.m. in the Clubhouse Party Room. We rehearse for a once a year concert in our theater. If you enjoy singing or play piano, join us. For information, call Irene Greenberg, President 954-426-0628. City University of New York (CUNY) Alumni Club meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m.

in Room G in the Clubhouse. All CUNY graduates and their spouses are welcome. We have Interesting programs and field trips. For information, call Norma 954-480-8938, Geri 954-360-9725 or Rosalie 954-427-1593.

meets every Monday afternoon from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Clubhouse in General Purpose Room. Musicians who can play cello, viola or clarinet are invited. For further information, call Vincent Zappi at 954-428-1794.

Classical Civilization Club meets every Wednesday, alternating with the Egyptology Club, at 1:30 p.m. in Clubhouse room C. Learn about all aspects of the Greek and Roman World. Call Lewis 954-421-8934.

CVE Sewing Club meets every Tuesday from 10 am. to 12 noon in the Sewing Room. For further information, call Rita at 954-571-1645

Clubhouse Bingo every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. in the party room. It is new and exciting and lots of fun. Only dabbers are used, no more chips. A six pack sells for $3, four pack for $2, the Early Bird and Bingo Special $1. The Early Bird and Bingo Players Special each pays $75. BINGO WILL BE OPENED ALL SUMMER. For more information call David 954-428-2849. Cornerstone Community Baptist Church, Pastor Bret M. Lovitz, Worship Services 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m., Wednesday Service 7 p.m., CCBC Youth Group 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., For information call 954-421-2530 CVE Duplicate Bridge Club. Games Monday, Tuesday and Saturday, 12:00 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Card Room B. For information, call Irving Ruga at 954-698-9741. CVE Magic Club Monday, 2 p.m., discussions Magic Learning, speakers, discuss magic, conventions, demonstrations. For information call 954698-9334. CVE Mandolin Orchestra now

CVE Shuffleboard Club meets first Friday of each month at 10:30 a.m. at the Clubhouse in Room A. Come join us for fun and friendship. For information, call Al at 954-421-8585 or Vito at 954-428-0925. CVE String Chamber Group is open to capable musicians. Come and get a musical workout year round on Wednesdays 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the mezzanine (3rd floor of clubhouse) music library office next to elevator. For information call Blanche 954-4264513. CVE Symphony Guild. For further information, call Bea Guccione 954-426-3540. For membership, call Jean Crown 954-421-8121 or Kitty Cole 954-360-7956. CVE Symphony Orchestra we welcome string musicians with orchestra experience to join our orchestra. We will meet on Sunday mornings during the season, starting November 5. For information, call Blanche at 954 4264513 or Ruth at 954 426-2028. CVE Volleyball Club meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 9 a.m. and beyond, next to tennis court. All invited. Call Harry Liner 954-426-4853

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

5B

or Harry Chizeck 954-426-3178. Dance With Us for Folk and Line Dancing meets on Tuesday from 12 noon to 2 p.m. in the Health Club. No Charge. For information call Gloria 954-480-6474 or Jerry 954-698-9240. Deerfield Beach Computer Club meets every Friday, except holidays, at Pompano Beach Highlands Park, 1650 N.E. 50th Court, which is two blocks east of Dixie Highway off 48th Street from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. For information Barry Cowen at 954-725-9331, Gerry Gerstenberg at 954 941-6689 or Roy at 954-429-9472. Deerfield Beach Democratic Club meets the second Monday of the month at 7:00 p.m. in Le Club. Stimulating political discussions. All invited. Refreshments served. For information: call Bernie Parness President at 954 426 1284 Deerfield Progressive Forum meets Saturdays, 10 a.m. to noon, in Le Club for lecture/discussion sessions on political, economic and social issues. For information call Julie Bloom at 954 428-1598. Deer-Raton Lions Club meets on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Atlantic Bread Co. 296 S. Federal Highway in Deerfield Beach. For information call George Gsegnet 954-419-9647. District 65 U.A.W. (formerly South Florida Retirees) meets every third month on the third Tuesday of the month, 12 noon, at the Activity Center. Updated reports will be made on the 65 Security Plan. Please attend and


PAGE

6B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

bring new members. For further information, call Pearl Hill 954-421-7776.

information call, Al Freiman 954-4290663 or Bea Lerman 954-421-3497.

Egyptology Club meets for group study, discussion and videos every Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. in General Purpose Room C. Future meetings will concentrate on the history, culture and art of Ancient Egypt. The club will continue with the video lectures by Dr. Bob Brier. For further information, call Golda 954-360-7377.

Knitting Club of CVE meets every Monday from 1 to 3 p.m. in Sewing Room at Clubhouse. We welcome beginners and experienced knitters and crotchetiers. If you have an “Itch to Stitch” come and have fun and make someone happy. Call Florence 954-698-9421.

Emunah of America meets third Wednesday every month at 12 noon in the Young Israel Synagogue in Century Plaza. Light lunch and interesting program. All cordially welcome. For information, call Ina Ciocca at 954360-0740.Please attend. For further information call Selma at 954-427-8674 or Pearl at 954-426-0189. Friends of Deerfield Beach Arboretum 2841 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Free tour of the Arboretum every Friday 10 a.m. and first Saturday of each month at 10 a.m., Seminars held at 7 p.m. in recreation room of Constitution Park. All seminars followed with an auction featuring plants, herbs and trees from our nursery. Refreshments served. All invited. Volunteers needed to help spread mulch, weed and participate in planting activities. For further information, call 954-480-4494. Hadassah Deerfield Beach meets monthly on the third Monday at noon at Temple Beth Israel. Refreshments served. Interesting topics. For information, call Gert 954-421-0945 or Adele at 954 427-4970. Hebrew Speaking Circle is formed to meet in the Clubhouse. For information, call Dr. Lee Lubin 954-4288642. Hispanic Club meets at the Clubhouse every second Sunday of each month in Music Room A from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. For information call Mimi Lourenso at 954-725-5229. Come and meet new friends and help plan club “outings” to various park picnics, museums, restaurants, etc. The President of the club is Judith Smith from Colombia, South America. Humanist of the Gold Coast meets at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2601 St. Andrews Blvd., Boca Raton. Exact date to be advised in future issue. For information contact Dr. Robert Griffin 954-426-5021. Italian/American Club meets second Monday of each month at 11 a.m. in the Clubhouse Party Room. For information call Lena Radicella 954-428-2184. Jelly Belly Dancers Free Belly Dance lessons. Learn to Belly Dance for fun and exercise! All ages, sizes and shapes welcomed. No registration required. For further information call Sandy 954-421-2541. Jet Setters Social Club Active, Jet Setters, widows, widowers and singles social club. Join a great NEW sophisticated singles group. Trips, dining experiences, plays, concerts, art museums, upscale shopping excursions, etc. No dues. For information call Lila 954-596-9949. Jewish War Veterans U.S.A. Post 265 and Ladies Auxiliary of CVE meets third Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. in Clubhouse Room F and G. Interesting informative programs. For

L’Alliance Francophone CVE. Join more than 500 French-speaking residents of the Village, mostly snowbirds from Canada. The association was established in 1995. For information, call Pierette Pelletier 954-426-6132 or Raymond Babeux 954-428 4158. L’Alliance Francophone of CVE. Si vous parlez Français, nous avons de nombreuses activitiées á vous proposer. Si vous êtes interessé appelez Pierrette Pelletier 954-426-6132 ou Raymond Babeux 954-428-4158. Lapidary Club members only, work every Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Lapidary Room. Supervisor must be present. Sessions will be added as needed. For information call Eli Weisberg 954-4274785 or Walter Reich 954-421-6875. Lets Talk meets 2nd and 4th Tuesday each month, 2 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Room E. Discussions, Daytrips, films will be topics of the day. For further information call Gladys 954-421-9232, Irene 954-418-9156, Shirley 954-427-0951. Mended Hearts Cardiac Support Group an affiliate of the American Heart Association, meets the 1st and 3rd Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. Heart Healthy Snacks will be served. Open to all cardiac patients and their families in the community. Located at 7300 Del Prado Circle South, Boca Raton. For information call 561-392-3000. Mr. & Mrs. Club Come and meet new friends and socialize. Ages 55-73. Monthly activities are being planned. For information, call Buddy at 954427-7407. Na’Amat USA For further information, contact Marjorie Moidel at 954-970-8609. National Association of Retired Federal Employees (NARFE) meets fourth Wednesday monthly at John Knox Village at 1 p.m. We are interested in protecting our federal pensions, COLAS and other entitlements. For further information and transportation, call Rita Daniels 954-428-9022. National Council of Jewish Woman. Meetings are held at the Clubhouse, Room N, at 12 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month, October through April. For information concerning the organization call Sylvia at 954-421-8870 or Arlene at 954-427-4566. Nature Club will meet third Friday of every month from November to April in Clubhouse Room A at 10 a.m. A different speaker is at each meeting and several trips each year are enjoyed by the members. These trips are to a variety of nature sites. For information call Shelly Baskin, 954-428-0634. Newbies Come and meet new people interested in social activities, dinners and trips. We meet the 1st

Tuesday of the month from November to April, Room F, 7 p.m. For information, call Virginia at 954-426-9455 or Beverly at 954-428-3705. New Covenant Church Celebration Service every Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and Evening Service and Bible Study every Wednesday at 6:45 p.m. For further information, call 954-7813170. New Horizons Church of Deerfield Worship Service 10 a.m., Sunday School 10:30a.m .For information call church 954-427-3045. New York Transit Retirees of Florida meets the second Wednesday of the month at 11 a.m. at Centura Park Clubhouse, 2395 N. W. 36th Ave., Coconut Creek. Keep informed of your pensions and medical benefits. For information, call 561-479-2149. New York Retirees DC37: Meetings held at B’nai Torah Congregation, 6261 S. W. 18th St., Boca Raton. Next meeting to be advised. For information, call Mildred 954-421-8527 or Vinnie at 561-451-3643. North East Focal Senior Center: Adult Day Care service, Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m .for individuals with dementia, Alzheimer or memory loss. Contact Mary Jo Bodnick, Case Manager at 954-4804463. Ballroom Dance lessons every Tuesday 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., “Hot Topic” discussions every Tuesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Open Water Color Painting class every Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact Laura Newman at 954-480-4447.Silver Sneakers class by Humana first Thursday monthly from 12 noon to 1 p.m. Beginner Computer lessons offered one-on-one at $40 for six one-hour lessons. Contact Laura Newman 954-480-4447 for appointment. Vision Impaired Support group every Wednesday 12 noon to 1 p.m. Tai Chi every Thursday, 12 noon to 1 p.m.; Arm Chair Fitness every Friday, 12 noon to 12:30 p.m,; Stretching/ Yoga Lite every Monday 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.. Line Dancing ($4 donation) for beginners/intermediates every Friday 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Volunteers required to demonstrate and assist in Floral Arrangements. Contact Ilean Sylk 954-480-4447. Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church, 5201 N. Military Trail, Deerfield Beach, Fl. Services Monday to Friday, 9 a.m., Saturday Vigil 4 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., and 11 a.m. by Rev. James Parappally, Pastor. For further information, call 954-421-3246. Parent & Adult Children Club meets the first Sunday of the month, Room F. This is a Social Club. Learn nutrition tips, exercise tips, meet new people, outings. The parent and adult child must come to the meetings together. If one does not live in the Village invite them to attend the meeting with you. For further information call Linda 954-725-3762. Pflag (Parents, Family and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) will meet on the second Tuesday of each month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Clubhouse, Room F. For information, call Abe at 954- 571-8448 or Dorothy at 954-4228508. Philadelphian’s and Neighbors Club meets 2nd Tuesday of the month at 2 p.m. in Clubhouse, Room October through March. Entertainment

at every meeting. Greet old and new friends. For further information call Selma Edelman, 954-421-6423 or her cell phone 954-675-3998. You can also call Bea Lerman 954-421-3497. Philosophy of CVE meetings is held each Monday in Room A at the Clubhouse from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m, beginning November 17, 2008 All residents and friends are welcome. Our schedule begins in November and lasts until mid-March. Starting with Opera, other topics will include the environment, humor, liberty, law, a piano recital and a variety of other cultural themes. For details, call Dr. Bob Griffin 954-596-0463 Pythian Sisters, Bright Star Temple #36 meets first and third Tuesday of every month at noon in the Activity Center, Room B. Interesting meetings, refreshments served. Become a member. Information, Ruth Goldberg 954-427-5226 or Irene Greenberg 954426-0628. Red Hatters Club, The JCP Red Hatters meet the second Wednesday of each month in the clubhouse. Monthly outings planned. Requirement for membership is a Red Hat and Purple Dress, Blouse, Pants etc. must be worn on outings. For more information call Josephine Privitera at 954-425-7026. Russian Club will be meeting every third Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the home of Galina Baraz, 2064 Ventnor P. For further information, contact Galina at 954-428-3870. Saint Ambrose Catholic Church, Pastor Rev. Bryan Dalton, Daily Masses 7:30 a.m., 11 a.m., 7 p.m., Saturday morning Vigil Masses 4 p.m., 5:30 p.m., Sunday Masses 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12 noon, 6 p.m., Confessions Saturday, 11 a.m. to 12 noon, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., For information call church 954-427-2225. Scrabbleers meets every Thursday at 7 p.m. in Room C at Clubhouse. All scrabble players welcome. Bring set if possible. For information, call R. Levin 954-427-4092. Selma’s Jewish Discussion Group meets first and third Wednesday of each month at Clubhouse, Room F at 10:30 a.m. All denominations welcome. For further information, call Pearl Keiler at 954-421-8719. Senior Volleyball for men and women on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the Volleyball Court, next to the main tennis courts back of the Clubhouse. Everyone, who attends, plays. Call Harry 954-426-3178. Sisterhood of Young Israel of Deerfield Beach meets at the Synagogue the first Tuesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. Interesting speakers, exciting programs and refreshments served. Gift Shop now open Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. Everyone welcome. For further information call Helen Hagler 954-360-9939 or Tobi Kleiman 954-725-3776. Sisterhood of Temple Beth Israel meets on second Thursday of each month at 11:30 am. A mini lunch is served followed by an interesting program. For further information call the Temple office at 954-421-7060 .


OCTOBER 2008 Sixty-five Social Club accepting new members couples only, one of who must be 70 or under. For information, call Lillian Jaffe at 954-3602941. Social Single is a social club for singles who are young at heart. We enjoy monthly outings, dinners, shows as well as monthly club brunches at local restaurants. Meetings are held the second Monday of each month in the Clubhouse, Room G at 7 p.m. For more information, call Nermie at 954-421-6931 or Sheila at 954-725-1521. SOCO (Symposium of Concerned Owners) meets the second and fourth Friday of each month in the Clubhouse. In-dept lectures and discussions with guest speakers. For information, call Jeff Chester at 954429-9285. SoftBall Players now forming Century Village teams. No age limitations. Call Ed Obeid at 954-421-2228. South Florida Gold Coast Chapter of Myasthenia Gravis support group meets second Saturday each month at 1 p.m. at the North Broward Medical Center, I-95 and Sample Road. For information call Gladys or Evelyn 954429-0455. St. Louis Club of CVE meets the first Wednesday, every other month, beginning in August for lunch. For information call Sol Mitchell 954-4287497. Stained Glass Club meets first Wednesday of every month until April at 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse Stained Glass room. For further information, call Harry Liner at 954-426-4853. Stamp and Coin Club meets every Thursday at 11 a.m. in Clubhouse, Room D. Residents are invited to have

their stamps and coins appraised free of charge any meeting day at 10:30 a.m. Stock Market Discussion Club meets first and third Monday each month at 10 a.m. Room N. Exchange information about stocks, mutual funds, ETF’s and bonds. No fee involved. For further information call Jim 954-596-2233 or Bill 954-698-0423. Talking Book Club the JBL Library, in conjunction with the Low Vision Group in CVE is forming a monthly Talking Book Club. Each participant will receive the same audio book. A representative for the JBI Library will facilitate the book discussion once a month. The group will meet the second Tuesday of the month at 10:30 am. For information call Janet Agmund 954-428-0711 or Goldie Witrock at the library 954-689-0207. Tai-Chi class will start on November 8. The class will be on Mondays and Thursday from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Exercise Room at Clubhouse with instructor, Terry. Come join our class and get rid of stress Temple Beth Israel. Is a Conservative Egalitarian Synagogue. Friday evening services, 7:30 p.m. Oneg Shabbat. Saturday, morning services 9 a.m. to noon followed by a Kiddish. Membership dues include a ticket for the High Holy Days. The temple library is open Monday thru Thursday 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. All Village residents may borrow bestsellers, large print books, biographies, Judaica, etc. There is also an ongoing book sale. Canter Bell will resume his lecture series with musical examples by Jewish Composers on Broadway beginning, December 3 through Wednesday, May 6, 2009. The lectures are from 11 a.m. to 12 noon in the Temple, and are held on the first Wednesday of the month. The fee for the series is $10. For more

information regarding membership and schedule of events, call the Temple office at 954-421-7060. Temple B’nai Shalom (Reform) Services are conducted every Friday at 8 p.m. at Le Club by Rabbi Alton M. Winters and Cantor, Gary Sherman. Oneg Shabbat follows every week. For additional information call William Schmier 954 428-8231. The Auxiliary meets the fourth Monday of every month at 10 a.m. For further information, contact Julia Bale 954 427 6669 or Bea Rosner 954 360 7760. The Theosophical Society of Deerfield located at 831 SE 9th Street, phone number 954-420-0908 offers a free Sunday Speaker’s Forum every week from 3:30 to 5 p.m. In addition we have many interesting classes during the day and evenings, also without charge. To obtain a free quarterly bulletin call the lodge at the above number or Lillian Mayer, a CVE resident for more information about specific classes we offer at 954-3607080. TNT (THURSDAY NIGHT TALENT) OPEN-MIKE NOW at 6 PM. Residents meet every Thursday evening year-round, in the Clubhouse, Music Room A. Everyone who wishes is given up to five minutes to entertain us with songs, jokes, a musical instrument, a reading, a dance, a story, etc. Audience-only visitors also invited. All talent levels, ages, and languages needed. For further information, call Mary Anne Surrette, (954) 734-0095. Pianists-by-ear highly welcome. United Federation of Teachers/ Retired Teachers Chapter Meetings at Temple Anshei Shalom, W. Atlantic Ave. West of Jog, Delray. For further information, call Hilda Cohen 954428-6805.

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

7B

United Club No. 7 (Retirees of ILGWU & ACTWU) meets on the first Thursday or first Saturday of each month in the Clubhouse, Room N at 1 p.m. For information, call Bea Jacobs at 954 427-0665. United Order True Sisters meets every fourth Tuesday at Temple Beth Israel at 11:30 a.m. For information about this organization contact President Frieda Weiss, 954-419-9143 or Membership Chairperson Betty Swinkin 954-570-9526. Visionally Impaired Persons (VIP) meets the first Wednesday monthly in Room E at 10:30 a.m. We exchange information and have guest speakers. We also have a book club and plan trips to seminars. All are welcome Contact Janel Agmund 954 428-0711.. Waves (Navy Gals) Meets every month on the first Saturday at 12 noon at the Olive Garden on Federal Highway in Ft. Lauderdale. For further information, call Eunice Westin at 954-427-7119. We Care of CVE still available for supplies (wheelchairs, walkers, canes, etc.) only. Contact Barbara Brown at 954-574-9675. . Wit, Wisdom & Humor information call 954-698-9334. Women Marines Association membership is open to women who serve or have served honorably in the U.S. Marine Corp or U.S. Marine Reserves. Many people are not aware of our existence. For information, call Ruth Beisner at 954-428-1637. Workmen’s Circle, Branch 1051 meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday at South County Civic Center on Jog Rd. or information call, Miriam Guz 561-495-7378.


PAGE

8B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Sports CVE Bowling League By LOUIS KAUFMAN Row, row, row your boat merrily down the stream. That just about describes how Century Village Bowlers feel about our new bowling alley at Pompano. Our league started on schedule on September 4th with 21 bowlers and has been rolling along since then. Surprisingly everybody is happy at our new location and are having a good time. I am happy to report that nobody has fallen yet and hopefully nobody will. After all is said and done, we are glad we made the change. The management has been especially cooperative and catering to us in super fashion. We have been in touch with some snowbirds and hopefully they will be back soon. I would like to expand this column with your comments. Please let me hear from you if you have any news that would be appropriate for the column. It is with great sadness that I have to report the death of Irene Glazer and Carol & Bob Hornsby’s daughter. See you next month. September 4, 2008 Estelle Kaufman 167 (426);

Milt Weisman 173; Betty Schwartz 147, 157 (425); Roz Caliendo 164; Jo O’Callaghan 142, 144 (414); Dorothy Elfont 142, 147 (423); Stuart Levine 141, 142 (418); Alan Hirschel 157. September 11, 2008 Sidney Goldstein 155; Vito

Ferrantino 154 (414); Sheldon Klein 167 (431); Betty Schwartz 150; Roz Caliendo 140, 162 (413); Nelson Morciglio, Jr. 160. September 18, 2008 Dorothy Elfont 165, 142, 149 (456); Vito Ferrantino 161, 158 176 (495); Alan Hirschel 146; Sheldon Klein 154, 159 (419); Stuart Levine 156, 159 (437); Roz Calinedo 158 (403).

See Our New Selection Of Wicker, Rattan & Patio Furniture!


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

9B


PAGE

10B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

11B


PAGE

12B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

All Women are born to be Actresses By JEROME ALLEN GONICBERG

All women are born to be actresses. It is not just in their gene makeup, it is a given the moment that they are born. From the cradle, there is no way that they can not resist being told how cute, how beautiful, and how charming they are. Yes, boy babies are also told the same, but once they start acting out with toy guns,cars, and planes, they are no longer cute, they are simply boys. But girls are constantly told and reminded how beautiful they are, and even if they are homely, no one is going to tell them they are not beautiful. Beautiful or not, it is constantly force - fed to them with kisses. Kissing by their female relatives, by strangers who stop and admire them and give them kisses, even if they are homely, perhaps looking like their fathers or mothers, or a spitting image of that aunt we all hate. But boys, as soon as they are big enough will avoid Aunt Sophie’s kisses, even if the are told how much they resemble father or grandfather or some dead relative,

they are boys after all. No one says to a boy how beautiful he looks, and if perchance they say how handsome he is, it rolls off like water on a duck’s back, thank goodness. Girls on the other hand thrive on kissing. They not only kiss their female relatives, they kiss each other, they kiss their dolls, they kiss their games, they kiss the Spice girls on the TV Screen, Hannah Montana; they kiss pictures in magazines of movie stars, and they kiss any relative that looks at them who tells them how beautiful they are. In a climate of people telling them how beautiful they are, even if they are ugly, and unfortunately some of them are, not really ugly, let us just say, they are homely, and will never win a popularity contest for looks. If one looks at boys clothes vs. girls dressed in girly clothes, no wonder girls learn to primp and preen as soon as they realize that being told how pretty they are is worth its weight in gifts like dolls, and clothes and jewelry. Like Pavlov’s Dog, it becomes a

clarion call for a girl to expect to be kissed or rewarded every time someone says to them How beeeuatifuul you are darlink. Again, boys couldn’t give a damn how they look; the dirtier the better they like it, besides it keeps female relatives from kiss, kiss, kissing them all the time. So we have established that like being born to the Manor, girls are born to be actresses and strive to make themselves more beautiful then they think they are. How many pairs of BVD’s, all white and neatly folded, are in a boy’s drawers, along with undershirts, and socks, neatly matched by color? Shoes lined up with ten pairs of sneakers that have an overwhelming gagging aroma. I remember one year my son went to camp with a dozen pairs of new briefs. I still cannot figure how come they were still in the original packages when he returned home. Compare that to girls, 20 pairs of panties in 20 different colors and types, from hip

huggers, to thongs. And then of course there are their boob holders, no longer stuffed with Kleenex, and also in 20 different styles, from strapless to padded, again in every Crayola color. Then we have their clothes and shoes, and makeup and lipsticks in every color of the rainbow and then some. The difference goes on and on, so why shouldn’t females think as fledging movie or rock stars, if Paris Hilton has created herself, why not any girl? Society has preprogrammed them to think that way. If a boy pouts, well what do you expect, he is a he and they all do that. And if he gets dirty playing with mud, what can you expect, he is a he. But a girl playing with mud, is only making mud pies, honing her future skills as a homemaker, besides, her mud is neatly trimmed, if not baked. Later in life, its her

coffee that will taste like mud. Boys on the other hand make their mud into small imitations of meat balls, but not to look like them, only to make it easier to throw them at girls. So as the little girl matures into a teenager, she will learn to talk girly talk with her friends, and dress up to the seven’s from her idols, the Spice Girls, or Paris Hilton, or any number of half clad female idols who believe that they have the most beautiful stomachs or belly buttons, or rear ends, or chests, especially if they reached the age of having a tattoo of an eagle or the flag on their chests. Girls talk about some movie star who excites them or some singer that they scream when they see a him or her in person. Now really, do you see teenage boys, scream and cry over a movie star. Yes, males get excited over a female, but not to scream over.


OCTOBER 2008

Peter Principle, Principal By JACK GALIT

There’s a description of a person who has been promoted to his/her supervising status who has reached the level of their incompetence, that is called the Peter Principle. When they have to think or act by their own efforts they fall short, having used the employees’ efforts over whom they had oversight on the way up the ladder. Whenever I attended a Parent Teacher Association (PTA) meeting, I would hear this criticism from several parents but on a muted tone from the teacher’s side. I had friendly relations with many mothers and several fathers because of their sons who were members of the three scout troops I had organized. Also, we had scout parents night on the fourth Friday evening each month during the school year at the school that two of my children attended. The principal in charge was anti-scout training because he opposed the pre-military preparation the training led scouts to, in later years, particularly the wearing of uniforms. He made it difficult for me to schedule 30 scout den meetings after school hours.

As my work office was located close to the Board of Education Headquarters in downtown Brooklyn, I would bypass his disapproval by reserving the rooms through the after school hours administration section. One afternoon, after I had been pressured to be PTA president at their meeting the previous night, after the elected president resigned, I stopped in to see this principal. When his secretary told him my name he blasted out that he had heard that the new PTA president “was an Englishman who didn’t know enough to come in out of the midday sun” (a Kipling quote). I replied that from what I have heard, “Dr. Moses, you sure haven’t led us into the promised land of education.” It was from the following conversation that I learned about his personal opinion about the Boy Scout system. I also brought to his attention that many parents, including myself, were unhappy with his type of disciplinary procedure when unruly, disturbing pupils were sent to his office. When he made his rounds of the classes

he would take this problem pupil with him. This student would be in back of the principal (and teacher) making all kinds of gestures and funny faces, much to the annoyance of many seated students. My son and daughter were among the many who brought these incidents to the attention of their parents. The disciplined boy was having a great time during his socalled punishment period. As a doctorate in child psychology, the principal believed that punishment should not be conducive to dislike of school and learning. However he admitted that he wasn’t aware of the youngster’s carryings on when accompanying him to the classrooms, as none of the teachers told him about such actions. That statement served to confirm the opinion of the teachers who designated him as a Peter Principle principal – who did very well at test-taking for higher positions but poorly as an administrator, responsible for his own ideas and actions. Before the beginning of the next school year, I learned from the head of the teachers’ group that the principal had been appointed to head up the Queens branch of the Bureau of Children’s

CVE REPORTER

Development Studies (approximate name). I thanked her for crediting me about the

PAGE

13B

transfer and resigned as PTA president before the year term was over.


PAGE

14B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

The Nanny States of America By SY BLUM/ Associate Editor The title of the book is One Nation Under Debt; the author is Robert E. Wright. But, surprise, this column is not really a book review. Rather, upon reading it I realized what has transpired over many years to this once-great democracy. Our founding fathers, back in the late 18th century, most certainly never envisioned the then newly created United States of America to evolve into what we have today. Back then governmental service was for a very limited period of time. The elected leaders of this fledgling nation were primarily farmers, business men, artisans, etc. They simply looked upon government service as a duty. Upon completion of their elected term they went back to their original occupations. Believe it or not! As a matter of fact, as late as the 1920s, during the incumbency of President Silent Cal Coolidge, the federal government comprised only 2% of the national economy. Soon thereafter, due to the Depres-

sion (1929-1937), the whole tapestry of small government became unraveled. As a result of Black Tuesday when the stock market collapsed, the federal government was forced to take draconian measures to try to stop the complete collapse of the economy. In an effort to get the country back on track, then President Franklin Delano Roosevelt created agencies such as the CCC, the NRA and many others. And, of course, he engineered the birth of Social Security to enable the elderly to retire with some sort of security. This expansion of the federal government’s role in the life of private citizens entailed the hiring of thousands of additional workers to operate these new government programs. From that point on the government sector grew like Topsy until you have what we have today. As history tells us, just as the new federal programs began to kick in and save the economy, we found ourselves

attacked by the Japanese at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Following the declaration of war on the Axis, the military complex took over. As a result, unemployment and the Depression disappeared and winning World War II at any cost became our main focus. Of course, this created hundreds of thousands of jobs, financed mostly by the federal government. If you were not directly employed by a federal agency or in the military, most likely your business had dealings in some way with the prodigious needs of a war-time economy. Even though the war officially ended in 1945, a false, government-funded prosperity continued. Many federal employees stayed on the job even though the need had considerably lessened. Shortly thereafter, the Korean War perpetuated some of the wartime programs. In a word, the federal bureaucracy was here to stay. Come 1965 through the

Herculean efforts of President Lyndon Baines Johnson, the beginnings of Medicare came into being. Needless to say, this program, along with President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Social Security program, is the reason the vast majority of us senior citizens are still around. These programs and many others are financed by the American taxpayer. Unfortunately, as more and more citizens took advantage of these entitlements, and others, tax revenues no longer covered the cost of these vital services. And thus we come to the point of this article. As mentioned at the beginning, our congressional representatives once served their term and went back to their original occupations. However, as government grew, Congress realized the power they had not only for legislating the laws of the land, but also to mandate perks for themselves and thus make their incumbency very desirable indeed. In effect, serving their constituents gradually became less important than serving themselves. Consequently,

over the years, getting elected and re-elected to Congress has resulted in a lifetime career par excellence! for a majority of our esteemed representatives. As the book points out, today two-thirds of your elected representative’s time in Congress consists of contacting donors for campaign financing for the next election. So, as has been mentioned many times in the past, our national elections are becoming increasingly meaningless as less than 15% of incumbents are defeated at the polls. One Nation Under Debt attributes our ever escalating deficit to Congresses’ refusal to raise taxes to pay for these very expensive entitlements. In other words they realize that facing reality by raising taxes would very likely end their living a Shangri-La existence. It is much more politically palatable to just borrow the money. The fact that the deficit (estimated at this writing, as exceeding ten trillion dollars) is going to have to be paid some day in the not-too-distant See NANNY, pg 15B


OCTOBER 2008

Nanny

continued from pg 14B

future bothers them not at all. Let their children and our children worry about it. That sum at present amounts to a liability of very roughly $31,000 for every single citizen, from the newly-born to the aged! Of course, these entitlements do not stop with Social Security and Medicare, the list keeps growing. Every time there is a need (real or imagined) the American people turn to government to fund their desires. Considering the fact that their elected representatives (federal or local) have as their sole objective to be re-elected, they are only too willing to provide it, where at all possible. It is just like maxing out your credit card except that the person authorizing the borrowing of funds is not responsible to pay off the card; that is for those unfortunates who follow us. In One Nation Under Debt, the author comes up with an appropriate phrase which I have used for the headline for this column. Contrast this approach to the conception to resurrection

policy of the Scandinavian countries: Norway, Sweden, Denmark, etc. These countries have long been considered to be the most paternalistic of their citizens of any nation in the world. Everyone is assured the necessities of life in some way, regardless of age or income. However, it is sometimes overlooked that Scandinavians pay as they go as much as possible. For example, Danish citizens pay what amounts to confiscatory taxes (roughly 50% of their income) to support this philosophy. Admittedly, it does inhibit somewhat the accumulation of great wealth, but everyone is assured a comfortable and carefree lifestyle. In addition, these countries do not engage in senseless, expensive wars. (A recent poll found them to be the happiest people in the world.) So, let’s face it. Despite the seemingly never-ending presidential campaign now in its final phases, it seems unlikely to this writer that no one person can change things, as this is the way the U. S. Government works, and has worked for a long time. God bless those who follow us.

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

15B


PAGE

16B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

Go figure

By EMANUEL PELLEGRINO “Uncle, when I’m 80 years old, many changes will take place in my life. First, let’s start with breakfast. I was always told that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. With me, it will be a sumptuous feast, throwing sound healthful eating habits, and other prescribed good eating regimens to the wind. Start first with three eggs fried in bacon fat. Of course I’ll also eat the bacon along with slices of white toast slathered with butter – the real thing. I will repeat this each morning along with, if I desire, a side of fatty ham, or perhaps a couple of fried pork chops dipped in black strap molasses, or perhaps a steak or two, without trimming the fat. Why am I proposing this Cardio Vascular Nightmare regimen? The way I see it, you are damned if you do, damned if you don’t. For instance, take our friend Mendel. If there ever was a poster boy for how to prevent cardio vascular disease, it is he. His total cholesterol is 129, LDL’s 64, HDL’s 54, Triglycerides 57, all well

within the normal range – this ration of 2.4 – 4.5 is normal. Further, no history of any coronary heart disease in any of his eight siblings – all were older than he – or his mom and dad. He works out daily in the indoor pool – to avoid the sun – doing full body exercises. His routine is forty exercises which he does fifteen times each, going through this routine three times, which takes at least 45 minutes – try that at 84 years old. He and his wife eat out maybe twice a year, Mother’s Day and Easter Sunday. They cook all their own meals, never take-out. Plenty of roasted chicken, never anything fried. Plenty of steamed, poached or baked fish, perhaps a stuffed baked pork chop, or a three ounce steak once a month. Plain steamed vegetables, or raw, with no butter added. And plenty of fresh fruits and nuts. He has never in his life eaten a cheeseburger, and wouldn’t be caught dead in any of those fast food restaurants. Although he once remarked he would consider going to Wendy’s for a grilled chicken

breast sandwich with honey mustard sauce. Allow me to tell you what he has for breakfast seven mornings a week. He cooks his own oatmeal, never any of that tampered with instant junk. He plates this up then adds three tablespoons of raw wheat germ, five almonds, (some people with severe arthritis claim eating nine almonds and a good shot of pure gin each morning gives them relief from pain – gin has that effect) a scoop of raisins, a sprinkle of cinnamon, no salt or sugar, just a splash of raw honey. But first he has a full glass of orange juice and then a serving spoon filled with black strap molasses. Is all this healthy? Then he has the only caffeine beverage he will have each day, (never drinks any soda) a real cup of coffee. I might add that he grinds his own coffee beans fresh daily. For lunch each day he will cook in advance several meals which he will freeze in serving portions. For instance, boiled turkey necks along with carrots, celery and onions, also beans with celery, and pea soup from a left-over ham bone, or left-over pasta with mother’s famous meat-

CVE REPORTER

balls that don’t bounce, or a chicken breast sandwich from last nights supper – never eating any processed meat cold cuts. I think you get my drift, and I won’t bore you with what he and his wife prepare for dinners. This past June, during his daily workouts, Mendel developed chest pains. For two days he passed them off as indigestion. His cardiologist suggested that he go to the hospital to do an angiogram catheter. This test revealed an artery blocked 97%. Angioplasty was done and a coronary stent was installed. Fortunately all this was done at this time, as a fatal heart attack could have occurred. Mendel always kept his routine health check-ups. Five months previously an echo cardiogram was done, which he passed with flying colors. At the same time a stress test was done which he also passed with flying colors. Routine electro cardiograms showed nothing. So, go figure. He crossed all the t’s and dotted all the i’s , always taking the health comes first route. He doesn’t drink alcohol or smoke, or fool around with sports cars. Seriously,

PAGE

17B

what did our friend Mendel do wrong? Why did he fall through the cracks? How does one develop a blocked artery in five months that induce cardio vascular problems? I might add that in addition to all the precautionary testing and eating a healthful diet, our friend Mendel takes a statin drug daily as an added precaution, also an anti-coagulant drug to prevent clots and other buildups, as well as 81 mgs of aspirin each day to keep the blood thin. Go figure. Are the electro cardiograms, sonograms and stress tests not true tests of what’s going on, or were they done properly? I posed this question to three different cardiologist’s and got the same answers from all three, “ No matter what test proves that there are no problems, or what precautions we take, or what healthy life styles we pursue, stuff happens!” So Uncle, what should I do? I have 20 years to go until I’m 80. Should I go on my proposed regimen now or wait? What if I don’t make it to 80? Perhaps I should put everything on hold while I try to figure out how to quit smoking.”


PAGE

18B

What’s bugging you? By HARRY L. KATZ The Whitefly Century Village East has a new resident, the Whitefly. It is quite common in Florida but only recently invaded Deerfield Beach. According to Larry White, with CVE pest control, they are infesting ficus trees and bushes along Hillsboro Blvd. and in the Ellesmere and Ventnor areas. He is spraying with systemic insecticides and applying fertilizer. It is a serious pest of several ornamental plants, especially ficus, leaving the foliage covered with honeydew or blackened with a heavy growth of sooty mold. They start out as tiny, oval eggs less that 1/100 inch long, attached with a short stock to the underside of leaves. Within 4 to 12 days, they hatch into crawlers which insert their beaks into leaves to suck out the sap. After molting four times, they become adults only 1/12 inch long with a fine white powder covering their body and four wings, resembling a tiny moth. Infested plants lack vigor, wilt, turn yellow and die. Termites With all the excessive rain that we have at times, how is it that the subterranean termite, a common resident in our soil, does not drown in their waterlogged nests? It can be more than a day after the rain before some air is available. Ants and other soil dwellers all leave their galleries before they are submerged, but not the termite. Researchers have found that termites escape drowning by entering a period of quiescence. They are able to block penetration of water through the microscopic spiracle openings. They can also shut down body processes periodically to reduce oxygen consumption. That is why termite control contracts include annual maintenance costs to protect against re-infestations. Repeated soil drenching removes some of the termite control toxicants from the soil. Excessive rainfall also makes the soil more conducive for more rapid colony development after the rain. The indoor pest, the common dry wood termite, of course, is not affected by any rainfall.

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Ask Bea

By BEA LITNER Friendship Dear Readers: While talking to some of my neighbors, the subject of friends came up. The topic: What makes a person someone you want to be with? It was so interesting that we made up the following list. Here are the thoughts that come to mind. Value each other – because life is short. Respect – the differences. Welcome – from diverse backgrounds. Be smart – smart people learn from others. Listen - you have two ears and one mouth so listen twice as much as you talk.

Talk to people not about people. Ask questions like, where are you from originally? What did you retire from? And then listen before you tell them about you. Negative people bring you down, so stay clear of them. When you leave a room or a conversation, take all the fun people with you. Life is short, so live tall! Make a difference Want to make a difference? Saturday, October 29, 2008 will be another Make a Difference Day. It is not too early to start planning what you can do to improve your community or help in your Village and be part of this National Event. Do some-

thing good for someone that day! Fun for the day? We disbar lawyers and we defrock clergy, so why don’t we: Delight electricians?

Derange cowboys? Depose models? Debark tree surgeons? Depress dry cleaners? Send your questions and wise advice to Ask Bea at the Reporter.

PLAY AGAIN

Anterior Hip Replacement Less pain Less Scarring Quicker recovery Anterior Hip Replacement has a faster, easier recovery for most people. We’re the only South Florida hospital with the state-of-the-art Hana table to help our surgeons replace the hip without cutting leg and gluteal muscles. And that’s a huge advantage to help you get back to being you, again!

POWERFUL ORTHOPEDICS For more information about Anterior Hip Replacement visit BrowardHealth.org or for a physician referral call the Broward Health Line at 954-759-7400. NB Anterior Hip ad 7.875x9.875.indd 1

6/25/08 10:38:42 AM


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

19B


PAGE

20B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Hurricane Season Be Prepared


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

21B


PAGE

22B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

23B

How the Internet Began

Submitted by BETTY SCHWARTZ/ Assistant to the Editor - From the Internet In ancient Israel, it came to pass that a trader by the name of Abraham Com did take unto himself a young wife by the name of Dot. And Dot Com was a comely woman, broad of shoulder and long of leg. Indeed, she had been called Amazon Dot Com. She said unto Abraham, her husband, “Why doth thou travel far from town to town with thy goods when thou can trade without ever leaving thy tent?” And Abraham did look at her as though she were several saddle bags short of a camel load, but simply said, “How, Dear?” And Dot replied, “I will place drums in all the towns and drums in between to send messages saying what you have for sale and they will reply telling you which hath the best price.

And the sale can be made on the drums and delivery made by Uriah’s Pony Stable (UPS).” Abraham thought long and decided he would let Dot have her way with the drums. The drums rang out and were an immediate success. Abraham sold all the goods he had at the top price, without ever moving from his tent. But this success did arouse envy. A man named Maccabia did secret himself inside Abraham’s drum and was accused of insider trading. And the young man did take to Dot Com’s trading as doth the greedy horsefly take to horse flesh. And, before very long, there were many others and they were called Nomadic Ecclesiastical Rich Dominican Siderites, or Nerds for short. And lo, the land was so

Philosophy Club By BOB GRIFFIN

New Season Are you ready for a new season of challenges and adventures? The CVE Philosophy Club can be your discussion group with a happy difference. Our view, in the words of Robert L. Stevenson, is: The world is so full Of a number of things, I’m sure we should all Be as happy as Kings. Philosophically, of course, we should try to understand what it is to be happy. Lewis Carroll, author of Alice In Wonderland, offers us a cheerful idea in his professional text on logic. Did you know, for instance, that Charles Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll) taught logic and math at England’s Cambridge University? – that Alice In Wonderland is filled with logic puzzles? Dean Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) offers one easy answer to the problem of happiness. He says: “Happy is the man who does not know what ‘toothache’ means.” (Symbolic Logic, p. 15). As a logic exercise, he analyzes the statement and finds it to mean: All men who do not know what ‘toothache’ means are happy men. A logical interpretation? A truth? Life and logic do not always match. Back to our happy CVE Philosophy Club. Beginning November 17, 2008, we will meet each Monday evening, 7:30-8:30 p.m. in the Social Room A (second floor) of the Clubhouse. All residents and friends are invited. Our schedule begins Monday, November 17, and lasts until mid-March, 2009. Starting with Opera by our

own Jeff Chester, our topics will include the environment (Sierra Club), humor, liberty and the law, a piano recital,

feverish with joy at the new riches and the deafening sound of drums, that no one noticed that the real riches were going to the drum maker, one Brother William of Gates, who bought up every drum company in the land, and indeed did insist on making drums that would work only with Brother Gates’ drumheads and drumsticks. Dot did say, “Oh, Abraham, what we have started is being taken over by others.” And as Abraham looked out over the Bay of Ezekiel, (or as it came to be known “Ebay”) he said, “We need a name that reflects what we are.” And Dot replied, “Young Ambitious Hebrew Owner Operators.” “Yahoo”, said Abraham. And that is how it all began – It wasn’t Al Gore after all. and a variety of other cultural themes. Join us throughout the season, starting Monday, November 17 at 7:30 p.m. in the clubhouse, Social Room A.

10/31/08


PAGE

24B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Cooke’s look at books By RICHARD WILLIAM COOKE

A monthly look at books of interest – new and, occasionally, not-so-new, fiction and nonfiction -- currently available at your public library, local bookstore or from online booksellers. The Audacity of Hope By Barack Obama, Crown, 320 Pages, $25.00 In his best-seller, presidential candidate Obama lays out what we all agree with. Government is broken. Congress is so fraught with partisanship and hopeless bickering that nothing gets accomplished. Politicians are wholly out of touch with the people they are elected to serve. Investment in education in science and technology is absolutely critical to our future.He is skeptical of big government, Republican tax cuts for the rich and the privatization of Social Security. He believes government should offer, not a “hand out,” but a “hand up” to those who really need it. And he emphasizes that a policy of change, one that is rooted in inclusiveness and nobility of spirit, will bring about the resurgence of our country’s standing in the

world. In fact his book is subtitled “Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream.” The Illinois senator’s writing is eloquent, thoughtful and skillful and as moving as his oratory. A confessed night owl, Obama says he wrote the book between 9:30 PM and 1:00 AM each night, after his Senatorial duties were over and his family was in bed. If his positions on issues can seem triangulated to some readers, that’s probably because the issues themselves are complicated and manysided. And some may think he’s biting off more than he can chew, particularly for one as young and unseasoned in the way of old-style Washington politics as he may be. However, history records that it is the passionate young who, with their unbridled zeal, often succeed in bringing about important societal change. One thing is for sure, Barack Obama’s warm and inviting style, so evident in this book – and demonstrated willingness to thoughtfully listen to the other side and consider its positions – would, for many, be a welcome change in Washington.

Faith of My Fathers By John McCain and Mark Salter, Random House, 368 Pages, $15.00 Whether or not one agrees politically with presidential candidate McCain, this book is important if for no other reason than it helps to illuminate how the senator from Arizona got to where he is today, both morally and ethically. While not actually written by McCain – his administrative assistant, Mark Salter, is credited as ghostwriter – the book provides the reader with a dramatic and riveting account of much of McCain’s life. Many will find the first half of the book less than interesting. It is filled with lots of military history and details intertwined with the story of McCain’s father and grandfather, both of whom rose to the rank of admiral in the U.S. Navy and were involved in military action. However, there is no covering up the fact that McCain himself was not nearly as imposing a naval officer. He was nearly expelled from the Naval Academy and, when he graduated, he placed fifth from the bottom in his class. One gets the sense that, ever since, McCain has been at-

tempting to make up for this embarrassment. But make up for it he did, and in a remarkable way. Shot down over Viet Nam, he was captured and spent five years in the Hanoi Hilton, the infamous POW camp. Horribly tortured, deprived of food, forced to sleep on a dirt floor – an experience he writes about fully in this book -- after being freed, he was transformed into one of the best known survivors of the Viet Nam conflict. Some may find McCain’s defiance when cornered, admiration of the military and perceived tendency to embrace war as an immediate solution to international problems – all fairly clear from this reading -- a bit troubling. In this book, the straight talker lives up to his name. Miles from Nowhere By Barbara Savage, Mountaineers Books, 324 Pages, Paperback, $14.95 At dinner one night in their tiny apartment in Santa Barbara, Barbara and Larry Savage, a young married couple, looked at each other and said, “Know how people say ‘We wish we’d done something really exciting when we were younger because now we’re

too old’?” That’s how they ended up, eighteen months later, after saving every cent they could, traveling by bicycle around the world. This book, tailor made for the armchair traveler in all of us, is one people have read again and again and given to friends. And there’s good reason for that – it’s one of the most delightful pieces of travel literature you will ever come across. Over the course of their two-year, twenty-five-country, 23,000-mile global bicycle odyssey, the Savages encountered warm-hearted strangers eager to share food and shelter, bicycle-hating drivers who shoved them off the road, wild animals (including violent apes and attacking camels), rock-throwing Egyptians, overly-protective Thai policemen, motherly New Zealanders, meteorological disasters and great indignities, not the least of which were the lack, in most places, of even the crudest of toilet facilities. This last fact accounts for some of the book’s funniest passages. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll cringe in revulsion – or in terror – as you ride along See BOOKS, pg 25B


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

25B

At The Movies-October By SANDRA PARNESS

WALL-E-What if mankind had to leave Earth, and somebody forgot to turn the last robot off? WALL-E, a robot, spends every day doing what he was made for. But soon, he will discover what he was meant for. From Academy Award-winning writer-director, Andrew Stanton, Disney/ Pixar’s “WALL-E” is the story of one robot’s comic adventures as he chases his dream across the galaxy. Starring voices of Fred Willard, Signourey Weaver, Ben Burtt, G, 98 minutes. Playing Wednesday, October 8, 2 & 8 p.m., Thursday, October 9, 8 p.m., Friday, October 10, 8 p.m. THE INCREDIBLE HULKFugitive Dr. Bruce Banner must utilize the genetic accident that transformed him into a giant rampaging hulk to stop a former soldier that purposely becomes an even more dangerous version. Starring Edward Norten, Liv Tyler, Tim Roth, William Hurt, PG-13, 114 minutes. Playing Sunday, October 12, 8 p.m., Monday, October 13, 2 & 8 p.m., Wednesday, October 15, 2 p.m.

Books

continued from pg 24B

with the Savages on their sometimes dangerous, often zany, adventure. Included are several excellent color photographs of the authors, their bicycles, their destinations – even one of their bicycling shoes nearly beyond repair but held together with duct tape. Tragically, as the book was going to press, Barbara Savage was killed when the bicycle she was riding was hit by a truck near her Santa Barbara home. In the Frame: My Life in Words and Pictures By Helen Mirren, Atria Books, 272 Pages, $35.00 Who can forget Helen Mirren’s performance as Queen Elizabeth in “The Queen,” the role for which she won an Oscar? And who can forget her in the role of detective chief inspector Jane Tennison in the acclaimed TV series, Prime Suspect? While Mirren may be best known to American audiences for those two vehicles, since her stage debut in 1967, the year she joined the Royal Shakespeare Company, her career has embraced dozens of roles in theatre, cinema and television and earned her loyal audiences the world over.

RAID ON ENTEBBE – 30TH ANNIVERSARY-Based on a true Military operation by Israeli commandos that took place 30 years ago. An Air France flight is hijacked by the PFLP. The plane has about 100 Jewish passengers. The plane is grounded in Uganda. Israelis would not negotiate. Less than 500 soldiers actually flew so far and rescued the passengers in one of the most successful Military operations in history. Starring Peter Finch, Martin Balsam, Charles Bronson, N/R, 121 minutes. Playing Wednesday, October 15, 8 p.m., Thursday, October 16, 8 p.m., Friday, October 17, 8 p.m., Monday, October 20, 2 p.m.

Jason Bateman, PG-13, 92 minutes. Playing Monday, October 20, 8 p.m., Wednesday, October 22, 2 & 8 p.m., Thursday, October 23, 8 p.m MAMMA MIA-Hit Broadway show comes to the big screen featuring the music of ABBA. It’s a trip down the aisle you’ll never forget; a story of a bride-to-be trying to find her real father out of a possible three gentlemen and that’s where the fun begins. Starring Pierce Brosnan, Colin Firth, Meryl Streep, PG-13, 120 minutes. Playing Friday, October 24, 8 p.m., Sunday, October 28, 8 p.m., Monday, October 27, 2 & 8 p.m.

HANCOCK-There are heroes. There are superheroes. And then there’s…Hancock!!! A hard-living superhero who has fallen out of favor with the public enters into a questionable relationship with the wife of the public relations professional who’s trying to repair his image. Starring Will Smith, Charlize Theron,

SWING VOTE-One ordinary guy is giving the candidates a reason to run. In a remarkable turn-of-events, the result of the presidential election comes down to one man’s vote. Starring Kevin Costner, Kelsey Grammer, Dennis Hopper, Stanley Tucci, PG-13, 120 minutes. Playing Wednesday, October 29, 2 & 8 p.m., Thursday, October 30, 8 p.m., Friday, October 31, 8 p.m.

In this magnificentlyproduced new biography, Mirren writes of her aristocratic Russian grandfather, Pyotr Vasielivich Mironov, who was sent to London by the Tsar then found himself stranded and left penniless by the Bolshevik revolution. He brought with him a trunk of papers and photographs all of which Mirren kept. It is the contents of that trunk – which included handwritten notes and letters – and the rich stream of pictures and memorabilia from her own life that make up much of this new book. The author vividly recounts stories of her parents, family life, childhood, teenage and early years as an actress spent sharing insalubrious flats with friends. She looks back at

her many distinguished roles and at the illustrious men and women she has encountered. She tells of her decision to try Hollywood and of her subsequent life in the U.S. with her husband, film director Taylor Hackford. What makes the book even more outstanding are the pages of stunning images of Mirren by the world’s leading photographers. Known for her refreshingly forthright style, liberated attitude and bohemian outlook – all of which are reflected in word and picture in this book – Mirren, made a Dame of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth in 2003, holds nothing back in this book. Her fans, which are legion, will be more than delighted.

Plumbing, Electrical, Remodeling, Repairs, Carpet, Wood, Laminate, Etc.


PAGE

26B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

27B

CVE Symphony Orchestra Concert Season Resumes December 9, 2008 By WILLIAM P. BRYAN, Ph.D./ President As summer vacations, family visits, holidays, and other significant celebrations come to an end, the CVE Symphony Orchestra Conductor, Dr. Clark McAlister, and the talented musicians, are again ready to provide the CVE community with another musically thrilling schedule for the 2008-2009 concert cycle. As usual, the concert selections and professional guest musicians will provide another program series of dynamic performances. The 1,600 seat Century Village East Clubhouse Theater is still reverberating from the 2007-2008 season of the four exceedingly successful performances. The orchestra’s Board of Directors, with assistance from the CVE Symphony Guild and the Clubhouse staff, is already planning the new season’s program of events. The orchestra rehearsals resume on Sunday, November 2nd. This year’s concert series, held on Tuesday evenings, will continue with a tremendously extensive concert program. The four programs for the 20082009 concert series are: 12/09/08 Respighi: Ancient Dances and Airs, Suite 1 Handel: Concerto in B flat (Kay Kemper, Harp) Saint-Saens: Morceau de Concert

tra has been performing at CVE for over 25 years! This is a most amazing accomplish1/20/09 ment, beginning with a small Handel: Heroic March Mozart: Concerto No. 24 group of CVE resident musicians who gathered to play in C Minor (Alice music for themselves. And Levinson, Piano) today, the orchestra, comBeethoven: Symphony posed of musicians of all ages, No. 5 has become an astonishing achievement of the many mu2/24/09 sicians, the Symphony Guild, Offenbach: La Vie Parisi Clubhouse staff, and music enne-Overture students over these many Wieniawski: Polonaise years of orchestral service. No. 2 (Anton Miller, This, too, is an outstanding Violin) accomplishment by Dr. Clark David: Andante et McAlister, CVESO Conduc Scherzo (Anton tor, in the continual shaping Miller, Violin) Gounod: Symphony No. 1 of the musicians into such talented and loyal performers. Puccini: Three Arias for And, at each performance, Dr. Orchestra (O Mio Babbino Caro, Gianni McAlister introduces nuances of particular pieces of music Schicchi; with such lively enthusiasm Humming Chorus, Ma dame Butterfly; and, and knowledge, that it makes these concerts both acousti Musetta’s Waltz, La cally thrilling and education Boheme) ally satisfying. The guest artists are all 3/31/09 exceptionally skilled and Mendelssohn: Hebrides talented musicians. Their Overture concert and artistic achieveSaint-Saens: Concerto ments demonstrate their No. 2 (Roberta Rust, many years of persistence Piano) and determination in their Mozart: Symphony No. music theory education and 36 proficiency, both required to (Note: the Conductor has the skillfully master their instruright to change the music listing ment. We, collectively, are at any time). lucky to be the beneficiaries of Ruth Cousin, Manager of their talent. the Orchestra, and a violinist Future monthly articles with it, noted that the orchesHaydn: Symphony No. 93

CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild By MARION G. COHEN

No hurricane, no disaster, no sweltering heat can stop the Board of the Guild from planning ahead for an exciting 2008-2009 season. The members of the Board have been working all summer on these plans, and what an exciting year that will be for all the friends of the guild! There are many newcomers in Century Village who are not aware of the goals of the CVE Orchestra Guild, and we want to enlighten you so that you can join our growing membership list and support our efforts. We have been fund-raising for the Symphony Orchestra for over 20 years. How do we do it? Every year we present a sizable sum to the orchestra. We take exciting trips, attend theatrical productions and engage in other fund-raising activities. We meet as a group at an Open Meeting to which we invite our members and interested potential members. At this meeting we keep you abreast of what is happening in the Guild and in the Symphony, and we always present a musical performance. We are very dedicated, and as a team we work hard to make sure that our orchestra remains the wonderful group that adds so much culture and

entertainment to Century Village and to the community of Deerfield Beach. If you are a member of the Guild, you will receive a flyer in October listing the information about planned events for the season. We hope you will join us in our excursions into fun, culture and musical experiences. Here is a preview of planned activities for the coming year. On November 9, 2008 we will be attending a matinee performance of the ballet, Swan Lake, Act 2, at the Broward Center of the Performing Arts; on Friday evening, December 5, 2008 we will be viewing the Opera, La

Traviata; on January 27 and January 28, 2009 our famous Trip with a Difference will take us to the West Coast of Florida. Our fashion show scheduled for February 8 will be sponsored by Coldwater Creek in Boca Raton. Why are we so successful with our fashion show? We present fabulous entertainers, serve a wonderful lunch, and then offer so many prizes for which there is no charge. On March 15 we will be attending a ballet matinee at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts. On April 2, 2009 our opera fans will return to the Broward Center for the

will detail each of the season’s programs. Dr. McAlister, Conductor, centers the orchestra with his conducting skill and technique. This sets the tenor and foundation for the musicians. His musical guidance and international experience brings magic to the theater as the concert begins. You can literally hear a pin drop as the lights dim and his baton is raised into the air, signaling the beginning of a composition. All eyes, and ears, of the musicians are focused on him and ready for the first beat. At this point, the musicians present an artistic work of music to its waiting audience. The selection of music score possibilities Dr. McAlister brings to this orchestra, which is composed of many volunteer musicians with a wide variety of technical skills and maturity, yields much joy to both the audience and musicians alike. Those of you who have attended previous concerts are highly aware of the maturity of the guest performers and orchestra’s musicians. It is again hopeful that this season’s concerts will attract full houses. The continuation of your CVE Orchestra is contingent upon the attendance of music lovers of all ages. So, tell all, bring a friend, and PLEASE purchase tickets for the four (4) perfor-

mances. After all, this is your Symphony Orchestra, and, how many communities have a Symphony Orchestra to claim their own??? We most sincerely appreciate those who have made attendance at the concerts a significant part of their lives! Additionally, the theater’s lobby is a great place to meet friends before and after the performances to discuss the evening. Heard after performances of last season’s concerts are statements such as…”this is like going to the Boston Symphony”; and, “I felt transformed and began floating like in a wonderful dream”. We hope to see each and every one of you in support of our new concert season of 2008-2009. As with all not-forprofit organizations… OUR CONTINUATION IS DEPENDENT UPON A FULL HOUSE OF CONCERTGOERS. Your CVE Symphony Orchestra needs your ongoing financial support (ticket purchases, etc.) to succeed and to continue to bring annual concert programs to all of you. So, please help us fill each and every one of the theater’s 1,600 seats throughout the concert season. We look forward to performing for all of you.

Performing Arts for a performance of Figaro. And there is much more! Review your flyer! Have you ordered tickets for the CVE Symphony Orchestra when you filled out your five-month flyer for our Clubhouse Theater? Have you paid your dues of $10 single and $12 family

membership? You may send your checks to Jean Crown, 173 Prescott I. Every member helps support our unique orchestra. Remember…all paidup members receive a mailing of scheduled events early in the season. You have priority in joining our offerings before they are sold out!


PAGE

28B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

SUDOKU Sudoku doesn’t require any special math skills or calculations. It is a simple and fun game of logic -- all that’s needed is brains and concentration.

There is really only one rule to Sudoku: Fill in the game board so that the numbers 1 through 9 occur exactly once in each row, column, and 3x3 box. The numbers can appear in any order and diagonals are not considered. Your initial game board will consist of several numbers that are already placed. Those numbers cannot be changed. Your goal is to fill in the empty squares following the simple rule above. 1. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each row. 2. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each column. 3. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each 3x3 box. 4. A complete Sudoku puzzle contains the numbers 1 through 9 in every row, column, and 3x3 box. Hint: Start with a square that only has three numbers missing. Look at surrounding squares and grids to see which numbers you need to fill that 3x3 grid. SOLUTION ON PAGE 37B

JUMBLE

CRYPTOGRAM

By CHARLES K PARNESS

1) S H O A C 2) P R E S U M E 3) N O N R A S P I I I T 4) M A X E I N E 5) C L E P C A T E R E

_ _ _ ( _) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ( _) _ ( _) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ( _) _ _ _ ( _) _ _ _ _ _ _ _

THE WORLD’S SHORTEST PUN: “I CAN ROW A BOAT. Answer: ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _)?”

Unscramble each word, then use the letters in the brackets to solve the jumble. Solution on page 37B

By CHARLES K PARNESS

ACDED / HED/ AZI / AEHMDXWD T / WB / PWKD, I B D / W T / BIA / V I / M D V / C D H E A ’ T / X D T W E D.

FIGE/

ACD / IACDE / WT / AI / MDV / W A. M. / J. / T C H Z

SOLUTION ON PAGE 37B


OCTOBER 2008

CVE Duplicate Bridge Club Winners

10/31/08

G. Schulhoff/C. Holtzman 8/11/08 B. Weinberg/D. Leviss, C. Holtzman/G. Schulhoff 8/18/08 B.Weinberg/G. Schulhoff, P. Tepper/C. Holtzman Tuesday 8/05/08 B. Bronstein/B. Feldstein, C. Whitman/R. Silverman 8/12/08 S. Bhatt/B. Weinberg, R. Rosen/J. Gratsky 8/26/08 B. Lillienfeld/M. Nearier, S. Babich/R. Colman

PAGE

29B

The Puzzler- #2 By: CHARLES K. PARNESS

By BERNICE RUGA

August 2008 Saturday 8/02/08 R. Silverman/B. Feldstein, S. Babich/J. Conti 8/09/08 R. Silverman/B. Feldstein, B. Bronstein/A. Orent 8/16/08 S. Bhatt/B. Weinberg, S. Babich/J. Conti 8/23/08 R. Silverman/B. Feldstein, S. Babich/R. Colman 8/30/08 P. Tepper/B. Weinberg, R. Eden/M. Kean Monday 8/04/08 B. Zinovoy/H. Luber,

CVE REPORTER

A fruit store received three unmarked boxes of fruit. One box contained oranges, another contained grapefruits, and the last one contained both oranges and grapefruits. The store clerk labeled the three boxes depending on their

contents: “ORANGES”, “GRAPEFRUITS” AND ORANGES “AND” GRAPEFRUITS. The labels he made were fine, but when he put them on each box, every box had the wrong label. The manager wanted to correct the labeling, but the boxes

CVE Clubhouse Library News By RUTH WOLFSON

Substituting for Gloria Shomer is not an easy task, but a last minute call to me to write this month’s column has to be answered. One of my jobs in the library is to order the new regular-print books and I attempt to read the reviews and synopses at least one month ahead of the date the books are available for purchase (and for you to enjoy.) At this moment I have placed an order for the October and November deliveries from the latest Baker and Taylor catalog. It occurred to me that sharing these titles with you gives you an opportunity to reserve them in advance. It is not feasible to share all of them, but choose the ones that sound interesting to you and get to the library as soon as possible. While there, be sure to shop in our Boutique because it is these proceeds plus donations that enable us to buy all these wonderful books. A Good Woman by Danielle Steel. Her life and family is changed forever by the sinking of the Titanic and by some scandalous secrets of her husband so Annabelle Worthington leaves for war-torn France. Her present and her past eventually meet in the medical field. Death Run by Jack Higgins with Justin Richards Teen twins Rich and Jade, vacationing in Venice with their father, meet a ruthless criminal mastermind and Rich and his father are held captive in a Scottish castle. Testimony by Anita Sheve Combine a New England boarding school, sex scandals, and videotaping and a situation that shocks the parents,

rocks the students, derails the innocence of all. Rough Weather by Robert B. Parker Boston private investigator Spenser is on his way to escort gold-digger Heidi Bradshaw to her daughter’s wedding when he becomes involved in a kidnapping plot. Add a hurricane to the turmoil and the situation becomes even more involved. A Cedar Cove Christmas by Debbie Macomber Pregnant, stranded and alone, Mary Jo Wyse goes into labor in a stable she shares with animals. Her Christmas miracle occurs in the form of a caring paramedic. The Gate House by Nelson Demille If you read and enjoyed Demille’s The Gold Coast, you will surely want to read this sequel in which John Sutter finds himself targeted by Anthony, the mafia son of his ex-wife’s dead lover. Sounds complicated? DeMille sorts it out very well for the reader. Against Medical Advice by James Patterson and Hal Friedman This book is Patterson’s first work of narrative nonfiction and he aptly tells the unusual and dramatic true story of one family’s struggle with a medical mystery that defies solution. Patterson knows how to tell a story, true or not Also on order: Private Patient by P.D. James Bodies left Behind by Jeffery Deaver Silks by Dick Francis Bones by Jonathan Keller man Brass Verdict by Michael Connally And many others…

were set up so high, that the only way he could find out was to reach over the top and pick a fruit. Question: How many picks would you need to correct the labels? ANSWER IN NOVEMBER ISSUE If you know of an excellent 2008 or 2009 book that you would like to see us purchase, please leave word for me, Ruth Wolfson, in the library. If you include your name and phone number, I’ll try to reach you to talk about it. Thank you for being a friend of the CVE Clubhouse Library.

THE PUZZLER #1ANSWER FROM SEPTEMBER ISSUE When dividing the 8 rolls into equal shares, each of the three were given 2 and 2/3 rolls. Of Matt’s 5 rolls, he ate 2 and 2/3 rolls, and therefore 2 and 1/3 of Matt’s rolls were eaten by Ozzie. Of Ned’s 3 rolls, he ate 2 and 2 and 2/3 rolls, and therefore 1/3 of Ned’s roll were eaten by Ozzie. Therefore of the 2 and 2/3 rolls eaten by Ozzie, 2 and 1/3 (7/3) were from Matt and 1/3 were from Ned (1/3). The quarters supplied by Ozzie were distributed in the same manner, with Matt receiving 7 quarters and Ned receiving 1 quarter.


PAGE

30B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

GREETINGS CENTURY VILLAGE RESIDENTS: The new year is right around the corner and Seacrest Services is gearing up to make Century Village Deerfield the best community it has ever been!!

4 MONTHS AND COUNTING!!!!!!! WE WILL BEGIN OUR SERVICES

JANUARY 1, 2009

ADDITIONAL SERVICES THAT WILL BE AVAILABLE TO YOU ON AN ESTIMATE BASIS: CONSTRUCTION SERVICES / G.C. PAINTING LANDSCAPE DESIGN & INSTALLATION LANDSCAPE LIGHTING WE LOOK FORWARD TO A GREAT WORKING RELATIONSHIP WITH ALL OF YOU!!!!

PLEASE CALL US WITH ANY QUESTIONS

1-888-828-6464


Paid Advertisement

OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

31B


PAGE

32B

CVE REPORTER

Prose A Magic Chef If I were a Magic Chef who could make some special dishes These would be some of my special wishes First, I would grow enough food, so all people of the world could be fed And, instead of hunger and depriva- tion, their stomachs would be full instead. Then I would cook up a potion of love And I would distribute it all over the world carried by doves Then I would have a special selection, called The Human Race Which would fill people with affection and concern all over the place. With my special formula, I’d have all the people browsing Since I would have adequate and beautiful housing The homes would be fully furnished and filled with compassion And not fear or hostility, or love that is rationed. I would have books that are read Since, illiteracy would not be dead I would cook my meals with fresh air in view With fruits and vegetables, that are fresh from the dew. Our air would be kept pure, not with pollution At least, that is something that would be part of my solution My menu would never allow war Since that is something that I abhor. I would have specials for outgoing orders And, I would certainly, never have countries with restricted borders All the people of the world would be free The main specialty of my place would be World-Wide Democracy. -GEORGE SHEVELOVE

Poetry & OCTOBER 2008

Denouement In my hours of logic and despair… I have a room – a room is mine. All eyes exit and return without a smile. Oh this room is filled with a passionate – Intellects mind – I must remember… I have a room – a room is mine… I collapse in my chair; the walk is too much for my empty veins. Having thousands of books – I cannot concentrate. I am a stranger to you. I am watching the Weather Channel – as I wait for the telephone to ring at the beginning of Autumn. I tried to hide this futile walk before Sunrise, but I have the conscience of a fool, yet the endurance of a champion. Drafting this little work to music I adore – I will never play these songs for you. My right hand is trembling again as my fingers glide across the white paper pad. And my favorite Cross pen has run out of ink. I light incense sticks and scented candles. I have a great fear of losing you. I have a great fear of losing my cigarette habit. I will not be able to write like this anymore. I will lose my personality once I stop smoking. I am scared when I gaze at the patterns on my Oriental Rugs; The colors of the rugs seem to fuse together; I am surrounded by animals in my writer’s studio. And then the Big Ben clock is ticking loudly to let me know that this is the status quo of reality – and I am ready to hear the telephone ring, and I am ready to meet with youagain-I am ready to meet with the outside world…Denouement. -ELISSA DOMROE

Song of Love You are in my dreams for days and nights, You are in my life, like sun and lights, Without you I’m losing my soul, And summer’s like a coming fall, Without you I cannot sing, Like a bird can’t fly without wings. You are my angel and my star, Please, always be as you are, Around me, creating mood, As fairy tales in my childhood. The feelings that I save and store, Which make me richer even more, Fulfill my life and give you strength, Embracing you by loving hands. My always endless love for you Is infinite like sky of blue, And deeper than the depth of sea, It always will be you and me. -IZABELLA JUCHNEWICZ

The Contrary Wind Gentle touch, Whistling friend. Raging pirate, Secret flight Whispered word destruction unleashed Mortal enemy depts of hell Tainted breeze touching a star Inferno erupting unrelenting savagery -NANCY A. GUERETTE

Happiness – A fantasy

All the World’s…

Today is one of my happiest days. I looked up at the sky, clear as clear could be, Saw before my very eyes, the world’s great beating heart Revealed to me. It was beating out a song of love for all humanity, And for every world yet to be. Suddenly, I saw beauty and love everywhere, A tree with arms outstretched to the heavens, praying for peace A bird on the wing, singing a song of love for you and for me. The dilemma of life no longer bothered me. As I passed a beggar, I had no choice but to drop a coin into his box. Happiness was his, as well as mine. All this is a fantasy, I know, but is it not better to dream, Than never to dream at all.

How will I make my exit, kicking and screaming, Or will I leave willingly, thankful I had a part to play. Will I fall to my knees and beg the Director for another scene, Will I reply with some regret: sorry, your time is up. Will I make my exit to bravos and job well done, Or will no one notice I’m gone, A minor player who didn’t affect the plot. When I make my exit, will they weep for the unfortunate heroine, Or gloat at the demise of a villain. Will I stand in the wings and cry: I didn’t play that scene right, I know what I should’ve done, please give me another chance, Will they echo in unison: too late, too late, too late. Will I protest: look, the play can’t go on without me, Will they laugh and say: that’s what you think, Others, far superior, are eager to take your place. At least let me warn them to play the scene differently, Or it will end in tragedy, Will they say with a snicker: too bad, you should’ve known better, You forgot your lines, you altered them, You performed another’s role out of turn and ruined the play, You didn’t follow directions, now you have no voice, Ha! Ha! Ha! And Ha! Ha! Ha! When the script is tattered and torn, and my eyes too weak to read the lines, Will I appeal to them: please enlarge the type, I can be young again, Bring on the make-up artists, the dyers and surgeons, replace my worn-out parts, Let me play the role again, I have experience, it will be much better now. Will they say: the audience is smarter that you think, You’ve finished, kaput, you’re not suited for the part anymore. Let the Stephanies, Melanies, Brittanys, and Tiffanys Take their turns on stage, their time will also come. I don’t know how I’ll make my exit, I only hope the role I played Will merit at least three stars.

-DORY LEVISS

My name is Hurricane The hurricane season has come its way, I can be called Abigail or Abe My season name starts with an A. All can be quiet I make no sound My eye can be still Then I suddenly turn around. I crush everything that’s in my way, I’m here to destroy And not to play! I’m nasty and mean I fervently attack Then I leave and I hide, And then I come back! I blow my angry breath On your trees They sway and they break I do as I please! My anger gets so violent I crush all in my path My fury is so fierce, I’m the Devil’s wrath! Bolt down your windows Close your doors When I get this mad I tear up your floors. My eye is so sneaky, I have no control I’ll blow down your house And your streetlight pole. The ocean waves become higher and higher The floods arrive, The winds howl their song. They never tire! I’m, exhausted, finished and I limp softly out to the sea But beware, Prepare! My brother Jerry and sister Katie Will be coming after me. -SANDI LEHMAN

-AVIVA RAVEL

Divine Companion You are the product of my love, my own unique creation. There is no other like you, my precious incarnation. Never succumb to fear, for I always surround you. I shall be right here within you and around you. I comfort you in grief; I am your guide, your inspiration. When you are burdened, I support you; I calm your agitation. When you feel you are alone, I embrace your solitude. You must sense my loving presence, for you change your attitude. You need not despair when you speak to me in prayer; For I am there, I am aware; I love you and I care. I am your close companion, your parent, your friend. You can place your faith in me; upon me you can depend. Just close your eyes; surrender; I shall never let you fall. You are the fruit of my vision; my treasure; my all. -NORMA LOCKER


Century Village Deerfield Beach Theater Seating Plan

OCTOBER 2008 CVE REPORTER PAGE 33B


PAGE

34B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Our 2008-2009 Season Has Many Broadway Musicals

MARTY BRILL

AL MARTINO

A CHORUS LINE - THE COMPLETE BROADWAY MUSICAL

STEVE SOLOMON’S

LENNY RUSH

“MY SISTER’S AN ONLY CHILD”

AMERICA DANCES

THE PLATTERS BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND

MORE BROAD WAY BROADW MUSICALS DAMN YANKEES DIRTY DANCING SHOW BOAT I LOVE A PIANO

RENEE TAYLOR & JOE BOLOGNA IN “IT HAD TO BE YOU”

DREAMGIRLS

FAVORITES

Together Again

CAVENDISH CLASSICS SOL ZIM THE INK SPOTS FRANKIE KEIN & MANUEL ARTE ADBACADABRA THE MUSIC OF “MAMMA MIA”

These shows are only a sampling of the great shows coming this season. For a complete listing, please see the advanced season brochure available at the staff office by mid July. All programs are subject to change, and/or modification.

The Annual Resident’s Show


OCTOBER 2008

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

35B

Our Theatre Will Feature Great Performers In The 2008-2009 Season

FREDA PAYNE “IN A MUSICAL TRIBUTE TO ELLA FITZGERALD”

CHUBBY CHECKER

TOMMY TUNE AND THE MANHATTAN RHYTHM KINGS

HAL LINDEN

NESTOR TORRES

THE MARVELETTES

ROBERT KLEIN

DAVID BRENNER

THE HAPPENINGS featuring BOB MIRANDA These shows are only a sampling of the great shows coming this season. For a complete listing, please see the advanced season brochure available at the staff office by mid July. All programs are subject to change, and/or modification.

FREDDIE ROMAN

MIKE BURSTYN


PAGE

36B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

Just write in 150 words or less about a GOOD NEIGHBOR who went out of their way to help you. That’s It!

Congratulations to Rose Vaupen

October’s Winner of the Good Neighbor Sam Essay Contest Dear Editor: It was a sunny afternoon in August when I took the 94 bus to J & J Farms to purchase some vegetables. While I was there, the heavens suddenly opened and we got a thunderstorm. What to do? I can’t go out and wait for the bus in this downpour and there isn’t even a shelter. As though in answer to my prayer, there appeared my good neighbor, Jack Malin from Grantham D. Without asking if I needed a ride, he said, “Wait here, I’ll be right back.” He went to his car and fetched an umbrella and then taking my packages, he escorted me back to his car completely sheltered from the rain. When we arrived at my building he again escorted me under his umbrella, and carried my packages to the door. Friends can bring sunshine even on a rainy day. Thank you Jack! Rose Vaupen, Grantham E


OCTOBER 2008

Jumble Solution:

1) Chaos 2) Supreme 3) Inspiration 4) Examine 5) Receptacle Answer: “CANOE”

Cryptogram Solution: There are two tragedies in life. One is not to get your heart’s desire. The other is to get it.

G. B. Shaw

CVE REPORTER

Sudoku Solution:

PAGE

37B


PAGE

38B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008


OCTOBER 2008

Hurricane Season Be Prepared

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

39B


PAGE

40B

CVE REPORTER

OCTOBER 2008

GARDEN 1 BEDROOM 1 BATH PRESCOTT B LIFT IN BLDG. GARDEN VIEW, ENC. PATIO MARKHAM E FURNISHED, ALL TILE, BLDG HAS LIFT TILFORD F GROUND FLOOR, ALL TILE, GARDEN VIEW TILFORD O FURNISHED, GROUND FLOOR, 2 A/C’S ELLESMERE C GROUND FLOOR, ALL TILE, WATER VIEW OAKRIDGE P COZY AND WITH A GREAT GARDEN VIEW, ENC. PATIO HARWOOD B FURNISHED, GARDEN VIEW, CENTRAL LOCATION VENTNOR M GROUND FLOOR, CLOSED TO POOL FARNHAM Q FURNISHED, RENTABLE BLDG. WELL MAINTAINED

$34,900 $40,000 $34,900 $35,000 $30,000 $37,000 $34,999 $28,000 $29,900

HI-RISE 1 BEDROOM 1 BATH DURHAM A FURNISHED, SCREEN PATIO, BEAUTIFUL WATER VIEW $47,500 DURHAM A GROUND FLOOR, ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW, STEPS TO CLUB $49,900 HARWOOD C TOP FLOOR, NEW APPLIANCES, WATER VIEW $46,000 GARDEN 1 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH OAKRIDGE S GROUND FLOOR, RENTABLE BLDG., ENC. PATIO $48,000 DURHAM X COMPLETELY CLEANED OUT, FRESHLY PAINTED $39,900 LYNDHURST C FURNISHED, GROUND FLOOR, LOVELY WATER VIEW, ALL TILE $56,500 ISLEWOOD A CORNER, FURNISHED, WATER VIEW, SCREEN PATIO $38,000 MARKHAM M CORNER, FURNISHED, RENTABLE BLDG. AT THIS TIME $67,000 TILFORD F FURNISHED,CORNER,NEWA/C,SCREENPATIOWITHSHUTTERS $39,500 UPMINISTER D GREAT LOCATION, FIRST FLOOR, ENC. PATIO, STEPS TO PLAZA $35,000 FARNHAM D FURNISHED, FRESHLY PAINTED, ALL TILE $39,900 UPMINSTER M CORNER, GROUND FLOOR, NEW A/C, GARDEN VIEW $79,000 PRESCOT C FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO, CURRENTLY RENTAL BLDG. $49,000 NEWPORT P FURNISHED, CURRENTLY RENTAL BLDG. GARDEN VIEW $49,000 FARNHAM L CORNER, LIFT IN BLDG. SCREEN PATIO, NEW A/C $44,900 OAKRIDGE J FURNISHED, COMPLETELY REMODELED, ALL TILE $59,000 GARDEN 2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH DURHAM X CORNER GROUND FLOOR, STEPS TO CLUBHOUSE $58,800 FARNHAM K FURNISHED, GROUND FLOOR, SHOWER IN BATH $59,900 WESTBURY D CORNER, ENC. PATIO, STEPS TO POOL & PLAZA $64,900 ELLESMERE E GROUND FLOOR, WATER VIEW, ALL TILE $57,000 OAKRIDGE M FURNISHED, ALL TILE, REMODELED BATHS & KITCHEN $79,900 DURHAM Y GROUND FLOOR CORNER, FURNISHED, 2 FULL BATHS $78,800

OTHER AVAILABLE PROPERTIES FOR YOUR INTEREST BOCA BARWOOD LOVELY 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH FURNISHED, TOP FLOOR, STEPS TO POOL

$164,900

POMPANO DEAUVILLE TERRACE 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH CONDO COMPLETELY REMODELED, ALL TILE, 2 WALK IN CLOSETS $99,000 BOYNTON BEACH 1 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH VILLA PALMLAND VILLAS UNFURNISHED, CORNER

$145,000

HOMESTEAD DADE COUNTY 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH CONDO SHOMA KEYS COVE UNFURNISHED, GARDEN VIEW $116,900 VILLAGES OF ORIOLE DEAUVILLE DELRAY BEACH 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH CONDO, RENTABLE $59,000

TILFORD A ALL REMODELED, NEW KITCHEN & BATHS, ALL TILE $74,500 VENTNOR E CORNER, FURNISHED, GARDEN VIEW $53,900 FARNHAM K CORNER, GROUND FLOOR, FURNISHED, UPDATED $61,900 MARKHAM A FURNISHED, WATER VIEW, HURRICANE SHUTTERS $49,000 HI-RISE 1 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH CAMBRIDGE B FURNISHED, WATER VIEW, GREAT LOCATION $62,000 BERKSHIRE B GREAT LOCATION, ENC. PATIO, STEPS TO POOL & PLAZA $59,900 CAMBRIDGE A GREAT LOCATION, WALK TO POOL & PLAZA, FRESHLY PAINTED $59,900 NEWPORT S UPDATED APPLIANCES, FURNISHED, WATER VIEW $47,000 HARWOOD C CORNER, ALL UPDATED, ALL TILE, WATER VIEW, ENC. PATIO $85,000 CAMBRIDGE A GROUND FLOOR, ALL TILE, WALK TO PLAZA & POOL $75,000 NEWPORT U WATER VIEW, ENC. PATIO, PARTIALLY FURNISHED $59,900 HARWOOD D ENCLOSED PATIO, WATER VIEW $59,900 CAMBRIDGE A GROUNDFLOOR,ALLREMODELED,EXPANDEDCOOKSKITCHEN $79,900 ELLESMERE A FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO, GOLF VIEW $87,000 HARWOOD D FURNISHED, MINT CONDITION, ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW $59,900 WESTBURY F WATER VIEW, SCREEN PATIO, WALK TO PLAZA $59,500 HARWOOD E KITCHEN REMODELED, STAINLESS STEEL APPLIANCES $110,000 ELLESMERE A COMPLETELY REMODELED, NEW KITCHEN & BATHS, ENC. PATIO $69,900 HI-RISE SWANSEA ASHBY C NEWPORT NEWPORT

2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH B CORNER, BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO $99,999 GROUND FLOOR, UPDATED, FRESHLY PAINTED, WATER VIEW $110,000 H COMPLETELY REMODELED, WATER VIEW, STEPS TO POOL $98,000 S WATER VIEW, ENC. PATIO, NEWLY RENOVATED KITCHEN & BATH $98,500

LUXURY VENTNOR VENTNOR RICHMOND OAKRIDGE VENTNOR RICHMOND VENTNOR OAKRIDGE

2 BEDROOM 2 BATH G FURNISHED, GOLF VIEW, SCREEN PATIO, POOL OUT FRONT $79,900 G CORNER, FURNISHED, REMODELED KITCHEN $105,000 C GOLF VIEW, PAINTED, FURNISHED, ALL NEW APPLIANCES $119,900 D REMODELED KITCHEN & BATHS, ENC. PATIO, NEW A/C $147,000 O FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO, GOLF VIEW, POOL & TENNIS $119,500 E ALL TILE, FRESHLY PAINTED & CLEANED, SCREEN PATIO $94,500 O UPDATED, ENC. PATIO, GOLF VIEW, FRESHLY PAINTED $119,000 D FURNISHED, NEW A/C, NEW CARPET IN BEDROOMS $95,000

RENTALS GARDEN APARTMENTS FARNHAM H 1/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED MARKHAM M 1/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL - FURNISHED UPMINSTER C 1/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL - FURNISHED MARKHAM P 2/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED OAKRIDGE I 2/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED MARKHAM I 1/1.5 ANNUAL RENTAL – UNFURNISHED NEWPORT P 1/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED TILFORD J 2/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED DURHAM O 2/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED FARNHAM Q 1/1 ANNUAL RENTAL – UNFURNISHED

$1,600.00 PER MONTH $1,650.00 PER MONTH $1,750.00 PER MONTH $1,600.00 PER MONTH $1,600.00 PER MONTH $ 800.00 PER MONTH $1,000.00 PER MONTH $1,500.00 PER MONTH $1,800.00 PER MONTH $ 745.00 PER MONTH

HI-RISE APARTMENT ASHBY D 1/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED RICHMOND E 2/2 ANNUAL RENTAL – FURNISHED OR NOT HARWOOD F 2/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED

$1,800.00 PER MONTH $900.00 PER MONTH $2,000.00 PER MONTH

OTHER AVAILABLE RENTALS: VILLAGES OF ORIOLE DEAUVILLE F HI-RISE BLDG 2/2 ANNUAL RENTAL - FURNISHED $700.00 PER MONTH


Reporter October 2008 Volume 32 Number 1