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Board of Directors of COOCVE Meets THIRD TUESDAY of the Month at 9:30 a.m. in the Party Room Official Monthly News/Magazine of the Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida

JUNE 2009

On Friday, April 24, 2009 the first Town Hall Meeting was held in the Party Room at the Clubhouse. COOCVE President Steven Fine chaired the meeting, and said that despite the return north of so many residents, the presence of about 400 participants made this a most successful event. This was the first time in memory that so many

SECTION A, 40 PAGES

only COOCVE Directors had this opportunity. In order to assist President Fine, in responding to residents’ questions were the COOCVE officers and aides, and the chairs of many COOCVE standing committees. The President of Master Management, the Chairperson of the Recreation Committee as well as a

Residents lining up to speak residents had the opportunity to ask questions, voice complaints, and propose so many new ideas to improve our community. While everyone was encouraged to speak, the main purpose was to permit all residents to participate. Up until now, IN THIS ISSUE:

representative from Seacrest Services and a representative from East Coast were present. The questions revolved around topics of interest to many people in the room, and people appeared to listen intently. The topics ranged over many subjects important to the residents here. They included bus transportation, adding more stops on the West Route,

irrigation, commercial trucks parked within the village, noise problems, a suggestion that government grants be investigated, complaints about building presidents who do not follow the rules, safety considerations, such as getting residents involved in improving security such as a block watch program. Many queries about irrigation

Ira Somerset addressing a question issues, and concerns about white fly attacking the hedges in the Village. Someone had a problem of mold in an apartment. There was a suggestion that volunteers move to curb bad drivers at intersections or stop sign locations. Over crowding on the 5/6 bus run, and passes for nurses, concerned some people, while canal clean-up, holes in a roof

VOLUME 32, NUMBER 9

(firewall holes) and missing firewalls, insurance, was the main concern of others. Many people seemed interested in the removal of shower curtains at the local pools, complaint about bus drivers using cell phones for personal calls while driving, foreclosures, a recommendation to have all buildings allow rentals

By CHARLES K. PARNESS

A successful turnout of over 400 particpants to ease the economic burden on owners. Some wanted to organize a fight against closing of the public library. There were calls for clarification of the occupancy rules for residents under 55 years of age, the role of the Florida Ombudsman. There were many calls for the use of cameras at the gate entrances to improve security. Efforts were made to

answer every question posed and in addition, problem sheets were distributed and completed by many more residents. The forms were collected and based on their content, were distributed to Master Management, the Recreation Committee and to the respective COOCVE standing committees and attending companies.

Board of Directors ......................... 3A

See TOWN pg 5A

starts on 5A Village Minutes.............................

Mayors Message.......................... 4A starts on Letters to the Editor...................... 4A starts on 15A Condo News.................................

News & Views............................... 23A Consumer Interest........................ 25A Political Scene.............................. 26A Our Commissioner........................ 26A starts on 27A Remembering the Past..................

Sounding Board ............................ 35A starts on 36A Up Front/Personal..........................

Health Matters............................... 9B starts on Observations................................. 10B

You Should

starts on 14B Know..........................

starts on 24B Arts/Entertainment .......................

SAVE OUR LIBRARY Petitions Available At

COOCVE Office For Details Call Steven Fine 954-421-5566 x-214


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JUNE 2009

COOCVE Board of Directors Meeting May 19, 2009 President Steve Fine called the Meeting to Order at 9:43 a.m. The Sergeant of Arms indicated that there were not enough directors to constitute a quorum. After the Pledge of Allegiance and a moment of silence, the Chair invited a deputy from the Broward County Sheriff’s Office (BSO) to address the Board. The deputy reported that someone had broken into a car in the Farnham area and had stolen an IPod and other items during the Mother’s Day Week-end. The deputy had no news to report on the mugging incident discussed in last month’s meeting. The police still don’t know how the alleged assailant, a nonresident, was able to enter the Village by car. The deputy invited residents to register in the BSO’s “CyberVisor” internet program, by which the Sheriff’s Office sends e-mails or text messages advising about crime or traffic problems in your neighborhood (www.sheriff. org/cybervisor). In response to a question about budget cuts affecting police forces, the Deputy said Deerfield Beach will continue to benefit from the same level of manpower from the BSO.

As there wasn’t a quorum, the minutes of the previous Board Meeting of April 21, 2009 could not be considered for approval. President Fine then read two letters. The first, from Bob Bender of Keswick C, suggested that presentations by outsiders such as the BSO be held at the end of our Board Meetings. Steve noted in response that this could be a problem, as BSO and other public authorities are on taxpayer time, and we don’t know the precise time our meetings end, so the invited speakers could end up waiting around. Bob Bender’s other point asked if the presiding officer at COOCVE meetings had a right to interject or comment while other speakers had the floor, other than under a ruling of “out of order”, and if so under what parliamentary grounds. President Fine agreed that the Chair should not interrupt while others speak and promised to try to refrain from doing so. Sam Adler wrote that the City had advised him that tank-less water heaters require a plumbing and electrical permit. Sam asked that the directors disseminate this information,

and cautioned that in case an illegally installed heater malfunctions, any resulting damage may not be covered by the building or condo unit insurance. President Fine’s report touched on two issues. He emphasized the importance for Associations to sign the authorization to the Insurance Committee mailed out to them late last month, and said that Dan Glickman of that Committee would speak about this matter during this Board Meeting. Steve also expressed appreciation for the large turn-out of over 400 people at the Town Meeting held on April 24th, and that so many spoke out at the meeting who are not directors or otherwise regularly participating in Village meetings. Steve said he expects to hold the next Town Meeting in January 2010 when our seasonal population is highest, for which we probably will have to use the Auditorium. Ken Barnett presented the Treasurer’s Report, noting that COOCVE had collected $64,000 of the annual dues compared to about $20,000 of expenses from January through April, consisting mainly of the monthly

CVE REPORTER

$4,000 payment to Master Management for rent and services, and an annual premium of about $3,600 for directors’ and officers’ insurance. Since last month, 11 Associations had paid their overdue COOCVE dues, leaving 18 still unpaid. Ken thanked Tilford Area Chairman Basil Hales for helping collect all the delinquent dues in his area, and said he would work with Area Chairmen to collect the remaining unpaid, principally in Durham (5 delinquent Associations), Newport (3 Associations), and Oakridge and Westbury (2 delinquents each). Bill Morse noted that COOCVE’s by-laws require that Associations pay the dues by February 15th of each year to be in Good Standing. President Fine noted that COOCVE’s assessment is only $8 a year per condo unit, and that it is the duty of the officers of each Association to remit this charge that they already include and collect in their own assessments from the unit owners. Ken noted that COOCVE’s Insurance Committee is working to save money for Associations in obtaining insurance, something the Committee would not be able to do if an Association ceases to belong to COOCVE. A director asked that

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the CVE Reporter publish the names of delinquent buildings in its next issue, and as a regular practice going forward in its March issue. President Fine then asked for Committee reports. Dan Glickman of the Insurance Committee said they have been meeting on a weekly basis, open to the public, teleconferencing, and have kept minutes of motions. Dan read aloud parts of the correspondence from the Committee to the Associations, and emphasized that despite some wording that might have been overly-broad, the purpose of the authorization that the Committee seeks is to make recommendations to the Associations on insurance, not to obtain it for them, which remains the sole prerogative of the Associations. Sheila LaBella of Newport G noted that Dan Glickman cited two words in the Committee’s letter as causing confusion, and asked that the Committee accept Authorizations with those two words changed by hand and initialed. Bob Bender asked if the Committee was making recommendations on appraisals. Dan said not now but maybe later in the year. A director noted that the Insurance Committee’s letter set a June 1st deadline See DIRECTORS pg 7A


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The Mayor’s Message By PEGGY NOLAND, Mayor/ City of Deerfield Beach

Editor-in-Chief STEVEN H. FINE Assistant to the Editor Betty Schwartz Editorial Staff Seymour Blum Judy Olmstead Wendy Rosenzveig Betty Schwartz Activities Editor Sandy Parness

Production Sid Goldstein Christie Voss

Sid Birns

Photo Journalists Jules Kesselman Al Miller

Advertising Consultants Susan Dove Arlene Fine Estelle Sabsels Office Staff Norman Bloom, Seymour Blum, Carol Carr, Susan Dove, Arlene Fine, Rhoda Jarmark, Bea Litner, Sharon McLear, Sandy Parness, Toni Ponto, Betty Schwartz, Estelle Sabsels Staff Cartoonist Alan G. Rifkin Alvin Sherman 1913-2000

Prepress Technition Christie Voss

Columnists and Regular Contributors Shelly Baskin, Harvey Beaber, Sid Birns, Evelyn Bloom, Norman L. Bloom, Sy Blum, Mary Catherine Castro, Herb Charatz, Marion G. Cohen, Richard William Cooke, Senator Ted Deutch, Arlene Fine, Jack Galit, Max Garber, Gilbert Gordon, Rolf Grayson, Broward Commissioner Kristin Jacobs, Harry L. Katz, Louis Kaufman, Jules Kesselman, Richard Koenig, Rosalind Lerman, Jess Levin, Dory Leviss, Bea Litner, Dr. Norma Locker, Rosalind Mandell, Pauline Mizrach, Judy Olmstead, Nelia Panza, Lori Parrish, Charles Parness, Phyllis Pistolis, Commissioner Marty Popelsky, Eva Rachesky, Betty Schwartz, Gloria Shomer, Rosalyn Spitzer, Helene Wayne, Carl Weitz, Lucille Weitz, Jerry Wolf, Robert Winston, Janice Zamsky. Business Manager Steven H. Fine

Circulation Proofreaders Outside Pubs., Inc. Carol Carr, Sid Goldstein, Beth Barbara Turner Heller, Toni Ponto, Wendy Rosenzveig, Betty Schwartz The CENTURY VILLAGE EAST REPORTER is published monthly and distributed,without charge, to the residents of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida. It is published for the edification of said residents, and contains reports of the monthly meetings of the corporations, Board of Directors and its Committees, as well as news, bus and theater schedules, and contributed articles of current interest to the residents. The Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Inc. aka COOCVE,a not-for-profit corporation, its officers, directors, editors, staff, any committee people are not responsible for typographical errors or misrepresentations in any advertisements or article. They are not responsible and assume no liability for the content of, or any opinions expressed in, any contributed articles which represent the author’s own opinions and not necessarily the opinion of COOCVE. Acceptance of advertising for products or services in no way constitutes an official endorsement of the product. Information to contributors: The Reporter reserves the right to edit, accept and refuse articles in the interest of brevity, clarity and the appropriateness of subject matter. Residents are advised to check with the person they are hiring to be sure he is licensed and insured.

From the President By STEVEN H. FINE, President/ COOCVE Since we did not have a quorum at the COOCVE Board of Directors meeting of May 18, 2009, the proposed COOCVE By-law amendment to be added to Section 8.5 (See Page 7) could not be brought to the floor for a vote. In addition, a second proposed By-law amendment to add to Section 8.7 (See Page 7) will be brought to the floor for a vote at the June 16 COOCVE Board of Directors meeting. Now that our seasonal residents have returned to their summer abodes it is more important than ever for our Directors or Alternates to make every effort to attend the meetings during the summer months so that we may have a quorum to move forward with the two proposed By-law amendments. Over the past few months I have been asked by quite

a few residents if we were going to have our COOCVE Ball again. The last was held on January 16, 2007. I am investigating the feasibility and will be discussing it with the Directors within the next few months. In the meantime I would appreciate any feedback from residents regarding their desire to attend the Ball as well as those who would like to volunteer their time and expertise to the Ball Committee. HAPPY FATHERS DAY HAPPY 4TH OF JULY

June is a month normally associated with slowing down, and savoring the “lazy days of summer.” It is a time to enjoy the company of family and friends at holiday gatherings, or on vacations around the country. However, June also represents the beginning of Hurricane season. I would like to take this opportunity to remind residents of the importance of having a plan. One component of planning is to pre-register for important services that are available to residents during an emergency. For instance, Broward County and the City of Deerfield Beach maintain a “Vulnerable Population” registry, which allows people who are disabled, frail or have health issues to register in advance, so that city emergency workers can plan a better response to vulnerable residents in a post-emergency recovery effort. For more information or to register, call 954-831-4000. Registry can also be done online at www.Deerfield-Beach.com, by clicking on “Hurricane Preparedness” under “Quick Links.” On the topic of plans, in May, the City of Deerfield Beach and the Florida

B

Department of Transportation held kick-off meetings for the Project Development and Environment Study (PD & E Study) for major improvements on the Deerfield Beach segment of State Road A1A. This is the first step in realizing the completion of a long-awaited project, which will address traffic congestion, pedestrian and bicycle access, and public safety in our beach area. These improvements are part of the 2030 Broward County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP), and are consistent with the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Master Plan. Stay

tuned for more exciting news on this in the future. A final word on planning addresses my recent trip to Washington, DC, with Commissioner Bill Ganz, Commissioner Joe Miller and City Manager Mike Mahaney. The purpose of the trip was to have faceto-face meetings with the Senators and Congressmen who represent Deerfield Beach, to discuss Federal appropriations funding for several crucial projects for the city. In little more than 24 hours, we connected with key decision-makers, to give them a first-hand account of the importance of considering Deerfield Beach’s future needs in transportation, economic development and infrastructure when doling out Federal funding. We are confident that our voices and those of our constituents were heard. I want to wish everyone a happy and safe 4th of July. As always, if you have suggestions, questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me through the City Manager’s office at 954-4804263, or via email at web. commission@deerfield-beach. com.

The Mail Bag

y far the most popular and widely read segment of our publication is the Letter-tothe Editor columns. We encourage letters that enable our readers to “sound off” on any subject. However, we will not print letters from the same person on the same subject in two consecutive issues. Also, letters must be from CVE residents, must be signed and, if possible type-written double-spaced. Please include your phone number. When we receive letters about applicable contracts, please remember the Reporter does not endorse any single company. Residents are free to make their own choices each year. Criterion for letters that will not be published: Letters in poor taste, demeaning and vastly untrue.

SAVE OUR LIBRARY To The Editor: As a member of the committee to Save Our Library, I would like to submit the following letter for inclusion in The Reporter. “The Movement for the Century Plaza Library is recruiting as many patrons of our library as possible to attend the June 23, 2009 meeting of the Broward County Commissioners in Fort Lauderdale at 2:00 p.m. to convey to the Commissioners how this library’s services are irreplaceable. For additional information regarding your participation to save our library, please contact me at 954-426-5254. JOYCE DOBKINS Farnham E A Big Thank You To the Editor: As a member of the 2009 Choraleers I want to say a big thanks to Music Director, Bill Weinhaus. The show was tremendously entertaining and well executed

as reflected by the enthusiastic audience, who weathered a fire alarm interruption, to cheer to the end. We in the chorus were privileged to enjoy the direction of the very talented and charismatic Bill Weinhaus and look forward to a more diverse and spectacular show next year. VIRGINIA PRENTISS Grantham A Democratic Voting To the Editor: After attending a COOCVE meeting and hearing one group accusing another group of doing things supposedly not under their auspices, I knew that this Village will never be run efficiently until we have one Board. This Board should consist of 15 members, each having a three-year term, with five members being up for reelection each year. To start this board the first year, the top five vote-getters would get a threeyear term, the next five a twoyear term and the remaining five a one-year term. After

that, each year five new or former board members would be up for election or re-election, the winner getting a three-year term. The board would elect its own officers. To make it really democratic, each unit would have a vote. Each unit would receive a ballot and bring the ballot, on the day of election, to a locked ballot box, which would be placed by the mailboxes in each building to be manned by a member of the Election Committee, one from each building. The time and date of the election will be determined by the election committee. The counting of the ballots could be done either in Le Club or the Clubhouse, with each candidate being allowed to have from one to three observers. If any member of the board cannot fulfill their term of office, the next highest vote getter would be put on the board until the next election. I know we are bound by complicated by-laws See MAILBAG, pg 14A


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Village Minutes Minutes of Master Management Board May 15, 2009 President Ira Somerset called the meeting to order at 1:37 pm on Wednesday, May 13, 2009. In attendance were: Reva Behr, Donna Dowling, Gene Goldman, Jules Kesselman, Jack Kornfield, Susan Koser, Bob Marcus (by phone) and Mel Schmier. Guest present was Bob Dolson, Business Manager. After the Pledge of Allegiance and moment of silence, the Board asked if anyone had signed up for the open mike session; no one had. Minutes A motion was made by Donna Dowling to waive the reading of the minutes. Mel Schmier seconded. Mel Schmier then asked that the last paragraph of the minutes be deleted. After a discussion the Board voted 2:5 against eliminating the paragraph. Jack Kornfield stated that there has been excessive turnover in the administrative assistant position since January and asked that this sentence be inserted into the minutes. After a discussion, the Board voted 2:5 against inserting the sentence. Financial Report - Bill Morse The CVE Master Management Financial Report prepared by Bill Morse was distributed to all Board members and discussed by Ira Somerset in detail. For the month of April 2009 Total Income is $750,770.84; Total Expenses were $771,026.93, Net Loss of ($20,256.09). YTD Total Income is $2,989,686.96, Total Expenses were $3,123,041.82; Operating Loss was ($133,354.86). Total Assets are $1,968,866.02, Total Liabilities are $1,080,420.75 and Total Equity is $888,445.27. The Century Maintenance legal issue is impacting the December reports. It was agreed by the judge that we are entitled to this information and are waiting for the reports. Overdue accounts receivable

from unit owners from January 1 through April 30 was $336,313 - over 30 days is $154,000 (approx, 1,900 unit owners), over 60 days is $90,000 (approx. 1,100 unit owners) and over 90 days is $91,000 (approx. 596 unit owners). MM and Seacrest have been making phone calls and a fair amount of money has been recovered. This was because many unit owners had automatic deposits and did not realize that it was not paid. Prepaid assessments received from unit owners through April 30th are $353,000 representing 1,500 unit owners. President’s Report – Ira Somerset Ira Somerset stated that Barbara from Seacrest will continue to be at the office on Wednesday’s from 9am to noon to assist with answering MM issues. MM is still waiting to hear from the City on the dumpster rooms. Soundnet, the monitoring service for the elevator phones, has corrected the addresses in their system which shows when an emergency call is received. The Comcast committee met with Comcast and is waiting for responses to questions raised during their meeting - channels 98 and 99 are now working. The insurance adjuster spoke with Mr. Bogen regarding the defamatory suit against Donna Childrey. After negotiation between the insurance adjuster and Mr. Bogen, Mr. Bogen was offered an offer of $1,000 to drop the suit – a response from Mr. Bogen is pending. Fairway investors received the letter intent with regard to the golf course and there response is pending. Mr. Somerset reminded the community that fresh water usage is expensive, and we must conserve by not watering with fresh water, and to please be mindful of leaks and drips inside your condos

- especially the toilets. To encourage pedestrians not to walk in the outbound traffic lanes, which is very dangerous, signs and plants were installed at the main gate. Mr. Somerset reminded the community that free use of the facilities in the Activity Center is available for associations and clubs to hold their meetings. The insurance exchange checks are still being distributed; so please see Lorraine if you have not yet picked up your building’s check – the remaining checks will be mailed next week. Ira stated that Newport Q has agreed to purchase MM’s share of the Newport condominium. Business Manager’s Report - Bob Dolson Correspondence – Bob Dolson Several complaints were received about sprinkler heads being broken in Harwood F. Response: Referred to Seacrest for correction. A request was received for trimming trees on Master Management property and replacement of dead trees. Response: Referred to Seacrest for proposals for trimming and replacement. Westbury A requested a copy their association property survey. Response: Master Management does not have copies of association surveys on file and they were referred to Broward Property Appraisers Office. Complaints were received about excessive trash at dumpsters, especially large items. Response: The buildings should call the city for pick-up of excessive trash and large items. Several letters requesting various improvements in the perimeter wall and traffic control signage in Century Village. Response: We have a retired “highway” expert as a seasonal resident. He has volunteered to examine CVE traffic and wall issues (this would be a long-term project as well as utilizing grant money to help fund) in the fall. A request was received for additional bus stops. Response: Referred to Transportation Committee for review. Several letters were received on transportation issues and complaints about drivers using cell phones and not making stops. Response: Referred to Quality Coach for resolution and will also be sent to Transportation Committee. Miscellaneous Projects and Issues Air Conditioning A/C at Le Club is currently in contract and being

manufactured. We anticipate a July install. The roofer and A/C vendor have been in contact with each other. Bus Bench Pads Permits were received, contractor is on site and the work will begin shortly. Irrigation Farnham N Pump 11 has a replacement motor contactor scheduled for installation the week of 5/18 and Pump 12 was repaired with a new electric feed which was completed on 5/12. Consolidation of irrigation operations - Gene Goldman moved to consolidate irrigation responsibility under Seacrest Services as the only authorized entity to operate the irrigation valves within Century Village. Reva Behr seconded. After a discussion, Mel Schmier asked to amend the motion provided that East Coast and the other service providers agree in writing that they understand the situation and have our attorney review it. Gene Goldman accepted the amendment and Reva Behr again seconded the motion. The motion passed unanimously. Irrigation pump repairs - To date, we spent $30,631. Bob Marcus moved to approve the additional amount of $5,000 for pump repairs. Reva Behr seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Landscape The need to remove and prune trees at Le Club Donna Dowling moved to approve Seacrest Services to remove several large Schefflera and dead fichus and thin the pitch apple for $650 plus fees and tax. Mel Schmier seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Proposal to “dress up” the East and West gates Gene Goldman moved to approve Seacrest Services to supply and maintain 2 large decorative pots with annual flowering plants and hand water for $1,300 plus fees and tax. Mel Schmier seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Pressure cleaning and painting the Military and West gatehouse roofs - Donna

Dowling moved to approve the proposal from Seacrest Services to pressure clean the gate houses and paint the roofs for a total of $650 plus tax. Reva Behr seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Perimeter hedge - The hedge has not been shaped for years. Donna Dowling moved to approve the proposal from Seacrest Services to box cut the perimeter hedge to a height of 8 to 10 feet, one quarter of the hedge at a time, at a cost of $7,125 each quarter for a total of $28,500 plus any applicable permit fees and tax. Gene Goldman seconded. Bob Dolson stated that the hedge was not maintained; it’s beyond the scope of the original contract and the initial trimming should be paid by MM in order to maintain it properly. Tony D’Amato (Seacrest Services) pointed out that the majority of the work is outside the fence and Seacrest is not obligated to trim the outside hedge. Jack Kornfield asked that we get competitive bids on this and that East Coast Bobcat be given an opportunity. After a discussion, the motion failed 2:6. Bob Marcus moved to refer it to our attorney to determine why Seacrest is not doing this as part of their current contract. Gene Goldman seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Maintenance Issues The Tilford pool has a new service vendor - Knox Pools; they are doing a very nice job in the short time they have been on board. Installation of vinyl tile at the coffee stations and entrance doors in the Activity Center. Gene Goldman moved to approve the contract with Medallion to install VCT (vinyl tile) in the areas specified in their proposal (three coffee stations, five doorways) for $1,600 plus tax. Mel Seconded. After a discussion, the motion passed unanimously. Light poles needing electrical repairs - Reva Behr moved to approve See MASTER pg 11A

Town

continued from pg 1A

Attendees were assured that all their written questions would be passed on to the relevant authority, and each resident would have a response some time after the meeting. President Steven Fine emphasized that this meeting was an important step towards the stated policy of his administration to be open

to every resident. He is already planning another Town Hall Meeting for December or January. This important meeting started at 9 a.m., and ended at noon. Judging by the large number of enthusiastic participants, and the important airing of their concerns, most people would agree that it was a great success.


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Village Minutes COOCVE Recreation Committee Meeting May 12, 2009 In attendance were: Shelly Baskin, Donna Dowling, Nancy Giordano, Danielle Lobono, Ronald Popp, Bill Schmeir, with Don Kaplan representing COOCVE and for DRF: Eva Rachesky and Dan Cruz Danielle made a motion to accept the minutes from the April 14th meeting. The motion was seconded and passed. Correspondence Nancy Giordano began the meeting by addressing correspondence received by the Recreation Committee. 1) She had several letters concerning the Choraleers. Concern was expressed regarding perceived “rude remarks” made at the last Recreation meeting directed toward one of the members. Nancy said this would be addressed during the meeting. 2) There have been complaints about the water temperature for the indoor pool. Nancy asked Eva what the temperature setting is for the indoor pool. Eva responded that the temperature is set for 89 degrees and acknowledged that this past season there have been issues regarding regulation of the water temperature. However, this issue has been resolved and the pool temperature is consistently in the appropriate range. 3) A resident wrote to ask why the doors from the pool to the locker room are closed at 6pm. Eva stated that the guard post by Giovanni’s is vacated at 6pm. The entrance from the outdoor pool to the locker rooms does not have a Security

station and could provide access to the clubhouse for unauthorized persons. For that reason, the door is locked and people using the outdoor pool are rerouted through the other entrance into the clubhouse as there is a Security station at that door where IDs must be presented. Chairperson’s Report Nancy said she wanted to speak about something not related to Recreation that she is concerned about. Her concern is about the closing of the library in Century Plaza. This is an issue that is of great concern for the residents of Century Village. She urged everyone to sign the petitions and advised that there will be a table set up at the library for people to sign the petition. Eva stated that there would be room in the Staff Office for one of the petitions as well. All the petitions will be turned in to COOCVE. Committee Member Reports Donna Dowling: has an update on entertainment. She reports the profit and loss for the theater for April was $759.61. She says Abby is working on the brochure for the upcoming 2009/10 season and is working on the 2010/11 season as well. Eva added that the profit amount for April is consistent for this time of year and she anticipates that next month will show a loss. Nancy stated that changes in the way tickets are assigned will be coming and more information will be available in upcoming months. DRF Reports Eva Rachesky and Dan Cruz : Channels 98 & 99 are now working. New lighting in hallway

by the Staff Office has been installed. It is very dark in that area and additional lighting in the ceiling will also be installed. Outlets installed for laptop stations. When the desks are purchased and installed residents will have a comfortable area to use their laptops. The desks will come from TargetOnLine and the purchase requires a company credit card. The card application has been approved and should arrive within the next few weeks. At that time the furniture will be ordered. Bids for new equipment for GP-A have been turned in to Nancy. Nancy said she has a full estimate from Acoutech and an estimate from All Access AVL. Eva remarked that these estimates are not “apples to apples” and are only intended to give the committee a general idea of what would be involved. The full estimate is for an LCD dropdown screen and better sound system, as well as equipment that can be a backup to show movies, should the need arise. Eva indicated that residents could possibly enjoy other genres shown in GPA – for instance, Alfred Hitchcock. She said Bruce has indicated that the prices in the bids might be a little high and can probably be trimmed down somewhat. The other company has been advised to present a complete estimate so the price comparisons can be “apples to apples”. New payment boxes installed in Clubhouse/ outdoor boxes ordered: The payment box by the ID office includes a slot for East Coast Management. The box is the property of Recreation. Although each entity has a key to access their own envelopes, appropriate signage has been ordered that will replace the paper signs. Recreation is providing these boxes to assist the residents in making their payments and the boxes will be on loan to the companies using them. Also, the boxes at the main entrance outside the clubhouse will be replaced and will include a fourth box that can be used by ECM. Two exhaust fans for the indoor pool have been ordered and should be delivered within the next six weeks. There have been many requests to continue the Sunday pool dance. The last dance was held the 3rd Sunday in April. Eva stated that this is the first time we have been so inundated with requests to continue

the Sunday dance through the summer and she wanted to bring it to the attention of the committee. The cost would be $250 to $300 for the band, which would total about $1,800 for June through October. Nancy remarked that she has also been contacted by residents about this. Bill stated that many year-round residents feel like step-children because so much attention is paid to seasonal residents and very little consideration is given to year-round residents. The committee members agreed to allow the dance at the pool once each month this summer. Attendance will be tracked and the members can evaluate whether to continue this schedule next summer. Eva will set it up for the first Sunday of the month. Additional golf cart for maintenance dept.: Nancy asked how the golf carts are used and what would be the benefit as opposed to using the van and truck. Dan explained that the golf cart provides better gas mileage, less costly maintenance and a better division of labor since the men can work on projects separately rather than doubling up in one cart. During discussion of the motion listed below, Dan advised that maintenance of the carts for this and the other villages has been mostly changing oil and tires. Ron asked that the carts be identifiable as there are so many carts running around the village and no way to identify the workers. Eva responded that identifying the carts as DRF Maintenance would be a good idea and that she is also working on a proposal to be presented with next year’s budget for uniforms for the recreation maintenance workers. Danielle made a motion to purchase one new 2009 Yamaha 323A medium utility vehicle. The cost is $6,250 plus tax and there is a one year warranty. Motion was seconded and passed unanimously. Area names being stenciled on pool buildings as the pool areas are closed for maintenance. The pool building is painted and the area name is placed on the building. The pool building names can be seen from the road, with the exception of the Richmond building, which, because of the tennis courts, is placed in such a way that the name can’t be seen from the road. Discussion regarding the recreation maintenance work order program: Dan reported that the work order

system is working great and is providing an overview of the work being done. He said there is a lot of work going on behind the scenes to keep things going and the work order program will provide information and reports to inform Eva and the committee of the work completed and pending. The preventive maintenance aspect of the program will generate automatic reports/reminders of work that needs to be completed annually, etc. Shelly mentioned that some trash cans are moldy and need to be cleaned – Eva requested that whenever a resident observes something of this nature please call the Cen-Deer office so a work order can be issued that will address the problem. She remarked that she has noticed during inspection tours that there is a lot of food in the trash even though food is not allowed at the pools. The committee members concurred and discussion ensued regarding the problems with ants and rats that is ongoing, in large part due to this issue. Bulletin boards removed at pool areas: Eva reports that there has been very little feedback regarding the removal of the bulletin boards. Grantham pool deck pavers sealed: Shelly asked if there have been any complaints from people with walkers about moving around on the pavers. Eva said the pavers placed at the Grantham and Markham pools are flat and there have been no complaints. The pavers at Markham haven’t been sealed yet because the well has an iron issue. Additional equipment has had to be installed to remove the iron from the sprinkler water and the building fencing and pavers have had to be cleaned to remove the staining. Markham pavers will be sealed once they get as much of the staining off as possible. Lyndhurst N pool house water heater replaced with tankless heater. Eva reports that as the water heaters breakdown they will be replaced with the tankless heaters. Request to expand Ventnor pool deck: Eva said the Ventnor pool deck is one of the smaller deck areas in the Village and there have been requests from residents for the deck to be expanded. She is presenting this for the committee’s consideration since this deck area is scheduled to have pavers installed. She discussed what could be done regarding expansion and stated that there would be room for at least an additional 20 chairs. Eva added that there might See RECREATION pg 12A


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Village Minutes Master Management Commentary By IRA SOMERSET, President/ Master Management It’s June, The month of graduations and weddings. I hope you are enjoying good times with your families. Here at Master Management the work goes on. Have you ever met someone who believes he is the only person who understands laws, rules and regulations? This type of person does not ask why, but simply assumes and concludes that others are ignorant, willful and conducting business illegally. We have among us a resident who fits this description. He has constantly written to the City Manager, The Commissioner, the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), and others complaining of illegal acts by Master Management and our contractors. Today there was a hearing for the variance that allows us to irrigate Century Village four days a week. Because of this resident’s opposition to the granting of the variance, the Board of Governors of the SFWMD was prepared to hold a hearing regarding the accusations made by this individual. In order to respond to the accusations, Master Management requested Tony D’Amato (Seacrest site manager for the Master Management Irrigation contract), Bob Dolson (Master Management Business

Directors

Manager), Michael Perkins (Irrigation consultant to Master Management) and me to attend. We were notified at 6:30 pm last night that the complainant would not attend the meeting. However, we had to go just to make sure he did not change his mind. We left CVE at 7:45 am, attended the meeting which he did not attend, and returned by 11:00 am. Consider how much time and fuel this man caused us to waste preparing and attending a hearing just to defend CVE from his threat. I prepared a statement that was handed in and will appear as part of the proceedings. It is printed in The Reporter for your information. We received two additional resumes for the vacant board position. Thank you to those who applied and Congratulations to Bill Goddard on his election to fill the position until the next

election. Our new Administrative Assistant, Kelly Serkin, started in the office and is a great help and fast learner. The minutes of the May 13 board meeting are elsewhere in The Reporter, and I urge you to read them. In other news relating to recent and continuing accomplishments: Barbara from Seacrest is in the office every Wednesday from 9 am - noon and will be there to help residents with any MM/Seacrest coupon issues. No further word from Deerfield Beach on the dumpster rooms needing repairs. Jules has been in contact with the city and they will get us a report. Bus pad permits were approved and are finally in our hands. Work has begun on the pads and may even be completed by the time you read this. Soundnet, one of the providers of emergency elevator telephone service, had incorrect addresses for some of those buildings they monitor. Thyssen-Krupp has worked with Soundnet to correct the addresses that show when an emergency call is received. Work has begun on our roofs and will continue for about six weeks. By the end of that time, we expect to have

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for reply, and asked that the Committee consider giving Associations some more time so that they can resolve with the Committee any confusion over the wording of the Authorization. Don Kaplan asked that the Insurance Committee, once it prepares its package of recommendations, hold a meeting for the Associations to review the package and for the Committee to answer their questions. Dan Glickman noted that terms for Wind Coverage are typically not available until after the Hurricane Season ends around October, but thought it would indeed be helpful to the Associations for the Insurance Committee to hold an “interim information meeting” before then. Bruce Gursey of the Bylaws Committee then noted that the proposed amendment to Section 8.5, concerning

the eligibility of candidates for COOCVE office, was due for a vote, the requisite waiting period having been fulfilled. However, there was still a lack of a quorum: 115 directors in attendance compared to the 117 minimum. Bruce explained that the Committee, in considering the amendment, had balanced off the benefit of having experienced people serving in multiple roles in Village entities, versus encouraging “fresh blood” and more people involved, by limiting each person to a single office. Bruce asked that directors focus on this question and the amendment in general, so that at the next meeting with a quorum, they will come prepared with their questions and comments. Roslyn Nehls of the Civic and Cultural Committee reminded directors of the planned celebration in December of our residents in

their 90s or older. Under Old Business, Nancy Giordano of the Recreation Committee confirmed the long-negotiated final agreement with Century Village Real Estate: $18,000 back rent, and $300 a month going forward for utility costs, adjustable upwards based on usage. In the Open Mic, Carol DiFilippo of Markham R said she would be joining in collecting petition signatures to keep open Century Plaza Library. Sheila LaBella asked if inquiry could be made through COOCVE of FPL, as to whether our buildings are capable of sustaining a power “surge” in the case that all units are using tank-less water heaters. At around 11:20 a.m. the Directors approved a motion to adjourn. Respectfully submitted, Ken Barnett.

the new A/C units installed in the Le Club. Seacrest has finished the first pass through Century Village making repairs to the irrigation system and will be going back to work on the troublesome areas they have not repaired yet. We have had to replace pumps and motors after the initial initiative. Mark Bogen has responded that he will not drop the defamation suit against Ms. Childrey and will amend his charges so as to try to remove our insurance coverage protection for Ms. Childrey. When our insurance company called him, he was asked what it will take to make him go away. He replied $10,000. She said “No.” He said $5000. She said how about $1000? He said he’d think about it, but later he refused the offer and again stated he’ll revise the complaint to include only Ms. Childrey. Unauthorized valve turning takes water from downstream users and interferes with repairs of the system. Fresh water watering costs thousands of dollars each week. Please be a good neighbor and let the irrigation crews do their jobs without

interference. Also, please be mindful of leaks and drips inside the condos especially the toilets. Safety Loop Detectors (to prevent the gate arm from coming down and hitting cars) have been installed. Signs have been installed approaching the main gate to direct pedestrians to the sidewalk on the west side of the entrance. Pedestrians walking in and out through the outbound traffic lanes are putting themselves in severe danger since there is no room or walkway on that side. Please use the walkway, not the road. Speaking of signs, the prototype by the new vendor has been received and approved and production will begin shortly. Newport Q is buying out the Master Management portion of a foreclosed condo in that Association. Please don’t forget our Conference Room and Call Facility – Free room use for Associations and clubs. Make use of the facility and conference phone to include your seasonal members in board meetings. Have a great summer!

NOTICE OF PROPOSED COOCVE BYLAW AMENDMENT Submitted by the COOCVE Bylaws Committee To be added to Sec. 8.5 “ No person may apply for nomination to more than one office of the Corporation. No person may be nominated, in any manner, for an office in the Corporation, or as a Director of CVE Master Management Co., Inc., or as a member of the Recreation Committee, if their election would result in their service in more than one of the aforementioned offices.” To be added to Sec. 8.7 “The Nominating Committee shall conduct the election of COOCVE Officers and Sgts-at-Arms, members of the Recreation Committee and the election of the members of the Board of Directors of Master Management.”


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Village Minutes Council of Area Chairs May 13, 2009 Chairman Joe Rubino called the meeting to order at 9:30 and called the roll. Absent: Ashby Cambridge, Ellesmere, Grantham, Islewood, Markham, Richmond, Ventnor. A quorum was present. A motion was made and passed to waive the reading of the previous minutes. Bernie Parness remarked that the minutes in the Reporter are verbose and should be limited to the business done. Chairman Rubino replied, “Then we would have no report because we pass very few motions!” Bernie Parness said that there was a motion on the floor and that was what should be reported and whether it passed or failed. Dan Glickman agreed that the motions should be included but added that when minutes are for distribution or publication it is proper to include what was said though not necessarily verbatim. Jack Galit of Swansea suggested that a previously assembled list of volunteers should be used to seek out a person to take the minutes. Peggy Cater volunteered a woman in Durham R who worked for the FBI to take the minutes, and Nancy Giordano suggested that a replacement be found for the time that Jeff is in Europe. MOTION: Resolved, to pay someone to do the minutes professionally. Failed; by hand vote, decision of the Chair. Next to be recognized was Anthony d’Amato of Seacrest Services. He informed the Council that he had brought copies of the quarterly report which had been distributed to the building presidents for examination. A web site is being set up by Seacrest exclusively for CVE; it will be up and running by June and an ad will appear in the Reporter announcing it. He introduced the janitorial, landscape and maintenance supervisors. Patti Bender, vice-chair of Keswick, suggested that

the landscape crew be made aware of an invasive plant called Virginia Creeper which should be removed wherever it is found. Naomi Redisch of Berkshire asked who to call about low irrigation pressure. Don Kaplan asked why the pressure of the golf course irrigation system was so much better than ours and whether they can water as extensively as they do and we cannot. Seacrest answered that it depends on who you as. Anthony d’Amato said that the golf course being a commercial operation was not under the same rules as residential property. He suggested Don go to the South Florida Water Management District web site where all the information is available; they can also be reached by phone and are very helpful. Jack Kornfield of Prescott asked if Seacrest has some method of enforcing the irrigation process -controlling people who are irrigating “not by schedule”. D’Amato replied that they do not and that it was a major problem. “If another building has their valves open and we come to your area and turn on your valves on your time and those valves are open on other buildings – nobody gets water. We are working on a proposal with Master Management to come up with a solution.” Jack Kornfield asked if Seacrest had any written reports on its irrigation progress that could be provided to the area chairmen. D’Amato said that the information would be on the web site. Stan Rosenholtz of Newport suggested that Seacrest workers listen to the sounds the pumps are making in order to determine if they need servicing. D’Amato replied that currently there are two pumps whose bearings are “shot” and that the night crews report problems which can only be handled during the day. Rosenholtz went on to report that there are some previously undiscovered valves amongst

the bushes and some of the pop-ups are not operating properly. Patti Bender asked if the crews could check for “gushers”. The explanation was that there are only four hours of daylight when the “gushers” are clearly visible – but that whenever it is reported, someone goes out to replace the head. In answer to a question, Seacrest stated that it is difficult to say how much time each zone receives water since the system is so cut up and patched. Basil Hales asked how many buildings are on each pump? There are four pumps serving the Tilford Area of which one is currently down due to a fire at one of the pumps; at this time there is no explanation for the cause of the fire. Jack Kornfield asked how long each zone is watered for? At least 10 to 15 minutes – given the existing drought conditions the amount of water is inadequate to the need. There are more than 5000 zones in the Village and it is impossible to give them each the time they really need in four days from 4:30 till midnight. Dan Glickman asked what the responsibilities of Seacrest and East Coast were relative to turning the water on and off for their individual clients. Seacrest said it could not answer for East Coast but Seacrest goes out to turn on the pumps four days per week and then proceeds to turn on the various valves and zones for their client buildings. James Quintano added that East Coast turns on the valves and zones for their buildings. Don Kaplan informed the Council that Steve Fine was on his way back from Israel and that there was no correspondence to report. He went on to remind the Area Chairs that they were here not just to ask questions concerning their own buildings but of all the buildings in their areas. He asked that the Area Chairs give reports as to what occurs at their Area Meetings. Chairman Rubino said Durham has a monthly meeting and that he is able to provide attendees with information. Stan said that there are some buildings that have made no effort to claim the checks from the Master Management Insurance refund. Chairman Rubino made an appeal to the body to support efforts to compel Broward County not to close the library in Century Plaza. He went on to say he had brought up the issue at the Executive

Committee and it was also discussed at the Recreation Committee meeting the day before. He asked COOCVE to report at the next Board of Directors meeting as to how the efforts could be coordinated. Jeff Chester reminded the Council that Ken Barnett had announced that there were 29 buildings that had not as yet paid their COOCVE dues. He urged that these buildings be barred from having their COOCVE Directors participate at the monthly meetings, that they not be counted towards a quorum and that they not be allowed to participate in COOCVE matters. . Basil Hales said that he had called the four buildings in Tilford who were delinquent and encouraged the other Area Chairs to make the calls. Jules Kesselman of Oakridge asked “If a building does not have the accounting service from Seacrest, the building does not get an accounting of who owes what for Master Management?” Anthony d’Amato replied that it is up to Master Management to contact the delinquent unit owner. D’Amato said that buildings were notified of delinquencies 90 days after non-payment but that during that period Seacrest makes attempts to collect the money on behalf of the Association and that it is a standard practice to wait 90 days before notifying the president of the building. In answer to Kaplan’s question about those with accounting services,D’Amato said that the late payers would show up on the monthly financial reports relating to the operating budget of the buildings. Kesselman asked if his building which has management services but not financial services would get the monthly report. D’Amato said they would not – only when the account of 90 days in arrears would Seacrest notify the president of who was late. Jack Kornfield asked Seacrest if there had been any problem co-ordinating the irrigation between East Coast and Seacrest? James Quintano said there were problems relating to pressure and timing; there were problems with the pipes; and things not fixed that should have been fixed. D’Amato said there was no problem with timing since East Coast knew that the water was being turned on Monday through Thursday from 4:30 until midnight. Quintano said that they, East Coast, turn the valves on and then Seacrest comes around and turns them off. D’Amato replied “Because they open every valve instead of working with us – we’ve

tried many times – I’m out there myself at night. They know how many valves there are by being here over the last several years, that it’s limited to how many valves can be opened in an area. They continue to open as many as possible which forces our crews to follow them around all night to turn off those valves so we can give equal water to everyone.” Chairman Rubino reminded everyone that it is not the job of the Area Chairmen to coordinate the irrigation efforts of Master Management, East Coast and Seacrest or other providers. Chairman Rubino recognized Nancy Giordano, Chairwoman of the Recreation Committee. Nancy announced that all of the satellite pools would be closed for a short period so they can be thoroughly cleaned: steam cleaning, inspection of pumps and water heaters, plumbing and necessary repairs. Notices will be posted as to the dates. In regard to Giovanni’s, the golf course has applied for permits to start the repairs and they are interviewing five companies interested in the restaurant. Hopefully everything will be ready by next season. Residents can go into the Staff Office and fill out a suggestion form. The Rec committee has suggested offering some sort of delivery service. The loan made by the Levy family to pay for the replacement of the Clubhouse roof after Hurricane Francis will be paid back so no more interest will have to be paid. Pool drain covers are being installed at the satellite pools pursuant to the BakerKnowles Act. Salt chlorination of the pools is being looked into as it is less corrosive than the standard form. Channels 98 and 99 are working again. Outlets for laptop stations have been installed on the mezzanine (the balcony to the theater) so people can plug in their laptops; there will be eight desks up there. The Rec Committee has decided to continue the dances at the pool, on the first Sunday of each month during the summer. Nancy said the Committee was looking into having computer systems available at the clubhouse, as well as a copy machine and a fax machine available for use by residents. Every pool will have the name stenciled on its side during the summer. Each pool will have the notice of when they will be closed posted at the pool one week prior to its being closed; the duration may be from three days to one week depending See COUNCIL pg 12A


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Village Minutes Minutes of Master Management Board April 22, 2009 President Ira Somerset called the meeting to order at 9:30 am on Wednesday, April 22, 2009. In attendance were Reva Behr, Harry Chizeck, Dick Ciocca, Anthony Falco, Gene Goldman, Jules Kesselman, Jack Kornfield, Susan Koser, Bob Marcus, Bill Morse, Charles Parness, Mel Schmier and Ira Somerset. Guest present was Bob Dolson, Business Manager. After the Pledge of Allegiance and a moment of silence, the Board had an open mic session: Open Mic Mr. Sachs – would like the agenda of the Board meeting circulated to the community. Joe Rubino – made a comment about Comcast regarding the annual meeting with Comcast. Nothing was reported and the service is getting worse as we now have three blank channels and 98 and 99 is still not working. Anthony Falco made a motion to accept the March 13 and March 23 minutes as stated. Donna Dowling seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Correspondence – Bob Dolson MM has received several complaints that it is difficult to reach Seacrest Services by telephone. Response: Referred to Seacrest Services for consideration. Complaints were received about spilled white paint on the West Drive, bus bench slats, roadway deterioration and roadway lighting. Response: The spilled white paint has been asphalt sealed to cover it, bus bench slats have been turned over to maintenance for correction, most have been corrected

and roadway deterioration is being addressed through a proposal to the BOD and the roadway lighting has been corrected. Received twelve letters requesting stops at J&J Farms, express buses to Swansea and Westbury, compliments to the bus drivers, and modification of services. Response: Letters will be given to the Transportation Committee for review. Received were requests for better signage. Response: A request for approval to the BOD to change current sign vendor should resolve the sign issue. Several complaints were received from the Prescott area about Seacrest parking golf carts in the Master Management parking lot. Response: Attempting to resolve with finding alternate parking place and/or replanting missing sections of screen hedge. Presidents Report – Ira Somerset A representative from Seacrest, Barbara, will be in the office on Wednesday’s from 9am-12noon and will be there to help residents with any MM/Seacrest coupon issues. A letter was received from the City informing us of problems and code violations to the garage doors to the dumpster “rooms”. The City reminded us of the past noted violations and that we make necessary corrections. The City agreed to re-inspect the rooms and give us a list of violations that need correction. If they are not corrected, the City stated that they will issue citations for code violations. Ira also stated the change to

the No. 48 bus schedule. This change will extend the trip time by five minutes. An emergency irrigation variance was received by CVE. This will allow CVE to irrigate Sunday through Thursday from 4pm to midnight. As of this past Monday, April 20th, the daytime irrigation and maintenance repair crew will be working from noon to 8pm Monday through Thursday to expedite the repairs in Newport and regular maintenance to both MM and the Associations. Ira stated that IDG’s report is approximately 85% complete. A suit was filed in circuit court by Mark Bogen alleging slander against Donna Childrey for comments that she allegedly made against Mr. Bogen in September. Ira Somerset reminded the community that unauthorized valve turning takes water from downstream users and interferes with repairs of the system. Fresh water watering costs thousands of dollars each week. Please be considerate and report anyone turning irrigation on without authorization or using fresh water to water other than new plantings. The golf course letter of intent is being prepared. Charles Parness stated that with regard to the slander suit against Donna Childrey, he made a motion not to exceed $100,000 in defense of Donna Childrey. There was no second. Financial Report - Bill Morse The CVE Master Management Financial Report prepared by Bill Morse was distributed to all Board members and

discussed in detail. For the month of March 2009 Total Revenue $ 742,862.50; Total Expenses were $ 780,114.78, Net Loss of $ 37,252. The loss is partially due to a 5-week month of trolley and security guard services. YTD Total Revenue was $ 2,238,915.67, Total Expenses were $2,331,806.58; Operating Loss was $92,890.91. It was noted that landscape and irrigation charges are expected to increase in the months ahead. Ira Somerset stated that MM has printed the checks from the insurance exchange fund. Association officers or directors can pick them up in the MM office. Project Updates Business Manager’s Report- Bob Dolson The Mechanical Engineer report on the A/C units in LeClub was distributed to the BOD. Pump Repairs As of April 13th the BOD allocated $27,000 for pump repairs and we have spent to date $26,630. Anthony Falco made a motion to allocate an additional $4,000 for pump repairs. Gene Goldman seconded. Motion passed unanimously. LeClub A/C Unit Bob Dolson discussed the replacement of the A/C unit at LeClub. Gene Goldman made a motion to approve the proposal from Cool Team to remove the LeClub 40 ton units and replace them with two 30 ton units as per the proposal plus add-ons for a total of $101,071. Bob Marcus seconded. After a discussion, Gene Goldman amended the motion to include that we proceed as long as the Carrier unit meets the legal requirements by law, the proposal of the Carrier unit is equivalent to the Trane unit and Bob Dolson will discuss, and have it in writing, with the consultant to see if he has any concerns on using a Carrier unit. Motion passed unanimously. Architectural Detail LeClub Bob Dolson discussed the roofing project at Le Club. This includes the replacement of the Architectural Detail in front of Le Club. The present color is Tudor Brown and Bob Dolson is asking the Board if they would like to change the color at this time. Bill Morse made a motion that we leave the present color the way it is. Harry Chizeck seconded. After a discussion, the motion passed 10:2. Gatehouse Rain Gutters Bob Dolson discussed a proposal from Rainbow Gutters and a conceptual agreement on painting and maintenance of the gatehouses. Anthony Falco made a motion to approve the proposal from Rainbow Gutters for $1,109

to replace the gutters and for a conceptual agreement on painting/maintenance of the gatehouses. Dick Ciocca seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Seacrest Janitorial Bob Dolson discussed having Seacrest janitorial services provide monthly carpet shampooing of all MM carpets and on demand spot cleaning for $480/month. After a discussion, Anthony Falco made a motion to have Seacrest clean all MM carpets and gatehouses once a month and maintain equipment onsite so that they can spot clean as needed. Gene Goldman seconded. Bob Marcus made a motion to table until we get additional bids. Jack Kornfield seconded. Motion defeated 4:8. Mel Schmier made an amendment to the motion that we do the cleaning every two months and spot clean as necessary. Bob Dolson stated that Seacrest would not keep a machine on-site. After a discussion, the motion passed 10:1 with 1 abstention. (no vote was Jack Kornfield) Signs Bob Dolson discussed with the Board the current situation with Mr. Blum from Columbia Signs and other alternatives. Mr. Blum is refusing to make any additional signs without a new contract and new pricing. The Board had previously approved additional funds of $16,184 to complete the sign project. Mel Schmier made a motion to approve the sign contract with Signsations for an additional $18,188 to complete the sign project. Gene Goldman seconded. After a discussion, the motion passed 10:2 (no votes were Jack Kornfield and Charles Parness) Safety Loop Detectors Bob Dolson discussed with the Board the need to have Safety Loop Detectors to prevent the bar from coming down on a car installed at East Gate, West Gate and the Hillsboro Gate visitor lane. After a discussion, a motion was made by Reva Behr to approve a proposal from Gate Systems in the amount of $2,455 +tax to install Safety Loop Detectors at the East Gate, West Gate and Hillsboro Gate Visitor Lane. Mel Schmier seconded. After a discussion, the motion passed unanimously. Tilford Pool Bob Dolson discussed a request to change the current pool vendor at Tilford pool and approval for cleanup and repairs. Bob stated that the current pool vendor is not doing a good job in cleaning and maintaining the Tilford pool. A motion was made by Gene Goldman to accept See BOARD pg 11A


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Village Minutes COOCVE Executive Committee Meeting May 11, 2009 2nd Vice President James McLear chaired the meeting in the absence of President Steve Fine and 1st Vice President Charlie Parness. VP McLear called the Meeting to order at 9:40 a.m., as more than the 17 members required for a quorum were in attendance. The members waived the reading of the Minutes of the previous meeting of April 13, 2009, and approved them as published in the May issue of the CVE Reporter. Ira Somerset spoke first as President of Master Management. He reminded attendees that Barbara of Seacrest was in the COOCVE office on Wednesdays to work with all individuals on their coupon payments. He said that Master Management is working with elevator service provider ThyssenKrupp to resolve the problem with elevator phones using SoundNet, which send out to the emergency dispatcher the address of “3501 West Drive” instead of the building. Master Management has also been talking to Comcast about its “non-performance” under its contract, as channels 98 and 99 have not been working (an attendee later noted that our community channels are now in fact working again). Ira spoke again on the problem of unauthorized people turning on hoses and sprinklers. In response to a written question, Ira confirmed that car washing is not allowed in the Village.

Using hose water may appear cheap, but it costs all of us. Master Management is adding signage to the pedestrian walkway out the Main Gate, so that walkers don’t cross against traffic. Master Management will be mailing out the Hurricane Wilma insurance account refund checks next week to the remaining Associations who have not yet picked them up. Four people have offered to run as candidates for the open Master Management Board seat. Ira said there is a problem with IDs that are not returned or cancelled when people move out. Later discussion noted that part of any unit sale closing is to get back IDs or charge a fine, and the Association President signs the new Certificate of Occupancy and it is his or her responsibility to circulate the transfer to the ID office. The Executive Members agreed that probably there is a need for Associations to provide an updated list of owners to the ID office to correct problems from the past when proper procedures may not have been followed. Master Management has set up in the COOCVE/ Master Management offices a conference call room for all Village entities. Groups need pay only for the cost of the calls. Several Area Chairmen talked about apparent flaws in repaving under Master

Management’s auspices: Stan Rosenholtz said the center roadway in Farnham was poorly done, and Naomi Redisch said water now accumulated on two areas recently repatched. In response to a question, Ira confirmed that it is the building service provider, e.g. Seacrest or ECM, who takes care of the parking lots under their contracts with the Associations, and Master Management has charge of the roadways. Roslyn Nehls said she still hadn’t received an answer from Master Management’s Transportation Committee about her requests for expanded service. Jack Kornfield of the Transportation Committee said he had sent an answer and would re-send it to Roslyn. Nancy DiGiordano of the Recreation Committee said that “Giovanni’s” has selected four or five bidders from local eateries to take over the diner, and has filed architectural plans with the City, which the City must respond to by law within 15 days. Nancy clarified that it is the golf course owner who determines who runs the eatery, but noted with satisfaction that the Rec Committee’s advice was solicited and given. The Rec Committee suggested delivery service via golf cart, and a small cooler for purchases of staples such as milk and bread, so residents wouldn’t have to leave the

Village to get these items. The Clubhouse now has laptop stations on the theatre balcony level, so residents have more access in comfort to the Clubhouse Wi-Fi spectrum. Nancy advised that CenDeer will be closing down the pools on a rotating basis to do complete maintenance. Nancy estimates each pool closing will not take more than two to three days. Bruce Gursey of Westbury asked that the Rec Committee let the Area Chairmen know in advance, as the Areas and Associations schedule meetings poolside. Roz Nehls said that food had been dumped in the recycling bins behind the Clubhouse and festered there for four weeks, since Sanitation Recycling wouldn’t remove what was not recyclable material. Roz and Nancy noted also the problem of disappearing bins by the Clubhouse in general. Dan Glickman asked about the Rec Committee’s Suggestion Box. Nancy said it is in the Staff Office in the Clubhouse, Dan suggested that she publicize this in the CVE Reporter for those who don’t know. Turning to the Standing Committees, Naomi Redisch asked about a letter dated April 24th from the Insurance Committee to the Associations, and asked whether COOCVE was once again trying to take over the insurance needs of the Associations. Dan Glickman of the Insurance Committee said it is quite the opposite the Insurance Committee is merely seeking authority from the Associations to gather information for the Associations to use in making their own decisions as to broker, appraiser, and coverage. The Secretary referred to a column in the May issue of the CVE Reporter by Dick Ciocca, Chairman of the Insurance Committee, entitled Responsibilities and Duties. Roz Nehls said that the Civic and Cultural Committee is moving ahead with its planned celebration of our residents 90 years and older. Joe Rubino subsequently brought out the great work done by volunteers Carol Lerner and Phyllis Siegel in gathering petitions, with great help from COOCVE, to keep open the Century Plaza library. Joe asked if the Civic and Cultural Committee could take up this cause, and Roz Nehls said that the Committee would. Nancy Giordano and others emphasized that time is of the essence to gather signatures and give copies to the Mayor and our

Councilman Marty Popelsky. By the time hearings are held in September, the decision will already have been made. Deliver completed petitions to Lorraine in the COOCVE office. Jules Kesselman said that Seacrest had overcharged buildings for doorknobs and lighting ballasts. Attendees pointed to the “Minor Repair and Maintenance” section in the Seacrest contract, paragraph 2, which names light fixtures and doorknobs as two of the items for which “Seacrest shall provide labor and equipment, and the Association shall pay for supplies”. Thus, the labor is included, but the Association pays for the material. Associations can usually obtain the items cheaper than Seacrest will charge, so go out and buy them yourselves if you want to pay less. For the “Budget and Finance Committee”, Ken Barnett as Treasurer said that the Committee estimated in its budget for the current year that COOCVE will operate at a slight profit of several thousand dollars, barring any unforeseen event. The Committee has looked at the issue of the approximate $300,000 that COOCVE holds in cash balances, which has remained fairly constant for at least the past 10 years, and feels it is not a problem since the funds are in FDICinsured bank accounts, and it is prudent as in any business to hold reserves for contingencies. Basil Hales asked Ken if Tilford Associations delinquent on their COOCVE dues had responded. Ken thanked Basil for his help the previous week, and said he could tell the results in a few more days. In “Open Forum”, Joe Rubino urged members to try to attend the meeting of the Community Appearance Board on Wednesday (May 13th) at 7 p.m., as Joe had gotten hard-to-understand answers from the Senior Planner concerning trim and rail painting rules and other questions. Bob Bender asked about “inconsistency” between different correspondence about insurance. Dan Glickman of the Insurance Committee said that any questions should be sent via e-mail to him (Dan) or any other member of the Committee, and they would be sure to look at it. As there was no longer many left in attendance, James McLear asked for a motion to adjourn, which was made and passed at 10:45 a.m. Respectfully Submitted, Ken Barnett, Secretary


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the proposal from Cadillac Electric to repair the three pole lights at a cost of $1,430 plus any fees and tax. Trenching fees are estimated at $500. Donna Dowling seconded. After a discussion, the motion passed 7:0 with 1 abstention (Jack Kornfield). Road Repairs Road repairs in Cambridge E - Mel Schmier recused himself from voting as this is the building where he lives. Gene Goldman moved to approve the MM portion of 2,259 square yards at a cost of $13,950 plus taxes and fees to receive asphalt overlay from Five Star Paving in conjunction with Cambridge E parking lot paving. Reva Behr seconded. After a discussion, the motion passed 7:0 with 1 abstention (Mel Schmeir). Roofing Project Started May 11; anticipated completion in 6 to 8 weeks – about July 4th. Security Modification of the vendor and aide identification requirements - Bob Marcus moved to approve the vendor and aide identification requirements as distributed to the BOD. Reva Behr seconded. Jack Kornfield stated that the Board should have a copy of the exempt list. After a discussion, motion was passed 7:1. Enhancing the existing bar code system - This enhancement will allow the ID office to remotely activate and deactivate bar codes. Gene Goldman moved to approve the ABDI Call In System for the front gate at a cost of $8,262; ABDI to supply and install the modular addition to the access control system as per the proposal dated May 4, 2009. Donna Dowling seconded. After a discussion, the motion passed 7:1. Rain gutters were installed at the Hillsboro gate and minor adjustments are being made to the downspouts. Safety Loop Detectors are expected the week of 5/18. We are still getting camera proposals for Gate Systems & TEM which will be discussed at the next Board meeting. Signs A sample sign from Signsations is expected the week of 5/18. Telephone System The telephone system in the MM and COOCVE offices needs to be expanded. Gene Goldman moved to approve the proposal from DCP Services to install a 4-station telephone module and wiring upgrade to the existing telephone system for $1,954 plus tax. Jules Kesselman seconded. Motion passed 7:1. Hurricane Clean up Post-hurricane clean up.

Reva Behr moved to approve Seacrest Services for post hurricane clean-up as specified in the Seacrest proposal dated April 16, 2009. Gene Goldman seconded. After a discussion, Jack Kornfield asked that the word association be changed to Master Management. Motion passed 7:1. Transportation Committee Jack Kornfield thanked volunteers Roslyn Neihls, Dan Glickman, and Rhonda Pittone. We currently do not have a statement from the attorney about documents that we are entitled to. The Transportation Committee is currently looking for volunteers to process data. Gene Goldman suggested to the committee that it would be helpful to our residents if they could gather information with regard to senior and disabled transportation and commuter buses which is available through the county and the city. Jack stated that the new bus routes have been published and will be printed and available in the next month. Old Business Estoppels The Estoppel process was discussed with the Board. After the discussion, there was no motion, so there will be no further consideration of MM providing Estoppels. Mr. Blum Ira Somerset discussed with the Board the status of Mr. Blum (sign company). The question asked was if the board wants to pursue this in small claims court. Ira mentioned that Mr. Murphy advised not to pursue legal action. After a discussion, Gene Goldman moved to take the advice of council. Jack Kornfield seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Board Vacancy Ira Somerset stated that resumes were received from four applicants for the MM Board vacancy. Jack Kornfield asked that all four applicants (J. William Goddard; Karl Jesaitis, Ron LeRadza and Fred Rosenzveig) be nominated for the Board vacancy. Jack moved for a secret ballot; there was no second. After an open vote, William Goddard was elected to the BOD of MM. Ira Somerset thanked all the applicants for applying for the position. Jack Kornfield asked that that at the next meeting a discussion be had on hiring of a MM Executive Director. Ira Somerset stated that it would be in the best interest of the Board to have a workshop as this will require a lot of discussion. Reva Behr moved to adjourn meeting. Donna Dowling seconded. Respectfully submitted, Ira Somerset, President

Board

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the proposal from Knox Pools for 3 service calls per week at Tilford pool for $475.00 per month and initial clean up and repairs at a one-time charge of $540. Jack Kornfield seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Asphalt Vendor Several small potholes were repaired; no major asphalt repairs performed this month pending the selection of an asphalt contractor. Bob Dolson discussed a request to use Five Star Paving as a preferred vendor for all road patching and asphalt overlay. Asphalt repairs are constantly needed in CV. In the past, areas were measured and sent for competitive bids, and then to BOD for approval. After a few tries the unsuccessful bidders decline further bids, making it difficult to get a competitive bid. A motion was made by Charles Parness to approve Five Start Paving as the preferred vendor at the pricing specified in the proposal. Dick Ciocca seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Road Repairs Bob Dolson presented a request to the Board for Five Star Paving to repair roadways in 39 locations throughout the community. After a discussion, a motion was made by Jack Kornfield to approve Five Star Paving to repair approximately 995 square yards of asphalt in 39 locations for approximately $14,000 plus tax, key cuts and permit fees. Anthony Falco seconded. After discussion, motion passed unanimously. Transportation Committee Jack Kornfield presented the Transportation Committee report to the Board. He stated that a “safety” conference with Nancy Giordano and Eva Rachevsky led to improved bus-boarding of the West Route bus at the Clubhouse. A new internal bus schedule can be found on page 38B of the CVE Reporter published in April, 2009. Jack Kornfield made a motion that the bus schedule stop named “Century Real Estate” be renamed “Upminster Pool.” Reva Behr seconded. Motion passed unanimously. The Committee still has not received much of the insurance information it is entitled to from Quality Transport Services (QTS) despite the motion passed on March 12, 2009, namely: that Patrick Murphy, Esq. obtains all insurance information that CVEMM is entitled to as specified in its contract with QTS. Further action by Mr. Murphy seems to be needed and we would ask that Mr. Murphy be informed of the same.

The Committee has not been receiving written concerns about transportation transmitted by Eva Rachesky to the MM office. It also appears that data from United Security has been misplaced. The Committee has not received much of the data it is entitled to from QTS. Jack Kornfield requested that Bob Dolson prepare an accurate inventory of all the information in-hand for the Committee by April 28th. Ira Somerset reminded Jack that the office staff is limited and the reason why we have committees is to help take the burden off the minimal staff we have. Charles Parness volunteered to catalogue the information. A Transportation Forum will be held on April 30, 2009. Jack Kornfield made a motion to provide special buses to NE Focal Point for the transportation forum being held on April 30th at an additional cost of $150. Jules Kesselman seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Comcast Committee Dick Ciocca stated that the committee has been meeting with Comcast and is working on resolving all issues. Security Committee Bob Dolson discussed with the Board the need for cameras at various gates. This would require several cameras and DVR’s. The incoming lanes would only be recorded as it is much more important monitoring who is coming into the community and would keep the cost down. The cost is approximately $30,000 for all three gates. Only one vendor was solicited. After discussion, the Board has given Bob Dolson direction to look into further vendors for bids for security monitoring. Activities Committee Harry Chizeck thanked Bob Dolson for his hard work and help in what is going on in the Activities Center. The lighting and sound system at LeClub is currently being worked on. Old Business Board Vacancy Ira stated that the Board received two resumes within the timeframe and one that came in late. Anthony Falco made a motion that we extend the deadline to May 7th to submit resumes and to have an election at the next BOD meeting May 14th. Charles Parness seconded. After a discussion, the motion passed 6:5. Ethics Motion Charles Parness revisited the motion that was tabled at the last BOD meeting. Charles Parness made a motion that neither Master Management nor any of its Directors shall accept

any gifts or any other donations from individuals or companies that are doing business with Master Management or from those who are being considered to provide materials or services to Master Management. Jack Kornfield seconded. After a discussion, Mel Schmier made a motion to table. Reva Behr seconded. Motion defeated 4:5. The Board then voted on the original motion and the motion passed 6:3. (No votes were Reva Behr, Anthony Falco and Susan Koser) New Business Estoppels Ira Somerset discussed with the Board the Estoppels process. This is a certification process that when there is a transfer of property and this certifies how much is owed to MM by the unit at the closing. Seacrest has been doing this for MM and charges $100. Seacrest stated that this is a service that MM might want to bring in-house. After a discussion, the Board agreed that we should look into it and get more specifics. Good and Welfare Mel Schmier read from the bylaws section 7.1 – power and authority to manage the affairs of the corporation vested in the BOD, etc., makes no differentiation between policy and operation or Officers and any of the Directors. Mel stated that he had an issue with the attitude that seems to indicate that the Officers are above question and a matter of operation rather than policies and are not open to question or discussion by a member of the BOD at a BOD meeting. Gene Goldman stated that the President is the CEO of the Corporation and shall act as Chairman of the BOD and have all the powers and duties of that office. Ira Somerset commented to the Board that there are Committees and staff that do the best job they can. The governing body either accepts or rejects the report and should not pick it apart. Corrections to these minutes: At the May 13 meeting a statement regarding a Board member taking it upon himself to disseminate information without authorization was deleted from these minutes. A statement made by Jack Kornfield noting that there have been three Administrative Assistants since January was added to these minutes. Mel Schmier made a motion to adjourn the meeting and Reva Behr seconded. Respectfully submitted, Ira Somerset, President


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on how much work needs to be done. Jeff Chester asked whether there was any contract between Recreation or DRF with East Coast as he had observed an East Coast truck removing pipes and other material from the storage area behind the Lyndhurst South pool. Nancy stated that East Coast had been contracted for the watering of the Clubhouse and for putting the zones in to complete the irrigation of the Clubhouse. Nancy went on to say that she had spoken to Dan Cruz and that once the work was done there would be no storage of East Coast equipment in any pool areas. Jeff went on to call to both Recreation and MM’s attention that only mini-buses are allowed to use the ‘tram path’ behind Lyndhurst L near the tennis courts and Giovanni’s. He stated that he had observed an East Coast vehicle as well as Rec vehicles using this as a shortcut. Nancy said the problem has been addressed and that it will no longer occur. Concerning the tiles being installed on the decks of area pools, installation is currently occurring at Ventnor with Durham next. All satellite pool deck areas will be repaired in order of the worst being addressed first. Chairman Rubino then recognized Ira Somerset of Master Management. President Somerset reminded attendees that the MM BOD meeting would be held that afternoon at 1:30 p.m. so as to allow MM BOD members to attend a meeting with SFWMD the next day. A Seacrest employee will be at the MM office for the foreseeable future to help residents understand their payment coupons due for MM. Thyssen-Krupp has updated the addresses for the elevator telephones. New pedestrian signs have been put up both inside and outside the Main Gate directing pedestrians to the pedestrian gate and crosswalk...During the summer for those Associations having board meetings, these meeting rooms (the Activity Center behind LeClub) are free for you and we have the conference phone. You can use our conference call service for which there is a charge that you will be billed by the provider or you can search the internet for an alternative provider but you have the use of the room and the phone for free. The Insurance Exchange checks are still being distributed

this week and those which have not been picked up will probably be mailed out next week. The checks will be mailed to the addresses provided by the Associations so whatever address MM has for the president, that is where the check will be mailed. Work has begun on the roof of the LeClub/Activity Center. The permits have been obtained. Jeff Chester reported that finding the ride of the #2 mini-bus particularly bumpy, he inquired of the driver when the buses would get their shock absorbers repaired. The answer he got from the driver was when the people of CVE wanted to pay to have it done. Somerset was asked about whether the sign replacement project would continue. He said it would. Basil Hales asked whether the water bill was in $1.5M range? Somerset said it was. Ira went on to day that MM pays for water and sewer in roughly equal amounts and for trash removal. Somerset said “Of your $86 monthly MM coupon, approximately $35 goes to the city of Deerfield Beach for water, sewer and trash.” “Having looked at the numbers, after we spend for cable, transportation, administrative etc., we are left with less than $8 of your $86 coupon money to maintain this Village.” Basil Hales emphasized the importance of having the residents aware of this. Somerset said that he intends to publicize this more as we get closer to the budget season. Jeff Chester asked if MM had gotten the information from Century Maintenance and Management in order to publish the financial statement for 2008? Somerset related the court decisions which ordered the release of the information and expects, hopefully, that it will be received in the next few weeks. Stanley Rosenholtz reiterated that the sewer bill increases as the water bill goes up – and asked how we can emphasize to the people the actual cost of ‘running toilets’ and dripping faucets’? He said “When you have a leaky faucet in your condo, we are all paying for it.” He suggested that units be inspected and that leaks be stopped and toilets repaired at the unit owners expense. Somerset suggested that the buildings could take the initiative A motion to adjourn was made and seconded and passed at 10:51 AM. Respectfully submitted by Joe Rubino

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possibly be room for a few tables. Nancy requested that Eva and Dan report back with the additional cost this expansion would entail. Bill requested that effort be made to save the two trees that were planted in memoriam in the area under discussion and Eva assured him that every effort would be made to save the trees. Westbury pool area closed for maintenance/repairs: The pool will be closed for about three days while preventive maintenance is performed. DRF is able to post signs prior to the closing of the pool when the work is for preventative maintenance. It was suggested that notice also be posted on channel 99. Status report on commercial pool drain law: Dan reports that the cost appears to be between $3,000 and $4,000 just for the drain covers. Only a couple of pools will need to be drained and this will be because the grate or drain is broken. He is making sure that the work being done will be compliant with both the state and federal requirements. The satellite pools should be done within the next month and a half. Everything has been documented. Giovanni’s update: Eva said that Sherry Manzell (golf course) has been in the process of interviewing potential restaurants and would like some feedback from us about what we would like to see placed there. Eva invited those interested in offering their thoughts to come by the Cen-Deer office and fill out a suggestion slip which will be presented to the golf course. Sherry says they have applied for permits so work can go forward on the building repair. Hand Ball Court/Half Court Basketball/Horseshoe Pitch: Eva has had requests for these activities and wants the interested parties to be aware that their requests have not been put on a back burner. She is gathering bids to be presented for consideration in the upcoming budget year. Nancy acknowledged Eva’s comments and said the committee wants the recreation facilities to be as pleasant as possible and to offer as many activities as possible. She said if enough people request an activity and if it is feasible the committee will try to accommodate. Eva stated that Bruce had informed her of the availability of a theater organ. Maintenance picked it up and it has been installed in the theater. A volunteer is being sought that would enjoy playing the organ for 30

minutes or so before a movie starts. The committee thanked Bruce for his efforts. Renderings of proposed remodel of ladies locker room: Eva informed the committee and audience that she has two copies available for review during the meeting and invited people to come up and get a copy; but to please return by meeting’s end. The copies were passed around the room and then returned. Eva said this plan keeps the existing plumbing configuration which provides great savings. The plan provides lockers and three changing rooms, plus automatic sliding doors. She is hoping that the remodel will provide a functional and pleasing appearance for the residents. Dan said the Clubhouse exterior has been pressure cleaned and sealed. During this process windows and doors have been evaluated for water tightness. The cupola windows will need to be replaced and this will be presented in the new budget. Bill asked to speak with regard to his comments about the Choraleers at the April Recreation meeting. He said his remarks were due to a wrong impression and he owes the Choraleers a very deep apology. Nancy spoke to all the committee members stating that no one should get personal at the Recreation meetings. She further stated that if someone has issues, it is private and should not be aired at the meetings. Unfinished business Nancy said that last year it was decided to begin presenting one of the movie showings in closed-captioning format. She has had a lot of responses from residents, both pro and con, regarding this issue. She has spoken to the ADA, FCC, etc. regarding this issue. The upshot is that we are not required by law to have closed captioning as long as we provide an alternative. Eva said we do provide an alternative which is the FM station; residents can bring a radio and earphones to the movie, tune in to 91.7 FM. She said Bruce is available to assist anyone having trouble with their radio. During the movies the booth door is always open. Bruce stated that the problem is generally the batteries; once the battery is replaced, the radio works fine. New Business Nancy said when she was at the town hall meeting someone asked her if Security could have a laptop to verify if someone could come into the Clubhouse without their ID. Eva responded that a valid ID is necessary and must be

presented to Security in order to gain admittance to the Clubhouse. Dan says two pools (the indoor pool and one of the satellite pools) have the salt-chlorinator system but it is not operational; the indoor pool presents special problems for this system. The systems which were installed about three years ago did not perform satisfactorily. He remarked that the systems offered today are much improved as opposed to what was available a few years ago. The cost would probably be $900 to $1,200 for purchase, plus installation costs for each pool. Pros for this system are that the cost of chlorine would go down, there would be less maintenance required, the chemical balance would be more stable and it would be better for the skin. Dan informed the committee that the Boca & West Palm Beach Villages have installed the system within the past year and Pembroke already had the system in place prior to that. Nancy and other committee members expressed interest in pursuing the possibility of using this system in the satellite pools. Ron proposed that any more pool renovations include this system. At the conclusion of the meeting, prior to adjournment, a few items were brought up. Nancy announced that as of June the loans and interest for repair of the roof will have been paid off. This means there will be more operational money for Recreation. Don brought up a question that was discussed at a security meeting last week. There is concern that when someone dies or leaves and is not coming back, the ID office isn’t informed and their ID remains operational. This creates a security issue. After discussion about this issue, including the need for revalidation of IDs and vehicle stickers, the meeting attendees urged building presidents and residents to contact the ID office and advise them whenever someone permanently vacates their apartment. Danielle urged residents to be observant now that so many neighbors have left for the season and to be particularly observant of their own personal surroundings – look around and behind you and be aware for your own safety. Nancy reviewed the dates and times for meetings scheduled over the next few weeks. The meeting was adjourned. Respectfully submitted by Meredith Harris


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Village Minutes CVE Reporter Board of Directors Meeting April 28, 2009 The Board of Directors convened at 9:34 a.m. with all directors and Editor-in-Chief, Steve Fine, present. President Gene Goldman chaired the meeting. Gene distributed minutes of the previous meeting of April 22, 2009 and asked for a motion to read aloud or waive reading of the minutes. The directors voted to waive reading and approved the minutes as written. Treasurer, Ken Barnett, gave a verbal recitation of the financial statement as of the end of January 31, 2009, representing seven months of the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2008. Ken noted that revenue averages around $20,000 a month, and through the first seven months of this Fiscal Year, gross profit was over $90,000 after the costs of publication and distribution. Ken noted that this profit margin had improved noticeably since

Steve Fine became Editorin-Chief in August 2007. After administrative costs, including the $4,500 monthly fee to Master Management, pre-tax operating income was about $15,000, and this was after expensing all of the approximately $35,000 paid to build out the new office. The Board approved the adoption of the Treasurer’s report as stated. The Reporter held $127,000 in its bank accounts as of January 31, 2009. Director, Wendy Rosenzveig, presented two motions concerning editorial policy. The first was to approve the following language in the CVE Reporter masthead: “Information to contributors: The Reporter reserves the right to edit, accept and refuse articles in the interest of brevity, clarity and the appropriateness of subject matter.”

Several directors seconded this motion, and the directors unanimously approved its adoption. The second motion, after discussion, was for the Reporter to publish the following policy concerning the publication of minutes: “Due to space limitations, the CVE Reporter reserves the right to limit the length of all minutes submitted. Strict priority will be given to motions, actions taken and information disseminated at the meetings. Full copies of the minutes can be obtained from the relevant Committees.” The directors unanimously approved the motion. Editor-in-Chief, Steve Fine, on behalf of himself and the Reporter staff, asked the Board to consider making and adopting a motion for the allocation of up to $30,000 from the Reporter’s cash, to fund building one

CVE Reporter Board of Directors Meeting May18, 2009 The Board of Directors convened at 1:30 p.m. Present were Ken Barnett, Gene Goldman, Don Kaplan, Judy Olmstead, and Luella Reaume, constituting a quorum. Absent were directors Charlie Parness and Wendy Rosensveig. Editorin-Chief Steve Fine of the CVE Reporter (the “Reporter”) was also in attendance throughout. President Gene Goldman chaired the Meeting. Ken Barnett read the

Minutes of the Meeting of the Board of April 28, 2009, which after several corrections proposed by Gene Goldman, the Board unanimously approved. President Goldman then read a letter dated May 7, 2009 from attorney Patrick Murphy, thanking the Board for its decision in its meeting of April 28, 2009, for the Reporter to use Mr. Murphy for legal advice. Gene Goldman asked if the COOCVE Directors and

Officers Liability insurance, issued by Travelers Insurance, covered the members of the Board of Directors of the Reporter. Steve Fine said he had asked this question of Phoenix, COOCVE’s insurance broker, and was awaiting a reply, and would be sure to get an answer and inform the Board. President Gene Goldman next presented a Motion, seconded by Don Kaplan: “The Board of Directors authorizes the Treasurer to

or more bus shelters in the Village. Steve noted that he and other Village residents on the Reporter staff work as volunteers, without any monetary compensation whatsoever, and that for him and the staff, the best reward was to give something back to the Village that all could enjoy. Judy Olmstead made a motion along the lines proposed by the Editor-inChief, which after discussion was presented as follows: “That CVE Reporter, Inc. allocates $30,000 for the sole purpose of erecting bus shelters in the Village, under the direction of and all costs of maintenance and insurance to be borne by Master Management Co., Inc.” The directors approved the motion by a vote of four in favor versus three opposed, as follows: in favor were Directors Goldman, Olmstead, Parness and Reaume; opposed were Directors Barnett, Kaplan and Rosenzveig. President Goldman then

presented two motions concerning attorney Pat Murphy. The first, after discussion, was as follows: “The Board of Directors of the CVE Reporter, Inc. authorize the President of the CVE Reporter, Inc. and the Editor-in-Chief of the Reporter to consult with Pat Murphy for legal advice as needed.” The directors unanimously approved the motion. The second motion concerning attorney Pat Murphy was: “The Board of Directors of the CVE Reporter, Inc. authorizes payment to attorney Pat Murphy for his work in connection with the legal opinion concerning the constitution of the Board of Directors of the CVE Reporter, Inc.” The directors unanimously approved the motion. There being no further business, the directors moved to adjourn the meeting at around 11:00 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Kenneth Barnett, Secretary

pay all regular ongoing bills regarding the production, printing, and distribution of the Reporter, and any rent or other regular and ordinary costs of the Reporter operation, as submitted to and initialed by the Editor-in-Chief.” The Directors voted unanimously in favor of the Motion. Judy Olmstead made a motion to rescind the Action approved by the Board at its last meeting, of April 28, 2009, to set aside up to $30,000 for the construction of bus shelter in the Village. Don Kaplan seconded the Motion. The

Board unanimously approved rescinding that previous Action. The directors engaged in discussion that re-affirmed the paper’s policy concerning the publication of Minutes, per the motion approved at the April 28, 2009 meeting and first published in the May 2009 issue of the Reporter. At around 2:20 p.m., Don Kaplan made a motion to adjourn the Meeting, seconded by Ken Barnett, which the directors unanimously approved. Respectfully Submitted, Ken Barnett, Secretary


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that would require a major change, but we should begin to plan how we can have a more efficient and unified community. SANDRA PARNESS Ventnor O Closing Century Plaza Library To the Editor: Thank you so much for all the wonderful work you do for CVE and the Reporter! Is there anything you can do as COOCVE President and Reporter Editor to contact Broward County officials to help keep the Century Plaza Branch Library open? I have just returned after a month away and learned about this. Can you publish names, addresses, phone numbers and e- mail addresses of those that our CVE seniors should contact on their own? Perhaps a mass of letters from us would help? Can the Area Chairs be asked to post notices regarding this, on each building, so that residents who don’t read the Sun-Sentinel and aren’t aware, could make phone calls, write letters, e-mails, etc.? Can you have a prominent article about this on the front page of the next Reporter? We would just have to hope that the Snowbirds would read it online and act upon it. I am a Snowbird myself and will be leaving soon. As you must know, this particular library branch is highly prized; and it would be a travesty to deny its access to our seniors and, especially, our handicapped who go by scooter. I have already sent a letter to the editor of the Sun-Sentinel, an e-mail to Mayor Peggy Noland, and placed a call to Marty Popelsky regarding this

problem, asking for names and addresses of Broward County officials to contact. I have mentioned that since seniors pay so much in taxes to the Broward County school system which they do not utilize don’t take away the one benefit they can enjoy. I will also be asking friends to write letters. Thank you for your consideration. PHYLLIS SIEGEL Richmond A Beautifying our Entranceways To the Editor: My compliments to whichever groups and whomever individuals are responsible for the recent upgrades in appearance made to our entrances. Much more than had been the norm, now each of the three gates have had substantial landscaping improvements that do a far better job of creating the right impression on visitors. The gateways to our Village now say, by way of our lovely flowers and landscaping, that we are an upscale community with pride in our appearance. In April, a final touch was added that I have been advocating for a couple of years. We added bright, cheerful, white string lights around several of the trees in the island between our access and exit roads at the Main entrance. Now, even after dark when our landscaping is not visible, the Main entrance at least, no longer looks like the drab, dark and forbidding entrance to “Cemetery Village” as some wags have referred to us. I appreciate this improvement; and I thank you, Steve, for your personal input in this improvement. I see your fine hand in this as you had expressed to me one day, your interest in a letter I had sent

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regarding this subject. Now I ask that the next two steps we need be considered and implemented, as soon as possible. First, the other two gates should also be taken out of the doldrums by adding string lights at those locations, as they currently look so very dreary at night. Finally, as nice as the new lights look at Hillsboro, they are only seen after the visitors have already turned into our entrance. It would further brighten our image and help new visitors to find us at night, if we added specific additional lights here. I suggest we add lights to at least one of the trees at the outsides of our access and egress roads, cornering on Hillsboro. Those trees are on our property, behind the ugly, concrete street light poles in that area. The lights would provide a visible clue to new visitors trying to find us at night, and they would have a secondary role of making those ugly concrete poles less obvious and prominent. NORMAN L. BLOOM Oakridge D Helpful Neighbors To the Editor: Last week, we had an incident where a tree cracked and fell onto cars parked below it. As soon as it happened, many of the residents living in Farnham O came out to help. It was so heartwarming to see how concerned and anxious they were to give any assistance. Men and women responded eagerly to help remove the debris from the damaged cars. Most of the respondents were not youngsters and certainly never thought they would be lifting tree limbs off the street. To see young and old working together was a sight to behold. Kudos to the residents of Farnham O! FAYE FRUMIN Farnham O Save the Century Plaza Library To the Editor: As we age, it appears that more and more is taken away from us. Sometimes we lose our eyesight, perhaps our hearing, or our ability to drive, and then our bodies lose mobility. These personal problems are very disturbing; and now we are confronted with the possible loss of our Century Plaza Library. This is the branch of the Broward County Library System that is adjacent to Century Village East. This library is extremely well utilized; it is a very busy, informative and wonderful resource for the residents of Century Village East, as well as the children and families of the surrounding area.

The Century Plaza Library is a place where computers are available for use; books, tapes and DVDs can be taken out; educational programs are given; newspapers and magazines can be read and foreigners can learn the English language by attending the English Café. By signing petitions, the residents of Century Village East are urging the Broward County Commissioners to make budget decisions to save our Century Plaza Library, as many of us no longer have the mobility to get to any other public library. CAROL LERNER Ventnor G The “Famous Fire Alarm” To the Editor: Our building, like all of the buildings in Century Village, has been forced to install hard wired fire alarms at a cost of $800.00 for each Unit. I have many years of experience with safety devices, and thought, from the beginning, that this was an ill-conceived idea. Today, I was proven right! This morning, just one week after the installation was completed, I was working at my computer early in the morning, while the Cleaning Crew was outside hosing down the hallway in the usual and appropriate manner. Suddenly, all Hell Broke Loose, as I could have predicted. The water created a short and the ALARM went on in the whole building, Everyone had to evacuate their homes, while the loud screeching noise did not stop, and no one knew how to turn off the alarm. Finally, I called the Fire Department and guess what? They do not know how to disarm the ALARM either! The company who installed the alarm finally arrived after hours of suffering by all the inhabitants- who had already suffered enough by having to fork out almost $1000 for something they did not want in the first place! The company had to instruct the Fire Dept on how to disable the alarm- this should have been done immediately upon installation. Following this incident, I asked myself, and now I ask all CV residentsWhat happens if there is a storm or HURRICANE, and the water penetrates the cables and triggers the alarm; you cannot shut the dam thing off individually. At least the ones that you buy at Home Depot allow you to disarm them individually in two seconds, and cost about twenty five dollars! My question is, what will you do if there is a hurricane? You cannot go out, the Fire Department is busy putting out fires, and the people who installed this ridiculous contraption are

nowhere to be found. You are then trapped with that sharp noise torturing you! I would like to propose that everyone be instructed on how to disable this blasted system in an emergency! I also demand that we should find out the names of the “Brains” who passed this law, so we can remember to never vote for them again. It almost seems like there is a conspiracy to get rid of older people- just bill them and aggravate them to death! That’s one way to fix the Medicare and Social Security systems! CARLOS PEDRAZA Prescott B Thanks to a Considerate Neighbor To the Editor: Talk about good neighbors! My neighbor, Rita Fuchs, deserves a prize. I have COPD and am highly allergic to cigarette smoke. When I moved into my condo, I discovered that my pleasant enclosed patio was just above my neighbor Rita’s, who enjoyed smoking on her patio below. The breezes brought the smoke up into my patio windows and apartment. I had to close up my apartment when anyone smoked down there. When Rita found out about this, she volunteered to walk over to the parking lot by the golf course and smoke there. How thoughtful and wonderful and good neighborly is that? Now I can enjoy the fresh Florida air in my condo. JUNE BRITTON Grantham C Give Praise Where Due! To the Editor: Kudos to the lovely, patient ladies in the Cen Deer office. They are never too busy to assist me when I need performer’s correctly spelled names for my theater reviews in the Reporter. I must also mention all the workers in the Staff, ID and ticket offices are always polite and courteous. In over five years I’ve never, never had a bad experience with any of them. If you treat people courteously, you will receive the same treatment back. (99 1/2% of the time!) Remember, the Staff Office is open seven days a week, 14 hours a day, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Workers get tired like you do. I won’t talk about the few rude residents and drivers here. Fortunately, I live in a great building where we all get along and never nit-pick about the use of the laundry rooms, loud TV, etc. A little courtesy goes a long way – to both your neighbors and CVE employees. JANICE ZAMSKY Cambridge D


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Condo News Coalition For CVE Homebound By MARION G. COHEN The end of the season has arrived, and many of our residents have fled the South for cooler climates to escape the heat and humidity of the summer months. But the clients of the Coalition for the Homebound are grateful that they have a home in Century Village and want to thank you for your contributions which subsidized the cost of the services of a licensed aide. What would be the alternative? Without your financial assistance these clients would be institutionalized. One year ago we held our annual main drive to collect funds for the Coalition in the month of February. Unfortunately, this year the drive did not take place until April. Hence, at this moment our records are incomplete. However, listed below are the results which have been forwarded to me at this point in time. As of April 30 the campaign resulted in the receipt of $6915. We have served 27 clients since July 1, 2008 and have 18 clients receiving service from us at the present time. We were so pleased to learn that the Richmond D Condo Association joined the drive this year by forwarding a check in the amount of $25. If every building association would make an annual contribution we could offer our clients more hours of service. We wish to thank the following contributors to the Coalition for the Homebound Program for their generosity. We welcome all contributions but can only list donations of $25 or more because of limited space in this column. $250 Robert French $100 Sandra Anderson, Richard Brokowski, Pauline and Harvey Cohen, Louise Davino and Lucille Gandars, Murray Jaffee, Janet Rao, Bernard Smith. $75 Herbert and Selma Weisz. $50 Alice Botwinik, Jean Glover, Susan Hills, George Schlossman in memory of Evelyn Sinert, E. Slenker, Betty and Robert Spatz, Patrick Sponsler, James and Zelda Stepner, Judith Tenenhaus. $36 Albert Bakelman, Fay Frumin. $35 Charles Dilbert. $25 Walter Abbott, Nicola Alleva, Rena Feuer Alster, Marguerite Auger, Rena Babich, Rose Baclar, Betty Baker, Phyllis Berk, Ethel Berkowitz, Leonard Bloom, Seymour Blum, Tobey

Bomson, Rowena Brewer, Lenore Chatzky, Isabel Cohen, Ruth Cousin, Rita Currao, Wilhelmina Davis, Leonard Delfiner, Beatrice Delman, Joan Demchar, Pauline Denkberg, Lillian Drobin, Philip Dubin, Ronald Effren, Harriet Elfman, Angelica Espizua, Alyce Fay, Mildred Feingold, Julius Feinstein, Carmen C. Fernandez, Esther Garfinkel, Patricia Ginsberg, Saul Gold, Helga Golden, Gertrude Goodmark, Rita Gottlieb, Beatrice Guccione, Abby Heitzler in memory of William Heitzler, Marion Hennigs, Enriqueta Herdegen, Martin Herman, Gerda Hollander, Aaron Jacoby, Barbara Jeffrey, Marsha Johnston, Marsha Kolasky, Peter Kopels, William Leeds, Ruth Leitman, Harry Liner, Lucille Long, Howard Luber, John Magee, Rosalind Mandell, Edythe Masel, Sylvia Milians, Marjories Miller, Nelson Morciglio, Elaine Nudelman, James O’Neill, John Phillip, Shirley Pine, Bernard Pittinsky, Nathan Polan, Caryl Polatchek, Sylvi Pomerantz, Toni Ponto, Susan Popp in memory of Bernice Feinberg, Mollie Rapchik, Helen Rapport, Rabbi Joseph Rudavsky, Rose Sagas, Dorothy Sceley, Jeanette Schess, Arthur Schuman, Arthur Schwartz, Betty Schwartz, Martin Schwarzschild, Irene Scott, Lila Scudder, Judith Sgoff, Abraham Siegel, Michael Silver, Sidney Simon, Shirley Sklar, Soris Sklarin, Adele Soalt, Ingrid Son, Rose Staff, Hyman Steckler, Beatrice Stein, Miriam Stein, Janet Stinson, Estelle Tropp, Doris Wachsler, Sheila Weinberg, Cecile Weiner, Elaine Weintraub, Dorothy Weiss, Alice White, Mary Wolfson, Alfred Zappala. The Board of the Coalition for the Homebound is very fortunate to have added to their roster Toni Ponto and Marilyn Lane who will assist in the publicity drive being planned for the forthcoming year. We want to introduce ourselves to the new residents of Century Village. We are planning to address building meetings and the Council of Area Chairs. The executive director of the Broward Homebound Program will join us in this endeavor. Please see our supplementary summary of the services of the Homebound Program listed on this page. Wishing all readers of this column, contributors to our cause, friends and members of the Board a wonderful summer.

COOCVE Appointed Committee Members for 2009 – 2010 ADVISORY* Chair – Judith Olmstead Gene Goldman Harvey Masef Barbara Nathan Marcus Miriam Peletz Rhonda Pitone Fred Rosenzveig Joe Sachs

AUDIT Joe Fridell Bruce Gursey Elaine Nudelman

BUDGET & FINANCE* Chair – Gloria Olmstead Ken Barnett Florence Charney Bernard Pittinsky

BY-LAWS Chair - Charlie Parness Florence Charney John Cole Bruce Gursey Jack Kornfield Mel Schmier CIVIC & CULTURAL* Chair – Myriam Sachs Beverly Kornfield James McLear Roslyn Nehls Wendy Rosenzveig CONTRACT Chair – Abe Trachtenberg Norman Bloom Florence Charney Caral Falco Bill Goddard Marilyn Lane Bernard Pittinsky David Polak

* Chairs are members of the COOCVE Executive Committee

GRIEVANCE Chair – Fred Rosenzveig Edward Gallon Beverly Kornfield Joe Sachs William Schmier

INSURANCE Chair – Joseph (Dick) Ciocca Frank Crowley Ross Gilson Dan Glickman Marvin Katz Carman Nepa Herman Shwide Saul Siegal Barry Smolin


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Condo News Recreation’s Most Commonly Asked Questions By EVA RACHESKY Administration/CenDeer Communities Office What type of attire is permitted at the Dances held in the Party Room? Shorts and skorts will not be considered appropriate attire and will not be permitted for the Party Room Dances. Residents wearing trousers, slacks, skirts or dresses will be welcome. ANNOUNCEMENT: Pool Dances The Sunday dance at the Clubhouse Outdoor pool will continue through the summer. The Dance will be held on the first Sunday of each month. Dates are June 7, July 5, August 2, September 6, and October 4. Staff Office What are the Staff Office hours? The Staff Office business hours are 9:00 am to 11:00 pm, 7 days a week. The Staff Office is only closed when the Clubhouse is closed. NOTE: Library Petition Broward County is planning to close the county library branch in Century Plaza. Those residents wishing to sign the petition being circulated in an effort to save this branch can do so at the Staff Office. ID Department I lost my ID card. What do I do? You will need to come to the ID office in the Clubhouse and get a replacement. It will cost you $20.00 to replace your

lost ID card – there are no exceptions and no refunds if your original card is located afterward. This fee schedule remains the same regardless of the number of times you have your card replaced. Theater What is done in the theater for hearing impaired? There is a “Hearing Impaired” station – 91.7 FM – that broadcasts theater performances. You must supply the radio, ear phones and batteries. If you have questions you may call the Staff Office and leave your name and phone number for our technician to contact you. The Staff Office phone # is 954-428-7095 and our technician is Bruce. ATTENTION: Volunteer needed to play organ An organ has been donated and set up in the theater. A volunteer is being sought who would enjoy playing the organ for 30 minutes or so before a movie starts. Anyone interested should contact the Staff Office. Athletic Department How often should I change my sneakers? New sneakers should be purchased every 300 to 600 miles. Wearing the proper footwear will enhance your workout while eliminating the possibility of additional aches and pains that can be caused by wearing older (worn-out) shoes. Recreation Maintenance Are there any pools or

tennis courts in Century Village East that are not part of Recreation responsibility? The Tilford (aka LeClub) pool and tennis courts are not part of the Recreation Properties and are not maintained by Recreation Maintenance. Any maintenance issues concerning LeClub, the Tilford pool or the Tilford tennis courts should be reported to CVE Master Management located in the COOCVE offices. They can be reached by phone at 954-421-5566. Note: the COOCVE office is closed on Fridays. Class Office Will there be Copa dances during the summer? No, because attendance is very low during the “off” season, Copa dances will not resume until November. Evening/Weekend Staff Office When can I buy show tickets on the weekends? The box office is closed during the day on the weekends and advance tickets are not sold in the evening or on the weekend. The box office opens 1 hour and 30 minutes before each show to sell tickets for that show only. At this time residents can buy tickets for themselves and for as many guests as they wish, provided there are seats available. Ticket Office I want to get the Advance Season Brochure – do I have to

Sign-up Sheet for Volunteers If you would like to help COOCVE, Master Management or the Reporter on an as-needed basis, please fill out this form and return it to the COOCVE office. Let us know how you can serve and you will be contacted when your services are needed. You may be called to fill in for the receptionist at the Reporter office, to stuff envelopes or to make telephone calls, etc. This is your opportunity to assist in the operations of the Village even though you may not have a lot of time to give. If you do not receive a call, please do not take it personally. It only means that the response was greater than the need, which is a compliment to all of the residents of Century Village. ____________________________ Name

____________________________ Telephone Number

____________________________ Building Address Description of number of hours, time of day and best days for you: ______________________________________________________________________________ Description of service that you are willing to perform: ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

buy an envelope if I am here in the Village? No, the envelope is for those residents who will not be in the Village at the time of distribution. The Advance Season Brochure

will be given out at the ticket window(s) starting Friday, July 31, 2009. The Ticket Office hours are 9:30am to noon and 1pm to 4pm, Monday through Friday.

In Remembrance By GLORIA OLMSTEAD In Memory of Selma Brenner. A very wonderful lady of our Century Village has passed away. She was Selma Brenner, who will be sorely missed by all the musicians and music lovers of Century Village. She was an extremely talented pianist who played everything from jazz to the Warsaw Concerto. She played piano as a volunteer for numerous groups: Nostalgia, Sholom Alechem, The Zanzibar Group of Singers every Monday night and their larger shows as well. In the past, Selma played piano for the ”masks” that performed at nursing homes. She also played the piano for the CVE Mandolin Group, for the CVE Choraleers, NE Focal Point and the Alzheimers home. Selma will never be forgotten by all the many friends she made who admired her, as I did. By Mimi Lourenso.

Maree Maxwell of 209 Newport M passed away on May 1. She is survived by three children, Craig, Scott and Dorathea; three grandchildren, Kyle, Ryan and Vanessa Maxwell, one brother, Robert Groh and several nieces and nephews. A memorial will be held on Saturday, June 20 at 1:00 p.m. at St. Paul Luthern Church, 701 Palmetto Road, Boca Raton. A luncheon will follow. In lieu of flowers please make donations to the St. Jude Children’s Hospital in St. Louis, Mo. Roslyn Zislis of 2047 Ventnor O passed away in May 2009.


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Condo News Nobody asked me, but… By HARVEY BEABER In my last two monthly columns I indicated that I was unhappy about our economic situation here in our great country. It seems to me that not much has been done that will change the situation either for the middle class or the working class, many of who have lost their jobs! The headline in today’s Broward County issue of the Sun Sentinel, “10 Big Banks Need $75 Billion,” and they will probably get it, but this time I would like to see restrictions and agreements put on it. First of all the CEO’s should be fired, along with every other authority in the banks that made the financial decisions that caused them to get into such a terrible financial position. What’s the sense in leaving these same unqualified, greedy people in charge with all this new money to play with. There must be many qualified and experienced people in the banking organizations who are able and eager to take over and make big bucks! It’s an idea anyway. I’m not

preaching communism or rebellion, but only an idea. We have to stimulate these bankers. Right? The next thing on my mind are cell phones being used while driving on the roads. This practice is very dangerous for both the user of the phone and the drivers and pedestrians on the road. Several states have regulations and laws pertaining to the use of cell phones while driving a motor vehicle. These individual state laws are enforced by their state police. At this time, I believe that there are only about five states that have these laws. Florida is not yet one of them. Why? It is up to us, as citizens of this great state of Florida! This is a very well-traveled vacation state and we have all kinds of motorists here, especially during the winter months, which is the tourist season. I hate to say it, but that is the time of year when we get some of the best and also the worst motorists from all over North America visiting us. It seems to me

that whenever I see traffic held up, or very slow driving while making turns, etc., the driver doing it is on a cell phone. There is nothing that justifies these actions. You cannot do two things at the same time; concentrate on driving in traffic and holding a conversation. This has proven to be very dangerous for everyone on the road. The Florida State Traffic and Motorist laws that we need must be brought to the attention of our state legislators who represent us in Tallahassee. They must work to bring in laws that are to our advantage. These laws have to be passed so that they will be strictly enforced. We elected them, and they are there to represent us. They are Florida Senators Kelly Skidmore (561-4706593), Ted Deutch (561-2892004) and Congressman Robert Wexler (561-988-6802). Please call them and tell them that you are in favor of a bill sponsoring this type of legislation, for the safety and health of all citizens of the

state of Florida. It’s also OK to give them my regards and you can tell them I told you to call. Great! .My darling wife Joan and I have been living here in CVE for almost 30 years. We love it here! We have been very happy about how this development has been run and cared for, and are very grateful for all the volunteer help that has been contributed and which has served to make the community so beautiful, desirable and successful. It also took a lot of hard work by volunteer leaders who gained your support and cooperation in order to make CVE one of the best senior condo residences in the country…in fact the whole good old US of A! Notice, I used the phrase “support and cooperation” relating to you because I want to impress upon you how important it is to volunteer your help. I think that what I am about to say is common knowledge. There are STOP signs at various corners in our Village

for traffic control, but there is no way to enforce the rules. It seems that the problem is money! The only ones who can enforce the traffic rules are Sheriff’s Officers and as I understand it, the Sheriff’s Department expects to get paid. I believe I am one of the few who stops at the signs and I see cars go flying by me all the time. Please don’t do that. It’s very dangerous. Thank you! Now, I feel a little better. I know, nobody asked me, but… God bless you all! God bless America! Due to space limitations, the CVE Reporter reserves the right to limit the length of all Minutes submitted. Strict priority will be given to Motions, Actions taken, and Information disseminated at the Meetings. Full copies of the Minutes can be obtained from the relevant Committees. -BOD CVE Reporter, Inc.


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Condo News Irrigation Update By IRA SOMERSET, President/ Master Management Statement for SFWMD Hearing – May 14, 2009 One of our principal responsibilities is to provide Century Village with irrigation. Century Village was built in the 1970’s, and over the years has had minimal infrastructure maintenance or improvements. So, we find ourselves with an irrigation system that was installed in the 70’s by the lowest bidders. There have not been any improvements or system updates since then. Maintenance has consisted of patches, splices and increasing lines and pump sizes. Following Wilma, a lot of our system was torn up when the large ficus trees were toppled. Repairs often consisted of splicing the broken ends to whatever pipe was available. It was and is a mess. I will not go into the details of the condition or means of operation of the system – I’ll let our irrigation contractor, Seacrest Services, discuss that. Our village is a small city – approximately 700 acres overall; 450 acres of which

is grass, trees and flowers needing irrigation. So far, we have uncovered over six thousand manual valves each of which must be turned at least twice to complete one irrigation cycle of Century Village. Two years ago, we began to bring our manual system into compliance with the current requirements and planned to make improvements which would result in a modern automated system. We installed meters on our pumps to measure the flow and hired an irrigation engineer to evaluate our system and provide us with a status report and guidance for the modernization of our system. This effort was complicated by the apparent lack of ongoing maintenance over the years on the part of a long time service provider who was responsible for this function, and with whom we are now in litigation, after we terminated their contract. Our progress was slowed by the extreme distress we found in the system, which required extensive repairs

just to determine the state of the system. We are expecting the report from the engineer this week. Then we will move forward. Our plan is to review the report in a workshop session of our board and allow the board to determine what the modernized code-compliant system will consist of, how the construction will progress, then hire a designer to draw the plans and specs. Following that, we would send RFP’s to contractors and begin construction. This is a very large project by any standards and will take a lot of planning and coordination. As I have limited experience with a project of this magnitude, I cannot begin to guess at timetables. I can tell you that just to go through Century Village repairing and replacing the pumps and electrical services; repairing the broken, missing and damaged spray heads; and reconnecting disconnected laterals with no additions to the system, has taken five months and there is still more to do in some small

areas that had to be bypassed during the main initiative. Since January 1, we have been trying to repair the system, provide irrigation in accordance with the SFWMD requirements, and maintain the system. We have spent an average of over $300 per building plus nearly $40,000 to repair and make safe the pumps, plus another $45,000 to make enough repairs to the system so Mr. Perkins (our Irrigation Engineer) could assess the status of the system. These repairs have cost us over $160,000 so far. In the midst of all of this comes Mr. Sheraton who makes assumptions and accusations. I will leave the questions of timing and operations to Seacrest Services to answer. But I will address some of his other comments. He has made a lot of assumptions and accusations, refusing to understand the extent, complexity and effort required to repair the dilapidated infrastructure. Further, he makes assumptions about the water quality, the meaning of indicator organisms, the content of variances and the reasons they were granted by SFWMD. We have all spent an inordinate amount of time attempting to answer his emails and letters. He

has taken information about bacteria-causing food and waterborne illnesses and transposes that into relating to aerosolized waves of toxins. He neglects to consider the many years during which spray irrigation was conducted during daylight hours everywhere. I could go through each of his statements, but I do not think that is necessary given the experience and expertise of this body. Master Management and our contractors make every effort to repair our system and to irrigate our village within the rules set by SFWMD. I will say there are times when mistakes are made – that is human nature, and our system is totally dependent on the human touch at this time. It is our hope and prayer that SFWMD will understand our predicament and work with us until we can complete the modernization of our irrigation system. In summary, I would like to say that data without context is meaningless; the information without relevance is dangerous. Thank you for allowing CVE Master Management to present our position. We look forward to moving ahead as efficiently and speedily as possible.


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Phyllis’ kitchen By PHYLLIS PISTOLIS

Macaroni & Eggplant Casserole Cut 1 unpeeled eggplant into ¼ inch slices & fry in oil in skillet till brown on both sides. In the meantime, boil & drain ½ lb. macaroni twists. Butter a 2 qt. casserole. Arrange ½ of macaroni on bottom. Top with half the eggplant. Sprinkle with salt, oregano, basil & parmesan cheese. Repeat layers then top with 2 cups (1 lb can) Italian style tomatoes. Dot with butter & bake at 350° for 30 minutes. Makes 4 servings. Quick Peach Desert Drain 3 cups of peach halves into an 8 inch square pan. Empty ½ pkg. piecrust mix & 1 cup dark brown sugar & mix well. Sprinkle on top of peaches & dot with butter. Bake at 325° for 30 minutes. Serve warm with cream.

Phyllis’

Kitchen

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United Order True Sisters On June 23, 2009 at 12:30 p.m. we will have a complimentary luncheon supplied by Integracare Rehabilitation. This function will take place in the Party Room of the Clubhouse.

Condo Docs/By Laws/Amendments Condo Docs: Includes: ByLaws, Declaration of Condominium and Amendments Responsibility: Each unit owner is responsible to give to the new owner, at closing, a Set of these documents. Each unit owner should, at closing, be sure to obtain these documents from the seller – or obtain reimbursement for the approximate cost of replacing them. They can be obtained from any title company for a fee, such as, Bailey & Woodruff Title Co. Tel. 954-571-7919 The cost is $35.00. Any questions or concerns? Call COOCVE office to speak to a COOCVE Officer.

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Condo News News & Views By JUDY OLMSTEAD

I was asked to make a correction and give an apology for my report on a BSO incident involving a domestic dispute of a couple in their twenties living in the Village. I based my report on the information given by the BSO representative at the April COOCVE meeting. I have now received a typed BSO report and there is a correction to be made: the male victim is 52 and the female perpetrator is only 25. Both were approved as residents of the unit, so I do not believe an apology is required. Section 9.1 of our Declaration of Condominium as amended states very clearly that at least one resident of each unit must be over 55. In addition, an incident occurring in May in another area of the Village, which only required security intervention, involved a 42 year old woman. I stand by my position on allowing residents under 55, especially those well below the cut-off demanded by our documents. We were all young once, but retirement communities were created by the Fair Housing Act for the sole purpose of giving seniors a secure and peaceful place to live. We need to work together to keep Century Village as “housing for older persons”. Furthermore, under our documents, there is no 80/20 rule and presidents are going to face discrimination lawsuits if they continue to ignore their own documents. I am happy to report that there was little, if no crime this month. The most serious crime to report is the scamming of more than one resident with people calling and claiming to be a friend of, or a grandson who was in trouble and desperately needed money. Fortunately, the wire-transfer company (Money-gram in the one case)

was alert to these scams and the transfer of money was stopped and the money was returned to the victim. If the BSO report at our May COOCVE meeting of a car break-in frightened you, this incident may not even have occurred inside the Village. The incident involved the grandson of a resident who did not know if his car was locked, or exactly when it occurred. He reported it to the BSO because a prescription for Oxycotin was one of the items taken from the car. During the report from the BSO representative at this meeting, we learned that no one is required to show ID in order to board the East, West and Plaza shuttle buses. In other words, we are spending a fortune on security and then allowing anyone to just ride into the Village on the mini buses. I do not know if ID’s are checked on the 48 bus, but the transportation and security committees of Master Management need to do something about this problem if we are to remain safe. Furthermore, Master Management needs to establish penalties for anyone who refuses to show their ID’s. I have observed residents who refused to show their ID’s to the guards at the Clubhouse and then just run inside. Somehow they have to be identified and have fines imposed. Taking away their ID’s won’t help because they refuse to show it anyway.

I hope no one thinks that I am taking advantage of this monthly column, but I would like to grade Seacrest Services after their first five months on board. For the first time in four and one-half years the grass around our building was watered. This occurred the first week of May, but has not been repeated. The way it was explained to me, the Markham area has 150 valves. Only seven (7) can be turned on at any one time. This means that if any of the five (5) East Coast buildings are turned on, the rest of Markham does not get water. Now I understand why only one line of sprinklers shared by Markham S and Markham R were turned on during the five years before Seacrest came on board. It always appeared that the buildings that complained the loudest, or who received special treatment from Century Maintenance, received more water. It is clear that the irrigation system does not work. While I hesitate to say this, after the sign fiasco, Master Management must make the hard decision and revamp the whole system. Those members of the board who put cost before everything else, must also bite the bullet and allow this problem to be solved. I received an email from the BSO cybervision web site which noted that, between November of 2008 and April of 2009, South Florida had the driest six-month period in history since records were kept dating back to 1932. In addition to the impossibility of efficiently turning on the valves and pumps that are working in the village, the city of Deerfield Beach refuses to work with our village allowing Seacrest to make the necessary repairs during the day. The

insertion of irrigation into the building contracts, after it was approved by the Board of Directors of COOCVE, is causing insurmountable problems in trying to irrigate all of the areas in the Village. COOCVE and Master Management need to get involved before Seacrest gives up in disgust and we again have no choice in service providers. Getting back to Seacrest -I love our property manager, Sandy Mallory. Neither of us knows everything, but we make a great team. She always makes and keeps appointments when I need her assistance. She responds immediately to my emails and has met my expectations of a property manager. The landscaping work has been terrific. Seacrest trims bushes and trees whereas Century Maintenance had demanded an extra $50.00 per tree for the same work. They actually fertilize and weed as promised. The janitorial services are so superior to previous work performed (actually not performed) and the attitude of the workers is a joy to experience. I unlock our laundry rooms at seven in the morning for the maintenance crew and the people assigned to our building are not only hard at work, but greet me with a smile and a cheerful good

morning. The jury is still out on the accounting system. Because of the problems the first month or two, bills had been paid out of our prior bank account and it is taking time to get everything into the 2009 budget. In addition, the software used by Seacrest, budgets each expenditure over the twelve months and our building had previously used a cash flow report to keep track of our finances. Furthermore, associations not using Seacrest for accounting were not receiving notice of unit owners who were not paying their building fees. I understand that this is being corrected, but as of this date (May 20th), I have not as yet received our monthly statement for April. The turn-around time for letting us know when Seacrest has paid a bill is also too slow. There is currently no system in place for timely notifying treasurers or presidents, either through email or the property manager, that a bill has been received and paid. For the July issue of the Reporter, send us your feedback on your experience with your service provider. Limit it to three (3) or four (4) sentences, so that we can print them all. Either email to cvereporter@hotmail.com or hand-deliver to The Reporter office. I can be reached at judycve@yahoo.com.


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Condo News

Statutes:


JUNE 2009

Consumer Interest “Ask Lori…Parrish on Appraisal” Broward County Property Appraiser Lori Parrish Answers Your Questions… “Help Us Crack Down on Tax Fraud!” Dear Lori, I read in both the Sun-Sentinel and the Pompano Pelican that your office is cracking down on homeowners who were illegally claiming Homestead Exemption tax breaks. I live in Pompano Beach and want to help. What is the best way to report this tax abuse without causing a problem with the neighbor? A.S., Pompano Beach, FL Property owners who file false applications to obtain a Homestead Exemption are breaking the laws and they’re making you pay more in taxes each year. Why? Because the School Board, the County Commission, your local city government, and the various taxing authorities must fund their budgets by equitably dividing the tax burden among all property owners within their jurisdictions. If someone lies to lower his or her

taxes, someone else has to make up the difference. Our office aggressively seeks to stop homestead fraud. Since we formed our homestead fraud units in 2005 over 18,487 fraud investigations have been resolved, resulting in over 26 million dollars in back taxes, penalties and interest and over three billion dollars of assessed value, back onto the tax rolls. We have worked with city governments, homeowner and civic associations to help identify tax fraud. If you know of anyone claiming Homestead Exemption on a property he or she is not

permanently residing in or if the property is rented, vacant or merely a vacation home, we urge you to contact our investigators in our Department of Professional Standards and Compliance at 954.357.6900 or www.bcpa.net/ fraudform.asp and we’ll check it out. Once reported, our office will fully investigate each charge. Property owners who intentionally cheat on Homestead can be back taxed for as many as ten years, plus be required to pay substantial penalty and annual interest. While it is extremely helpful and time saving when you speak directly to an investigator, you may remain anonymous. Sincerely, Lori Parrish, CFA If you have a question for Lori, please email her at lori@ bcpa.net or write to her at the Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office, 115 South Andrews Avenue, Room 111, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301.

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My presence in the Village

From the Senate

By MARTY POPELSKY, Commissioner District 3

By TED DEUTCH

Once again it’s budget season and all the city departments are preparing their needs. We will make every effort to save jobs and keep the millage rate as close to its current rate as possible. We will do everything possible to maintain the level of services you have been accustomed to. As of this writing, we are hopeful that Senate Bill 714 will be signed by Governor Crist. This is the bill Senator Ted Deutch and his associates have fought for, which deals with rescinding the requirements to hard-wire fire alarm systems in our garden apartments. I will keep you posted as to the final outcome. To date, I have received over 1,000 signatures protesting the county’s closing of the Century Plaza Library. To ensure that your voices are heard, these protests will be forwarded to the Broward County Commission, along with a strong letter from Mayor Noland and my fellow City Commissioners. UPCOMING EVENTS Recycle your old phone books Don’t throw away your old phone book! Instead, recycle it by placing it in your mixed paper recycle bin. Phone book paper is made from recycled paper and wood fiber waste that would otherwise go unused. Recycled phone books are made into useful products such as animal bedding, home insulation, bathroom tissue, cereal boxes, roofing shingles, and even new phone books! For more information about recycling in Deerfield Beach, call the Recycling Division at 954-480-4454.

For each 500 books recycled, we save: • 7,000 gallons of water • 3.3 cubic yards of landfill space • 17 to 31 trees • 4,100 kilowatts of electricity, enough to power an average home for six months Residential Paper Shredding Event Sat., Jun. 13, 9 AM - Noon Recycling Drop-Off Center, 401 SW 4 St. $10 for up to 10 banker-size boxes (10” x 14”) or 5 medium (up to 30 gallon) garbage bags (CHECKS ONLY) 954-480-4454 www.Deerfield-Beach.com Property tax exemption assistance at City Hall Tues., Jun. 16, 11:30 am - 1 pm, City Hall, 150 NE 2nd Ave. Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office sign-up event for Homestead, Senior and other property tax exemptions, held every third Tuesday of the month through 2009. Documents required to file a Homestead Exemption include: A current Florida driver’s license or Florida identification card, and a current voter registration card or declaration of domicile.

Non-US citizens must also provide proof of permanent residency. 954-357-6035 www.bcpa.net Floatin’ Family Movie Nights Fri. Jun. 26 – Family themed movie begins at dark. Deerfield Beach Aquatic Center, 501 S.E. 6th Ave. $2 per person 954-420-2263 www.Deerfield-Beach.com 4th of July Celebration Relax on the beach and join in as we celebrate the independence of our great nation. Kid’s Activities 3:00 – 6:00 p.m. Unforgettable Musical Entertainment 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. Spectacular Fireworks with the Mad Bomber 9:00 p.m. Plenty of vendors all day providing a wide variety of foods, drinks and other items of interest. *FREE event at the Main Beach Parking Lot, Ocean Way & SE 1st St. Free shuttle service from the Cove Shopping Center and the Publix Shopping Center (SE corner of Federal Hwy. and E. Hillsboro Blvd.) Remember that I am your only full time Commissioner. I am always here to assist you in any way I can. Call me any time, and I will be glad to help you resolve your problems. City Office Phone: 954-480-4218 City Assistant Phone 954480-4263 E-mail: web.commission@DeerfieldBeach.com Regards & Good Health Marty Popelsky Your District 3 Commissioner

The 2009 Legislative Session has been extremely challenging. We are facing record budget shortfalls and were forced to extend the regular Session to finish our work. However, I am very proud of the Legislature for recently passing two pieces of legislation which were of great importance to me. Continuing to pave the way on divestment of state funds from rogue nations, I am proud to say the Florida Legislature on Friday passed a bill making it easier for Florida’s citizens to exercise economic pressure against terror-sponsoring states. The bill, SB 538, requires fire and police pension funds to divest from Iran and Sudan and requires the State Board of Administration to provide a “terror-free” option for state employees participating in the State’s defined contribution retirement plan. In 2007, I sponsored the Protecting Florida’s Investments Act, making Florida the first state to divest its pension funds from companies engaging in business with Iran and Sudan. Since its passage, Florida – which has the nation’s fourth largest pension fund - has divested over one billion dollars from scrutinized

companies. SB 538 also requires police and firefighter pension funds to identify any holdings they may have with scrutinized companies and divest these securities by 2010. The state of Florida has made it clear that it will not aid the genocide in Darfur or Iran’s illicit nuclear weapons program. This bill reinforces the commitment of our state’s citizens to not support companies who choose to put profit over international security. For the last two years I have also been working on legislation inspired by a local constituent that would require judges to consider charges of domestic or sexual abuse, involving either parent, when granting custody or arranging visitation. On Friday, the Florida Legislature passed SB 904 which reduces from a third degree felony to a first degree misdemeanor the level of a domestic violence conviction judges must consider when determining parental custody. My efforts to revamp custody requirements began after learning the story of a constituent who left an abusive marriage, only to have her ex-husband, during his approved visitation, set fire to their home, killing their two children and himself. I recognized that not only are many felony domestic violence cases pleaded down to first degree misdemeanors, but that a parent is frequently granted shared custody or unsupervised visitation if they have a history of domestic violence not involving the children. I am so proud to have passed this legislation that will help ensure no child fall victim to the relationship of the parents. While there is no doubt that children benefit from spending time with both parents, it is always necessary to determine how to best protect the child. It is an honor to serve you.


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Angina Attacks By JACK GALIT During a period of about 12 months in 1972-73, I experienced three angina attacks, all of them on a Thursday night, while driving on the Long Island Expressway. As president of my Pythian Lodge’s credit union, I scheduled one Thursday night per month to accommodate the membership’s increasing activity, in addition to the initial openings on alternate Fridays when Lodge meetings took place. While driving home from downtown Brooklyn on the

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Expressway, I began to feel discomfort in the chest as I neared the area where the utility company’s huge gas tanks were located. At that time, I began to feel some mild stabbing pain off and on in my left arm which dissipated by the time I exited on the Jewel Avenue exit. When I parked my car near my two-family building apartment, I walked up a flight of stairs without difficulty. Fortunately, my wife was asleep and didn’t notice how tired I was. She had changed her work hours for Citibank, during the bus and subway strike, while Mayor Lindsay was in office. When the strike ended, she arranged her work hours from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. That’s why she would retire about 9:30 p.m. During a 10 month period, the first two angina attacks didn’t affect my driving since I did not pass out, which is why I didn’t feel that a heart attack had occurred. The third one was quite different as this one lasted longer and was more severe. My left arm gradually became numb so that I couldn’t keep it on the arm rest. Again, the pain had subsided by the time I parked the car near my apartment where I rested for several minutes before getting out. The next day was a Friday and I arranged my work schedule to be close to the Veteran’s Administration Medical Center on Ryerson Street, Brooklyn, during my lunch hour. I described the three angina attacks to the cardiologist, as explained above. The doctor became more attentive during the third explanation. He called in the Head of Cardiology to listen to my repeated descriptions while both of them stared at me as though I had three heads. After they told me I had suffered three heart attacks, they arranged for tests at the Ft. Hamilton Hospital in Brooklyn. The results caused the doctor to recommend retirement from the IRS since I told him about the tensions accompanying the type of cases assigned to me. As the hospital was the one that the IRS referred employees to when medical retirement was requested, the recommendation was approved. I left the day before Thanksgiving in 1973.


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1 Bed / 1 Bath – Garden Apt Durham G- One bedroom, first floor, on water……………………………………………$33,000.00 Tilford E - Renovated one bedroom, unfurnished…………………………………………………$37,500.00 Ventnor F - First floor one bedroom garden………………………………………………..$27,000.00 Ventnor I - All tile, encl patio with hurricane impacted windows………………………..$30,000.00 Ventnor J - Very quiet, exceptionally clean, all tile………………………………………..$42,500.00 Harwood C - Absolutely darling waterfront condo, 1st floor……………………………..$38,900.00 Oakridge P - Very low priced 1-1, 2nd floor, desireable location…………………………$27,000.00 Newport I - Great unit, Priced to sell, A must see…………………………………………………$26,500.00 Ventnor J - Cozy, great location, Steps to pool…………………………………………….$34,900.00 Grantham B - One bedroom 2 full bath, much sought after unit, rarely available…………$49,900.00 1 Bed / 1.5 Baths Oakridge C - 18” diagonal tile, newer appliances, clean………………………………….$47,900.00 Lyndhurst M - Tile & Wood flooring, Newer appliances, encl patio..…………………………….$55,000.00 Markham H - Remodeled, ceramic tile, first floor……………………………………….…………$34,900.00 Newport N - Beige Carpet, Great view, unfurnished ……………………………………..$49,000.00 Westbury K - Garden one bedroom, 1.5 bath, first floor, unfurnished……………………….….$43,990.00 Ellesmere B - One bedroom deluxe, on the golfcourse…………………….………………$51,900.00 Ellesmere A - One bedroom, carpet, on golfcourse……………..………………………….$54,000.00 Berkshire B - Attractive apartment ready to move into……………………………………$50,000.00 Newport S - Beautiful water view from patio, galley kitchen…………………………….$49,900.00 Newport K - One bedroom 1.5 bath garden, Bldg claims rentable………………………..$42,000.00 Lyndhurst L - Bright corner, new carpet, close to clubhouse, pool, & tennis…………….$37,000.00 Berkshire B - Handyman special, 1st floor near clubhouse………………………………………$52,500.00 Farnham C - Glass enclosed, immaculately clean, partially furnished………………………………$34,900.00 Upminster C - One bedroom, 2nd flr with lift, walk to plaza………………………………….$43,500.00 Berkshire A - Perfectly located, Steps to Pool and Club…………………………………….$59,500.00 Berkshire B - Fabulous Condo, Furnished in Grand Style……………………………………$79,000.00 Berkshire B - Attractive, well kept, wood floors, a truly must see unit………………………$62,900.00 Farnham J - Cozy corner, lift in bldg, bldg claims rentable…………………………………………$38,500.00 Westbury E - Gorgeous one bedroom unit, steps to pool and plaza………………………….$31,000.00 Cambridge G - Largest one bedroom 1.5 bath with view of lagoon and clubhouse…………$59,900.00 Harwood E - Water, water, water. Move in condition unit…………………………………..$56,990.00 2 Bed / 1.5 Baths Farnham P - First floor, corner, new cabinets, shows well …………………………….…$53,900.00 Upminster M - Two bedroom, near pool and plaza……………………………………..$59,000.00 Richmond D - Two bedroom, second floor, corner ………………………………………..$54,900.00 Westbury D - Clean garden apartment, Walk to Plaza……………………………………..$59,900.00 Berkshire A - Extremely well located near pool, plaza & clubhouse…………………..…..$67,500.00 Tilford P - First floor 2 bedroom unit, all neutral tile, fully furnished……………………….$57,000.00 Harwood E - Beautiful first floor with lake view, Stainless Steel appliances……………………..$99,500.00 Prescott E - Two bedroom corner, great view from patio………………………………..…$58,000.00 Farnham B - Two bedroom, corner, with lift, furnished……………………………………..$57,900.00 Farnham F - Priced to sell quickly, corner, 1st floor………………………………………………$49,000.00 Newport Q - Clean 2 bedroom unit, Galley kitchen…………………………………..…………$59,500.00 Upminster F - Quiet area, Needs TLC, Walk to plaza………………………………………$49,900.00 Westbury I - Two bedroom garden, walk to plaza………………………………………….$70,000.00 Prescott D - Corner, 2BD/1.5BA, 1st floor, with newer A/C………………………………$59,000.00 Farnham M - Clean, corner unit in quiet area………………………………………………..$54,000.00 Tilford B - Well appointed, corner unit on water………………………………………….$60,000.00 Newport V - 2 bedroom unit with hard wood flooring………………………………………$55,900.00 Prescott E - Two bedroom overlooking majestic garden, Quiet & Serene……………………$49,000.00 Lyndhurst L - Handyman special in need of TLC…………………………………………..$53,000.00 Oakridge P - Renovated, open kitchen, new cabinets, stall shower…………………………..74,500.00 Lyndhurst A - Enjoy the lovely water view from your screened patio………………………$52,900.00 2 Beds / 2 Baths Oakridge U - Richmond C - Keswick C - Keswick C - Oakridge V - Keswick C - Oakridge F - Lyndhurst K - Ventnor H - Richmond E -

1100 SqFt, luxury, magnificent lake view…………………….……………………$129,000.00 Two bedroom luxury, located near military trail entrance…………………….…..$110,000.00 Two bedroom luxury, first floor, near clubhouse, golf course view…..……..$84,900.00 Luxury two bedroom, near clubhouse, near golfcourse……………………..$115,000.00 Spectacular lake view, peaceful and immaculate…………………………..$129,500.00 Great location, walk to clubhouse, golf view…………………………………$89,900.00 Nature Preserve and Water view …………………………………………………$119,000.00 Prime Location, Near clubhouse and pool………………………………………$125,000.00 Updated kitchen, Enclosed updated patio, Golfview……………………….$129,000.00 Two bedroom luxury with both gold and water views…………………….$151,900.00


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CVE REPORTER

Sunday Night in the Country By HERB CHARATZ On Sunday nights, after the children were all put to bed, and when the guys were too tired to move, but hated to

end the weekend, and had to say good-bye to our wives for another week of work in the city – a bonfire was sometimes

the answer. We invited nearby neighbors and it was special for the adults. It was a circle type arrangement with everyone participating in singing, telling jokes (mostly a little offcolor) and story-telling about adventures of the week or funny experiences. Marshmallows, sometimes frankfurters and buns were added to the festivities. A bottle of beer was an accepted beverage, but it was mostly soda and some sort of fruit drink. It was on one of those beautiful starlit evenings that one of the conversations came around to doing crazy or daring things at least once in their lives. Some of the stories

went on and on ending with silly endings. It just brought laughter to the group. Other tales went a little deeper and had us waiting for the ending. They turned out to be very serious and involved members of their family. They were touching and very moving. When everyone quieted down following a serious story, I was determined to turn things back to laughter. I told them I usually get a little crazy when things get too serious or boring, and whenever that happens in life – I try to shake things up. I caught their attention and the questions started flying as to how I accomplish this. My

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brother-in-law Sam, a very handsome man had served in the military in special units and was in excellent shape. He turned on his charm with questions and side remarks as to what I could possibly do to make the evening more exciting. In fact, he dared me to do anything to make anyone laugh when they were all so exhausted following a wonderful, busy, very full weekend with the kids. Sam was sitting directly across from me on the other side of the fire. The fire was at a low level when a few of the guys added quite a load of branches and twigs to build it up – and they did a great job of having the flames jump high into the air. As I stood up and began to walk, I told Sam that deeds spoke louder than words and with that I took a running leap and jumped over the high flames of the fire and landed right on his lap. Although my body was sideways, my face was turned to face his and our eyes met, and nose to nose, we both kept very still. While I thought the joke was finished, it did not end there for Sam who also had a great sense of humor. Although I had pulled off a stunt to liven up the evening, he went right along with the gag as we never lost eye contact or nose contact and sat perfectly still in this pose. As the laughter from the group rose to a crescendo, something happened that neither he nor I expected. The metal lawn chair could not bear both our weights and slowly, very slowly, we started to sink to the ground. We never lost eye contact or nose contact as we sank – as though in slow motion. The lower we sank the harder the group laughed. And when we finally hit the floor our friends came over and started to help us up. My brother-in-law shook hands with me and said, “Boy, now I know what my sister means when she says she is never bored!”

Volunteers Wanted For White Fly Committee Call Don Kaplan 954421-5566


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My Friend is a Hero – Part Four By NORMAN L. BLOOM

This is the story of my friend, Herb Taff, who served all through the Second World War in every major battle campaign in Northern Africa and Europe. If you missed the earlier installments, the Reporter is available online, and you can read previous parts in the Remembering the Past section which is between pages 30 – 39 in Section A. Access the web site at cvereporter.com. The conclusion will appear in July. I met with Herb, during lunch, during which we selected the remaining key days of his war dairy, for this digested version, which we both felt would retain the flavor of the original diary. I asked him where he got such detailed information about the events of each day that he so carefully recorded in his diary. He explained that he had been a Communications Specialist and he had received access to all the messages sent back and forth between the Command Posts. He also told me that he believed that this was a good part of the reason he had survived all those battles, and all throughout the war. When he would get wind of a particularly dangerous plan that was about to begin he would make every effort to stay out of the way. The previous chapter ended with the fall of Sicily to the Allied troops. Herb’s Company soon joined a large number of troops who were scheduled to ship out, for both a long, and well deserved rest, and then subsequently to join the gathering of troops, ready for the invasion of Europe. Their large fleet of slow moving, boats suffered through air raids and submarine attacks, and the trip was doubly uncomfortable for Herb due to constant sea sickness. But the ships finally arrived in London on Thanksgiving Day of November of 1943. From then on until May of 1944, Herb’s company was on light duty in war torn England. He had many adventures there including some romantic interludes, and he spent a great deal of his free time in London. We skipped over that period, and we picked up his story as the long R and R was about to end. “February 29, 1944. I went to London on an overnight pass where I met Milt Saltzman and spent the day with him. My old friend was in the Air Force and he was depressed. He was supposed to have gone on a mission but he and a couple of

other airmen got bumped. The replacement crew and the rest of his regular crewmen were lost over Germany. He felt he should have been on that mission. March 2, 1944. Returned to Camp on the 1:25 train from London and arrived in Andover at 3:30. I was in bed by 5:00 for a nap, and then woke up at 6:30. I am very tired. March 4. 1944. We arrived at the Maneuver area, called Preston-Candover, outside of Bisingstope. A nice area but with pup tents as our quarters and it was bitter cold March 6, 1943. We went out on a problem today and I had a “300” radio assigned to me. It weighed 45 pounds and I had to carry it for 15 miles. We arrived at Camp at 2230 hours. I had some hot powdered milk and doughnuts and went right to bed where I fell right off to sleep. March 24, 1944. We stood in review today for General Eisenhower, Winston Churchill, Stark and other dignitaries. For the past few days the weather has been perfect, almost like summer.” (Eisenhower and Churchill were inspecting the troops to see if they were ready for the Normandy Beach Invasion. They must have been encouraged by the fine weather as well, however it turned nasty again soon after.) “April 18, 1943. We have been put on General Alert so there will be no more overnight passes. They read articles 38 and 58 of The Articles of War to us. April 25, 1943. Come what may, we are ready to go. We are getting equipped and we are on a 1A priority. April 26, 1943. Told to turn in all diaries until further notice.” ( This was a security measure, to guard against leaks, in the days before the Normandy Beach landing. Herb resumes his notes four days after D Day, after his diary was returned.) “June 10. 1944. D plus four, hit Utah Beach after trip across English Channel. Greeted by German air attacks. Breakfast on ship at 4.00 am, beans, ketchup and coffee. June 11, 1944. Started attacking Quinevlle, along the coast to Cherbourg. We encountered fields of hedgerows and we can see Air Bourne Troops, lying in the fields and among the trees with equipment scattered all over. Their gliders are all broken up from hitting poles that the Germans had put in the open fields. Hedgerow fighting is slow and costly. We have to take field by field. Later in the day, reached just outside of Cherbourg. City

is well fortified and defended by the Germans plus it rained quite a bit which also slowed our advancement. German air attacks and artillery fire was very heavy and we had to take the city, street by street. Jerries blew up the harbor, with many ships sunk in the port. I was told that they did that to make the port unusable for us. June 13, 1944. Attack at Quineville. Encountered pillboxes and anti tank fire. The Germans waved white flags as if to surrender, but we learned of this dirty trick and others in North Africa where it was tried often, so we opened up on them. They were not in a helpless position so they would not have been giving up so easily. Sure enough, a tremendous firefight started and the Germans counter attacked. We requested Artillery but the shells fell short onto our own positions, wounding a few of our men. We requested Tanks and they sent up only one, and the Germans knocked it out with their 88s” (On June 14 1943, this battle continued and Herb’s individual actions were later officially recognized for the extreme bravery he exhibited. The documentation with the Bronze Star Medal he was awarded, speaks of Herb Taff’s devotion to duty which had a direct bearing on the success of the mission and was an inspiration to the men of the battalion. Herb, at that time, was obviously too busy to write in his diary and he does not even mention the incident. He told me once that such bravery was a frequent occurrence in battle and his actions just happened to have been seen by the right officer.) “ June 17-18, 1944. Sealed off Cherbourg but not before many enemy counter attacks from Tanks, Artillery and air. We met up with War Correspondents Ernie Pyle, Charles Werten, Tom Henry, Robert Capri and Harold Denny, along the way. June 25, 1944. Fighting inside Cherbourg. There were small arms and sniper fire, artillery, and antiaircraft guns. The 89th T.D. was attached to us, and they knocked out two German Tanks. We captured 1,000 Germans. We could see four Cruisers and three Battleships outside the harbor of Cherbourg. July 1, 1944. At the end of Contentin Peninsular Campaign, we attacked Audeville with heavy support of Tanks and Artillery. We captured 3,000 prisoners, four railway guns, four 155’s, 400 self propelled and 24 mortars. Since D-day, my 9th Division had captured a total of 18,000 prisoners and

Division losses were 390 KIA, 1850 wounded. We rested in Les Pieeux Pivruss area. August 1, 1944. The 9th is to play a big part in Operation Cobra, which is a plan to break thru and strike deeply into France. Our Division celebrated the 4th year of reactivation while preparing for more combat. General Bradley’s 15th Army was split into two groups, one to form the 1st Army under Gen. Hodges, the other to become the 3rd Army under Gen. Patton. In overall control of both groups, called the 12th Army, was Gen Bradley. August 5. 1944. Our drive bogged down outside of Champ der Boult, where we encountered Mark V Tanks, self-propelled tanks, artillery and small arms. August 7, 1944. At Perrieson-Beauirice and Gathemo, we were attached to the 1st Division. We broke thru Avranches to Brittany. Germans staged an offensive that caused havoc and disarray. We counter attacked and held our positions. August 8th and 9th, 1944. Heavy fighting. August 11, 1944. Lt.Chaplain Irv Tepper, Jewish Chaplain of the 69t Infantry, was fatally wounded by 22 pieces of shrapnel. August 13, 1944. Germans were trapped in Fa Laise Gap. We traveled 50 miles and joined the 1st and 3rd Army to attack north. German resistance was heavy, with die hard Nazi SS troops and Panzers. They were fighting to get out of the trap, but our Aircraft kept coming and causing havoc with the Germans as they tried to withdraw. August began to be called The Month of the Rat Race. The 9th advanced 400 miles from Marigny to Dizy-Le-Gros, and at times we advanced so fast we ran out of maps and gas. September 2, 1944. Liberation of Belgium began. Passed thru Momigjes and pushed toward Charleroi. Slowed by mines and small arms fire. We were running out of fuel but we reached the village of Eppe Sauvage and we were in

Belgium. We were rerouted to Dinant as Intelligence reported the Germans planned to effect strong delay action along the Sambre River and Muese River line. September 4, 1944. We were to march on Meuse, but could not cross during the day as there was heavy fire from tanks, artillery, mortars and small boats. All of the bridges had been blown up and destroyed. A midnight crossing by small boas was planned. Went using dinghies and we were spotted. Just sitting ducks for the Germans. Some of us made it, and others didn’t. September 5, 1944. The Engineers tried to build pontoons but German fire prevented it and they had heavy casualties. Finally, with skills learned from experiences in the North Africa and Sicily fighting, we got over the river, dug in, and formed a defensive perimeter. We had successfully crossed the river and were building a position. We were certainly no longer green troops. We knew most of the tricks of our enemy and we knew how to find solutions to most of the problems we encountered. We knew what we had to do when attacking enemy positions and we did it well. Our experience served us well even on the frontline. September 6, 1944. Larger groups of Germans had withdrawn and by morning, only rear guard troops were evident. Dinant was taken and we were in control of the town. The Germans were retreating to the Siegfried Line and left behind equipment, guns and trucks, Our Artillery played havoc on their retreat.” Next month, in part five, (which will be the last chapter,) Herb again is cited for heroics and this time, he is awarded the very rare Silver Star for his actions. He wears it proudly to this day. We see his involvement in the Battle of the Bulge and the action at the Remagen Bridge where he was injured.


JUNE 2009

Mildred

By NELIA PANZA When I was six years old, my family moved into a small private house in Yonkers, New York. Since we had arrived from Italy only two years earlier, and we were only permitted to speak Italian at home, English was not an easy language for me. In addition to that, I was not allowed to play with other youngsters. My parents felt it was more important to learn to cook and sew in order to be a good wife. Therefore, I had no friends. One day, the minister came to our home. When my father opened the door, he was surprised. As my father was American-born, he asked the visitor, “What do you want?” “I should like to have your permission to invite your daughter to join my wife and daughter, Mildred, on Sunday, when we go to the cemetery to visit deceased family members and friends. Mildred hates going there and we thought that with a friend she might feel better about these trips.” Father replied,”

But my daughter speaks very little English.” “Then this will give her an opportunity to learn it. Please, Mr. Panza, I would be so grateful. They could color books, draw, and my daughter, Mildred, could even teach her some English. Please, these Sunday trips are so important to my wife and me – can’t we at least try it out once or twice? If Nelia doesn’t want to continue, we’ll understand. We leave right after lunch, at about two o’clock, and return about five.” “I’ll tell my wife about this arrangement and my daughter will be ready at that time.” “Thank you, Mr. Panza, I’m so grateful to you!” When my father told my mother about it, she was furious! She said “We don’t even know these people – how could you make a decision without talking to me about it first? How do you know he’s going to the cemetery?”

“Enough! He’s a minister,” my father replied. It was a new adventure for me. I had never been allowed to play with anyone but my younger brothers, so, this would be a whole new experience for me. When they came to pick me up that afternoon, Rev. Schneider brought his wife along to introduce our families to one another. She was petite, shy, and spoke in a very soft voice Mildred came up to me I came up to her shoulders. Her dad was about 6’3”, her mother five feet. Mildred took after her dad, with long legs, and a loud voice. “I hate school and I hate Sundays even more! Why do we have to go to the cemetery anyway? They’re all buried they can’t see or hear us. Who cares about dead people anyway?” She shouted. “Enough, Mildred! You and Nelia can color books in the car,” her father replied. “This may not be important to you, but, it is to your mother and me! Now, be a good girl!” “I hate Sundays and I hate you” she screamed. As her dad helped me into the car, I was shaking. Mildred was so angry – was she going to hit me? Why did my father agree to this? I was scared to death by this tall, angry individual. I just wanted to stay home and write stories or draw pictures. As we drove away,. I tried with all my might to control my tears and fright. While driving, Mildred’s parents asked me how I liked America, what I thought about school, how my two younger brothers and I got

CVE REPORTER

along, etc. Both the minister and his wife were very kind to me, considering my poor English. When we reached the cemetery, Mildred’s father bought us each an ice cream cone. It was so delicious! I started to relax and tried to convince myself that Mildred’s parents truly made up for their daughter’s nasty disposition! As I sat in the car with Mildred, her parents made their stops at the various graves. When our ice cream was consumed, the car headed back home as Mildred and I drew pictures. She never stopped whining and I wondered what would come next. However, I just kept coloring and kept my mouth shut. When we returned home, we got out of the car in the garage, which was located underneath the house. Above us, I was told, were the kitchen, living room and two bedrooms used by Mildred and her parents. Her father said, “Why don’t you girls play upstairs for a while, while mother and I clean the car up. When we’re through, we can all play cards.” Without answering, Mildred ran upstairs, her long legs taking two steps at a time, while I tried to keep up with her. When we reached the kitchen, she said, “We’re going to play cops and robbers. You’re the bad guy and I’m the cop. Run through the apartment while I chase you, and when I catch you, I’m going to kill you!” As I stood there terrified, she ran into her parent’s bedroom. Opening a drawer, she pulled out a pistol. Is that a real gun?” I asked. “You’ll find out when I shoot you,” she answered. I

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was frightened to death, but, not being familiar with their apartment, I didn’t know where to run to get away from her. As I stood there, bewildered and frightened, she screamed, “Come on, stupid, start running – and when you’re trapped, I’m going to kill you Now, run!” Not being familiar with their home, I didn’t know where to hide. I even forgot the way to the stairway leading down to the garage. Mildred pointing the gun at me, yelling, “Get going, you dumbbell, I’ll catch you wherever you are!” As I started running frantically, wishing I knew my way back downstairs I heard her scream, “Get ready to die. Here I come!” Suddenly, she fired the pistol, but, because it was too heavy to handle, the shot went through the floor, into the garage. Suddenly, her parents ran in. Her father, ran towards her, grabbing the pistol from her hand, and screamed, “What are you doing with the gun? Oh, dear Lord, Nelia are you all right?” I was hiding behind the bedroom door, hysterically screaming, “I want to go home. I don’t want to play with her anymore. Help me please, I’m scared.” Mildred’s father pulled the pistol out of her hand, while his wife embraced me, trying to calm me down. Meantime, Mildred looked at me with scorn and yelled, “Why didn’t you stand still? Stupid, stupid, stupid! I’m not going to play with you ever again. You’re not any fun.” Her father grabbed her, and, trying to stay calm, said, “After Nelia goes home, you and I are going to have a very serious talk. And, don’t ever mention this to anyone – understand?” Coming over to me, putting his arm around me, he continued, “Pretend this never happened. I’m so sorry she frightened you, but I promise you, it will never happen again. And, please don’t mention this to anyone, not even your parents. Promise?” I shook my head but knew that promise would be broken – I would definitely tell my parents He took me home, thanked my parents for allowing me to keep Mildred company, but needless to say, I told my parents everything. I was terrified and knew it would take a long time to erase this from my mind – if ever. Needless to say, from that day on, I was never again allowed to play with other children. I did, however, learn to cook and clean so that I would make someone a good wife. Or at least I tried.


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CVE REPORTER

JUNE 2009

What Happened To? By JACK GALIT

A few weeks ago a resident came into the COOCVE office for a new bar code for his car. He saw my name and set off a round of recollections after mentioning his family lived on E 10th St. and he had also graduated from J.H. School 64. We talked about the many guys who had to go to work after graduation from the same school. I mentioned Red Murray, a very close friend, who went to work for his mother’s brother in a downtown machine shop. One of the employees introduced him to a young Bronx girl whom he eventually married and moved to her family’s house. After the birth of one daughter, he and his wife moved to a house in Milford, Connecticut where they had another daughter. He had gone to work for his wife’s uncle, nearby. His cousin, Ronnie, who lived in the next building to his parents, told me about Red Murray’s death, at 58 years of age, from congenital heart failure, which had killed his father at

58 years of age years before. I told the CVE resident about Murray but he could only remember the appetizing store run by Murray’s father. After graduating from Cooper Union College (highly rated for its Math, Science, and Technology degrees) Murray’s Chemical Engineering degree gained him immediate employment with Polaroid; a subsequent position with a Dupont company as a project supervisor. During the period he had married a local girl and moved to a house in Staten Island where they became parents to 3 boys. When the Dupont subsidiary was sold to a Japanese combine, Murray was appointed to Production Vice President. With the consequent salary, bonuses, stock options, he became a multi-millionaire which enabled him to subsidize the education of his sons; one became a specialist in his medical field, another also became a medical specialist and the third became a professional in dentistry.

I gained much of this information when my wife and I attended the 50th anniversary of their wedding held in a DelRay Beach hotel. Murray passed away 3 years ago and his wife joined him 4 months later. Of the 3 Kramer brothers whose family lived in the same building as mine, Paul was the first to go to work for NY State, marry and move away, as did his brother Max who followed his brother into NY State employment, marry and move. Sammy, my age group, took a NY City job and moved away when he got married. The Great Depression years were the defining factor in their odysseys through those years. I learned all this when an IRS investigation led me to the NY State building where Paul and Max were section supervisors, then directed to Sammy in the City building next door, where he too was a section supervisor in the department he had started in. When I mentioned the name of the printing company

I was researching, Sammy told me that Davy and Stretch, brothers from E. 10th St, were partners who also owned the building in which the company was located. I hadn’t recognized them or the family name and they hadn’t recognized me or my name. I didn’t follow through even after I received a friendly call from Davy several months later. Sammy also told me that Willie S. the first one to go to

work full-time had worked his way up to salesman for a ladies garment company. He married the boss’ daughter and became a commuter from Connecticut to the garment center NYC. My two younger children loved to hear about such life stories from my youthful days when relating them during the dinner period at night instead of discussing the events of their day.


JUNE 2009

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Sounding Board Volunteer Spotlight By BARBARA NATHAN MARCUS Meet Betty Schwartz: Schwartz is a 25 year resident of CVE and a “volunteer extraordinaire.” Schwartz hails from Queens, New York and has three children who visit regularly. After her husband died, she had a huge void in her life and she “had to do something to fill in her days“ says Schwartz. This is a list of her volunteer credentials and how she fills her entire week: The CVE Library was her first volunteer project that she “just loves,” says Schwartz. As a Reserve Librarian, she spends every Friday afternoon at the library, working and meeting people. She also works one day a week at the North Broward Hospital Gift Shop selling trinkets, cards, flowers, used books, this and that

and sugar and spice and everything nice, with the proceeds supporting the many health projects at North Broward. She spends four days a week working at The Reporter, a work of love and a job that is taken very seriously, obvious to this interviewer. “Every summer I go to Senior Summer School in Madison, Wisconsin” relates Schwartz. “I know a lot of people there.” She renews old acquaintances and gets to learn something new and different each visit. Schwartz is on the Board of The CVE Orchestra Guild, and until recently she was the secretary of her bowling league, but “had to give it up.” she tells. In her spare time, she writes articles for the Reporter. WHAT SPARE

Betty Schwartz

The Art of the Condo By SHELLY BASKIN What is a condo? Basically, it is nothing more than concrete, steel; glass and wood; wallboard and spackle. Our condos have Florida rooms, kitchens, living rooms, bedrooms, and, of course, bathrooms. Some are up-dated, some, look like re-creations from Boca or Las Olas; others remind us of Brooklyn in years gone by. Don’t scream—I’m originally from Dodger-land. Remember Jackie, Pee Wee, Pistol Pete, Campy, and Leo the lip? O. K. A condo is also a way of life. It may be a place to rest while we contemplate the next game of pool, golf, cards, or going to the pool. We use our condos to park our hats while we take in a show, or visit friends. Condominium life is living with others in close quarters. For many people, it is a difficult transition to make, especially if we have lived in large houses with acreage, north of here. In past decades we have concentrated on raising families and didn’t have much time or energy for the neighbors. And, now we find that neighbors are everywhere., A condo is what we make of it, each in our own way. We learn to live with others. We slow down or speed up depending on our health, wealth, and circumstances which we may not be able to control. However, most of us change; and adjust. We must adapt to enjoy our new environment. In Richmond F many

of us have adjusted to this very different lifestyle of apartment house type living. This is good. In fact, it has of late, been great. We are learning to come together and are beginning to feel like family. The vibes are strong. In March and early April of this year, we were able to landscape the front of our condo so as to greet visitors and owners with color, aroma, and beauty of design. Some caught the fever and began to donate items as a permanent remembrance of loved ones. Bob Levy and his family, gave the condo a beautiful and useful

bench that was dedicated to his wife, Lillian. Some, in our family use it to wait for rides, while others just want to sit on the bench, or the stoop, as we did in Brooklyn. Remember? A dedication ceremony was performed by our own “Rabbi of the people”, Yankel, and was attended by many family members from the condo, out of respect. Both Christians and Jews attended the short service and it was a true coming together of the condo in support of our friend. Some, attended from their balcony or catwalk by viewing this show

of solidarity and friendship from above. Finally, a condo is its people. Be it garden style or hi-rise, a condo is, most important for its people. People with differing backgrounds, lifestyles, religions, and interests. But, on that morning, during that service, for that friend and neighbor, we were as family. We were as one. Cecile, Caryl, Sheila, and Morty were there. Isabelle, Peci, George, and Shelly attended. Muriel, Ginny, Sarah, Horty, Martha, Naftale were present. Avram and Bracha and Al and Selma were all in attendance. Sorry, everyone cannot be named here, there is not enough space. In our hearts, however, we know. We

TIME? “Don’t ask me my age, I won’t tell you,” says Schwartz almost proudly. And so she should be, and so is this reporter proud of her. She is the epitome of what living a full, long life and giving back to the community could be. Schwartz has reinvented herself as a full time giver. It is clear that she is a woman whom, when at a difficult life-changing time in her life, made choices. In choosing to fill her life with volunteering and with giving back to others it became a new and very positive way of being for her. “I enjoy it all very much. I get a lot of satisfaction from it.” Bravo Betty!!! Want to be a Volunteer? Know someone to share the Volunteer Spotlight? You can reach me at barbplusbobm@ aol.com

remember. People coming together, acting together, being there for each other, isn’t this what life is all about,? I think, after a lifetime in apartments and houses, condo life is wonderful. I believe it can get even better. How? That’s up to each of us to figure out; each, in our own way; each, in our own time; each, utilizing our own experience. Ideally, condo living is an art, or, at least it should be. It can be the greatest art, because in the end, people are all that matter. A condo is really people and not concrete, glass, and wallboard. People. Us. We. Family. Remember, “Wherever you go, you take yourself with you”


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CVE REPORTER

JUNE 2009

Just Keep Moving By PAULINE MIZRACH I am waiting for the local mini-bus, sitting on a bench with another neighbor in the front of my condo. We are engaging in short, light conversation, “How are you doing?” Today I am stepping outside of my routine for a quick change to avoid boredom in my condo in Century Village. Thankfully, the bus arrives on schedule. I move forward slowly and cautiously step on the bus. I smile and nod to familiar faces as I look around for an empty seat. This morning will be a new adventure; to look at the Target Store located on Powerline and Hillsboro

Boulevard, not far away. I need an energy boost today, a change of scenery. I walk along toward the Target Store entrance. “Give me a break!” One of the workers is standing by the cash register wearing a bright red Target blouse and appears to be free. “Could you give me some information about the Target Store?” I ask. She is friendly and accommodating and tells me that this Target Store opened in July, 2008 and has 300 employees. There are many departments; grocery, pharmacy, hardliners, and softliners. She enjoys working at Target. I thank her and

anticipate an interesting day, away from my condo to avoid boredom and an afternoon slump. I am enjoying the change of scenery as I walk through the spatial area, a new environment. I walk in different directions to pick and choose. Going to the deli counter I find carefully packaged sandwiches wrapped in plastic; steak, corned beef, cheeses, various salads and a selection of cooked foods. The sale items and attention grabbers are on the counter with the sign Prices Cut. I move along and hope to take it all in for the day. The bakery area is

creatively displayed on the counter and in full view are brownies packaged with walnuts, donuts and special sales on individual muffins. I am out of my condo and enjoying my day. I am checking prices, touching, picking up bakery finds, and considering a nicely packaged deli sandwich. I check my bus schedule and move briskly to the end of an aisle and stop at a dairy area where there are cheeses, milk, and yogurt. Asking for directions is no problem at the Target Store. The workers are helpful and almost lead the way for me.

I have avoided an afternoon of boredom at my condo, and I have had an interesting change of scenery. I have walked in different directions and checked the many counters, price-cuts, sales at the bakery, deli counters, fruits and vegetables. I look around the store at the fashionable clothing and housewares. I stop to greet some people who live in Century Village. I just keep moving and carrying my groceries as I walk toward the cashier, I have my credit card in my hand, to check out my special items. It has been a good day. I am glad I came.

wishes. I believe Italy has a church on every other corner. I lost track of how many churches we were in, or how many wishes we made. The first Easter after we learned of Annette’s cancer, she invited all of us out to a swell restaurant for Easter Sunday Dinner. She was very generous, and I’m sure all will recall the cakes, cookies and other goodies she furnished for our cook outs “Under the Oak Tree” , and never accepting a penny from “Your Sunshine Club” for the cost. On this Easter Sunday, I pinned a small cross on her dress, and asked her to wear it always, as a reminder of my and God’s love for her. The next time I saw Annette the cross was not where I pinned it. I believe she sensed my distress as she unbuttoned her blouse and showed me the cross pinned to the inside of her bra next to her heart, saying, “I know you gave this cross to me and me alone – so be it.” As the years went by, our families got closer, as well as and our feelings for Annette. became more close. She kept going for chemo treatments, and when her friend Danny couldn’t take her, I did. She had dinner with us twice a week , when the chemo didn’t totally blank her out. We celebrated many birthdays together, and she could have had lavishly decorated birthday cakes, but chose instead ,her favorite, of which she claimed no one in the whole

world ever made anything near as good as what I make – pineapple cheese cake. The last few months of her life she lived with her mother, as she no longer could go it alone. On my visits I would put my arm around her, hold her hand and say what she had said five years previously, “It’s alright, you’re going to be ok, I’m here praying for you.” She would doze on and off with her head on my chest. The funeral and burial were in New York, and before her mother left, I gave her a little angel pin to put on Annette’s shoulder. I asked if I may have the pin cross that I gave to Annette. Her mother said she recalls the cross, but hasn’t seen it in a while. I told her to look in Annette’s bra drawer, and sure enough there it was pinned to the inside of one of the bras. I pinned it on my collar next to Connie’s, and there it will stay as a constant reminder. Two women who brought love, joy and sadness into my life – not having one without the others is what gives us strength. Annette has an 18 month old granddaughter. When I look at her, I see Annette. She has her grandmother’s grace, beauty, smile, and laughter her whole being. Thank you Brianna - Thank you God.

A Love Story By EMANUEL PELLEGRINO People come into our lives at odd times, good times, bad times, when you don’t need them, or when you need them the most, We never know when, or why. God’s work? – you be the judge. Annette came into my life while I was having a heart attack. This beautiful young woman glided into the room as though she were on angel wings. She sat on the couch next to me, took my hand in hers and with a whisper of a smile on her face and in a soft assuring voice said, “It’s alright, you’ll be ok, help is here, and I’m praying for

you.” She rose kissing me lightly on the cheek and said, “God bless you.”, then left as the paramedics did their thing. I knew a young woman had moved in two doors down from me - this was our first meeting. As an officer and board member in our building, one of my functions is to sit in on interviews for new people moving in, but I missed this one for one reason or another. So, what does someone do when a stranger tells you that she and God love you? You fall in love – which I did.

I fully recovered from the heart attack, and in the following months became friendly and close to my new found friend, called Annette. My wife and I developed a sort of daughter/mother daughter/ father relationship. She called us mommy and daddy, and spoke of how lucky she was to have two mommies and a daddy that loved her. In short order, I learned that we came from the same city in New York, and back in 1929 I started kindergarten with her mother. I knew other members of the family, as well as Annette’s Uncle Lou who was a painting contractor who did work for me when I was a builder, Small world. We had one big knock-down re-union, and from then on we were family, being invited to all gatherings. It was a sad day when we learned that Annette had an advanced stage of ovarian cancer. Our world was shattered, as we had recently lost another dear friend to cancer. Shortly thereafter, my wife and I left on a trip to Italy with another couple. The four of us attended mass almost every day of the 26 day trip, and prayed for a miracle. Yes, as I did previously with Connie, I cried myself to sleep many nights praying for a miracle. Our traveling companions told us that when you enter a new church for the first time, you are entitled to three


JUNE 2009

We Did It By HELENE WAYNE We had talked about doing it for months. We had picked up a brochure in the Clubhouse office for a day at the Seminole Casino. Today we did it. It was really a great offer. A bus ride from the Clubhouse parking lot costs $15 and there was a coupon in the newspaper for $5 off. The bus left promptly at 10 a.m. as advertised. It is a quick ride of only about 15 or 20 minutes. The offer included a free luncheon buffet and $20 in playing money. It sounded too good to miss. To preface this story, several years ago we had gone to the Hard Rock Casino in Hollywood. At that time I found that their slot machines were not like the ones in Atlantic City or Las Vegas. There was no such thing as putting in a quarter or two. Not being a “real” gambler, a dollar or more for pushing one little button (which you probably can push 10 times in a minute), is not my thing. I decided that day that the Hard Rock Casino is a “no-

no” on my list. Then I read in the newspaper that they were allowing the Indian Casinos to have Vegas style slots, so we were ready to give it a try again. To say that $20 worth of script was great would be an overstatement. Mine lasted for maybe 20 minutes. In each machine you had to bet in units, be it $1 or 1 cent, plus how many lines you wanted to play. Each one had probably a dozen buttons that the player had to choose from. By the time I got the hang of it, the $20 was just a memory. Their so called Las Vegas machines looked exactly like the ones at the Hard Rock Casino. At this point I needed to find the cashiers desk in order to cash in a travelers check. They sent me to another desk for special services. The guy servicing me nearly lost his eyeballs watching me sign the check. Then he asked for my name, address, my driver’s license and my telephone number. The only thing he missed asking for was my

maiden name. He took my driver’s license and printed a copy of it with the travelers check. Now it was time to join up with my friend for the buffet. We joined a line of about 50 people waiting to be seated. From where we stood (for 35 minutes), we could see the dining room, and there were many, many vacant tables. They had a second entrance for their regular players, who flashed their cards, and were taken to a table pronto. I know it is good business to take care of your better customers, and I really have no complaints about that. But, I do not ever go to a restaurant where they made me stand in line for all that time. The lunch choices were very nice, and the food was very tasty considering that it was “gratis”, if you want to call it that. It was worthwhile, but gratis is not really the right word, because I’m sure all of us on that line paid dearly on the slots for it. The end result of all this

CVE REPORTER

was a decision that this was a onetime thing. Their slots are expensive and give little or no action. I went there expecting to spend money, but I’d like to get a little play time at the machines for it. Well, we had talked about doing it and I know that I

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have always been happy to get off our Reservation and go to Vegas or Biloxi in the past. It would have been great not to travel so far, and to enjoy the convenience of this location. But, I promised myself that I won’t be there again.

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JUNE 2009

Can You Dig a Few? By HELENE WAYNE There are little things that I assume all families have stored away in their memory banks. Here are a few of ours: My Pop had a family whistle with about six tones that formed a tune. When he whistled for us, wherever we were, he always got a quick response. When we were at Coney Island looking at something, and in a crowd, Pop would whistle and out came my brother and me, my mother and even my grandmother. It is probably about 50 years later now, and the whistle still signals the family. My children and grandchildren all use it. The best of all, is that my son’s bird does the family whistle too. The next generation, the great grandchildren, will now

be the next ones to learn it. When I get ready to go out, like all women, I put on lipstick. Of course, I blot it after it is applied to my lips. Most of the time my makeup is put on in the bathroom, –and the blotting paper is usually a square of toilet tissue. I promptly deposit it in the toilet. But, being a good citizen, and wanting to conserve water, it is not flushed and remains waiting for the next use. My younger son loves this as he always comes out smiling, and thanking me for the “target” in the toilet. Talking about smiles, we had a really big German Shepherd dog. Her name was Charlie (Charlene). After she finished eating each day, she

removed her dish from the kitchen, and headed down to my husband’s office with it. She would then place it under his desk and sit there with her paws around it. When someone came near, she would smile. At least that’s what we told everyone she was doing. Actually she was snarling, and you could hear the growl in her throat. She never did anything about it, but by guarding the dish she was letting the world know that it was hers. Everyone came to believe that this was Charlie smiling. Actually she really was a heroine. Every Sunday morning all our children crawled into bed with us and I would yell, “Help, Charlie” and you would hear her running the whole length of the house. Then she would jump up on the bed to rescue me. These are a few of the things that our whole family remembers. If you reach back into your memory, I bet this could spark a memory of some of the unique things your family did too.

Maybe we should have a contest where everyone could write in, and give us a yuk about some of their family’s

silly or unusual doings, the kind of things that memories are made of.

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JUNE 2009

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VOLUME 32, NUMBER 9

Meals on Wheels

Steven Fine, Editor-In-Chief of The Reporter, and The Reporter staff, present a check for $1000.00 to Ken Beers and the volunteers of Century Village Meals On Wheels. Meals On Wheels delivers a week’s worth of food every week to the shut-ins and disabled of CVE. They also provide Holiday and special occasion meals.

Hispanic Club of CVE Barbecue Text by SEDORA VILLA, Photos by ERNESTO CHEA and LUIS MENDOZA

On Sunday, April 19, 2009, more than 30 members of the Hispanic Club of CVE took advantage of the nice weather and held a barbeque at the CVE Barbecue grounds. Besides the typical barbecue food, each member brought a typical dish from their native land. We shared dishes from Puerto Rico, Columbia, Cuba, Uruguay, Argentina, Venezuela, Brazil, U.S. and many other countries represented by our membership. We shared songs from our respective countries, as well

as new songs composed by Ludy Fernandez who entertained us with her lovely voice. CVE’s own dance instructor, Mitzi, held Latin line dancing which was enjoyed by everyone present. The Hispanic Club thanks Mitzi for her dancing lessons; we would also like to thank the family of 2nd Vice President, Jane Abreu, for helping out with the grilling and serving of the food. Memories and stories were shared from our different countries as part of Hispanic Club of CVE

Jane Abreu and Family

the large Spanish-American family at Century Village East. More outings and events are planned for the rest of the year. The Hispanic Club meets at the Clubhouse every second Sunday of each month in Music Room A from 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. For information, call the President Judith Smith at 954-725-5229 or Vice President Ana Giubelini at 954-427-6033. Come and meet new friends and help plan club “outings.” Dues are $5.00 per year.


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JUNE 2009

Relay for Life – Deerfield Beach/Lighthouse Point BY JUDY OLMSTEAD

Elected officials and volunteers on the podium at Quiet Waters Park. Beginning Saturday, May 9, 2009 at 5:00 p.m. and continuing through daybreak the following morning, the communities of Deerfield Beach and Lighthouse Point held their Relay for Life annual event at Quiet Waters Park for the purpose of honoring cancer survivors and caretakers, and to raise money for cancer research, advocacy, education and service.

Opening ceremonies included the introduction by Gordon Vatch, the event chairperson, of Mayor Peggy Noland, Sheriff Al Lamberto and State Representative Gwyndolen Clarke-Reed and commissioners from the other districts. This was followed by having the survivors and caretakers take the first lap around Pavilion 10 at Quiet Waters Park. Hundreds of

people participated as relay teams applauded the walkers, who were then served dinner by student volunteers. Each of the relay teams also had fund raising booths set up to sell food, drinks, luminaria, and even rides on motorcycles with the Deerfield Beach American Legion Riders Association. At 9:00 p.m. all of the lights around the pavilion

Seated L to R: Millie Dowling, Carol DiFillippo, Donna Dowling, Debra Kugler. Standing L to R: Sharon Buzelli, State Representative, Gwendolyn Clarke-Reed, Gloria Olmstead, Judy Olmstead. were turned off. There was absolute silence while the participants and volunteers walked the perimeter and lit all of the luminaria signed in honor of, or in memory of, loved ones affected by cancer. It was a breathtaking site to see all of the luninaria lighting the walkway. It is difficult to factually describe this event because it is so moving in many ways. The goal this

year was to raise $100,000 for the American Cancer Society. Residents of Century Village who are cancer survivors can register for next year’s dinner and ceremonies at www.relayforlife.org/dblpfl. It is open to the public and the park does not charge admission if you are attending this event. Everyone is welcome to attend and participate.

A Sign of Times By WENDY ROSENZVEIG

In your daily travels around the Village, you will have noticed a new look of elegance in the many attractive signs that add beauty to our landscape. The task was to change all the directional signs (no small task), while taking into consideration all aspects of safety, good orientation, financial limitations and aesthetic

tastes, and also into account the many different opinions and concerns of our residents. The response has been mixed so far, but when the job is successfully completed to our satisfaction, we should have signs that we can all agree upon. While pleasing to the eye, they are also clear and give the necessary directions, even

at night. We much appreciate the work of Master Management, particularly Riva Behr who has been steering it along like a mother hen. They have done a difficult job, which is not yet completed, as they still have to add more signs where the need has become apparent and take away the old blue ones.

FREE BAR CODES FOR WEATHERED STICKERS NOW AVAILABLE First Must Be Validated At ID Office

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(Guest, Companion & 30 Day) Will Now Be Issued By The I.D. Office They Will No Longer Be Available at The COOCVE Office


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Feature Of The Month Fate or Destiny By BETTY SCHWARTZ, Assistant to the Editor (Editor’s note: This month Fate or Destiny by Betty Schwartz is our Feature of the Month.) Fate or destiny! The words are used interchangeably in many cases and according to Webster’s Dictionary the literal meaning is that which is predetermined or ordained to happen. Fate is usually thought of as inevitable. Fate implies no choice and is determined by an outside force acting upon a person or entity. In other words our destiny is our fate, and

most people feel that it has already been decided by a Supreme Being or God. Traditional beliefs imply that the circumstances of one’s life and death were laid down in advance as part of an orderly plan. Others believe that one can decide his or her own destiny. I think the notion of destiny is an excuse that people use for the misfortunes or fortunes that they encounter. I believe that during the course of our life we can begin to make our own destiny. Take the story of Bill Gates. He was not destined

to be the richest man in the world. He had a dream and worked hard when he was young to become what he is today. Was it destiny or plain hard work? People who believe wholeheartedly in fate are the ones who have it easy. They can look at any situation and say that the outcome, whatever it may be, is because of fate and was meant to be. These are people who can go skydiving with no fear because they believe that if it is their fate to live, great, and if it is their fate to die, well, then

*CVE IRRIGATION SCHEDULE*

* Please keep in mind this is a tentative schedule. Equipment malfunctions and weather permitting.

it was meant to be. Then there are people who believe that their life is completely in their own hands and that they themselves mold their destiny through their choices and actions. These types of people usually don’t take as many risks as the others because they are worried about the consequences which might damage the life they have created. Worrying about the choices you take in life is what causes heart attacks and ulcers. I personally believe that fate is a very real power

in all our lives, and that things happen for a reason. However, I also feel that we are free to live out our lives however we see fit, and that in most cases we help shape our destiny through our actions and our experiences. So, is fate fact or is it fiction? I think that each person develops his own opinion through personal encounters and experiences, and the only correct path is the one that he believes in and which lets that person live his life to the fullest.


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Active CVE Republican Club New and regular members call for updated meeting information. Call or fax Ron Goldfarb at 954-596-5198. Alzheimer’s Association Support Groups. Free for families and caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s. Locations in North, Central and South Broward. For a group in your area, call 954-726-0011 or 24 hr. helping hotline at 1-800-272-3900. American Red Magen David for Israel (ARMDI) Freedom Chapter of Deerfield Beach meets the fourth Wednesday of the month, 11:30 a.m. in Temple Beth Israel. For further information call Rose Trugman 954-4286627 or Rose Vaupen 954-426-2392. Americans United for Separation of Church & State New chapter being formed. Primary mission is to educate public regarding constitutional guarantee of church and state separation. We are concerned about book banning, schools teaching religious theology disguised as scientific theory. For further information, call Barbara Miranda at 954-422-5958. AMIT (Americans for Israel and Torah) meets second Monday of every month at Young Israel Synagogue at 12:30p.m. For information, Norma 954-428-2386. Art Club of CVE meetings will be held on the second Friday of each month (November thru April), from 10 a.m. to noon in Clubhouse Room GP-A. Membership is $12. We have interesting programs, trips & exhibitions. Artists and non-artists are welcome. For information call Ginette Beauvais, Acting President (October through April) at 954-482-8493. Astronomy Club will meet the second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in Room E. A telescope will be used for observation following a lecture. Call Norma 954-480-8938 or Jerry 954428-9381. Ballroom Dance Club meets every Thursday in the Exercise Room at 7:30 to 9 p.m. at no charge. Singles and couples welcome. For information, call Ernie Feder 954-418-8895. B’nai B’rith Unit #2995 for Men and Women. The following is a schedule of membership meetings for the year 2009-2010. Membership meetings July and August No Meetings, September 24, 2009 6:30 p.m., October 22, 2009, 6:30 p.m., November 19, 2009, 6:30 p.m., December 24, 2009, 6:30 p.m. April 23, 2010, 6:30 p.m., May 21, 2010, 6:30 p.m., June 25, 2010, 6:30 p.m. Board meetings for the year 2009-2010 are as follows: September 13, 2009, 10:00 a.m., October 18, 2009, 10:00 a.m., November 15, 2009, 10:00 a.m., Dr. Waxman will attend this meeting, December 20, 2009, 10:00 a.m., April 12, 2010, 10:00 a.m., May 17, 2010, 10:00 a.m., June 14, 2010, 10:00 a.m. All meetings will be held in the Activity Center includes board and membership. For further information contact Dave Polak 954-420-0096 or Jack Galit 954-428-6029.

JUNE 2009

Bible Study Group meets every Thursday in the clubhouse from 1 - 3 p.m. Study the old and new testaments. All welcome. For further information, call Roslyn Nehls at 954698-6184. Billiard Club of CVE If you are interested in joining, call Al Feinberg at 954-428-7624 for further information.

Center for Group Counseling’s SAGES (Senior Adult Group Experiences) meets at the Clubhouse Room D, Thursdays from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. to share thoughts, feelings and concerns in a private confidential setting. It is open to everyone and is free of charge. For Information call Paul Greenwald, Ph.D. 954-483-5300.

Bowling Club of CVE meets every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. at Strikes of Boca (formerly Boca Bowl), Town Center Rd and Military Trail. All welcome. Come join us and have fun. For information, call Nelson at 561-8653864.

Century Camera Club meets the first & third Tuesdays at 2:30 p.m. in Room F, at Clubhouse. Demonstrations, lectures, competitions, instructions, exhibits, shows and field trips are planned. All who are interested in photography are invited. For information call Jerry Raines 954 427 6785.

Broward Council of Na’Amat USA (formerly Pioneer Women) meets fourth Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Na’Amat Council office, 1721 N. State Road 7, Suite H, Margate. For information, call 954-327-0770.

Century Juniors Club of CVE. Active, couples only, social club meets at 7 p.m. second Thursday of each month in Clubhouse, Room N, accepting new members. For information call Harriet at 954-426-3008.

Broward County Support Group meets every Thursday in Clubhouse, Room C, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Choraleers CVE produced and directed by Bill Weinhaus, meets every Wednesday, 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse Party Room. We rehearse for a once a year concert in our theater. If you enjoy singing join us. For information, call Irene Greenberg, President 954-426-0628.

Broward Homebound Program your donations will enable elderly and disabled residents to live independently at home with dignity. For further information, call Diane or Marie at 954-786-2484. Cameo Drama Club meetings takes place the first and third Tuesday of the month in Room G. If interested call 954-570-8884. Canadian Club of CVE. The Canadian Club of CVE has been in operation since 1976 as a social club for Canadians wintering in Century Village, Deerfield Beach. In 2009-10, the regular monthly meetings are held on the second Thursday of each month, December thru March at 10 a.m. in the Club House party room, with an informative or entertaining program following a short business session. During the winter season, the Club organizes several social events, including weekly bowling on Mondays, a welcome brunch in December and a closing Bar-B-Q in March. Outings to various activities, including an NHL hockey game and a cruise are part of the activities. Membership is $5 per person per year. Registration takes place every Friday between 10 a.m. and noon in the CVE clubhouse upper lobby as of November 27. For more information, contact Co-President Dorothy Stober (CVE 954-426-4097 or Montreal 514-4856362) or Co- President Sidney Margles (CVE 954-596-0179 or Montreal 514485-9388). Check the Canadian Club website at www.canadianclubcve.com for updates as they occur. Catholic Social Club Catholic Mass Team meets every Saturday at 5:45 p.m. in Le Club Activity Room A, open to all denominations. Catholic Social Club Catholic Mass Team and Choir meet every Saturday at 5:45 p.m. Mass begins at 6:15 p.m. every Saturday, same room. Father James, Pastor of Our Lady of Mercy Church, is our Celebrant. For further information, call Mary Ann Braun at 954-571-2266.

City University of New York (CUNY) Alumni Club meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in Room G in the Clubhouse. All CUNY graduates and their spouses are welcome. We have Interesting programs and field trips. For information, call Norma 954-480-8938, Geri 954360-9725 or Rosalie 954-427-1593. Classical Civilization Club meets every Wednesday, alternating with the Egyptology Club, at 1:30 p.m. in Clubhouse room C. Learn about all aspects of the Greek and Roman World. Call Lewis 954-421-8934. Clubhouse Bingo every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. in the party room. It is new and exciting and lots of fun. Only dabbers are used, no more chips. A six pack sells for $3, the Early Bird and Bingo Special $1. The Early Bird and Bingo Players Special each pays $75. Bingo will be played all year. For more information call David 954-4282849. Cornerstone Community Baptist Church, Pastor Bret M. Lovitz, Worship Services 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m., Wednesday Service 7 p.m., CCBC Youth Group 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., For information call 954-421-2530 CVE Duplicate Bridge Club. Games Monday, Tuesday and Saturday, 12:00 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Card Room B. For information, call Irving Ruga at 954-698-9741. CVE Interfaith Prayer hotline: 954-571-1763 continuing the work of the late Geri Hope, has Catholic and Jewish residents praying in their own homes from the same prayer list page. Call the Prayer line at any time to request prayer for yourself or others. Requests may be anonymous.

Just state the specific need, with the name or initials of the person needing prayer. Miracles still happen. For information call Mary Anne Surrette at 954-734-0095. CVE Magic Club Monday, 2 p.m., discussions Magic Learning, speakers, discuss magic, conventions, demonstrations. For information call 954698-9334. CVE Mandolin Orchestra now meets every Monday afternoon from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Clubhouse in General Purpose Room. Musicians who can play cello, viola or clarinet are invited. For further information, call Vincent Zappi at 954-428-1794. CVE Sewing Club meets every Tuesday from 10 am. to 12 noon in the Sewing Room. For further information, call Rita at 954-571-1645 CVE Shuffleboard Club meets first Friday of each month at 10:30 a.m. at the Clubhouse in Room A. Come join us for fun and friendship. For information, call Alan Brigell at 954-4262085 or Eugene Metz at 954- 422-8903. CVE String Chamber Group is open to capable musicians. Come and get a musical workout year round on Wednesdays 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the mezzanine (3rd floor of clubhouse) music library office next to elevator. For information call Blanche 954-4264513. CVE Symphony Guild supports our Symphony Orchestra. For further information contact President Bea Guccione, 954-426-3540. For membership in the Guild phone Kitty Cole, 954-360-7956. CVE Volleyball Club meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 9 a.m. and beyond, next to tennis court. All invited. Call Harry Liner 954-426-4853 or Harry Chizeck 954-426-3178. Dance With Us for Folk and Line Dancing meets on Tuesday from 12 noon to 2 p.m. in the Health Club. No Charge. For information call Gloria 954-480-6474 or Jerry 954-698-9240. Deerfield Beach Computer Club meets every Friday, except holidays, at Pompano Beach Highlands Park, 1650 N.E. 50th Court, which is two blocks east of Dixie Highway off 48th Street from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. For information Barry Cowen at 954-725-9331, Gerry Gerstenberg at 954 941-6689 or Roy at 954-429-9472. Deerfield Beach Democratic Club meets the second Monday of the month at 7:00 p.m., at Temple Beth Israel, 201 S. Military Trail, Deerfield Beach, Fl., 33442 Stimulating political discussions. All invited. Refreshments served. For information: call Bernie Parness President at 954 426 1284 Deerfield Progressive Forum meets Saturdays, 10 a.m. to noon, in Le Club for lecture/discussion sessions on political, economic and social issues. For information call Julie Bloom at 954 428-1598.


JUNE 2009 Deer-Raton Lions Club meets on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Atlantic Bread Co. 296 S. Federal Highway in Deerfield Beach. For information call George Gsegnet 954-419-9647. District 65 U.A.W. (formerly South Florida Retirees) meets every third month on the third Tuesday of the month, 12 noon, at the Activity Center. Updated reports will be made on the 65 Security Plan. Please attend and bring new members. For further information, call Pearl Hill 954-421-7776. Egyptology Club meets for group study, discussion and videos every Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. in General Purpose Room C. Future meetings will concentrate on the history, culture and art of Ancient Egypt. The club will continue with the video lectures by Dr. Bob Brier. For further information, call Golda 954-360-7377. Emunah of America meets third Wednesday every month at 12 noon in the Young Israel Synagogue in Century Plaza. Light lunch and interesting program. All cordially welcome. For information, about this chapter call Ina Ciocca at 954-360-0740, Selma at 954-427-8674 or Pearl at 954-426-0189. Friends of Deerfield Beach Arboretum 2841 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Free tour of the Arboretum every Friday 10 a.m. and first Saturday of each month at 10 a.m., Seminars held at 7 p.m. in recreation room of Constitution Park. All seminars followed with an auction featuring plants, herbs and trees from our nursery. Refreshments served. All invited. Volunteers needed to help spread mulch, weed and participate in planting activities. For further information, call 954-480-4494. Hadassah Deerfield Beach meets monthly on the third Monday at noon at Temple Beth Israel. Refreshments served. Interesting topics. For information, call Gert 954-421-0945 or Adele at 954 427-4970. Hebrew Speaking Circle is formed to meet in the Clubhouse. For information, call Dr. Lee Lubin 954-4288642. Hispanic Club meets at the Clubhouse every second Sunday of each month in Music Room A from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. For information call Judith Smith at 954-427-8248.. Come and meet new friends and help plan club “outings” to various park picnics, museums, restaurants, etc. The President of the club is Judith Smith from Colombia, South America. Humanist of the Gold Coast meets at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2601 St. Andrews Blvd., Boca Raton. Exact date to be advised in future issue. For information contact Dr. Robert Griffin 954-426-5021. Italian American Club, your heritage, meets second Monday of each month at 11 a.m. in the Clubhouse Party Room. Join us for fun. Some of our functions: Pizza Parties, Picnics (the Italian Way), Trips, Lunch/Dinner Theatre, Guest Speakers and more. Contacts all year: Lena Radicella 954-428-2184, Lucille Carlucci 954421-2406 and Toni Ponto 954-428-0286. JOIN, JOIN, JOIN. Jelly Belly Dancers Free Belly Dance lessons. Learn to Belly Dance

for fun and exercise! All ages, sizes and shapes welcomed. No registration required. For further information call Sandy 954-421-2541.

ed in protecting our federal pensions, COLAS and other entitlements. For further information and transportation, call Rita Daniels 954-428-9022.

Jet Setters Social Club Active, Jet Setters, widows, widowers and singles social club. Join a great NEW sophisticated singles group. Trips, dining experiences, plays, concerts, art museums, upscale shopping excursions, etc. No dues. For information call Lila 954-596-9949.

National Council of Jewish Woman. Meetings are held at the Clubhouse, Room N, at 12 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month, October through April. For information concerning the organization & events call Sylvia at 954-421-8870 or Frances at 954-428-1336.

Jewish War Veterans U.S.A. Post 265 and Ladies Auxiliary of CVE will hold an organization meeting on Thursday, May 21, 2009 at 1 p.m. in Room G at the Clubhouse. All who are interested are welcome. One does not need to have served in the Armed Forces or be related to a veteran to attend. Any questions, please call Kitty Cole at 954-360-7956.

Nature Club will meet third Friday of every month from November to April in Clubhouse Room A at 10 a.m. A different speaker is at each meeting and several trips each year are enjoyed by the members. These trips are to a variety of nature sites. For information call Shelly Baskin, 954-428-0634.

Knitting Club of CVE meets every Monday from 1 to 3 p.m. in Sewing Room at Clubhouse. We welcome beginners and experienced knitters and crotchetiers. If you have an “Itch to Stitch” come and have fun and make someone happy. Call Florence 954-698-9421. L’Alliance Francophone CVE. Join more than 800 French-speaking residents of the Village, mostly snowbirds from Canada. The association was established in 1995, offer great activities. For information, call Yvan Sinotte 954-425-4355 or Pierrette Pelletier 954428-4158. L’Alliance Francophone of CVE. Si vous parlez Français, joignez-vous aux 800 personnes déjà members de notre association. Nous avons de nombreuses activites tres diversifies a vous proposer. Pour toute information appeler Yvan Sinotte 954-425-4355 ou Pierrette Pelletier 954-428-4158. Lapidary Club members only, work every Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Lapidary Room. Supervisor must be present. Sessions will be added as needed. For information call Walter Reich 954-421-6875 or Victor Goldring 954-418-2174. Lets Talk meets 2nd and 4th Tuesday each month, 2 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Room E. Discussions, Daytrips, films will be topics of the day. For further information call Gladys 954-421-9232, Irene 954-418-9156, Shirley 954-427-0951. Mended Hearts Cardiac Support Group an affiliate of the American Heart Association, meets the 1st and 3rd Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. Heart Healthy Snacks will be served. Open to all cardiac patients and their families in the community. Located at 7300 Del Prado Circle South, Boca Raton. For information call 561-392-3000. Mr. & Mrs. Club Come and meet new friends and socialize. Ages 55-73. Monthly activities are being planned. For information, call Buddy at 954427-7407. Na’Amat USA For further information, contact Marjorie Moidel at 954-970-8609. National Association of Retired Federal Employees (NARFE) meets fourth Wednesday monthly at John Knox Village at 1 p.m. We are interest-

Newbies Come and meet new people interested in social activities, dinners and trips. We meet the 1st Tuesday of the month from November to April, Room F, 7 p.m. For information, call Virginia at 954-426-9455 or Beverly at 954-428-3705. New Covenant Church Celebration Service every Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and Evening Service and Bible Study every Wednesday at 6:45 p.m. For further information, call 954-781-3170. New Horizons Church of Deerfield Worship Service 10 a.m., Sunday School 10:30a.m .For information call church 954-427-3045. New York Transit Retirees of Florida meets the second Wednesday of the month at 11 a.m. at Centura Park Clubhouse, 2395 N. W. 36th Ave, Coconut Creek. Keep informed of your pensions and medical benefits. For information, call 561-479-2149. New York Retirees DC37: Meetings held at B’nai Torah Congregation, 6261 S. W. 18th St., Boca Raton. Next meeting to be advised. For information, call Mildred 954-421-8527 or Vinnie at 561-451-3643. North East Focal Senior Center: Adult Day Care service, Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m .for individuals with dementia, Alzheimer or memory loss. Contact Mary Jo Bodnick, Case Manager at 954-4804463. Ballroom Dance lessons every Tuesday 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., “Hot Topic” discussions every Tuesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Open Water Color Painting class every Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact Laura Newman at 954-480-4447.Silver Sneakers class by Humana first Thursday monthly from 12 noon to 1 p.m. Beginner Computer lessons offered one-on-one at $40 for six one-hour lessons. Contact Laura Newman 954-480-4447 for appointment. Vision Impaired Support group every Wednesday 12 noon to 1 p.m. Tai Chi every Thursday, 12 noon to 1 p.m.; Arm Chair Fitness every Friday, 12 noon to 12:30 p.m,; Stretching/ Yoga Lite every Monday 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.. Line Dancing ($4 donation) for beginners/intermediates every Friday 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Volunteers required to demonstrate and assist in Floral Arrangements. Contact Ilean Sylk 954-480-4447. Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church, 5201 N. Military Trail, Deerfield Beach, Fl. Services Monday to Friday, 9 a.m., Saturday Vigil 4 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., and 11 a.m.

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by Rev. James Parappally, Pastor. For further information, call 954-421-3246. Parent & Adult Children Club meets the first Sunday of the month, Room F. This is a Social Club. Learn nutrition tips, exercise tips, meet new people, outings. The parent and adult child must come to the meetings together. If one does not live in the Village invite them to attend the meeting with you. For further information call Linda 954-725-3762. Pflag (Parents, Family and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) will meet on the second Tuesday of each month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Clubhouse, Room F. For information, call Abe at 954- 571-8448 or Dorothy at 954-4228508. Philadelphian’s and Neighbors Club meets 2nd Tuesday of the month at 2 p.m. in Clubhouse, Room October through March. Entertainment at every meeting. Greet old and new friends. For further information call Selma Edelman, 954-421-6423 or her cell phone 954-675-3998. You can also call Bea Lerman 954-421-3497. Philosophy of CVE meetings is held each Monday in Room A at the Clubhouse from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. All residents and friends are welcome. Our schedule begins in November and lasts until mid-March. Starting with Opera, other topics will include the environment, humor, liberty, law, a piano recital and a variety of other cultural themes. For details, call Dr. Bob Griffin 954-596-0463 Pythian Sisters, Bright Star Temple #36 meets first and third Tuesday of every month at noon in the Activity Center, Room B. Interesting meetings, refreshments served. Become a member. Information, Ruth Goldberg 954-427-5226 or Irene Greenberg 954-426-0628. Red Hatters Club, The JCP Red Hatters meet the second Wednesday of each month in the clubhouse. Monthly outings planned. Requirement for membership is a Red Hat and Purple Dress, Blouse, Pants etc. must be worn on outings. For more information call Josephine Privitera at 954-425-7026. Russian Club will be meeting every third Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the home of Galina Baraz, 2064 Ventnor P. For further information, contact Galina at 954-428-3870. Saint Ambrose Catholic Church, Pastor Rev. Bryan Dalton, Daily Masses 7:30 a.m., 11 a.m., 7 p.m., Saturday morning Vigil Masses 4 p.m., 5:30 p.m., Sunday Masses 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12 noon, 6 p.m., Confessions Saturday, 11 a.m. to 12 noon, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., For information call church 954-427-2225. Scrabbleers meets every Thursday at 7 p.m. in Room C at Clubhouse. All scrabble players welcome. Bring set if possible. For information, call R. Levin 954-4274092. Selma’s Jewish Discussion Group meets first and third Wednesday of each month at Clubhouse, Room F at 10:30 a.m. All denominations welcome. For further information, call Pearl Keiler at 954-421-8719.


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JUNE 2009


JUNE 2009 Senior Volleyball for men and women on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the Volleyball Court, next to the main tennis courts back of the Clubhouse. Everyone, who attends, plays. Call Max Amichai Heppner 954-596-0484, E-mail: Heppnershanamax@aol.com. Sisterhood of Young Israel of Deerfield Beach meets at the Synagogue the first Tuesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. Interesting speakers, exciting programs and refreshments served. Gift Shop now open Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. Everyone welcome. For further information call Helen Hagler 954-360-9939 or Tobi Kleiman 954-725-3776. Sisterhood of Temple Beth Israel meets on second Thursday of each month at 11:30 am. A mini lunch is served followed by an interesting program. For further information call the Temple office at 954-421-7060 . Sixty-five Social Club accepting new members couples only, one of who must be 70 or under. For information, call Lillian Jaffe at 954-3602941. Social Single is a social club for singles who are young at heart. We enjoy monthly outings, dinners, shows as well as monthly club brunches at local restaurants. Meetings are held the second Monday of each month in the Clubhouse, Room G at 7 p.m. For more information, call Nermie at 954-421-6931 or Sheila at 954-725-1521. SOCO (Symposium of Concerned Owners) meets the second and fourth Friday of each month in the Clubhouse. In-dept lectures and discussions with guest speakers. For information, call Jeff Chester at 954-429-9285.

SoftBall Players now forming Century Village teams. No age limitations. Call Ed Obeid at 954-421-2228. South Florida Gold Coast Chapter of Myasthenia Gravis support group meets second Saturday each month at 1 p.m. at the North Broward Medical Center, I-95 and Sample Road. For information call Gladys or Evelyn 954429-0455. St. Louis Club of CVE meets the first Wednesday, every other month, beginning in August for lunch. For information call Sol Mitchell 954-4287497. Stained Glass Club meets first Wednesday of every month until April at 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse Stained Glass room. For further information, call Harry Liner at 954-426-4853. Stamp and Coin Club meets every 4th Thursday at 12 noon to 2 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Room C on the 1st floor. Residents and guests are invited to have their stamps and coins there to sell, buy & trade. For more information call Rafael Vance 954-421-8579. Stock Market Discussion Club meets first and third Monday each month at 10 a.m. Room N. Exchange information about stocks, mutual funds, ETF’s and bonds. No fee involved. For further information call Jim 954-596-2233 or Bill 954-698-0423. Talking Book Club the JBL Library, in conjunction with the Low Vision Group in CVE is forming a monthly Talking Book Club. Each participant will receive the same audio book. A representative for the JBI Library will facilitate the book discussion once a month. The group will meet the second Tuesday of the month at 10:30 am. For information call Janet Agmund 954-428-0711 or Goldie Witrock at the library 954689-0207.

Tai-Chi. The class will be on Wednesday from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Exercise Room at Clubhouse with instructor, Terry. Come join our class and get rid of stress Temple Beth Israel (Conservative, Egalitarian) Services Friday evening 7:30 p.m. with Oneg Shabbat. Saturday morning 9 a.m. to noon with Kiddush. Minyon Monday and Thursday 8:30 a.m. Library Monday thru Thursday 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for all Village Residents. Ongoing book sale. The library will be closed for the months of June, July and up to August 13. Call Temple office for more information, 954-421-7060. Temple B’nai Shalom (Reform) Services are conducted every Friday at 8 p.m. at Le Club by Rabbi Alton M. Winters and Cantor, Gary Sherman. Oneg Shabbat follows every week. For additional information call William Schmier 954 428-8231. The Auxiliary meets the fourth Monday of every month at 10 a.m. For further information, contact Julia Bale 954 427 6669 or Bea Rosner 954 360 7760. The Theosophical Society of Deerfield located at 831 SE 9th Street, phone number 954-420-0908 offers a free Sunday Speaker’s Forum every week from 3:30 to 5 p.m. In addition we have many interesting classes during the day and evenings, also without charge. To obtain a free quarterly bulletin call the lodge at the above number or Lillian Mayer, a CVE resident for more information about specific classes we offer at 954-360-7080. United Federation of Teachers/ Retired Teachers Chapter Meetings at Temple Anshei Shalom, W. Atlantic Ave. West of Jog, Delray. For further information, call Hilda Cohen 954-428-6805.

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United Club No. 7 (Retirees of ILGWU & ACTWU) meets on the first Thursday or first Saturday of each month in the Clubhouse, Room N at 1 p.m. For information, call Bea Jacobs at 954 427-0665. United Order True Sisters meets every fourth Tuesday at the Clubhouse, Room N, lower level, near the Billiard Room at 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information about this organization contact President Frieda Weiss, 954419-9143 or Betty Swinkin, Membership Chairperson, 954-570-9526. SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT : On June 23, 2009 at 12:30 p.m. we will have a complementary luncheon supplied by Integracare Rehabilitation. This function will take place in the Party Room of the Clubhouse. Visionally Impaired Persons (VIP) meets the first Wednesday monthly in Room E at 10:30 a.m. We exchange information and have guest speakers. We also have a book club and plan trips to seminars. All are welcome Contact Janel Agmund 954 428-0711.. Waves (Navy Gals) Meets every month on the first Saturday at 12 noon at the Olive Garden on Federal Highway in Ft. Lauderdale. For further information, call Eunice Westin at 954-427-7119. We Care of CVE still available for supplies (wheelchairs, walkers, canes, etc.) only. Contact Barbara Brown at 954-5749675. Women Marines Association membership is open to women who serve or have served honorably in the U.S. Marine Corp or U.S. Marine Reserves. Many people are not aware of our existence. For information, call Ruth Beisner at 954-428-1637. Workmen’s Circle, Branch 1051 meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday at South County Civic Center on Jog Rd. or information call, Miriam Guz 561-495-7378.


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JUNE 2009

Want To Take A Trip? UNITED ORDER OF TRUE SISTERS is having a cruise on the Royal Caribbean’s ENCHANTMENT OF THE SEAS, starting October 3 to 8, 2009. Ports of Call are Ft. Lauderdale, Grand Cayman, Cozumel. Inside cabin N $455.00 per person double occupancy, Inside cabin M $465.00 per person double occupancy. Outside cabin I $520.00 per person double occupancy. Outside cabin H $530.00 per person double occupancy Port charges, all taxes and bus transfers included. $100.00 per person deposit. Final payment due July 20, 2009. Insurance is strongly recommended and not included in the price. Inside cabin insurance $45, Outside cabin insurance $50 per person. For reservations call Jean Keats 954-421-6311.

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GH_22829

B’NAI BRITH UNIT 2995 has an extremely low priced cruise, leaving on November 30, 2009 for 6 days and 5 nights on the Navigator of the Sea, a 135,000 tons and 3,000 passengers. Inside cabin is only $380 per person, double occupancy, on the seventh floor and $530 for an outside cabin on the third floor, this includes all taxes, port charges and transportation from Century Village in Deerfield. Tips for the bus driver and luggage handler in Miami are included. An experienced leader will be attached to the group for the same price. Insurance is strongly recommended. For further information call Dave Polak 954-4200096.

BRO 06/09


JUNE 2009

Anti-Germ Warfare- The Natural Way By ELLEN KAMHI, PhD RN

The media world is a-buzz about ‘bugs’! However, the new threats of “swine flu”, bring us back to a basic discussion. Should we just sit around and wait until we become a victim, and then take an antibiotic or Tamiflu and hope that the illness goes away? Or would it be wiser to be a health advocate, and shore up our immune systemthe body’s natural defense mechanism. (One interesting point to consider is that Tamiflu was developed by Gilead Sciences. Donald Rumsfeld was Chairman of the Board of Gilead from 1997-2001, when he became Secretary of Defense under Bush.) The best approach is to do all you can to help support your natural immune system. The efficient functioning of the immune system is of paramount importance to everyone, adults and children alike, since it controls our ability to fend off illness, whether it be a deadly disease, or even the common cold. The immune system is made up of a combination of specialized cells, chemicals, tissues, and organs. These include the lymph nodes, thymus gland, spleen, bone marrow and tonsils as well as specialized white blood cells, which recognize and engulf invading microorganisms and cellular debris. The ability of the immune system to function optimally is influenced by many factors. These include inherent genetic makeup, environmental influences, (such as pollution, pesticides, hormones, artificial flavoring/colorings in food), obesity and stress levels; not only exposure to infective agents, whether they are natural or man-made. We can aid our immune system by eating a high amount of organic green vegetables, whole grains and nuts, while cutting down on ‘junk food’ consumption. Stress reduction, through prayer, meditation, yoga and moderate exercise, such as a daily

walk around Century Village’s great walkway- is more important than ever when we are under sustained stress. Herbs may be used in several ways to aid in our Anti-Germ Warfare personal campaigns. Tonic herbs strengthen the immune system over time, while strong immune system stimulants have a more immediate action, and are used during an acute infection. Many herbs have been scientifically proven to have strong broad spectrum anti-microbial properties. Herbal tonics work to help maintain a dynamic balance in the body and usually need to be taken long-term. Astragalus is said to build Wei chi. “Chi” is the Chinese concept of life energy force. One study by the National Cancer Institute demonstrated Astragalus’ ability to help strengthen the immune system’s resistance, especially to viral infections. Reishi has been called the “mushroom of immortality”, and has been used for centuries as an overall tonic. Ligustrum berries are used by Chinese physicians specifically for their immune enhancing activities. Codonopsis is a Chinese herb that contains the bitter yellow compound, berberine, that helps the immune system prevent infections. Other immune system tonic herbs include Siberian Ginseng and Schisandra. Schisandra has been shown to build non-specific resistance, improve brain function, increase work capacity and build strength. Osha Root has been used traditionally by both the Chinese and Native Americans, (who called it Chuchupate), for increased immune function. Echinacea is a well researched and respected immune system stimulant. It helps increase the activity of white blood cells, which engulf invading microorganisms. Thuja is an herbal extract from the Northern White Cedar tree. It is a strong immune

stimulant that Native Americans used for colds, coughs, bronchitis and other respiratory infections. Possibly the mushroom with the greatest capability of stimulating the immune system is the Maitake. Maitake contains specific chemical components that have been scientifically studied for their strong immune enhancing effects. Oil Of Oregano (Origanum vulgare) is rich in vitamins and minerals including Vitamins A and C, Niacin, Calcium, Magnesium, Zinc, Iron, Potassium, Copper, Boron, and Manganese. In addition, the herb contains many active chemical constituents that provide beneficial support to our bodies, such as thymol and carvacrol. These components strongly discourage the growth of microorganisms, an action recognized by traditional herbalists throughout history as well as supported by modern scientific research. Oregano oil is exceptional in its ability to destroy many different kinds of microorganisms including bacteria, fungus, virus and parasites. Oregano oil has been shown in scientific studies to actively inhibit and destroy E. Coli, candida albacans and the bacterias that cause strep and staff infections. Unlike pharmaceutical drug antibiotics, oregano oil does not cause the development of resistant strains of bacteria. Although it is always possible for an individual to have an allergic reaction to any substance, there are no known adverse effects to oil of oregano. The bitter compound, oleuropein, extracted from the olive leaf, has the capacity to destroy and inhibit the growth of an incredible array of pathogenic organisms, including bacteria , yeasts and viruses, such as the cold and flu virus, herpes, and even retro-viruses. Bacteria and parasites destroyed by oleuropein include planterum, E. coli and malariae, to name a few. Apparently, the old anti-malarial olive leaf and wine remedy had some merit! No toxic effects have been reported, even at high doses. Rosemary ( Rosmarinus officinalis) has been used as an anti-infective agent since ancient times. Rosemary was regularly burned in hospitals and sick-rooms to purify the air and prevent infection. It was also used in courts to keep the judge and jurors from contracting plagues and fevers that the prisoners brought up from the dungeon. A sprig of Rosemary was also often carried at funerals. The aromatic oils

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of rosemary contain active essential oils, rosmarinic acid, phenolic acids and tannins with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Thyme (Thymus) was used by the Greeks to keep venomous creatures away from the home. The Egyptians used it to mummify their dead, due to its antimicrobial and antioxidant activity. The thymus gland got its name

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from thyme, due to its similar structure to the thyme flower; interesting because both thyme and the thymus gland promote immune function. The principle components consist of phenol, thymol and carvacrol. An article in Chemical Abstracts in 1977 revealed that thymol’s antimicrobial activity is 20 times stronger than phenol.


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JUNE 2009

As I See It By ROLF GRAYSON PIRACY Years ago we often read with fascination, stories about high sea piracy. These were stories tinged with excitement and a splash of romance, about the swashbuckling, one-eyed and onelegged pirates stealing gold, silver and the occasional beautiful maiden. Daring, bearded, tall, slim and outstandingly handsome, these men of the high seas were often the center of fantasies, and little skits were played by boys in school yards or neighborhood streets. But these events occurred 100 or 200 years ago, and

they no longer exist due to strict high seas rules, and severe punishment. Now we are in the 21st century with all its technological inventions, its modern seafaring super cruisers and awesomely equipped military vessels and pirates no longer have a chance to get to first base. Or do they? Circumstances have developed in our day where high sea piracy is in full swing, and seems to be successfully holding the whole world at bay. Reaping millions of dollars in ransom, with apparent impunity, these pirates

ply the waters off Somalia venturing hundreds of miles into the open waters. They hold ships for a ransom which is usually collected later from insurance companies. The money is used to buy modern, up-to-date mother ships and high speed small crafts extremely well equipped with military hardware of the latest and most deadly design. Our world which has never been united appears to be most sluggish in making a concerted effort to end this scourge. Now we have something of an international fleet of

warships plying the waters off the coast of Somalia to intercept these brazen bandits. As of this writing, a courageous American captain has volunteered to become a hostage to save his crew. He is being held in a small speed boat with U S warships nearby. Undaunted, two pirate ships are steaming towards the scene in an attempt to join in this crime. What has happened to our world? Why do we not blow them out of the water wherever we find them? Notwithstanding the value of human life, these terrorists have no place in human society. Let us take a page out of history, and follow their example. There is no doubt in my mind that once

we show these bandits the price of piracy, it will disappear rapidly. Right now as it stands there is little motivation and reason for the pirates to stop these crimes for they perceive only rewards. It is now necessary to have a few well trained and well armed personnel on all ships that travel in this part of the world, and who can respond decisively whenever a threatening boat comes within range. This is outright and open warfare, and should be treated as such, with no mercy for these criminals. Sink any and all of their vessels anywhere they are found and then perhaps we will have normalcy again on the high seas.


JUNE 2009

Final Farewells By PAULINE MIZRACH They are all gone. I am caught up in the memories while I ride the new minibus transportation. Yet my reality world kicks in, the happenings within Century Village where I live. As we move along on the new mini-bus I hear talk, and dramatic stories, on the way to my destination. But for today, I am caught in

the moment; the present…I watch the local shops: The Dollar Store, Target Supermarket and Publix. I am listening to the other seniors with their familiar talk and stories, “I have to get out of my condo, just to keep me going,” says one. I am listening, open, smiling with a nod so as to touch base as we share the closeness of

the seating arrangement on the mini-bus. “What’s going on these days?” says another, as we listen to the stories of people who have moved to other homes and facilities. Stories of daughters and those who are no longer here: Dorothy, Marilyn, Kate – this day their final farewell, as I check the current obituaries in the Reporter.

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There are many changes and happenings in Century Village these days. There is new management - Seacrest Services, Inc.’s coupons, Quality Bus Transportation, fire alarms.There are advertisements for funeral offerings often stuck in my mail (cremation to remember your loved ones, with special discounts of $2500.) I receive cards with ads for celebrations with balloon releases, wine and cheese parties for current funeral bargain prices.

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Conversations keep me going and I feel less lonely as we talk, smile, and listen to the others, as we ride in the close seating on the mini-bus. On this trip I remember the friendships and acquaintances, and all the people I have shared experiences with, and who are no longer alive and I remember their final farewells. I take it all in, caught up in the moment of sadness. I am focused on moving along with the rest of the crowd, one day at a time.

Together we are one

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JUNE 2009

Giant Oaks from Little Acorns Grow (The Story of Publix Super Markets) By SY BLUM, Associate Editor Sometimes the most interesting stories are right in front of us and are part of our daily living here in South Florida. Let’s face it – Deerfield Beach, as beautiful as it is most times, is still devoid of many institutions, both cultural and commercial, that dominate other cities in Florida. However, when it comes to shopping for groceries and other essentials for daily living, we are blessed with several options, foremost of these, of course, is Publix Super Markets. To justify the headline, the acorn is the accompanying photo of the first Publix Grocery Store opened in Winter Haven, Florida in 1930. Its founder, George W. Jenkins, had a vision. Although he already had a steady job and the country was in a depression, much like we are experiencing today, “Mr. George,” as he was affectionately known, took the plunge. From Day One, he established rules of cleanliness, efficiency and, somewhat unique at the time, employee participation in the form of profit-sharing and marketing decisions that persist to this day. In fact, today, every one of the 140,500 Publix employees receive every pay day partial or full shares of stock! The stock is not traded publicly, and the Board of Directors sets the price. The most recent price is $16.10 per share. Obviously, his strategy was a success from the start. In its first year of operation, Publix grossed $100,000 (in 1930 dollars that is). Emboldened by his initial success, Jenkins mortgaged a small orange grove he owned and opened a second store, also in Winter Haven, in

1935. Not content to be the average store owner, coming to work every day, Mr. George spent his time traveling around the country buying items not ordinarily seen in grocery stores of that era. As a result, Publix prospered since many of their items were not available anywhere else. (This is another modus operandi that is still part of the Publix strategy.) Come 1940, Publix opened the first Super Market, complete with state-of-the art innovations such as automatic

doors, fluorescent lighting, frozen food cabinets, etc. During World War II, Publix continued to grow. Mr. Jenkins purchased all 19 stores of the All-American grocery store chain. This acquisition, combined with the existing Publix stores, grossed $49 million in 1951. The time had come to establish their own warehouses; Lakeland, Florida, located just a few miles from the original Winter Haven stores, was selected. Today, this giant network of warehouses,

railroad tracks and tractortrailer facilities constitutes the dominant business entity in the City of Lakeland. In addition to these facilities, Publix also operates in Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and Tennessee. Publix first ventured into South Florida by opening its Miami division in 1959. As you must have noticed, Publix also has a giant warehouse and manufacturing complex right here in Deerfield Beach. Here, it manufactures dairy products and

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distributes fresh food. There is also a distribution center in Boynton Beach, as well as in the many other communities it serves in the five-state area. Always in the forefront of improving service to its customers, Publix installed a check-out scanning system back in 1980 that greatly reducing the tedious task of “ringing up” each individual item. Another Publix service, not very well publicized and seldom found elsewhere, is a program called “Aprons,” available in all of its stores. The purpose is to show customers how to prepare nutritious, yet economical meals. Some other items of how this tiny acorn, “planted” in that tiny Winter Haven store, has grown into the giant oak it is today should be of some interest. As far back as 1970, Publix Super Markets had already produced $500 million in annual sales and continues to grow. In 2008, its sales totaled an astonishing $23.9 billion, and the chain has mushroomed to more than 1,000 stores. Publix continues to open more stores in carefullyselected areas. It is already one of the ten largest supermarket chains in the United States. Among its many other accolades, Publix Super Markets has been, repeatedly, listed in the top ten best places to work by Fortune magazine and has been on that list since its inception. George W. Jenkins passed away in 1996. Members of his family still lead the company and, along with Publix associates, control this highly successful enterprise. “Where Shopping is a Pleasure” indeed!


JUNE 2009

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Ye Olde Fishing Hole By IRVING BRENT The weather is in the high 70’s and low 80’s, somewhat humid daytime and in the nighttime high 60’s. Less humidity nighttime with some rain and breezy. Water level in CVE canals was receding a little; it is still a green village wherever you look. Fishing is holding up, and there are a few butterfly bass, speckled perch and some nice-sized catfish, along with largemouth bass weighing up to four pounds. There are Bream, papadia and Oscars with minnows aplenty. We have to remember that the fish are full of mercury – do not eat them; catch the fish and throw them back into the water. At the coastal piers, barricuda, jacks, and blue runners have been caught at Lake Worth Pier. Dania Pier had some ballyhoo, permit and mutton snapper at night. Pompano Pier sported blue runners and yellowtail snapper. Deerfield Pier hooked

barracuda, blue runners and 40 pound cobia. The sight of a young girl, fishing for the first time after having been given her first fishing rod as a gift was something to behold. She was thrilled when she hooked her first fish ever, a bluegill and an Oscar. A big smile spread over her face as she reeled them in. I wondered how many other youngsters would have had their lives brightened by the gift of a fishing rod. There is no way to explain the wonder to a fisherman, of a wild creature at the end of a fishing line while reeling it in. Other anglers test their physical skill by trying to tame big fish using light tackle, while still others prefer the challenge of figuring out where a fish will be and what it will bite. For many fishermen, a fishing rod is a way of escape from the pressures of everyday life and there is no telling

where a fishing rod might take you; perhaps to exotic fishing destinations such as Alaska, Caribbean or maybe just a nearby pond or pier. It also helps to keep you out of trouble. After all, when fish are biting, who has time to do drugs or spray-paint sculptures? Most of my fishing acquaintances have happy memories of certain rods and reels. One of them, who practically grew up on Anglin’s Pier in Lauderdale-By-TheSea, remembered how his mother finally acknowledged his fishing addiction, and bought him a first-class outfit. This angler’s first stop that day was the Las Olas Boulevard Bridge, where he promptly hooked a car while trying to cast. Luckily, angler was able to apply enough pressure to bread a 50 pound mono-filament line before the reel exploded. This fisherman’s first fishing outfit was a hand-line

given to him by his father. It consisted of a wooden frame, about 20 feet of ten-pound mono-filament line wound across it, a small slip sinker and a gold hook. I used it in fresh water and saltwater, from docks and rowboats. Surprisingly, I caught many fish. I graduated to a spinning outfit used to pursue carp, largemouth bass and crappies at local ponds and lakes; also flounders and bluefish from a local bay, One rod and reel was all I needed back then, where nowadays I would need rods for cranking. Jigging, flipping, casting, twitching and trolling, all these things – plus an assortment of reels. There have been incredible advances in tackle technology in the past few years – kids who get hooked on fishing these days have a lot to look forward to. In the Freshwater/Everglades speckled perch moved out of open water at Lake

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Ida, Eden and Osborne, with crappies starting to bed now as a cold front comes through. Right along the shore line, biting minnows and jigs for bass busting come up with shad on the surface. I use Rat-L-Trap and plastic worms.. Fishing in the Everglades was tough, with a few anglers finding some bass on flats west of the L-67A canal. A report from Buckhead Ridge Marina that shiners were producing catches of bass at Eagle Bay Island, Indian Prairie Canal, North Shore, Monkey Box and Moonshine Bay. Top lures were plastic jerkbaits and topwater plugs. Speckled perch were biting minnows, jigs and grass shrimp at Eagle Bay Island, Indian Prairie Canal, Tin House Cove and Harney Pond Canal. Deerfield Beach is cloudy, on and off in the 80’s range – there was a thunder storm during the night with pouring rain, which lowered the humidity to give us a nice morning to start the day. I hope you patronized the beach and pier.

Gold! Gold! Gold! By JERRY WOLF When outsiders think of Costa Rica they think of the jungles of Osa, surfing on the beach of Golfito or perhaps the fishing around Papaguayo. These are activities which may also take place in other tropical countries but Costa Rica, also has a treasury of gold taken from the tombs of ancient Indians. This treasure is now on exhibition right in the center of the capitol, San Jose. The intrinsic value of these gold adornments must, at today’s prices, be over a billion dollars. The National Gold Museum is located in the center of San Jose, just a hundred yards from the Gran Hotel de Costa Rica and the plaza of the National Theater. For about a dollar and a half you can get a ticket to see all the gold treasures now belonging to the Costa Rican government. When Christopher Columbus discovered Costa Rica in 1492, on his first visit to these shores, he brought with him armored warriors and missionaries. Some of these first visitors were obsessed to save the souls of the Indians, but they discovered many treasures of gold that had been buried with deceased monarchs. So much of this metal was discovered that they called the land Costa Rica. In English this translates as “Rich Coast”.

In these artful displays you can see so much gold that your mouth may water. You will see solid gold chest plates, ornaments for the hair, arms and headdresses and decorations for a high official’s coffin. Although these gold objects are for the world to see, they don’t just lie there. Instead, they adorn well-guarded, life sized statues. To make it all appear more lifelike to the visitor, stuffed natural fauna such as a life-sized Jaguar with jaws that seem fierce enough to break an observer’s arm, add to the arrangements. When I went to the ticket office, the young cashier took one look at my white locks and said, “Old people don’t have to pay.” However I was escorted by a lovely 21 year old family friend and he said to her, “You can go in free for taking such care of your grandfather, but taking samples is not allowed.” Did I really look that greedy? I still dream about this priceless metal in the form of warriors with clubs, butterflies and birds, and forms of wild animals. There are only three other gold museums in the world, but I’m prejudiced and feel that ours in San Jose is number one.


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Ask Bea By BEA LITNER, Historical Society Board Member

Deerfield Beach Historical Society Dear Bea: I was very much interested in your column about the Deerfield Beach Historical Society’s Old School House Museum. Do you have other information on the Historical Society and other places of interest on the Society’s list? Jennifer Dear Jennifer: The Deerfield Beach Historical Society was founded in 1973, with a directive to identify, preserve and maintain historical sites in the Deerfield Beach area. The Society banded together in 1976 to prevent the demolition of the two-room school house which also served as the town’s City Hall for many years. Another addition to the historical list is the Butler House, home of pioneers, James D. Butler and Alice Butler. It was bequeathed to the Society in 1977. Following Mrs. Butler’s passing, it is now the Society’s permanent home. The Society is proud to have been instrumental in placing four local structures on the National Register. The Historical Society meets the third Wednesday of the month from September to May at the Meeting Room of the Old School House. You can receive a program at the Historical Society’s Office by calling 954-429-0378. Of further interest is the Historical Commission located at 151 SW 2nd Street, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301. Their phone number is 954-7654670. This Broward County Historical Commission was created by ordinance, in 1972, to encourage awareness of local history and to preserve the artifacts of our heritage. The 19-member Board is assisted by a small staff and a small group of dedicated volunteers. The scope of activities includes topics such as oral history, publications and civic programs. The Commission provides research, archive facilities and cosponsors an annual “Pioneer Days” event. For further information, call 954-765-4670. Who Knows? Ever wonder who the genius is who decided to put fire hydrants in all the good parking spots? Happy Father’s Day! Send your questions and stories to “Ask Bea” at the Reporter office.

JUNE 2009

What’s Bugging You? By HARRY L. KATZ Rodents? Ugh!! If the rodents are rats or mice, there is a feeling of revulsion. There is, however, one rodent that many of us can tolerate – that’s the squirrel. CVE residents often see them cavorting nervously on the turf or on a tree. They are part of our environment, along with the bucolic scenes of the duck trailed by her little ones on a roadway or serenely paddling in the lagoon, or a flock of the long legged, long beak egrets pecking for earthworms in a recently watered turf. The squirrel is not really a serious pest except possibly to a two-story build-

ing where it can nest under the roof. It can gnaw a hole through the soffit or other wood member under the roof to access a nesting site. The squirrel population in our Village has been reduced somewhat since so many trees were destroyed by last year’s hurricane. Old trees are ideal for them to hollow out a nesting site. The female squirrel gives birth to two litters a year with about three babies each time. After three months, the mother is ready to bear again and she abandons her young. When the young female squirrel comes into season and is receptive, she

vocalizes this condition to the male squirrels who will then chase after her relentlessly. Once impregnated, she isolates herself and gets no help from the males in rearing the offspring. She will be busy collecting nesting materials and chewing a hole in an old tree or in the fascia board under a roof. Trapping squirrels is a specialty for a limited number of pest management professionals. Fortunately, our Village is not overrun with too many of these rodents; and we need not be alarmed when we see them romping about our condos.

See Our New Selection Of Wicker, Rattan & Patio Furniture!


JUNE 2009

Do you work? Need a bar code? Call I.D. office or COOCVE for an appointment.

SAVE OUR LIBRARY Petitions Available At COOCVE Office For Details Call Steven Fine 954421-5566 x-214

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Your Elevator Recall Specialists Some of our clients include: The Shore Club The Placide Mizner Grand Trump Plaza of Palm Beach Point of Americas Harbourage Laurel Oaks and Fairway Pointe Pompano Beach Club N. & S. Imperial Point Medical Center Boca Raton Fire Department Broward County Convention Center Boca Raton City Hall US Customs Service Sky Harbor East

North Broward Hospital Lebaron East and West The Corinthian Renaissance III Boca West Sabal Pointe Telemundo Station 52 Three Thousand South Pompano Medical Group Ocean Dunes The Venetian Coral Springs Medical Center Opal Towers Boca Towers

Is Your Elevator Recall Working Correctly? Have You Been Cited By The City? ATECH CAN HELP! We have the experience needed to effectivly set up, repair & maintain your Elevator Recall System. What is Elevator Recall? Elevator Recall Systems allow fire alarm systems to send an elevator to a selected floor based on the triggering of a smoke detector within a fire alarm system.

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SAVE OUR

LIBRARY Petitions Available At COOCVE Office For Details Call Steven Fine 954421-5566 x-214


JUNE 2009

VISITORS ARE NOT BEING CALLED IN AT THE FRONT GATE CAUSING DELAYS AND CONFUSION PLEASE CALL ALL VISITORS INTO THE AUTOMATED SYSTEM BY DIALING 954 421-2556 AND CLEARLY SPEAK THE NAME OF YOUR VISITOR WHEN PROMPTED TO DO SO. CALLS FOR VISITORS ARRIVING THE FOLLOWING DAY MUST BE MADE AFTER 8:30 PM. FOR A SPEEDY ENTRY, PLEASE MAKE SURE ALL VISITORS HAVE YOUR FULL NAME AND ADDRESS AND YOUR TELEPHONE NUMBER.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP!

Attention: CVE Residents Starting 2009, the Reporter will have a new In Loving Memory Section. Please send via e-mail to cvereporter@ hotmail.com or fax to 954-421-9269 or hand deliver to Reporter office, ATTN: Gloria Olmstead.

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CVE Duplicate Bridge ClubWinners By BERNICE RUGA April, 2009 Saturday 4/4/09 S. Babich/R. Colman – F. Beaudin/B. Derobertis 4/11/09 D. Connell/V. Del Favero – A. Reef/I. Reef 4/18/09 F. Kilstein/B. Zinovoy – B. Lilienfeld/J. Wasserman 4/25/09 D. Connell/V. Del Favero – Z. Becker/A. Orent Monday 4/6/09 P. Tepper/D. Connell – B.Ruga/I. Ruga 4/13/09 W. Kaufman/G. Schulhoff – A. Cadesky/M. Bader

4/20/09 G. Schulhoff/L. Fertik – B. Cordes/C. Parness 4/27/09 G. Rothman/A. Greene – Z. Becker/A. Orent Tuesday 4/7/09 D. Connell/B. Levitt – P. Tepper/E. Masel 4/14/09 W. Kaufman/G. Schulhoff – M. Ginsberg/R. Ginsberg 4/21/09 E. Sohmer/G. Schulhoff – R. Silverman/R. Devorin 4/28/09 D. Connell/R. Schucker – R. Ginsberg/M. Ginsberg

THE PUZZLER #9 SOLUTION FROM MAY ISSUE The question we asked was “Do you live here?“ If the answer was “yes”, we were in Western Cockabolli and if “no“, we would be in Eastern Cockabolli. For example, if we were in Western Cockabolli, a Western Cockaboli native would tell the truth and answer “yes”,

while the Eastern Cockabolli native would lie and also say “yes”. But, in Eastern Cockabolli, the Western Cockabolli native would truthfully answer “no”, while the Eastern Cockabolli native would lie and also answer “no”

Clubhouse Library News By GLORIA S. SHOMER Calling all Readers. We have been having the most amazing weather. My days are spent either laying out by the pool and reading, sitting in a doctor’s office and reading, or propped up in my air conditioned bedroom with a good book on my chest. June is busting out all over, and so are my bookshelves. I can’t wait for the next rainy day. When that occurs, I will wake up, tend to my morning chores, shower, and spend the rest of the day happily reading. Naps are also a recommended activity for that very rare rainy day. I hope it comes soon. Since the library is not as busy as it was in season, I have been checking our shelves. I was particularly interested in the fairly new biographies that are on our sales shelves. Certain people interest me for reasons I don’t quite understand. When I get involved in the details of their lives, I feel at least an understanding of why that person piqued my interest. We also have sports books for sale. Golf, tennis, and swimming for the people who take pleasure in athletics as well as volumes on bridge, houseplants, painting and clay pottery

The Puzzler #10 By: CHARLES K. PARNESS Three really intelligent, new move-ins to Century Village East, Al, Bess and Clarence, decided to try out for the CVE Logic Club. The initiation was naturally a test in logic. Each neophyte was seated in a chair as follows: Chair 1 Al Blue hat Chair 2 Bess Red hat Chair 3 Clarence Blue hat All participants were shown five hats, three blue and two red. While their eyes were closed, a blue hat was placed on Al and Clarence’s head and a red hat on Bess’s

head. After being told to open their eyes, this was the situation: Al could see the color of the hats on Bess and Clarence; Bess could see the color of the hat on Clarence, and nobody could see the color of their own hat, nor which two hats had not been used. The test proctor then asked Al if he could tell the color of the hat on his head. After considerable thought, Al said “No.” The proctor asked Bess if she could tell him the color of the hat on

her head. She replied that she had heard Al’s answer but after considerable thought, she also could not tell the color of the hat on her head. Finally, the proctor asked Clarence if he knew the color of the hat on his head. He thought awhile and answered that he had heard Al and Bess’s responses and that he had a blue hat on his head, and he could prove it! That’s the puzzle - how did Clarence logically deduce he had a blue hat?

Bridge

By IRVING RUGA Unusual NT As a general rule, an Unusual NT bid is a jump. Here is an example: your right hand opponent opens 1♠ and you overcall 1NT. Your INT bid is natural and shows 15+ to 18 HCP’s. Had you jumped to 2NT that would have been the Unusual NT showing at least 5-5 in the minors. When the opponent opens a weak two bid, an immediate bid of 2NT is best played as natural, showing 15+ to 18 HCP’s. It is extremely rare for a non-jump NT bid to mean the Unusual NT. It usually occurs when the person who is bidding NT has already passed, presumably denying opening bid valves. In other words, it makes no sense that the person bidding NT is making a natural bid. Here are two examples when the non-jump NT bid is the Unusual NT. N E S W N E S W P 1♠ P 2♠ P 1♥ P 4♠ 2N 4N

for those of us who prefer sitting down. Another great section is our sale cookbook shelf. Great recipes, all sorts of ethnic cooking, microwave use, Forman grilling, as well as those books for heart health, weight loss, and some that cater to different diseases. Just ask any of the librarians for directions. We also have maps at the beginning of each stack that will tell you where to look. Let me tell you what is happening at our boutique. People are coming in and spending a much longer time going through our merchandise. Without the usual crowding, they can take their time trying on earrings, selecting necklaces and looking for those great looking knickknacks that they have just the right place for in their homes. It seems that our Clubhouse staff has discovered our wares. They come in almost daily, and always find something they can fall in love with. Our new machine for those with limited vision is right inside the front door. We take it for granted that we can dispute a charge on our credit card, balance our checking accounts and actually see mail that our grandchildren send. Most of us have been trained in the use of the machine and would be glad to assist you. All you have to do is ask. Even though the summer has slowed down attendance at the Library, we still make it a point to have the latest books by your favorite authors. Mary Higgins Clark has written a new

thriller called Just Take My Heart. With her usual flare, she has given us extremely relatable characters, a riveting plot and everything necessary for a great read. Another very popular author is Luanne Rice’s The Geometry of Sisters. Families are always interesting to read about and the women in this poignant story discover the eternal truths about sisterhood. Please come in and get better acquainted with our library. We still have amazing books on our shelves that are not usually available in public libraries. Along with these we also have the latest New York Times Best Sellers which are kept at the Reserve Desk. You are allowed to reserve any of the volumes you choose when you become a Friend of the Library. For the great price of two dollars per year, you will be personally called when your reserve book is ready. You will also receive a free volume of your choice and a chance to be eligible for our monthly lottery. This year’s monthly winner is Marcia Reisman. Please come in and claim your prize book. Remember it’s summer now and you don’t want to be stuck in the house without a bunch of books. I work Thursday afternoons and I would be delighted to help you find just the right book, by just the right author. Enjoy the summer. It’s sad when our friends go home but a good book makes everyone feel better. See you on Thursday afternoon.


JUNE 2009

CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild By MARION G. COHEN The end of the season has finally arrived and the Guild is happy to report that we have had a good year. You have demonstrated your loyalty to the Orchestra by re-enrolling as members of the Orchestra Guild. You have attended our Open Meetings with musical entertainment. You sailed the Gulf of Mexico with us. You have oversubscribed to our offerings in opera and ballet. You have attended our gala fashion show where Century Village staff and residents have demonstrated their modeling skills. And as a result, we were able to present a check in the amount of $9,000 to the Orchestra to assist them in meeting their expenses for the year. These monies offset orchestral costs such as musician fees, stage management, conductor, soloist fees, printing and supplies, music stands and piano tuning. The Orchestra has been able to recruit and maintain exceptionally qualified musicians. To do this

requires the payment of wages to approximately 60% of the orchestra. Dr. Bill Bryan, Vice President of the Symphony Orchestra, in a written memo to the Orchestra Guild, indicated the appreciation of their tireless efforts on behalf of the Orchestra and gave recognition to the fact that members of the Guild have devoted many hours this past year in their fundraising efforts. At this point we hope we can do even better next year. We hope to get many new members. Membership is the backbone of our group, for without these loyal dues-paying members we couldn’t accomplish our main goal – to support the orchestra. You may be off vacationing now, but the work of the Board of the Guild has just begun. So at the Board Meeting, beginning in April 2009, plans were discussed for your musical pleasure in 2009 – 2010. And they are exciting! They include opera, theater, museum trips,

ballet and fashion shows. Our Trip with a Difference will take us to an area where cultural activities abound. As soon as we have committed ourselves, the information will be relayed to you. As of now, we plan to have a mailing for our membership during the month of October. So if you are not a member of the Guild now, won’t you join us by mailing you dues of $10 for single membership and $15 for family membership to Kitty Cole, 7 Oakridge B. Remember – all paid-up members receive a mailing of scheduled events. You have priority in joining our offerings before they are sold out! We are please to announce that Lillian Mandelman, Betty Schwartz and Gert Schwartz have joined our panel of Officers of the Guild. We extend our wishes to all our friends for a good and restful summer. We’ll meet again in the Fall, fresh and vigorous, and ready to pursue our goals!

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From The Internet Who Will Take Grandma? Submitted by ESTELLE KAUFMAN

Who will take Grandma? Who will it be? All of us want her; I’m sure you’ll agree. Let’s call a meeting; let’s gather the clan; In such a big family there’s certainly one Willing to give her a place in the sun! Strange how we thought that she’d never wear out; But see how she walks; it’s arthritis, no doubt. Her eyesight has faded; her memory’s dim; She’s apt to insist on the silliest whim; When people get older, they become such a care! She must have a home, but the question is where? Remember the days when she used to be spry? Baked her own cookies and made her own pie? Helped us with lessons and tended our seams. Kissed away troubles and mended our dreams? Wonderful Grandma! We all loved her so! Isn’t it dreadful, she has no place to go? One little corner is all she would need, A shoulder to cry on, her bible to read; A chair by the window, with sun coming through,

Some pretty spring flowers still covered with dew. Who’ll warm her with love, so she won’t mind the cold? Oh, who will take Grandmother now that she’s old? What?! Nobody wants her?!... Oh yes, there is one willing to give her a place in the sun. Where she won’t have to worry, or wonder or doubt; And she won’t be our problem to bother about. Pretty soon now, God will give her a bed; But who’ll dry our tears when dear Grandma is dead?


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Movie Review June By SANDRA PARNESS LAST CHANCE HARVEY-It’s about first loves, last chances and everything in between. In London for his daughter’s wedding, a rumpled man finds his romantic spirits lifted by a new woman in his life. Starring Dustin Hoffman, Emma Thompson, James Brolin. PG-13, 92 minutes. Playing Monday, June 1, 2009, 2 & 8 p.m., Wednesday, June 3, 2009, 2 p.m. NEW IN TOWN-She’s an executive on the move. But her career is taking her a little farther than she expected. A Miami businesswoman adjusts to her new life in a tiny Minnesota town. Starring Renee Zellweger, Harry Connick, Jr. PG, 97 minutes. Playing Wednesday, June 3, 2009, 8 p.m. Thursday, June 4, 2009, 8 p.m., Friday, June 5, 2009, 8 p.m., Sunday, June 7, 2009, 8 p.m., Monday, June 8, 2009, 2 p.m. DEFIANCE-Jewish brothers in Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe escape into the Belarussian forests where they join Russian resistance fighters

and endeavor to build a village in order to protect themselves and about 1,000 Jewish non-combatants. Starring Daniel Craig, Liev Schreiber. Rated R for Adult Situations, 137 minutes. Playing Monday, June 8, 2008, 8 p.m., Wednesday, June 10, 2008, 2 & 8 p.m., Thursday, June 11, 2009, 8 p.m., Friday, June 12, 2009, 8 p.m. YES MAN-One word can change everything. A guy challenges himself to say “yes” to everything for an entire year. Starring Jim Carrey, Terence Stamp. PG-13, 104 minutes. Playing Sunday, June 14, 2009, 8 p.m., Monday, June 15, 2009, 2 & 8 p.m., Wednesday, June 17, 2009, 2 p.m., Thursday, June 18, 2009, 8 p.m. CHANGELING-To find her son, she did what no one else dared. A mother’s prayer for her kidnapped son to return home is answered, though it doesn’t take long for her to suspect the boy who comes back is not hers. Starring Angelina Jolie, Gattlin

Griffith. Rated R for Adult Situations, 141 minutes. Playing Friday, June 19, 2009, 8 p.m., Sunday, June 21, 2009, 8 p.m., Monday, June 22, 2009, 2 & 8 p.m., Wednesday, June 24, 2009, 2 p.m. REVOLUTIONARY ROAD-How do you break free without breaking apart? A young couple living in a Connecticut suburb dur-

ing the mid-1950s struggle to come to terms with their personal problems while trying to raise their two children. Starring Leonardo DiCapio, Kate Winslet, Kathy Bates. R, 119 minutes. Playing Wednesday, June 24, 2009, 8 p.m., Thursday, June 25, 2009, 8 p.m., Friday, June 26, 2009, 8 p.m., Sunday, June 28, 2009, 8 p.m., Monday, June 29, 2009, 2 p.m.

PAUL BLART, MALL COP-Safety never takes a holiday. When a shopping mall is overtaken by a gang of organized crooks, it’s up to the mild-mannered security guard to save the day. Starring Kevin James, Shirley Knight. PG, 91 minutes. Playing Monday, June 29, 2009, 8 p.m.


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Prose & Poetry

JUNE 2009

The Certainties of Life

Two ex-cell users at CVE married each other blissfully No use for cell phone in their Home Sweet Home They smooch on the couch – blast the TV!

There aren’t too many certainties in this world of ours, but there are some on which we can depend. Most of them are governed by nature’s powers which can be difficult to comprehend. We can be certain that the winds will blow; that the tides will ebb and the tides will flow; that the sun will shine, for it’s always there, tho’ it’s hiding behind the clouds somewhere; and when they disperse, the forecast is fair. We can be certain that Niagara falls; that the rivers flow in one direction; that Georgians speak with a southern drawl, and Scotsmen with a Scotch inflection; that roses reach for the warmth of the sun, and healthy children love to have fun. There’s no doubt that wings were made to fly; that bees make honey and honeycombs; that raindrops fall down from the sky, and emeralds and diamonds are precious gemstones. We can surely count on the robin’s song when springtime rolls around; for the mating urge is very strong, and the female is lured by the sound. We can be certain that seasons change – fall to winter; spring to summer; that cattle need a fertile range; and we each march to a different drummer. There’s something else we surely know – when snow falls it glistens white; that there’s nothing whiter than the driven snow; it’s one of nature’s most pristine sights. Then there are the phases of the moon; so reliable are they. As sure as July follows June, and June comes after May; and night ushers in another day – all of these we can be certain.

- SANDY WICKER

- NORMA LOCKER

A Couple of Cell-ers A cell phone user at CVE talk-talk-talked incessantly Such constant connections caused ear infections Now he’s deaf – what the heck, at least he is free! A cell phone user at CVE talk-talk-talked incessantly Such constant connections caused ear infections Now she’s deaf – but not bereft since she found he!

Welcoming your Little Girl into the World It’s a Small World The girl I worked with got me a blind date. I had to hurry, so I wouldn’t be late. On to the Russian Tea Room, I knew they would be there soon. As I approached the table, I couldn’t believe my eyes! The three of us screamed and laughed so hard, I thought we would die. My girlfriend looked so puzzled, but all I could do was laugh and cry! Low and behold my blind date was none other than my darling brother! - FLORENCE ROTHMAN

Journey to …? I find myself on a frantic odyssey, Endlessly searching for an epiphany. While probing around for the elusive “it”, Even if found, my fear is I won’t notice “it”.

Now that your little girl has made her debut Your parental duties are laid out for you. To love, to teach, to guide, to inspire, To answer her questions when she will inquire. For all these duties I’m sure you are ready. This will be a job that is very steady. But it will also be a labor of love. She is a special blessing from God above.

\“I’ve walked the walk and talked the talk I’ve made a pledge I’ve driven a wedge.” “I have gotten down on my hands and knees And cried and asked for peace I have tried to make sense Of a war at our kids’ expense.” “I have tried to forget The tragedy of senseless killings, but yet I know it’s hard for an old codger like me But I ask you to listen to me.” “I ask the powers that be To end the catastrophe Don’t send kids into battle As if they were mere cattle.” “It’s a heartless and shameful thing to do And please, don’t misconstrue I’m getting old and almost a goner But please bring these young ones home soon, with dignity and honor.” - GEORGE SHEVELOVE

The vicissitudes of life will also come your way, And you will learn to cope from day to day. ‘Cause experience, you see, is a wonderful teacher. And it’s free and accessible to every creature. I’m sure little Rachel will bring you much joy And precious memories that nothing can destroy. Just be well and strong and follow your heart. And you’ll be off to a spectacular start. With my thoughts and my love I share your happiness, And wish you only the very best. And some day when Rachel is a little older You’ll bring her to Florida. And she’ll put her head on my shoulder. Be well, be happy and be wonderful parents. All My Love, - Grandma Rose

At best, this quest is remarkably nebulous, Far too amorphic and ultimately incredulous. Don Quixote-ish, tilting at a windmill, Much like Jack and Jill, forever climbing up that infernal hill. Enmeshed in a disorienting quandary, I hesitate, Even at this late date, why I insist it is my fate, Tenaciously, to create and to innovate, Greatness so deeply embedded, for which I can no longer wait. Foolishly bordering on the idiotic, Why would my dissembling thoughts be so utterly neurotic? To delude myself with such high-falutin’ ideas, When, in realty, I cannot propel my work-out carcass into action, even in low gears. Age has robbed me of my adventurous spirit, For the most part, I exhibit the symptoms of decrepit. Redundantly uncertain as to the fulfillment I am seeking, The journey is an ordeal, armed with bones that are creaking. An enigma cloaked in a question mark, What I’m trying to uncover is a rallying spark. A blaze to ignite passion and to make my paltry mark, One last ditch effort to illuminate the rapidly encroaching dark. It shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise, That humans own the capacity to dissect and analyze. This trait itself is undeniably quite stunning, That which keeps our complex brains viable and running. - GLORIA DONNELLY

It’s Enough

Evenings in Florida When the sun is resting walking outside at night with Doris, my friend, at my side, inhaling fresh air, I feel the air embraces me all around like a lover’s arms. And the lonely star in the sky, our star, is greeting us, watching over us, illuminating our paths. - SHULA ROBIN The Simple Things of Life To dream wonderful things To watch butterflies drifting along To hold a newborn baby in your arms To laugh at a funny joke To eat an ice cream cone To sleep on clean, soft sheets To smell a cake baking in an oven To lie on a beach wrapped in warm sun’s rays. To shop in your favorite gourmet shoppe To sing your silliest song To talk to grandchildren on the phone Such smiles This is living and The simple things of Life! - SANDI LEHMAN

The Little Soldier All doting grandparents love to boast, Because of cherished grandchildren, who are the best and the most. As a hard and fast rule, I attempt not to brag, To be brutally honest, it is nudgedik and a drag. HOWEVER! My grandson, Corey enlisted in the army, emulating Grandpa Ralph, the Marine, he felt compelled to serve, Passionate and patriotic, his commitment will not swerve. In my mind’s eye, he is still a toddler, but he has evolved into a man, When the army shipped him to fight an unwinnable war in Afghanistan. What he experienced was quite an exciting ride, Thank goodness, he arrived home safely, and is stateside. This brave, young man will be stationed in Kentucky, Where, so far, to date, he has been remarkably lucky. With all the possible scenarios, I am relieved he made it home, Of course, who knows where next he will be forced to roam. Whichever armpit of the universe will be his next deployment, It’s still a helluva distance to travel for gainful employment. For the time being, I am quite elated, Cherishing this moment to be celebrated. Welcome home, my little soldier, thank you for your service to our USA. Grandma is feeling love and pride on this gratifying day. -GLORIA DONNELLY


JUNE 2009

SUDOKU Sudoku doesn’t require any special math skills or calculations. It is a simple and fun game of logic -- all that’s needed is brains and concentration.

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There is really only one rule to Sudoku: Fill in the game board so that the numbers 1 through 9 occur exactly once in each row, column, and 3x3 box. The numbers can appear in any order and diagonals are not considered. Your initial game board will consist of several numbers that are already placed. Those numbers cannot be changed. Your goal is to fill in the empty squares following the simple rule above. 1. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each row. 2. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each column. 3. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each 3x3 box. 4. A complete Sudoku puzzle contains the numbers 1 through 9 in every row, column, and 3x3 box. Hint: Start with a square that only has three numbers missing. Look at surrounding squares and grids to see which numbers you need to fill that 3x3 grid. SOLUTION ON PAGE 34B

JUMBLE

CRYPTOGRAM

By CHARLES K PARNESS

1) ISACONSOC 2) ACENIGHT 3) RELENTC 4) HISTING 5) LANCEHN

_ ( _) _ _ _ ( _) _ _ ( _) ( _) _ _ _ ( _) ( _) _ _ ( _) _ _ _ ( _) _ ( _) _ _ _ ( _ ) _ _ ( _) _ ( _) ( _) _ _ ( _) _

What do you call the “safety zones” of justice? “ ( _) ( _)( _)( _)( _)( _)( _) ( _)( _)( _)( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) .”

By CHARLES K PARNESS

say bnces edg snbhcke nmc oyppnb rcyhsmcye de gns sn ahsy sayt, zms sn zy dgkdooycygs sn sayt: sahs’e say yeeygry no dgamthgdsi. say kyfdp’e kderdwpy Hint: The letter “e” appearing above

Unscramble each word, then use the letters in the brackets to solve the jumble. Solution on page 34B

stands for the letter “S”

SOLUTION ON PAGE 34B

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Cooke’s Look at Books By RICHARD WILLIAM COOKE A monthly look at books of interest – new and, occasionally, not-so-new, fiction and nonfiction -- currently available at your public library, local bookstore or from online booksellers. American Lion By Jon Meacham, Random House, 483 Pages, $30.00 Winner of the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction, Jon Meacham’s latest book, American Lion, tells the remarkable story of Andrew Jackson, “Old Hickory,” who rose from nothing to the pinnacle of power and is one of our most important yet least remembered presidents, Orphan, battlehardened warrior, founder of the Democratic Party, Jackson created, through sheer force of will and ambition, the office Obama has now assumed. Newsweek editor and bestselling author Meacham argues that if you don’t understand Jackson, you can’t understand anything that happens in Washington today. Consider that Jackson was so upset with partisan coverage that he founded his own newspaper which would be as if George W. Bush, during his presidency, had created Fox News. Jackson destroyed the Bank of the United States, which was the equivalent of Wall Street, on the grounds that the elites – the “financial sector” – were profiting at the expense of others. Jackson was the first president to be the target of an assassination attempt – and it happened twice. Jackson’s partisans trashed the White House on Inauguration Day, destroying carpets and furniture in search of whiskey punch to celebrate the defeat of the unpopular son of a president, John Quincy Adams, in the George W. Bush role. Jackson invaded Florida on a slim pretext and added it to the Union. Jackson sent the U.S. Navy to France because the French refused to pay a debt, threatening combat. Responsible for the removal of Indians from their native lands, he also adopted an Indian child he found on the battlefield and raised him as his own. And there’s more, much more. Surprisingly detailed, thoroughly researched and fast-moving, this portrait of a president both beloved and hated, venerated and reviled, is totally engrossing. As one reviewer wrote, “After reading it, no longer will you be able to look on the gaunt, craggy face on the twentydollar bill without hearing

the tumult of America in the making.” CAN A SMART PERSON BELIEVE IN GOD? By Michael Guillen, Thomas Nelson Publishing, 160 Pages, $17.99 WHY I BECAME AN ATHEIST By John W. Loftus, Prometheus Books, 428 Pages, Paperback, $19.95 Two new books have joined the lively “Is there a God?” debate. In Can A Smart Person Believe in God?, author Michael Guillen, a TV science journalist, argues that both science and the Bible prove the existence of God. John W. Loftus, author of Why I Became An Atheist, spent twenty years as an ordained minister of the Church of Christ and tells why he ultimately rejected religion and why he now believes the Bible is replete with, not only errors, but out and-out non-truths. Can A Smart Person Believe in God? is the easiest of the two books to get through. It’s short, simple, and takes a breezy, pop-science approach to the debate insisting “If the Bible says it, it’s true.” It’s an approach that will reassure and comfort those who may be looking for confirmation and reassurance in their belief in God. The weakness in Guillen’s book – as it is in nearly all treatises written to prove the existence of God is that it is totally based on the King James version of the Bible. He never makes the case why nonbelievers should accept this Bible as the definitive answer and, like most similar authors on the subject, never addresses the existence of any tradition other than Christianity. As one reviewer wrote, “It’s as provincial as a book on life in the twentieth century that only talks about New York City. Yeah, it’s big, but it isn’t all there is.” Loftus’s book, on the other hand, is by far the most scholarly, thoughtful and intellectually challenging, presenting arguments that every religious and nonreligious person will find vastly provocative, whether or not he or she agrees. With skill, but without rancor, he lays out his persuading philosophical, scientific and historical case against belief, covering a broad intellectual plain including the implications of religious diversity, the authority of faith vs. reason, and the problem of evil. For every issue -- the con-

tradictions between the Bible and the scientific worldview, the conflicts between traditional dogma and historical evidence, or lack thereof, surrounding both Old and New Testament stories, scholarly disagreements over when and who actually wrote the various books of the Bible, why certain books of the Bible were deemed worthy of inclusion by early church leaders while others were summarily discarded – Loftus succinctly summarizes the various points of view and provides references for further reading. He writes that by the late 1990s he experienced a fullblown crisis of faith, brought on by emotional upheavals in his personal life as well as the weight of the doubts he had long entertained. “I became an atheist precisely because that’s where the unanswerable questions led me. The arguments just weren’t there, period.” No matter which side of the God debate you find yourself on, one thing is sure – after reading both of these books you will come to the conclusion that both believers and atheists believe in something that cannot be proven. And so the debate will continue… and continue…and continue. DON’T LOOK TWICE By Andrew Gross, William Morrow, 378 Pages, $25.99 With his New York Times and internationally bestselling books The Blue Zone and The Dark Tide, master thriller writer Andrew Gross has earned a legion of fans and high critical praise for his ability to create tension, anticipation and suspense. One critic puts him in the company of such current masters as Lee Child and Harlan Coben. Along with co-authoring six number one thrillers with James Patterson, Gross’s own novels and his popular Ty Hauck novels have clearly established him as one of the best writers in the genre today. Now, in his electrifying new thriller – filled with wildly unsuspecting twists and turns – Hauck returns to face the most complex and deadly challenge of his career. A heart-racing tale of murder and conspiracy that reaches into the upper echelons of wealth and power, this latest story finds Hauck at the center of a sinister cover-up and in the grip of a powerful group of insiders who will stop at nothing to protect an international profiteering scheme. In a case where almost nothing adds up no matter

how hard he looks, Hauck can see that those who know too much are turning up dead… and he may be next. Focused on spending quality time with his daughter and a new woman in his life, a routine stop at a gas station turns into an explosive drive-by shooting that leaves an innocent bystander dead and Hauck’s own daughter injured -- and leaves Hauck reeling and wondering if he was the target. While trying to piece together the clues of what appears to be a vicious act of revenge, a fellow police officer is killed in an explosion intended for Hauck. Hauck now knows he’s in way too deep to simply walk away. Don’t Look Twice is a taut, gripping, emotionally wrenching thriller from one of today’s hottest talent in suspense fiction. OLIVE KITTERIDGE By Elizabeth Strout, Random House, 286 Pages, Paperback, $14.00 Critics fell all over themselves praising this book of related stories when it first came out earlier this year but it was slow to attract a popular audience. Now that it has been awarded the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, that is sure to change. In this book, author Strout binds together thirteen rich, luminous narratives into a

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book with the heft of a novel through the presence of one larger-than-life, unforgettable character, Olive Kitteridge. A retired schoolteacher, Olive deplores the changes in her little town of Crosby, Maine, and in the world at large. But she doesn’t always recognize the changes going on around her which include a lounge musician haunted by a past romance, a former student who has lost the will to live, Olive’s own adult child, who feels tyrannized by her irrational sensitivities, and her own husband, Henry, who finds his loyalty to his marriage both a blessing and a curse. At the edge of the continent, the town of Crosby may seem like nowhere but seen through this brilliant writer’s eyes it is, in essence, the whole world, and the lives that are lived there are filled with all the grand human dramas -- desire, despair, jealousy, hope and love. “Olive Kitteridge is a heartwrenching, penetrating portrait of ordinary coastal Mainers living lives of quiet grief intermingled with flashes of human connection…The collection is easy to read and impossible to forget,” wrote Publishers Weekly. Other critics has called Olive “Funny, wicked and remorseful, a compelling life force, a red-blooded original. When she’s not onstage, we look forward to her return. The book is a page-turner because of her.” And you will agree.


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Sudoku Solution: Cryptogram Solution: THE WORST SIN TOWARDS OUR FELLOW CREATURES IS NOT TO HATE THEM, BUT TO BE INDIFFERENT TO THEM: THAT’S THE ESSENCE OF INHUMANITY. THE DEVIL’S DISCIPLE

Jumble Solution: 1) Occasions 2) Cheating 3) Lectern 4) Insight 5) Channel Answer: “Technicalities“

2009 Area Chair and Vice Chair


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A Snowbird Reviews By JANICE ZAMSKY Cavendish Presents…A Springtime Serenade, April 15. Cheryl Cavendish never disappoints a CVE audience and this mid-week show was no exception! The gowns of the two sopranos (Ms. Cavendish and Valerie Girard) were as gorgeous as the evening’s musical selections and voices. Two tenors, Bill Stafford, and a terrific gent from Spain, Eduardo Aladrea, and, of course, the always superb pianist-accompanist and musical director, Dr. Warren Broome rounded out an evening of musical treats. Cheryl Cavendish was in her usual top-notch form as she opened the program, so appropriately, with a rendering of Its a Grand Night for Singing. Her offering of I Love Paris in the Springtime was equally outstanding. Tenor Stafford and soprano Girard lived up to Cavendish standards with selections from Broadway and opera. Tenor Aladrea was smashing in his hearty Granada. Opera selections included songs from Puccini’s La Boheme and Bizet’s popular Flower Song from Carmen. Rodgers and Hammerstein were represented by Younger Than Springtime from State Fair. A Cavendish show always includes something for everybody: Sweethearts (from Victor Herbert’s Springtime), Give me Some Men Who Are Stout Hearted Men, When you Walk Through a Storm, and more

Puccini from the opera Tosca. Needless to say, the complainers were silent this evening! Mary Anne Edwards and Barron Rice, April 18 Unbelievable: two fantastic musical shows in less than a week apart and both at the wonderful ticket price of $5 each! Broadway favorites reigned this evening and were enthusiastically received by a most appreciative CVE audience. Familiar tunes were faultlessly rendered. Ms. Edwards started the evening with a medley of Gershwin tunes. Rice joined her for two duets from South Pacific: Bali High and Some Enchanted Evening. The beloved Edelweis from Sound of Music suited Barron Rice’s vocal talents very well. Both singers collaborated on selections from other Broadway hits, including The King and I, Phantom of the Opera, West Side Story, Showboat and Man of La Mancha. No complaints again – everybody went back to their condos in a joyful mood. Paulette Dozier, April 25 Paulette Dozier has been compared to Josephine Baker according to her introduction. She is a warm, pleasant person and easy on the eyes. However, her husky, throaty voice is more suited to a small, intimate cabaret than a large theater. Her selection of songs could be greatly improved upon (no familiar favorites tonight).

Her childhood tales were more impressive than her singing. Perhaps she should stick to acting rather than singing. The shows opener, The Amazing Tomaso has appeared at CVE previously. If you like magicians, you might find him “amazing.” If you don’t particularly care for magicians (e.g. the usual scarf tricks, white doves and rabbit in a hat), what can I say? Mora Newman, May 2 A pleasant voice and a peppy, highly enthusiastic personality are valuable assets for Mora Newman. Appropriately, she began her performance with This Could Be the Start of Something Big. The vivacious singer followed this tune with equally spirited renditions of Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered, Won’t you Come Home, Bill Bailey, ByeBye Blackbird and a poignant Somewhere over the Rainbow. Other selections that showcased her enthusiastic style and vocal talents included It’s Very Plain That our Love is Here to Stay, Cabaret and a vigorous Stop in the Name of Love. She concluded her act with I Can’t Say Goodbye. Explaining to the audience that she was one-half Puerto Rican and one-half Jewish, Ms. Newman impishly added, “But I have a Yiddishe Kop! (head).” That fact was apparent in her choice of the evening’s repertoire. The opener, Art Bergman, a comedian, was not as outstanding a performer. I’ve heard worse, I’ve heard better. The best word to describe his act is “mediocre.” I’m cer-

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tainly glad the main act of the evening was stellar. Cavendish Revue – Broadway Cabaret, May 13 Taking a much-needed brief respite from the rigors of preparation for our annual summer migration north (endless packing and condo cleaning), I thoroughly enjoyed Cavendish’s Broadway Revue. The evening’s repertoire showcased the lively talents of the vocal quartet: sopranos Cheryl Cavendish and Diana D’Ambrosio, Wayne Legette and Bill Stafford, tenor and baritone respectively. Pianist and musical arranger, Dr. Warren Broome, and percussionist Doug Friend also made notable contributions to this pleasant evening. The program started with a lively rendition (most appropriately!) of Cabaret. Some of the notable numbers (done as solos, duets or trios), were This is my the Moment, I Gotta be Me, It’s Delightful, It’s Delicious and It’s Delovely, The Lady is a Tramp (from Guys

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and Dolls) and If Ever I Would Leave You (from Camelot). Other all-time favorites performed included I Could Have Danced All Night and Luck Be a Lady Tonight (another tune from Guys and Dolls). Show selections ranged from songs of the roaring 20’s (Chicago) to the 1950”s (Oliver) to more current shows (Richard Rodgers’ Cinderella and Oklahoma, Cats and Kiss Me Kate). The last two selections of the evening were my favorites: the poignant duet from Phantom of the Opera as sung by Ms. Cavendish and Mr. Stafford. The other favorite was I Want To Be A Producer as rendered by Mr. Legette. I will probably miss some of these excellent Cavendish shows during the summer. They will perform a Carmen production slated for midJune. Year-round residents can enjoy shows during the off-season. I’ll be back in the Fall with my column, praising or “panning” CVE theater performances!

New Bus Procedure for the West Route (to Deerfield Mall, etc.)

Guaranteed Seats

1. At the Clubhouse, tickets will be handed out on a firstcome, first-served basis up to the seating capacity of the bus. 2. When the bus arrives at the Clubhouse, residents with tickets will board. The tickets will be collected as you enter the bus. Note: This does not apply to the internal CVE bus system, only the external West Route.

The system will begin on April 1, 2009.


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SAVE OUR LIBRARY

Petitions Available At COOCVE Office For Details Call Steven Fine 954-421-5566 x-214


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Coverage for all residents of Century Village with great service at very affordable rates. Did you know that beginning January 1st, 2009 all owners of Condominiums in Florida are required to have a Condominium Insurance policy? We can write this policy for you at a rate you can afford. Stop by our office or call for a Free Quote!

In Palm Trails Plaza between Sal’s and Quizno’s 1137 S. Military Trail on the SW corner of SW 10th St.

Call us for a free quote: (954)428-0411

Or visit us on the internet at: www.underwriting.com

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Reporter June 2009 Volume 32 Number 9  

only COOCVE Directors had this opportunity. In order to assist President Fine, in responding to residents’ questions were the COOCVE officer...

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