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Board of Directors of COOCVE Meets THIRD TUESDAY of the Month at 9:30 a.m. in the Party Room Official Monthly News/Magazine of the Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida

JULY 2009

SECTION A, 36 PAGES

VOLUME 32, NUMBER 10

Four Year Anniversary of Fire at Ventnor B By JUDY OLMSTEAD

Photos by ROSS GILSON

NW Corner – 2009

NW Corner – 2005 Exactly four years ago, on July 7, 2005, a fire occurred in an upstairs unit at Ventnor B because a previous owner wanted to save a few dollars by having a non-professional install and wire a ceiling fan. The current owner went out for the evening leaving the ceiling fan on. Florida Power and Light recommends turning off the ceiling fan when you leave a room (in order to save energy). While this might not make sense in our small

units, after what happened in Ventnor B, it might be advisable to turn the fans off when you leave your unit. Ventnor B is a 20 unit building and half are still unoccupied. The problems for the Board of Directors of Ventnor B have been almost insurmountable. The building was underappraised at slightly over $700,000 and, therefore, underinsured. In addition, the original assessment of damage from POE

Insurance was estimated at less than 25% of the entire building and they only wanted to pay less than $200,000.00 for all of the necessary repairs. After 21 months POE went into receivership and the Ventnor Board of Directors was finally able to obtain a copy of the adjuster’s claim, including causation, which had been submitted to POE. POE was also involved in compensation for Hurricane Wilma damages, and subsequent to their filing for

bankruptcy, Ventnor B had to deal with FIGA, which chose to rely on the original erroneous claim report. The damage was minimized by the original claims adjuster and FIGA continues to fight payment every step of the way. To compound problems, the city of Deerfield made it virtually impossible for Ventnor B to get permits to even start the work. Finally, with the help of Senator Ted Deutch and the invaluable assistance of

then Mayor Al Capellini, architectural designs were prepared and approved. Because of current building codes, the cost of build-out continues to plague Ventnor B. According to Faye Adam, President of Ventnor B, replacement value up to current code requirements was not part of the insurance coverage obtained in 2004, when Amadeo Trinchitella was still in charge, and bulk insurance was obtained through See FIRE pg 8A

Volunteers Honored for Service to Village By BETTY SCHWARTZ, Assistant to the Editor

Ira and Michelle flanked by family and close friends IN THIS ISSUE: Board of Directors ......................... 3A starts on 6A Village Minutes.............................

Former COOCVE President Ira Grossman and Rec Committee and Master Management Volunteer, Marty

Ira Grossman and Tina Silverman Silverman took their place on the CVE Wall of Frame in a ceremony conducted Friday, May 29, 2009.

Tina Silverman flanked by admirers of her husband Marty COOCVE President, Steven Fine made the presentation to Mr. Grossman and Mr. Silverman’s widow, Tina

at the Wall that sits at the Theater entrance in the Clubhouse.

Mayors Message.......................... 4A

See HONORED pg 8A

starts on Letters to the Editor...................... 4A starts on 11A Condo News.................................

News & Views............................... 15A Consumer Interest........................ 21A Political Scene.............................. 22A Our Commissioner........................ 22A starts on 23A Remembering the Past..................

Sounding Board ............................ 29A starts on 32A Up Front/Personal..........................

Health Matters............................... 10B starts on Observations................................. 11B starts on 23B You Should Know.......................... starts on 25B Arts/Entertainment .......................

See Our “Veterans Day Special” On Page 31A

SAVE OUR LIBRARY Petitions Available At

COOCVE Office For Details Call Steven Fine 954-421-5566 x-214


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JULY 2009

COOCVE Board of Directors Meeting June 16, 2009 President Steve Fine as Chair called the Meeting to Order at approximately 9:38 a.m. Sergeant-at-Arms Art Dove counted attendance of 125 directors, constituting a quorum. Deputy Jim Engle spoke after the Pledge of Allegiance and Moment of Silence. He reported a number of minor crimes, many of them avoidable such as reports of items left unattended that disappeared, an unlocked car with prescription drugs inside that were taken, and falling for a money scam of an offer from an unknown party overseas that was clearly too good to be true. A director asked for guidance on turning right legally and safely exiting the Village on Hillsboro to turn north on Military Trail. Sheriff Engle said it is OK to move to the left when traffic permits, but if traffic is too heavy to change lanes right away, instead go straight on Hillsboro to an extra traffic light to Lock Road and turn left, which will take you back to Military. After the Sheriff’s report, the Chair called for a reading of the Minutes of the Board’s previous meeting of May 19, 2009. The directors moved

to waive the reading of those Minutes, and approved the Minutes as published in the June 2009 issue of the CVE Reporter. Steve then gave the President’s report. He referred to a previous discussion on COOCVE’s renting buses to take residents to Broward County Commission meetings and hearings so that we can show support to maintaining intact the Century Plaza Library. Steve mentioned an article by Elizabeth Roberts in the SunSentinel the day before, which stated that the Century Plaza Library gets on average 12,000 visitors a week, much higher than many other libraries in the County. Bernie Parness noted that the main criteria for the Commission are usage and cost, and that although the Century Plaza building is highly utilized, it is in a rented facility which costs the County more to operate than the Percy White library which the County owns. Bernie said that the Century Plaza Library is on the Commission’s agenda for August, and the Commission has asked that we don’t come to speak about the Library at the June meeting since there

are plenty of other matters on the Agenda. Bernie noted also that the City of Deerfield Beach, Mayor and the City Commissioners, had written a letter to the County Commission to oppose cuts to the budget of the Century Plaza Library. Steve Fine announced that the November 2009 issue of the CVE Reporter would be a special “Veteran’s Day” issue, and asked for residents to send in for publication a photo of themselves in uniform, and one of themselves today. Steve then mentioned that COOCVE had received a letter (dated June 4, 2009) from Deerfield Beach’s Department of Public Works, disclaiming liability for damage to dumpster enclosures, and alleging that many buildings are “in violation” of lacking proper buffers. Steve said he had asked the City for specifics. Treasurer Ken Barnett reported that as of May 31, 2009, COOCVE’s bank accounts totaled $322,538. We have now collected dues from all but three Associations, and Ken said he had requested help from Seacrest in one case and East Coast Management in the other who each provide

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management services to one of the past-due Associations. For the first five months of the year, COOCVE had over $67,000 of income from dues collected, and expenses of just under $27,000, resulting in net income of about $40,000. The Chair then gave the floor to Mel Schmier of the Bylaws Committee, to submit two amendments to COOCVE’s bylaws, after due notice at previous Meetings and through publication in the CVE Reporter. Mel noted that a bylaws amendment requires a 2/3 favorable vote, and read aloud in turn each motion. The first Motion was to add to Sec. 8.5. of the Bylaws: “No person may apply for nomination to more than one office of the Corporation. No person may be nominated, in any manner, for an office in the Corporation, or as a Director of CVE Master Management Co., Inc., or as a member of the Recreation Committee, if their election would result in their service in more than one of the aforementioned offices.” After the Motion received a Second, discussion ensued. Bernie Parness spoke in favor of the Amendment, saying it was necessary to avoid “dictators”. Bernie asked to amend the Amendment to require existing officers to resign if they are in violation

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of this new prohibition. Beverly Chase questioned the impact of the Amendment, saying it was already difficult to get enough people to volunteer for all positions. In that regard, Rhonda Pitone noted that if we don’t get candidates for all positions, there is the danger that they get appointed without vote. Beverly Chase asked that the Amendment allow people to run for a second office, if they commit to resign from their existing office if they are in fact elected to the new one. Dan Glickman questioned the need for the Amendment as a way to prevent concentration of power, noting that the officers of Master Management are elected by a Board of 15 directors, and the officers of the Recreation Committee by a Board of seven directors. Parliamentarian Gene Goldman opined that the Bylaws specify that amendments must come through the Bylaws Committee, so the directors could not consider any amendments from the floor, but must vote on the Amendments as presented by the Bylaws Committee. The Chair called the Question. The directors approved the Motion by a vote of 95 in favor, exceeding the 2/3 level of 84 votes required for See DIRECTORS pg 7A


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The Mayor’s Message By PEGGY NOLAND, Mayor/ City of Deerfield Beach

cvereporter@hotmail.com Editor-in-Chief STEVEN H. FINE Assistant to the Editor Betty Schwartz Editorial Staff Seymour Blum Judy Olmstead Wendy Rosenzveig Betty Schwartz Activities Editor Sandy Parness

Production Sid Goldstein Christie Voss

Sid Birns

Photo Journalists Jules Kesselman Al Miller

Advertising Consultants Susan Dove Arlene Fine Estelle Sabsels Office Staff Norman Bloom, Seymour Blum, Carol Carr, Susan Dove, Arlene Fine, Rhoda Jarmark, Estelle Kaufman, Bea Litner, Sharon McLear, Sandy Parness, Toni Ponto, Betty Schwartz, Estelle Sabsels Staff Cartoonist Alan G. Rifkin Alvin Sherman 1913-2000

Prepress Technition Christie Voss

Columnists and Regular Contributors Shelly Baskin, Harvey Beaber, Sid Birns, Evelyn Bloom, Norman L. Bloom, Sy Blum, Mary Catherine Castro, Herb Charatz, Marion G. Cohen, Richard William Cooke, Senator Ted Deutch, Arlene Fine, Jack Galit, Max Garber, Gilbert Gordon, Rolf Grayson, Broward Commissioner Kristin Jacobs, Harry L. Katz, Louis Kaufman, Jules Kesselman, Richard Koenig, Rosalind Lerman, Jess Levin, Dory Leviss, Bea Litner, Dr. Norma Locker, Rosalind Mandell, Pauline Mizrach, Deerfield Beach Mayor, Peggy Noland, Judy Olmstead, Nelia Panza, Lori Parrish, Charles Parness, Phyllis Pistolis, Commissioner Marty Popelsky, Eva Rachesky, Betty Schwartz, Gloria Shomer, Rosalyn Spitzer, Helene Wayne, Carl Weitz, Lucille Weitz, Jerry Wolf, Robert Winston, Janice Zamsky. Business Manager Steven H. Fine Circulation Proofreaders Outside Pubs., Inc. Carol Carr, Sid Goldstein, Beth Barbara Turner Heller, Toni Ponto, Wendy Rosenzveig, Betty Schwartz The CENTURY VILLAGE EAST REPORTER is published monthly and distributed,without charge, to the residents of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida. It is published for the edification of said residents, and contains reports of the monthly meetings of the corporations, Board of Directors and its Committees, as well as news, bus and theater schedules, and contributed articles of current interest to the residents. The Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Inc. aka COOCVE,a not-for-profit corporation, its officers, directors, editors, staff, any committee people are not responsible for typographical errors or misrepresentations in any advertisements or article. They are not responsible and assume no liability for the content of, or any opinions expressed in, any contributed articles which represent the author’s own opinions and not necessarily the opinion of COOCVE. Acceptance of advertising for products or services in no way constitutes an official endorsement of the product. Information to contributors: The Reporter reserves the right to edit, accept and refuse articles in the interest of brevity, clarity and the appropriateness of subject matter. Residents are advised to check with the person they are hiring to be sure he is licensed and insured.

Summer is well underway as I write this, just a few days after our spectacular 4th of July celebration. I hope that you were able to come to the beach to enjoy this wonderful event, and if not, that you had a safe and happy holiday. We all know that the heat of South Florida summers can be unforgiving. What better time to take advantage of community services, such as those offered at your local library? In recent Broward County budget discussions, the Century Plaza Branch has been tagged as one of a collection of county libraries to be closed. Through your e-mails, phone calls and petitions, I have learned how devastating this would be for the residents of Century Village. I want you to know that I am committed to keeping this branch open. In May, I sent individual letters to all Broward County Commissioners, to ask them to reconsider this action. I thought you would appreciate my sharing the letter with you.

B

y far the most popular and widely read segment of our publication is the Letter-tothe Editor columns. We encourage letters that enable our readers to “sound off” on any subject. However, we will not print letters from the same person on the same subject in two consecutive issues. Also, letters must be from CVE residents, must be signed and, if possible type-written double-spaced. Please include your phone number. When we receive letters about applicable contracts, please remember the Reporter does not endorse any single company. Residents are free to make their own choices each year. Criterion for letters that will not be published: Letters in poor taste, demeaning and vastly untrue.

Participate or Don’t Complain To the Editor: Thank you to the 15 delegates of the Oakridge

By STEVEN H. FINE, President/ COOCVE

Master Management.” After a brief discussion the Chair called for a vote. The directors voted in favor of the amendments. The BOD also approved a motion made by Bill Goddard to authorize the President to disperse funds necessary to hire buses to take residents to Broward County Commission Meetings in support of saving the Century Plaza Library which is visited by around 12,000 people a week from and outside the Village. We must take whatever steps necessary to keep the library

The Deerfield Beach City Commission is in recess for the month of July, but rest assured, this issue is a priority of mine and my fellow Commissioners. As always, if you have suggestions, questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me through the City Manager’s office at 954-480-4263, or via email at web.commission@ deerfield-beach.com.

The Mail Bag

From the President The BOD Meeting of 6/16/09 had a quorum. Two proposed COOCVE By Law amendments were submitted for the directors approval by acting Chair Mel Schmier. They are as follows: To be added to Sec. 8.5 “No person may apply for nomination to more than one office of the Corporation. No person may be nominated, in any manner, for an office in the Corporation, or as a Director of CVE Master Management Co., or as a member of the Recreation Committee, if their election would result in their service in more than one of the aforementioned offices.” To be added to Sec. 8.7 “The Nominating Committee shall conduct the election of COOCVE Officers and Sgts-at-Arms, members of the Recreation Committee and the election of the members of the Board of Directors of

Dear Broward County Commissioner: As you are aware, Broward County is planning on closing several libraries due to budget cuts. Enclosed are petitions including over 1,400 signatures from City of Deerfield Beach constituents, who are opposed to the closing of the Century Plaza Branch Library, located at 1856A West Hillsboro Boulevard, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. On behalf of the City Commission, I urge you to keep the Century Plaza Branch Library open as it is vital to the

senior community. An estimated 12,000 people utilize this facility each week. The majority of individuals are elderly residents from Century Village who are unable to drive to another branch, many needing canes and wheelchairs. When considering which branches to close, please take into consideration the hardships that will be placed on our elderly residents. I thank you for your attention to this important issue. Should you need any further information, please contact (954)480-4263. Sincerely, Peggy Noland, Mayor

operating. Petitions are still at the COOCVE office. I urge you to stay involved. The library is an important resource for our residents. We do not want to lose it. At the August meeting of the Board of Directors, I will, with the approval of the BOD, appoint a Nominating Committee (of which no member shall be a candidate for office) consisting of one member from each area of Century Village East. The Committee will elect its chairman. Sign up sheets will be available at the July BOD meeting. The COOCVE financial statement prepared by independant auditor Reynolds & Picciano LLC is available for your viewing on page 12A & 13A. It is your village, it’s your home. Let’s work together to make it a better place to live.

area who attended the COOCVE meeting on June 16, 2009. This was a far cry from the seven who attended the May meeting. Because of your attendance and others like you, an important bylaw change was voted on. It stated that no person can be nominated or serve in more than one office at one time i.e. COOCVE, Master Management or Recreation. But there were no delegates from Oakridge A,B,C,I,L,N or R. Some of these buildings never have a delegate in attendance at these important meetings. So don’t complain about how this Village is being run if you don’t take an interest in its operation. JULES KESSELMAN Oakridge V Pool Dance – Lots of Fun To the Editor: Please know that the pool dance this past Sunday was delightful and very much enjoyed by all. Your choice for a DJ was perfect and contributed greatly to the afternoon. With additional publicity, I feel the numbers would increase substantially. Perhaps notices could be posted on the front and back

doors of the Clubhouse prior to each date. Of course, the additional 3rd Sunday would make us very happy but we’ll settle for the “Once-a-Month” to continue through October. Many thanks for all your efforts! ROSLYN SIEGAL I Can’t Hear You To The Editor: After attending a recreation committee meeting, it was very apparent that the Chairperson was looking for ways to avoid expanding closed caption at the Clubhouse movies. For those who do not have a hearing problem, captions might be annoying. For the hard of hearing, the showing is a complete waste In a community like ours, where hard-of-hearing is common, many would benefit if the closed caption program was expanded. Telling the hard of hearing to go out and buy an Am-Fm radio which might or might not work is throwing us a bone and is totally unfair and unreasonable. Eugene Bein Lyndhurst F See MAILBAG, pg 10A


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Village Minutes Minutes of Master Management Board June 11, 2009 Acting President Reva Behr called the meeting to order at 9:30 a.m. In attendance were: Reva Behr, Anthony Falco, J. William Goddard, Gene Goldman, Jules Kesselman, Jack Kornfield, Bill Morse, Mel Schmier and Ira Somerset (via phone). Guest present was Bob Dolson, Business Manager. Reva Behr welcomed and introduced the newest Master Management Director, J. William (Bill) Goddard to the Board of Directors. After the Pledge of Allegiance and moment of silence, the open mike session was held. Two community members signed up: Adele Cross, Oakridge E, spoke about the removal of a honeycomb of bees from a tree on the lawn and wanted to know who will pay for the service. Dan Glickman commented on the Executive Committee Meeting regarding the Comcast services. There were statements made about a letter sent out to Comcast for breach of contract, and he would like clarification. Minutes A motion was made by Mel Schmier to waive the reading of the minutes; Bill Goddard seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Jack Kornfield asked that we change the minutes under Hurricane Clean-Up as follows: Gene Goldman asked that the word “Association” be changed to “Master Management.” Jack Kornfield indicated that Associations were mentioned in this agreement and this agreement be reviewed by our attorney. Financial Report – Bill Morse The CVE Master Management Financial Report prepared by Bill Morse was distributed to all Board members and discussed in detail. For the month of May 2009: Total Income --$746,139; Total Expenses -- $739,264; Net Income -- $6,875. YTD: Total Income -$3,735,827; Total Expenses

-- $3,853,783; Operating Loss -- ($117,956); Total Assets -- $2,094,989; Total Liabilities -- $1,195,846; Total Equity -$899,143. The delay, by Century Maintenance, in providing the December 2008 Financial Reports was resolved by Order of the Court; and the reports have been received. The net status of Assessments Receivable from monthly coupons of approximately 330 unit owners, as of December 31, 2008 -- $116,285. Overdue Accounts Receivable, representing 1,133 unit owners (January 1 through May 31) -- $240,517; 478 unit owners (over 30 days) -- $35,330; 208 unit owners (over 60 days) -- $34,345; 98 unit owners (over 90 days) -- $23,877; 31 unit owners (over 120 days) -$10,204; 318 unit owners (over 150 days) -- $136,760. Legal Committee – Bill Morse An opinion letter was read from Patrick Murphy regarding watering guidelines and the Seacrest contract, regarding cutting the overgrown perimeter hedges. Mr. Murphy stated that Master Management does not have a strong legal basis under the existing contract to require Seacrest to cut back the hedges. With regard to the watering guidelines, Mr. Murphy stated that the operation, rights and obligations to water, reside with Master Management. Reva Behr will prepare a letter to send to East Coast and Associations asking them to cease and desist from watering as Seacrest, the official management company for Master Management, will be taking over the responsibility for watering all the buildings of the Village, effective immediately. Acting President’s Report – Reva Behr Century Service Systems – Our lawyers received an extension of 30 days to gather the documents for the lawsuit.

Property Lines –We have not found any documentation on property lines along Military Trail or SW 10th Street to support the City’s claim that it is CVE property and that CVE and Master Management are required to maintain it. Verbal requests to Deerfield Beach officials have not yielded responses. Ira Somerset suggested we request written documentation from the Mayor and City Commissioner. Comcast – Dick Ciocca, Comcast Committee Chair, has been informed that CVE will have, free of charge, for one year, the TV Guide Channels, 18 and 41. If you do not have this channel, call Comcast directly. Security – Several residents in CVE have been victims of scams. Please be careful and do not give out personal information when answering the phone. Also, residents should be responsible with their personal belongings in the gym. Business Manager’s Report – Bob Dolson Air Conditioning Le Club A/C in contract; units are being manufactured, waiting for permits and anticipate June installation. Ira Somerset moved to approve replacement of the condenser fan unit in the Activities Center, by Cool Team, at a cost of $725; Mel Schmier seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Bus Bench Pads All pads are installed and inspected. Benches are being located onto pads and will be anchored. Irrigation IDG report is almost complete. Mr. Perkins is waiting for two items, FPL and Geologist; Final Report will be available next week. Pump Station repairs to date were $34,675, close to the authorized $36,000. Mel Schmier moved to approve an additional $4,000 for pump repairs; Jack Kornfield seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Landscape Seacrest will replace damaged hedge material along West Drive and at Newport and Ventnor the week of June 15. Planters for East and West Gate Houses will be installed the week of June 15. After a detailed discussion on the trimming of the perimeter hedge, Jules Kesselman moved to accept G&V Shalom’s proposal; Reva Behr seconded. Bill Morse moved to table the discussion; Mel Schmier seconded. Motion passed 7:1. In anticipation of the hurricane season, bids were solicited for trimming Master Management trees. Anthony Falco moved to approve the proposal from G&V Shalom

Tree Care to trim Master Management trees for a total of $26,612 plus any applicable permit fees and tax; Mel Schmier seconded. Motion passed 7:1. Maintenance Issues Roof painting at the East and West Gate houses is complete. Three gate valves in the Tilford Pool Pump Room need replacement. Anthony Falco moved to approve the proposal, dated May 12, from Knox Pools, Inc. to replace three vacuum pump valves for $556.50, including sales tax; Reva Behr seconded. Motion passed 7:1. Pool Fence State Law now requires a fence of minimum height of 48” around all pools. To comply, Tilford Pool must have a fence installed. Mel Schmier moved to approve the proposal from Bulldog Fence, dated May 19, 2009, to supply and install a fence around the Tilford Pool for $4,065, provided all safety features are included in accordance with the law, plus any applicable tax and permit fees; Jack Kornfield seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Waterproofing and Sealing The windows and doors at Le Club and in the Activities Center are in need of sealing and waterproofing. Jack Kornfield moved to authorize Ability Glass and Mirror to perform the repairs as outlined on the proposal, dated June 9, 2009, for $12,306, including tax and permits; Bill Goddard seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Parking Lot Lighting There are nine aluminum light poles that need replacement. Anthony Falco moved to approve the FDC Electric proposal to replace the nine light poles at the Master Management complex for $14,400, plus permit fees as per proposal, dated May 6, 2009; Reva Behr seconded. Motion passed 6:1 with one abstention. Stop Signs Several Stop signs that are faded need to be replaced. Gene Goldman moved to approve the proposal from Signsations for 12 Stop signs for a total of $742.26, including tax; William Goddard seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Road Repairs Thirty-five locations throughout the Village require road repairs. William Goddard moved to approve Five Star to repair 2,397 square yards of asphalt for $39,080, plus tax and permit fees; Mel Schmier seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Roofing Project Roofing project is underway. Rain has caused some delay and an estimated completion date of July 4 is expected. Security Safety Loop Detectors have been installed. Security enhancements at all exit gates were discussed. Bill Morse

moved to table this discussion to a later date when funds are available for this project; Jack Kornfield seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Signs Sign project is progressing and a sample sign from Signsations was installed in the Harwood area. Transportation Committee Reva Behr announced that Jack Kornfield has resigned as Chair and as a member of the Transportation Committee and thanked Jack for his support and work on the Committee. Mel Schmier and Charles Parness will now be co-chairing the Committee. Mel Schmier discussed the meeting held with Lewis Herring (Quality Transportation). Topics discussed were a recent bus incident, uniforms of drivers, motor scooters, drivers using cell phones, drivers stopping at designated bus stops, drivers checking IDs of riders, monthly meetings with Mr. Herring, ridership data and improved methods for reporting rider complaints. The Committee is proposing an Open Meeting for residents in July or August. Mel Schmier will put together a Memorandum of Agreement between Quality and Master Management for the Board to consider at the next meeting. Old Business Jack Kornfield moved to hold an open workshop to hire an Executive Director; Mel Schmier seconded. Bill Morse moved to table discussion until next meeting; Jack Kornfield seconded. Motion passed unanimously. New Business Jules Kesselman discussed the removal of the beehive in the Preserve that cost an Association $500. A motion was made by Jules Kesselman to approve the reimbursement of $500 to the Association; Mel Schmier seconded. After a discussion, the Board voted and the motion failed unanimously. Reva Behr discussed the expiration of the current copier lease. A new lease for the copier would be the same amount as the current lease, but the new copier would have many additional and desirable features. Anthony Falco moved to accept the proposal of a new lease on a Toshiba copier; Jack Kornfield seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Reva Behr discussed purchasing a Quick Books software program user license for The Reporter. Bill Goddard moved to purchase the new version of Quick Books with a license for The Reporter for a total cost of $1,000.00; Mel Schmier seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Motion was made to adjourn at 12:25 p.m. Motion passed unanimously. Respectfully submitted, REVA BEHR, Vice President


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Village Minutes COOCVE Recreation Committee Meeting June 9, 2009 In attendance were: Shelly Baskin, Donna Dowling, Arlene Fine, Nancy Giordano, Danielle Lobono, Ronald Popp, Bill Schmeir, with Don Kaplan representing COOCVE and for DRF: Eva Rachesky and Dan Cruz Danielle made a motion to accept the minutes from the May meeting. The motion was seconded and passed. Correspondence Nancy Giordano began the meeting by addressing correspondence received by the Recreation Committee. 1) Rosalind Nehls requested that the trash can that she had previously requested be placed in the restaurant area now be removed because the recycling bin was removed and people are placing recycling in the trash can. 2) Charlie and Sandy Parness would like to see children be able to go to the movies in the Clubhouse – ages 12 or 13 and up. Bill Schmeir stated he would like this to be brought up as a motion that could be discussed and voted upon, rather than as correspondence. Nancy added that this would be a very big change and she feels the proposal should be tabled for study and discussion so the full ramifications of this proposal can be considered. Chairperson’s Report Nancy stated that there will not be a Recreation meeting in July; the next scheduled meeting will be in August. She further commented that the July meeting would not have a quorum as some Committee members would not be available in July. She further stated that should

an emergency come up, she would call for an emergency meeting. DRF Reports Eva Rachesky and Dan Cruz Theater Profit/Loss-May: Eva stated the Entertainment Report shows a loss of $1,683.11. She commented that this is normal for this time of year as historically the summer months have low attendance. Last Saturday’s show had only 56 people attending. Eva said that even though there is a loss in the summer, the entire year shows a profit. Nancy remarked on the demoralizing effect for a performer when there are only 50 people in attendance. The committee members discussed the problem of light attendance in the summer months – weather, people out of town, scheduling, etc. Shelly commented that he found the summer shows to be very entertaining. Nancy said Abby would be at the August meeting and they could discuss the issue with her at that time. Don suggested possibly offering summer shows for free to build attendance. The committee agreed this was something to consider and they will discuss this with Abby in August. Eva reported that the first Summer Pool Party had an attendance of about 50 people. Real Estate Offer: Nancy read the final agreement reached between the Committee and the Real Estate Office. $19,800 will be paid to the Recreation Operating Account as reimbursement for any and all past utility expenditures for

the property through June 30, 2009. Beginning July 15, 2009, and every month thereafter, a payment of $300 will be made to the Recreation Operating Account by the Real Estate Office. The utility costs will be reviewed upon request and the monthly payment will be adjusted if appropriate. The agreement was signed at this meeting and, when queried by the audience, Nancy stated that this agreement had taken three years to work through to a satisfactory conclusion. Don mentioned that the REC Office actually didn’t have to pay anything and this money was gained through the hard work and perseverance of the Recreation Committee Members. Ticket programming changes: Nancy said they will try to improve the seat distribution for Advance Season Ticket purchases. Eva said the company had been looking into purchasing a new program but there was nothing existing that would meet our needs. The program presently being used was created specifically for our needs; therefore it has been decided to attempt to adjust the existing program so that it will better serve the community. Since we never sell out the first three rows held for the visually impaired, we will keep Rows A and B for the visually impaired and take Row C out – putting it back into the mix. We are also looking into a way to set different parameters into the way the program chooses the seating. People participating in the Advance Season program would get preferential seating. Nancy stated that she didn’t want residents to have to wait another year to see improvements in the seat selections so she is pushing for the change to happen for the upcoming season. The wall seats will be taken out of the mix so Advance Season purchasers will get the best seats possible. Nancy said she hopes it will work out – they will try it and see what happens. People not participating in the Advance sales will have the option of purchasing whatever seats are left. Carpeting for ground floor: The new carpeting will be ordered this month and should arrive in August. The carpet will be glued down which should eliminate the rippling problem that we have now. Installation should take approximately a week. New tile for ground floor: Sections of the red brick was taken up and replaced

by new tile which will compliment the carpeting that will be installed in August. The remainder of the red brick will come out when the carpeting is installed. Bid for new equipment in GPA: Eva reported that another company, Media Stage, came in and declined to bid, so she is still seeking another bid. Exhaust fans: Two exhaust fans have been replaced at the indoor pool. Emergency phone to move: The red emergency phone will be moved from the hallway to the indoor pool for emergencies. Ron asked if another phone could be added instead – Eva responded that the system won’t support an additional phone. Bill raised the point that the pool opens at 8am while the Staff office doesn’t open until 9am. There would be an hour when there wouldn’t be anyone present in the office to respond to an emergency call. He then suggested Eva look into installing an additional system like the one at the satellite pools. Theater Air Handlers: Dan said the air handlers have been delivered and will be installed the week of June 22nd. Nancy announced that there would be no movies for that week. Eva added that the show on Saturday will be presented. Golf Cart: An additional golf cart for the Maintenance Department has been ordered. Ventnor pool deck expansion Dan said $32,000 was budgeted for the deck and coping. An expansion was also requested which would cost another $11,000. He said the city is enforcing the fencing requirement so when the permits for the pavers are pulled, fencing will also have to be installed. In addition, the engineer’s report on the drain installations stated that fencing is needed as a life safety issue and the pools without fencing are not up to code. The cost for fencing at Ventnor would be $11,000. Nancy said she and Bill would be going to the Ventnor pool to review the proposed expansion area so consideration of the pool deck expansion will be tabled for now. Berkshire pool closed: Some maintenance repairs are needed and the deck has to be painted. Eva is not sure how long it will take since the weather has been a problem, but they are working as quickly as possible under the circumstances. Commercial pool drain:

Dan said the drain covers should be coming in with the cost being about $4,000. The job requires a licensed pool contractor and no permits have to be pulled. Giovanni’s update: Sherry at the Golf Course says she now has the insurance check and permits will now be picked up to move forward on the work. Eva believes it is possible that a restaurant will be in the building by the beginning of the season. Don said he would like Mr. Levy to take over the building from the golf course. He also stated that he thinks Levy should give the Ceramics building near Tilford to COOCVE so they can have it for their offices and put Ceramics somewhere else. Unfinished business Vehicle information: The committee requested a monthly report on vehicle mileage. Laptop Stations: Eva said the order for the desks has been placed and they will be using existing chairs rather than buying chairs with castors as they are too hard on the carpet. Nancy mentioned that she had been approached with a suggestion to purchase a few laptops for the Clubhouse that could be loaned out to those who didn’t have one. She asked if any of the members were interested in discussing this. When no one responded she said the issue was closed. New Business Irrigation at Satellite Pools: Dan reported that Seacrest has agreed to begin watering the satellite pool areas. They have given us a schedule, but since the watering is at night Dan hasn’t been able to verify the coverage. Dan said there are a lot of broken lines and funds are not available to repair all of them at this time. He said the automation of the Clubhouse irrigation should be working by the end of this month. Eva said that she has done very little landscaping this year, instead taking the funds allocated for landscaping and using them to improve the irrigation system around the Clubhouse. Eva said the landscaping line is presently slightly over budget for the year. Nancy acknowledged that the committee is aware of this and next year will adjust the budget for irrigation. Dan said the Clubhouse irrigation covers the front and side of the property but is still needed at the back of the tennis courts and behind Giovanni’s. He stated that some of the expenditure was for work done around the Markham pool area and other See RECREATION pg 7A


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Village Minutes Master Management Commentary By IRA SOMERSET, President/ Master Management It’s July – the first month of summer; and I hope that you are enjoying good times with your families and friends. As most Century Villagers know, I am a seasonal resident and am not in residence for the summer. However, the work of Master Management is being carried out by the four Vice-Presidents, our staff and Board members. Roads are being repaired; the Le Club – Activities Center is being re-roofed and air conditioned; landscaping is progressing; lights are being repaired; buses are running; security upgrades have been added to the entries; efforts are being made to untangle the

Directors

financial confusion created by Century Maintenance and Management’s abrupt termination of services to Master Management; work continues on the lawsuit

against Century Maintenance and Management, etc. Ongoing projects continue to move forward, and new projects are being developed. There is much for us to accomplish during this period, and we will do our best to meet our goals and objectives of repairing and improving the services and infrastructure of Century Village. On behalf of the Board of Directors, I wish all Century Villagers a healthy, safe and happy summer. I am looking forward to seeing you all in the fall. Until then, have a great summer!

continued from pg 3A

passage. Mel Schmier then read the second motion, to be added to Sec. 8.7 of the bylaws: “The Nominating Committee shall conduct the election of COOCVE Officers and Sgts-at-Arms, members of the Recreation Committee and the election of the members of the Board of Directors of Master Management.” Mel explained that this Amendment merely described what was already our practice, but was simply not mentioned in the bylaws. After brief discussion, during which several directors asked what criteria does the President use to qualify members to serve on the Nominating Committee, the Chair called for a vote. The directors voted in favor of the Amendment, all voting “yes” except for one abstention. Under “New Business”, Bill Goddard made a Motion

to authorize the President to disburse funds necessary to hire buses to take residents to Broward County Commission Meeting in support of the Century Plaza Library. After discussion, during which directors noted that this Motion did not set a cap and was thus left up to the discretion of the President, the directors approved the Motion with three voting “nay”. Judy Schneider made a motion to hold a “Candidates Forum” at least two weeks before COOCVE’s fall elections (for Master Management and Recreation Committee directors), at which all candidates can address and respond to COOCVE’s directors about their qualifications for office. Directors approved this Motion, with two opposed. In “Open Mic”, Basil Hales said the air conditioning was not working on Sunday in the

#5 and #6 buses, and noted that our contract requires Community Bus to maintain two spare buses for just such eventualities. He asked that Master Management look into this problem, and Reva Behr, Acting President of Master Management, who was in attendance, said they would. Jeff Gilman of Ashby noted that with the conversion of TV signals to high-definition digital format TV sets that use the old non-HDTV conversion boxes, do not get the Community Access channels of 98 and 99. Jeff asked that Master Management look into this problem with Comcast. At the same time, Jeff said he thought that Comcast had done a great job in upgrading the system since it took over from Adelphia. At 11 a.m., the Chair called for a Motion to adjourn, which the directors approved. Respectfully submitted by KEN BARNETT

Recreation

continued from pg 6A

minor irrigation repairs at other pools. Indoor Pool appearance: Danielle said there has been some discussion about the need to improve the indoor pool’s appearance. Eva responded that there are some major projects presently in the works and years of projects that need to be done. She stated that the quickest and easiest fix for the indoor pool would be painting. Redoing the ceiling would have to come first; then some kind of paint job, possibly a mural. There was some discussion about who to approach: the art club, other artists, instructors, university students, etc. Eva said after painting, new coping and tile would come sometime in the near future. Residents can’t get Channel 98: Shelly reported that some residents can’t get Channel 98 on their TVs. Don stated that if the TV is hooked up to a box, i.e. they get HD, then they can’t get 98; but

if they are just hooked up to cable the channel can be accessed. There was some discussion about uses for 98 and 99. Shelly said that the slide video presently being shown on 98 will be updated shortly after season begins when he can acquire more shots of various activities in the Clubhouse and Village. Nancy advised residents to contact Shelly if they have an event that they would like to be presented as part of the slide show. Announcements Nancy reviewed the dates and times for meetings scheduled over the next few weeks, including a meeting at the Century Plaza Library on Friday, June 12th at 10:30a.m. concerning the closing of the Library. She also announced the following information: Seacrest will be available for building issues two days a week, Tuesday and Thursday – from 9a.m. to 12p.m. at the COOCVE Office. Respectfully submitted by MEREDITH HARRIS


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Village Minutes Council of Area Chairs June 10, 2009 Chairman Joe Rubino called the meeting to order at 9:30 a.m. After the pledge of allegiance to the flag, a moment of silence included thoughts for Tony Marino who had passed away and John Caliendo who has serious health problems. Both had served as members of the Council. The roll was called and there was no representation from Ashby, Berkshire, Ellsmere, Harwood, Markham and Richmond. Verna Shore of Best Care

Fire

continued from pg 1A

Plastridge Insurance Agency, Inc. For four years, Faye and her Board of Directors have been in an uphill battle with the city, FIGA, and Comcast. A lawsuit is pending against Comcast based on the actions of their predecessor, Adelphia Cable, which failed to repair holes in the firewalls after running cable wire through their attic. As a result, a fire confined to one unit quickly spread through half of the building. In its quest for reconstruction, the Board of Directors of Ventnor B has had to obtain 26 permits to complete the roof, windows, balcony repairs, and new doors. In addition, ten more permits will be needed to demolish the walls and whatever else remains in the empty units. Ten permits will be needed for electrical work in each unit. Ten permits for plumbing and ten permits for replacing the sheetrock are also required. Then, of course, each unit owner is faced with completing the restoration of their individual units, finding licensed contractors and obtaining the necessary permits. Some were uninsured and will need additional money to refurbish their units. When Ventnor B is completed, it will be the safest and strongest

Medical Marketing spoke about the availability of assistance for those who suffer from diabetes or arthritis. She said that medical equipment is available under Medicare at little or no cost. She was holding an informational meeting the following Monday at the Clubhouse. She can be reached at 561487-4711. Next was Steve Zucker of MariTech Systems. They had already held an informational meeting at

the Activities Center. His company designs, installs, services and monitors new fire alarm systems. Zucker can be reached at 954-4471200. Once again there was a discussion about providing a report of the meeting for the Reporter. A suggestion was made to have the Reporter either have someone attend our meeting or make a report from the recording that was being made by Jules Kesselman. At this point Anthony D’Amato of Seacrest said they would have someone at the next meeting to take minutes. The offer, with a round applause, was accepted. The Chairman then called on James Quintano of East Coast. There were no questions and Quintano said if anyone needed help or information they could contact their office on Powerline Road. Anthony D’Amato of Seacrest was next and he advised that they would have a property manager at the COOCVE office on Tuesday and Thursday

building in Century Village. The new windows and doors meet current hurricane standards. The fire walls in the attic will do much to delay a fire from spreading. While it may look the same from outside, through the diligence and hard work of Faye Adam

and Ross Gilson, it will be a source of pride to the residents of Ventnor B. It has been a costly and timeconsuming project and, through it all, Faye prayed that no one else in the Village ever has to endure or experience a similar occurrence.

North Face – 2005

North Face – 2009

to answer association questions. Some buildings would prefer to have catwalks hosed down quarterly rather than monthly and that could be arranged. He also said a letter would be going out to associations advising they could now have management without accounting. As for the web site they plan to have available, there is still work to be done but it should be completed shortly. There was a discussion about the great job being done by many volunteers in spearheading the drive to save the Century Plaza Library. It was impossible to recognize all the individuals so the Council and guests gave a loud round of applause to all who are participating. Reva Behr of Master Management read a letter from the City of Deerfield Beach concerning repairs that had to be made to the garbage enclosures in the high rise buildings. After a lengthy discussion, Chairman Rubino suggested a letter be sent to Mario Reboa, writer of the letter, inviting him to the next Council meeting so he could

Honored

explain the specifics of the city’s requirements. A discussion followed on delinquent accounts. Some early problems were the result of information not passed on to Seacrest in a timely manner. Currently letters are being sent to those who are behind on their payments. Master Management has volunteers making calls to these owners and building associations should be doing the same for their accounts. Reporting for the Recreation Committee, Don Kaplan said there had been complaints about the lack of irrigation at the pool areas. He reminded the meeting that this had nothing to do with Seacrest or East Coast. It is the responsibility of Cen-Deer and is being addressed. The meeting closed with a discussion of the outside bus routes which will require additional meetings of the Transportation Committee consisting of Mel Schmeir, Charles Parness and Dan Glickman. The meeting adjourned at 10:45 a.m. Respectfully submitted by JOE RUBINO

continued from pg 1A

Mr. Fine stated that for many years the ceremony was traditionally held at the annual COOCVE Ball. However, since the Ball

was discontinued several years ago, the tradition of honoring those who give much of their retirement time to serve the residents of CVE, will continue.


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Village Minutes COOCVE Executive Committee Meeting June 8, 2009 President Steve Fine called the Meeting to order at 9:30 a.m., and the Sergeant-inArms, Art Dove confirmed that there was a quorum. The members waived a reading of the minutes of the previous meeting of May 11, 2009, published in the June edition of the CVE Reporter distributed that day, and approved a Motion by Joe Rubino to approve the minutes subject to any subsequent changes approved by the Executive Committee. President Fine then spoke about several matters of importance to the Village Community. The first concerned the threatened cuts to the Century Plaza Library. Steve emphasized the importance of the Library to the general welfare of the Village. For example, the Library draws in patrons from the surrounding areas who patronize the stores in our neighborhood. Steve then invited Roz Nehls of the Civic and Cultural Committee who is now spearheading the coordination of efforts by Village residents to keep intact the Library’s services. Patty Bender who has been manning the petition table at the Library also spoke. What came out of the general discussion is that there are three “tiers” of budget cuts that the County is contemplating. Closing the Library is in the third tier of proposals and is not likely to happen. Area Chairmen expressed appreciation to County Commissioner Kristin Jacobs and County Administrator Bertha Henry for their participation in a recent meeting with concerned Village residents about the Library. Still, it is important for the Village to keep fighting until the decision is made, Steve Fine emphasized. So far, we have submitted to our City Commissioner Marty Popelsky the signatures of about 2,000 residents on our Petitions to Save Our Library. Steve Fine also reiterated his willingness to rent buses for our residents to attend budget meetings, up to $250 that he can fund under COOCVE’s officers discretionary authority. President Fine then spoke of Seacrest, saying he has received an “extraordinary number of calls about work not being done”, and that Seacrest is not responding to complaints. In order to start to remedy this situation, a Seacrest representative will be in the COOCVE offices every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to Noon, starting this week.

Steve then turned to the work of the Insurance Committee in representing Associations who choose to do so, to get volume discount quotes for their building associations. Apparently some Associations have not bothered to read the April 24th letter from the Insurance Committee asking for the Association’s authorization to do this work on their behalf, or Associations have chosen not to respond because they believe that they will have to give up their authority to make the final decision as to insurance, which is not the case. Jules Kesselman reminded the Executive Members about the idea, discussed at the May meeting of the COOCVE Board of Directors, for the Insurance Committee to hold an information meeting for all the Associations, which would help to resolve this confusion about the Insurance Committee’s authority as well as other questions. While Association officers will not be back in full force until late this year, even a meeting at that time would not be too late for Associations to join in and take advantage of the volume of discount quotes expected through the Insurance Committee’s work. President Fine asked the Area Chairmen to consider combining (in the interest of redundancy), the “Council of Area Chairs” meeting into the COOCVE Executive Committee Meetings, which Steve said he believes is consistent with their duties and the COOCVE By-Laws. Steve emphasized this was a suggestion, and that he would leave it up to the discretion of the Council of Area Chairs. The Executive Members then discussed using e-mail circulation lists, Channel 99, and “Hot Topics” on our website to improve communication among COOCVE entities and with residents. As the final point in his report, Steve showed another example of unauthorized business activity in the Village, one offering meal delivery to the home, and cautioned against bringing in unlicensed parties into the Village. President Fine then opened up the floor to the Area Chairmen to speak in turn. Joe Rubino asked for the Executive Committee to approve the Recreation Committee’s negotiation with the Century Village Real Estate office. The Motion was seconded. Nancy Giordano of the Recreation Committee said that the Rec Committee has

in fact improved the terms of the deal previously presented to the COOCVE Board of Directors, now consisting of a $19,800 one-time payment in settlement of past utility charges, and at least $300 a month starting as of January 2009. Joe Rubino responded that he was not aware that the monthly charge would be assessed back to January and that now that he knew that, he was withdrawing his Motion as unnecessary. Several Executive Members complimented the Rec Committee on a job well done. Joe Rubino also cited a problem with Comcast, now that the conversion to digital is done. It has changed many channel settings and removed the easily accessible “TV Guide” channel. Several Executive Members cited responses from Comcast about this problem that were not consistent, and appeared to require additional charges on residents. Reva Behr of Master Management which is responsible for the Comcast cable contract said that Master Management was in fact looking at this issue and was demanding that Comcast come forward to discuss it or risk Master Management holding them for breach of contract. In subsequent discussion,

several Executive Members cited irrigation and other landscaping issues. Nancy Giordano of the Rec Committee stayed on in the meeting and responded to questions about the Real Estate office and watering around pools. Several Seacrest employees also were in attendance throughout, and Chris Smith and another responded that Seacrest’s policy is to replace missing sprinkler heads as soon as they are noted missing, and that Customer Service is open to take complaints “24/7”. Master Management’s representative left the meeting during the Area Chairs portion. Afterwards, several Area Chairs lamented her absence as they had problems in Master Management’s purview. President Fine noted that Master Management holds a monthly meeting at which time these issues should be taken up. Guest Don Kaplan, a former President of Master Management, opined that the Executive Committee meeting is the

“meeting that should solve problems brought up by other meetings”. The Executive Members discussed having Master Management’s President once again present at COOCVE Board of Directors meetings, as used to be done until COOCVE’s Board of Directors voted against it. President Steve Fine said he would invite both Master Management and the Rec Committee to “be available” Jack Kornfield made a Motion for COOCVE to ask Master Management to publish a watering schedule by building. The Executive Members approved this Motion. 1st Vice President Charlie Parness noted that all COOCVE motions must be approved by the COOCVE Board of Directors to have effect. After all Area Chairmen had a turn to speak, President Steve Fine asked for a Motion to adjourn, which was approved at 11:10 a.m. Respectfully submitted KEN BARNETT

The Recreation meeting has been cancelled for the month of July.

COOCVE Appointed Committee Members for 2009 – 2010 ADVISORY* BY-LAWS Chair - Charlie CoChairs – Gene Parness Goldman & Fred Florence Charney Rosenzveig John Cole Harvey Masef Bruce Gursey Barbara Nathan Marcus Jack Kornfield Miriam Peletz Mel Schmier Rhonda Pitone Joe Sachs CIVIC & CULTURAL* Chair – Myriam Sachs Beverly Kornfield Roslyn Nehls AUDIT Sandy Parness Joe Fridell Wendy Rosenzveig Bruce Gursey Gloria Shomer Elaine Nudelman Norma Weiner

BUDGET & FINANCE* Chair – Gloria Olmstead Ken Barnett Florence Charney Bernard Pittinsky

CONTRACT Chair – Abe Trachtenberg Norman Bloom Florence Charney Caral Falco Bill Goddard Marilyn Lane Bernard Pittinsky David Polak

* Chairs are members of the COOCVE Executive Committee

GRIEVANCE Chair – Fred Rosenzveig Edward Gallon Beverly Kornfield Joe Sachs William Schmier

INSURANCE Chair – Joseph (Dick) Ciocca Frank Crowley Ross Gilson Dan Glickman Marvin Katz Carman Nepa Herman Shwide Saul Siegal Barry Smolin


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Mail Bag Mailbag

continued from pg 4A

Color Changes To the Editor: As a long time owner but still a snowbird, I always enjoyed driving into the

Village and getting that first impression of the clean, white buildings that make up our community. To my utter amazement, this year’s first impression took me past a flesh colored building that looks totally out of sync with the rest

of CVE. I am told there are other buildings that are also painted other than white. I was here for the devastation that was hurricane Wilma and was saddened by the experience. As the years have passed, new plantings and re-growth have restored much of the appearance of the Village. This new assault on the eyes however, is more appalling since it is something we can control. While I understand that each condo association can make decisions about their building, I believe that such a drastic change should have input from all residents. The all white buildings are what set CVE apart from Century Village in West Palm and Boca. Please restore our clean looking community.

monthly publication, is a total character assassination of people who volunteer and contribute their time and effort for the benefit of Century Village. Not only is it done in his publications, but also at the meetings. I thought that the

Democratic Club was for us to be informed with more important issues of our State and our Country than to be used for personal vendettas. Danielle LoBono Newport H

LOUISE D’AVINO Farnham O An Appalled Democrat To The Editor: As a member of the Deerfield Democratic Club, I am appalled that the President’s message in his

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Condo News Coalition For CVE Homebound By MARION G. COHEN

In support of the Broward Homebound Program a group of Century Village residents joined the 8th Annual Roll and Stroll for Independent Living at the Hugh Taylor Birch State Park on Saturday, May 30, 2009. The two-mile walk around the park on a scenic path along the waterside was done at a leisurely pace. I think our group came in last, but we did have fun. There were bottled water stations along the way; corporations provided us with little gifts such as a water bottle holder and pill boxes; and Publix supplied us with breakfast food. A raffle was held at the end of the walk, and I am proud to announce that the members of the Lighthouse Stained Glass Club of Century Village had contributed 14 prizes for

this raffle. The artisans were Arnold Argondizzo, Real Beaudette, Michael Feldman, Greg Hernandez, Harry Liner, Moe Melnick, Celine Roy and Frank Share. Harry Liner, instructor of Stained Glass of Century Village contributed most of the glass used for these projects. In addition, Arnold Argondizzo, a wood carver, contributed a walking stick created from materials found in Deerfield Beach. I want to personally thank Harry Liner, Greg Hernandez, Toni Ponto and Gladys Miller who, at 7:45 a.m. on a Saturday morning with the weather prediction of storms for the day, bravely ventured out to roll and stroll at a State Park in Fort Lauderdale in order to benefit the elderly and disabled adults in Broward County.

L to R: Greg Hernandez, Toni Ponto, Gladys Miller, Marion Cohen, Harry Liner.

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Condo News Recreation’s Most Commonly Asked Questions By EVA RACHESKY Administration/Cen-Deer Communities Office What is Direct Debit / ACH and how does it work? Residents who sign up for Direct Debit (also referred to as ACH) have authorized Cen-Deer Communities to draw the monthly payment from their checking account each month – freeing the resident of the need to keep track of payment dates, amounts and the need to mail the payment each month. Payments appear on the Resident’s bank statement as Century Village ACH. Staff Office How do we find out what activities and clubs are available for CVE residents? The Staff Office will provide information about activities and clubs to residents who contact us in person and/or via telephone. There are numerous flyers available in the Information/ Staff office covering a wide variety of activities and events. In addition, each issue of the CVE Reporter provides a list of all CVE clubs. How are emergencies handled in the Clubhouse? If you or a friend are in the Clubhouse and require assistance you should notify

Security or the Staff Office immediately. Office Staff will immediately come to you with an Incident Report; you must have IDs ready. It is important that Security and Office Staff be aware of the situation in order to coordinate the proper response to each incident, including summoning emergency personnel if needed. ID Department I need a new ID but I work. Does the ID office have any evening hours? To accommodate residents who work during the day, the I.D. Office is open extended hours on Wednesdays from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm for revalidation, gate passes, guest passes and companion passes only. All other business must be conducted Monday thru Friday during normal business hours. Whenever there is a need to cancel the Wednesday evening hours a notice will be posted at the ID office. Theater Do you have captioned movies for the hearing impaired? We are happy to report that if a film has close captioning available, we will present the first viewing of the film with

In Remembrance By GLORIA OLMSTEAD

John Theodore Kowalchuk John Theodore Kowalchuk passed away June 8, 2009. He was born June 8, 1919 in Brooklyn, NY to Sofie and Theodore. He is survived by his loving wife Laurie, son Thomas John, daughterin-law Sharon, and his grandchildren, T. Jay and Julie (Nikkie). John and Laurie spent many of their 61 years of marriage in Queens Village, NY and retired to Deerfield Beach, Fl in 1986. John was a linotype operator by trade, and when he retired to Century Village he volunteered and enjoyed working at the Reporter, where he worked for a long time. Because of John’s knowledge of printing, Irving Barr, Editor at that time, made him an Assistant Editor in the Advertising Department. Each month,

when the paper had to be printed, John, along with others, went to the printer to make sure all ads, editorial and makeup of the paper were in. He was also in charge of the distribution of the paper. John served our country as an Army Staff Sergeant in WWII. His memorial service will be held at Calverton National Cemetery, June 30, 2009.

the captioning for our hearing impaired residents. Please note that, since the scheduling varies, this could be either a matinee or an evening presentation of the film. Athletic Department What is the proper footwear for the exercise and equipment area? It is very important that appropriate shoes be worn when doing any kind of exercise. Appropriate footwear would be TENNIS / ATHLETIC SHOES with lace up or Velcro fastenings – residents should NOT be wearing flip-flops, high heels, sandals, sneakers without backs or any other type of street shoe or boot. Shoes should be in good condition (i.e. the shoe tread should not be worn/slick). Recreation Maintenance I have noticed a lot of maintenance activity in the Clubhouse and at some of the pools this summer. What is going on? Our goal in maintaining the recreation facilities in Century Village East is to try to inconvenience as few residents as possible. For that reason, we try whenever possible to schedule large maintenance jobs for the

“lighter” months in the off season. When there are fewer residents about, we do the larger, more disruptive jobs. Class Office How are refunds for classes issued? Refunds are only given under two circumstances: 1. The Class Office cancels the class due to lack of registration or illness of the instructor. 2. A student has a medical reason for not being able to attend the class. Refunds will not be issued if you take a class and decide you don’t like it. If you are requesting a refund for the reasons stated above, you must make your request by the second class of the session. The refund process begins during the third week of classes. The Class Office will call those students due a refund, once the funds are available for pickup. This is usually around the fifth week of classes. Evening/Weekend Staff Office How late are the Staff Office and the Clubhouse open? The Evening Staff covers the Staff Office and Clubhouse activities scheduled weekdays

from 5pm to 11pm and on the weekends from 9am to 11pm. The indoor pool, locker rooms and exercise rooms are closed at 9pm to enable cleaning staff to restore the rooms to order before the building closes for the evening. Residents will generally have access to most other areas of the Clubhouse until approximately 10:3010:45pm, when the Security staff starts to check on the rooms and lock them up for the overnight hours. Ticket Office I don’t come into the Clubhouse very often. Can I obtain information about theater activities, show changes, etc. through my computer? Many of our residents have provided the Ticket Office with their email address. If you can’t pickup the “Clubhouse Happenings”, just stop by or call the Ticket Office and provide them with your email address. That way you won’t be the last to know about shows, movies, or dances! Regular announcements and a copy of the monthly “Happenings” will be available for you to review via your email. Also the information is presented on our website www. centuryvillagetheater.com.


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Condo News News & Views By JUDY OLMSTEAD

This month has been quiet. There was another resident scammed out of money with a telephone call claiming a grandson was in trouble and needed money. If I heard the BSO representative correctly, the resident wired $11,000.00 to a complete stranger. If you read this column, no matter how persuasive they are, do not fall for it. Make some calls on your own and verify the alleged emergency before sending anyone money. One thing I learned since last month is that Pat at the recreation staff office is available to notarize documents for residents for free. Since I am now publicizing this fact, if the demand becomes too much, especially in season, the office may limit her availability as a notary to certain times of the day or require appointments. In addition, for those of you who do not have a property manager but use Seacrest Services for landscape and maintenance, they have agreed to send

a representative over to the COOCVE office every Tuesday and Thursday morning from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. to meet with unit owners and/or board members. Many of you have come to the COOCVE officers with questions because you do not drive or cannot get to the Seacrest office. Instead of COOCVE acting as a middleman, you can get help or just information directly from one of their employees. As people become more accustomed to the change in services, this additional service will be cut back. I learned of a new web site “condonewsonline. com”. In the Ask the Lawyer section, attorney Chelle Konyk discusses the use of Robert/s Rules of Order at condominium board meetings. As she explained, most board members and managers are not aware that the rules governing a meeting where there are not more than a dozen board members are different.

1. Members are not required to obtain the floor before making motions or speaking, which they can do while seated. 2. The president can make motions and vote on all matters. 3. The president can speak on any matter before the board. 4. No motion needs to be seconded. 5. There can be informal discussion of a subject without a motion being made. 6. If a proposal is perfectly clear, a vote can be taken without any motion having been introduced. 7. After a general discussion has been held without a motion, action can be agreed upon by unanimous consent without taking a vote at all. I believe that many of us have been conducting our association meetings in this fashion without realizing that Robert’s Rules of Order has already taken into consideration the

This is very disturbing and everyone should be given the opportunity to discuss it with their other board members before signing any document just for the price of a free lunch. Remember, there is no such thing as a free lunch.

awkwardness of formal meetings when only a few board members are present. An association, of course, has the option of holding more formal meetings. Finally, there is an attempt under way to take over this Reporter, COOCVE, and Master Management by persons unhappy with the results of the elections last year. Your association president may have been asked to join this organization and were told that they could sign up your association without the knowledge or consent of the board members or unit owners.

Due to space limitations, the CVE Reporter reserves the right to limit the length of all Minutes submitted. Strict priority will be given to Motions, Actions taken, and Information disseminated at the Meetings. Full copies of the Minutes can be obtained from the relevant Committees. -BOD CVE Reporter, Inc.


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Condo News

Statutes:


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Phyllis’ kitchen By PHYLLIS PISTOLIS

Chicken Cordon Bleu Boneless chicken breast Sliced ham Sliced Swiss cheese 1 beaten egg 2 parts bread crumbs to 1 part grated cheese Roll 1 slice each of ham & cheese, roll the chicken breast around it. Dip in beaten egg & roll in bread crumb mixture. Cover bottom of baking dish with melted butter, place chicken in it. Bake @ 350° for 35 to 45 minutes. Garlic Mashed Potatoes Boil potatoes & mash Add chopped garlic, 1/3 cup sour cream, butter (2 tbsp), salt & pepper. When mashed till smooth sprinkle chopped chives over it. Lemon Cake 1 pkg yellow or lemon cake mix ¾ cup water ¾ cup salad oil 4 eggs ½ cup lemon juice 2 cups confectionery sugar Combine first 4 ingredients. Beat for 3 minutes till smooth. Pour into 13 X 9 inch pan. When done – puncture top of cake with a fork. Combine lemon juice & sugar & spread slowly over cake. Frosting will drain over cake. Let cool & cut into squares.

Phyllis’

Kitchen

07/31/09

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Condo Docs/By Laws/Amendments Condo Docs: Includes: ByLaws, Declaration of Condominium and Amendments Responsibility: Each unit owner is responsible to give to the new owner, at closing, a Set of these documents. Each unit owner should, at closing, be sure to obtain these documents from the seller – or obtain reimbursement for the approximate cost of replacing them. They can be obtained from any title company for a fee, such as, Bailey & Woodruff Title Co. Tel. 954-571-7919 The cost is $35.00. Any questions or concerns? Call COOCVE office to speak to a COOCVE Officer.


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Consumer Interest “Ask Lori…Parrish on Appraisal” Broward County Property Appraiser Lori Parrish Answers Your Questions… “Understanding the Property Tax Puzzle!” Dear Lori, I’m a first time home buyer and I can’t seem to get a straight answer on how property taxes work. The house I’m buying has current taxes due of $8,400. When I use your online calculator, my purchase price with the Homestead Exemption calculates to $3,951. How long would I pay taxes of $8,400 and when would the new tax rate start? ~Amanda, via email As a new home buyer you will inherit the seller’s current status for the 2009 tax year. When buying property, you should look on our website (www.bcpa.net) to determine if the current year’s values have posted. If they have not posted, you can e-mail me for an estimate of your property taxes. The Property Appraiser does not levy or collect taxes. We cannot give guidance as to whether the property tax rate in your area will go up or down in the next year until the taxing authorities (Broward County Commission, County School Board, South Florida Water District or City Commission) give us the new

rates and special assessment fees around August 5th, 2009. At your closing, the seller will give you a deduct for the seller’s pro-

rata share of the current year’s taxes. You will be responsible for the entire bill in November 2009. For estimating purposes, take the taxable assessed value, deduct any current year exemptions and multiply it by 2%. Then, look at last year’s TRIM Notice and add back on any non-ad valorem fees for drainage, fire, garbage, etc. The estimation is based upon the average Millage Rate of 20 mills (or 2%). You may also use our online tax calculator found at www.bcpa.net for new home

purchases only. New home buyers can simply click on the “Home Buyers Tax Estimator” and follow the easy instructions. Please remember the calculator is only an estimate based upon the millage rates of 2008 until after August 15th when the 2009 rates will apply. Also, this estimate does not include any non-ad valorem fees which the city or local taxing districts may charge. In many areas there are some pricey fees so be sure to check the previous TRIM (proposed tax) notice and add those to the tax estimate. These fees typically range from $150 - $500 or higher. Your property taxes for the following year will be based upon your new assessment (approximately 85%

of your purchase price) less any exemptions you apply for and are granted, and the new 2010 tax rates plus any non-ad valorem fees. Should you have any question, please contact our office at (954) 357-6830. Sincerely, Lori Parrish, CFA If you have a question for Lori, please email her at lori@bcpa.net or write to her at the Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office, 115 South Andrews Avenue, Room 111, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301. (June 2009) Robert L. Wolfe, Jr. CFE Media and Government Relations 954.357.6871 – office 954.357.8474 – fax


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My presence in the Village

From the Senate

By MARTY POPELSKY, Commissioner District 3

By TED DEUTCH

Since I last wrote, Governor Crist vetoed Senate Bill 714. This means that statewide, garden apartment condo owners will have to install the proper fire safety equipment without delay. All deadlines have passed and inspections will resume immediately. Unfortunately, the expenses associated with bringing these units into compliance will be born by condo owners. Assessments may be necessary to pay for it, so be prepared. Your life and the lives of your neighbors are more important than money or sacrifice. What is the price of saved lives? The City Commission will be in recess during the month of July. Meetings will resume on August 4th. This means that the Save the Library group will have to wait until the August Commission meeting to have any real impact, since it will not be on the agenda until then. I will keep you posted. UPCOMING EVENTS Residential Paper

Shredding Event Sat., Jul. 11, 9 a.m. - Noon Recycling Drop-Off Center, 401 SW 4 St. $10 for up to 10 bankersize boxes (10” x 14”) or 5 medium (up to 30 gallon) garbage bags(CHECKS ONLY) 954-480-4454 www. Deerfield-Beach.com Property tax exemption assistance at City Hall Tues., Jul. 21, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. City Hall, 150 NE 2nd Ave. Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office sign-

up event for Homestead, Senior and other property tax exemptions is held every third Tuesday of the month through 2009. Documents required to file a Homestead Exemption include: A current Florida driver’s license or Florida identification card, and a current voter registration card or declaration of domicile. Non-US citizens must also provide proof of permanent residency. 954-357-6035 www.bcpa. net Remember that I am your only full time Commissioner. I am always here to assist you in any way I can. Call me any time, and I will be glad to help you resolve your problems. City Hall Office 954-480-4218 City Assistant Phone 954-480-4263 E-mail: web.commission@DeerfieldBeach.com Regards & Good Health Marty Popelsky Your District 3, Commissioner

On May 1st, the Florida Legislature concluded all non-budget related business for the 2009 Legislative Session. With an extension of the regular session needed to finish the appropriations process, we continued our work an extra week, and last Friday, passed a $66.5 billion budget. It was certainly not an easy process. We were faced with some of the most challenging decisions many of us have ever had to face in our legislative careers. The Senate worked diligently to come up with new sources of revenue to avoid devastating cuts. We unanimously voted to pass my top public health priority, a tobacco surcharge that will provide close to a billion dollars for healthcare, including a $50 million annual commitment from the state of Florida to cancer research. However, not all of our efforts to raise revenue were well received and we were forced to make some spending cuts. Fortunately, we were able

to spare our public schools and our universities and community colleges from the most severe cuts. Thanks primarily to $1.8 billion in federal stimulus money, public school funding will see an increase of $28 per student from the current spending level. My Senate colleagues and I were able to fend off a potential $500 million cut to our public university system. Instead, there will be a $90 million reduction, which will be absorbed by legislation allowing an increase in tuition costs. With the increased tuition, comes an increase in needbased financial aid. Thanks in large part to over $5 billion of federal stimulus money from the Obama administration, the final budget will not cause serious damage in our most critical areas. Nevertheless, we must continue to press for tax fairness by eliminating inequitable sales tax exemptions. When the stimulus funds run out, we must ensure that we will have sufficient revenue to invest in our state’s public schools, community colleges and universities. I look forward to spending the summer in the district to continue working on behalf of the residents of District 30, and all Floridians. It is an honor to serve you.


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My Friend is a Hero, (Part Five, Final Chapter) By NORMAN L. BLOOM This is the 5th and last installment of the diary of my friend, Herb Taff, who served through five years of the Second World War and in every major battle campaign in Northern Africa and Europe. If you missed the earlier installments, this newspaper is available online at cvereporter.com. You will find previous parts in Remembering the Past which is usually between pages 30 – 39 in Section A. We pick up our story in October of 1944 as Herb recorded it in his dairy: October 12, 1944. Columbus Day. More heavy casualties as German resistance is heavy on our advance toward Vossenback. B’Gen. Marshall –Army Chief of Staff- visited the 9th Division today. We were attacking to hold our advance on the Rorer Dams and there were heavy counter attacks all day. October 13, 1944. We counter attack again and retake the positions the Germans had occupied. Herb was awarded the rare Silver Star for his heroics this day and again he did not feel that the action that day was worth recording in his dairy. On one important mission, he was attempting to cross a field of fire and his radio was shot right off his back. He finished the mission despite continuing attempts by German riflemen to pick him off. The medal reads that “his aggressiveness, initiative and devotion to duty, with complete disregard for personal safety were a credit to the Armed Forces of the United States.” He continues to proudly wear the Silver Star on his lapel to this day. October 15, 1944. Showers were arranged: First time after many weeks in the same clothes. They had captured a German trailer that had four showers and a dressing room. October 16, 1944. We joined the Hetergen Forest campaign which had been raging for some time. We were in a defensive position laying mines, sending out patrols.. We were under artillery mortar and small arms fire continually from the well dug in Germans who were determined to hold. Casualties were extremely heavy and I witnessed trucks carrying the dead with the bodies stacked up like so much firewood. Beats me why the Army did not choose to simply bypass this forest and leave the Germans stranded there while we continued our march behind them. November 8, 1944. General Eisenhower and General Bradley visited the 9th’s Company Post. November 16, 1944, Largest air strike of the War. Weather had been bad but when the

heavens opened up, 5,000 planes dumped 20 million pounds of Arial Bombs on four key German cities, plus we added artillery and mortar fire. Duerer and Juelich were obliterated and other towns leveled. We cleaned up in house-to-house fighting. December 16, 1944. Today, so far, it has been unusually quiet. (What was later called The Battle of the Bulge begins.) The Germans sent tanks, artillery and planes south of Monschau in a counter offensive. More Germans went on a blitz to Antwerp to try to cut off the 1st Division U.S. and the British from the allies to the south, and to seize their only supply port. The major German force was designed to hit us between Monschau and Echternach, and to recapture Antwerp. We had only four divisions holding this 75 mile front. The Germans had massed 14 infantry divisions, 10 SS Panzer Divisions, and also some English speaking German troops. They parachuted behind American Lines to do sabotage, cut roadways, cause confusion and seize vital supplies in dump area. December 22, 1944. Germans were infiltrating our positions, counter attacking in the Rohrer area. We held them off with mass artillery fire from the 9th , 2nd, and 99th and inflicted heavy casualties. December 23, 1944. We attacked and regained the area we had lost the night before in some of the toughest fighting I had seen so far. We were told that 11,000 rounds of ammo were fired in one location- Hohe Mark- during the night of December 22. January 2, 1945. Many problems with supplies due to deep snow and freezing

temperatures. We were issued felt inner soles and camouflage snowsuits, and charcoal was issued for use in improvised stoves. Raw wool found in a local felt manufacturing plant, was issued to line our foxholes. Our company with three tanks in support, jumped off to push the Germans out of the Schwalmbach area. Resistance was stubborn. January 15, 1945. We were successful in sealing off the Germans within the Bulge. We heard that Von Rundstadt gave the German troops orders to withdraw. This entire month, during what was called the “Bulge,” has been cold, snowy and with very limited visibility. We suffered thru blizzards, trench feet, frostbite and German artillery. February 2, 1945. Captured Forsthaus and Wahlescheid, which had strong German style defenses, including three room bunkers, walls 40” thick and roofs 45 inches thick. The pillboxes were camouflaged and protected by barbed wire, trenches, and foxholes. February 3, 1945. The offense is a week old. Drifting snow added little to the dreary and desolate fields around Dreiborn. At Dreiborn Castle, we waded thru icy slush to reach the enemy. Artillery support was impossible so it was up to the riflemen fire and hand grenades for support. We passed thru Dreiborn and reached the vicinity of Herhauhr and dug in. February 4, 1945 Our objective was to seize the Urhaulsperre Dam the second largest of five. It contained 12 million gallons of water. G-2 said that if the Germans lost it, it was “Goodbye Charlie.” We were again the spearhead as we

relieved the 60th Infantry on the line .The Germans began counter attacks as we were passing thru the 3rd Battalion of the 60th, and we were peppered with small arms machine gun fire. At about two a.m. four or five German tanks began firing on us. Then two self-propelled guns approached and we were under more direct fire. The 9th Division and 2nd Division artillery, plus our own Corp’s artillery all helped us to repulse the German counter attack. We pitched in with Bazooka and anti-tank at dawn. We pushed into Morsbach, where we chased the Germans out of town. We took positions on the high ground and fired everything in the book at the retreating Germans. It was like a shooting gallery, while they tried their best to withdraw over the river. March 7, 1945. All of the bridges over the Rhine were blown up except for oneLudendorph below the town of Remegen . This bridge was wired for demolition but was not blown. The bridge was crossed by the 9th Armored. On hearing the news, the rest of the 9th Division changed its direction of attack, rushed to the Remegen bridge and crossed it. March 17, 1945. This day, ten days later, the weakened bridge at Remegen finally did collapse. We were across the river today and advancing against heavy resistance. March 18, 1945. While advancing on the attack, I was under a tree and tank fire hit the tree. There were six of us around the tree and shrapnel from the shell hit my right leg at the ankle and wounded me severely. It also killed three of my buddies and wounded two others beside me. The action was

too hot for anyone to come and help us, so I crawled about two hundred yards back and found the Aid Station. They put me on a stretcher and said I would be treated soon. After treating the more severely wounded, they attended to my leg. I was evacuated and flown to Orly Field in Paris to a hospital there. What a difference it was to me. After three years in the fields, finally an atmosphere of tranquility and no sign of the war other than the wounded at the hospital. I stayed in the hospital until May 18, 1945 , the end of the end of the War in Europe. NOTE FROM HERB TAFF. The diary you are reading, served to help me keep my sanity during that long period of extreme danger to which I was exposed. When I look back on my notes, I am amazed that I even survived. It was as grim as I recorded it and worse. I realize that I am the only living link to so many of my buddies who perished in that war. They only exist now in my memories which I am sure will haunt me for the rest of my life. From the Foreword of the book length version of this diary: The label of “Hero” gets attached to some personalities with very little justification. Herb Taff’s selfless dedication to his country has, without any doubt, earned for him the adjective of “Hero.”. Thank you for all you have done for our country, Herb. I dedicate this editing of your wartime diary to you, with love, appreciation and utmost respect. I am proud to be called your friend. Norman L. Bloom October 25, 2001.


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1 Bed / 1 Bath – Garden Apt Durham G - One bedroom, first floor, on water……………………………………………$30,000.00 Tilford E - Renovated one bedroom, unfurnished …………………………………………$33,500.00 Ventnor F - First floor one bedroom garden………………………………………………..$27,000.00 Ventnor J - Very quiet, exceptionally clean, all tile………………………………………..$42,500.00 Oakridge P - Very low priced 1-1, 2nd floor, desireable location…………………………$25,750.00 Newport I - Great unit, Priced to sell, A must see……………………………………………$26,500.00 Ventnor J - Cozy, great location, Steps to pool…………………………………………….$34,900.00 Harwood C - Popular building, one bedroom one bath with central air …………………….$30,000.00 1 Bed / 1.5 Baths Newport N - Beige Carpet, Great view, unfurnished ……………………………………..$44,900.00 Ellesmere B - One bedroom deluxe, on the golfcourse…………………….………………$51,900.00 Ellesmere A - One bedroom, carpet, on golfcourse……………..………………………….$54,000.00 Berkshire B - Attractive apartment ready to move into……………………………………$46,900.00 Newport S - Beautiful water view from patio, galley kitchen…………………………….$49,900.00 Newport K - One bedroom 1.5 bath garden, Bldg claims rentable………………………..$42,000.00 Lyndhurst L - Bright corner, new carpet, close to clubhouse, pool, & tennis…………….$37,000.00 Berkshire B - Handyman special, 1st floor near clubhouse……………………………………$52,500.00 Farnham C - Glass enclosed, immaculately clean, partially furnished…………………………$34,900.00 Upminster C - One bedroom, 2nd flr with lift, walk to plaza………………………………….$43,500.00 Berkshire A - Perfectly located, Steps to Pool and Club…………………………………….$59,500.00 Berkshire B - Fabulous Condo, Furnished in Grand Style……………………………………$79,000.00 Berkshire B - Attractive, well kept, wood floors, a truly must see unit………………………$62,900.00 Westbury E - Gorgeous one bedroom unit, steps to pool and plaza………………………….$31,000.00 Cambridge G - Largest one bedroom 1.5 bath with view of lagoon and clubhouse…………$59,900.00 Berkshire B - 2nd floor, turnkey furnished, walk to plaza and club……………………………$55,000.00 Grantham B - One bedroom 2 full bath luxury ……………………………………………….$49,900.00 2 Bed / 1.5 Baths Farnham P - First floor, corner, new cabinets, shows well …………………………….…$53,900.00 Upminster M - Two bedroom, near pool and plaza……………………………………..$59,000.00 Richmond D - Two bedroom, second floor, corner ………………………………………..$54,900.00 Westbury D - Clean garden apartment, Walk to Plaza……………………………………..$59,900.00 Tilford P - First floor 2 bedroom unit, all neutral tile, fully furnished……………………….$49,900.00 Harwood E - Beautiful first floor with lake view, Stainless Steel appliances……………..$99,500.00 Prescott E - Two bedroom corner, great view from patio………………………………..…$58,000.00 Farnham F - Priced to sell quickly, corner, 1st floor……………………………………..………$49,000.00 Newport Q - Clean 2 bedroom unit, Galley kitchen…………………………………………$54,000.00 Upminster F - Quiet area, Needs TLC, Walk to plaza………………………………………$49,900.00 Westbury I - Two bedroom garden, walk to plaza………………………………………….$70,000.00 Farnham M - Clean, corner unit in quiet area………………………………………………..$54,000.00 Tilford B - Well appointed, corner unit on water………………………………………….$54,000.00 Newport V - 2 bedroom unit with hard wood flooring………………………………………$55,900.00 Prescott E - Two bedroom overlooking majestic garden, Quiet & Serene……………………$49,000.00 Lyndhurst L - Handyman special in need of TLC…………………………………………..$53,000.00 Oakridge P - Renovated, open kitchen, new cabinets, stall shower…………………………..74,500.00 Durham P - Gorgeous and updated 2 bedroom unit. Must see ……………………………..$79,900.00 Upminster A - Priced to sell, move in condition, walk to plaza ……………………………$55,000.00 2 Beds / 2 Baths Luxury Oakridge U - 1100 SqFt, luxury, magnificent lake view…………………….………………$110,000.00 Richmond C - Two bedroom luxury, located near military trail entrance…………………..$110,000.00 Keswick C - Two bedroom luxury, first floor, near clubhouse, golf course view…..……..$84,900.00 Oakridge V - Spectacular lake view, peaceful and immaculate…………………………..$129,500.00 Keswick C - Great location, walk to clubhouse, golf view…………………………………$89,900.00 Oakridge F - Nature Preserve and Water view ……………………………………… $119,000.00 Lyndhurst K - Prime Location, Near clubhouse and pool……………………………….. $125,000.00 Ventnor H - Updated kitchen, Enclosed updated patio, Golfview……………………….$99,900.00 Richmond E - Two bedroom luxury with both gold and water views…………………….$151,900.00


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Introduction to My Childhood By FRIEDA STEINBERG

I could not sleep last night, but I was not counting sheep. I was searching for memories in the deepest corner of my mind to bring me back to when I was a very little girl. I was 11 months old when I arrived in the United States with my parents, ages 22 and 23, grandparents, and extended family. There was a span of years from that time to when we all migrated to Edgemere, Long Island, which was primarily a summer resort. I will call it a “Shtetel”, not a suburb, not a village, but a “Shtetel.” It covered an area of maybe 15 streets between two other such “Shtetels,” Wavecrest and Arverne. There was only one of each: butcher, grocer, drugstore, shoemaker and, not to be forgotten, the fourroom schoolhouse. These were sufficient to fulfill all of our needs – food, clothing and shelter. And, now about the “Shule”. There were two – one for the summer months and one that was open all year round. The one that was open all year had living quarters on the lower level in the back area. In the front there was a “Mikva” (ritual bath), and my grandmother was in charge! My grandfather was a “Shamos” (a caretaker), and he supervised the physical needs of the Sanctuary. They were very pious and well respected. The “Mikva” was my pool, and the lawn was my playground. I was such a happy kid! Such beautiful memories – I must have smiled when I fell asleep. My memories served me well.

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“Joey” By NELIA PANZA Shortly after my mother, brother and I arrived in New York City from Italy, my father, who worked for the transit system, was transferred from Manhattan to Westchester. Within a brief time, we moved to our new home in Yonkers (Westchester County). It was a small private house, across the street from the Hillview Reservoir. It was Heaven! One morning, as Mom was throwing out the garbage, she saw a truck passing by our home. The sides of the truck were open, displaying fruits and vegetables. Since she didn’t speak English, she simply stood on the sidewalk, watching the other housewives walking over to the truck, making their purchases. “Oh, how I wish I could do that, too!” Mom thought to herself. As soon as Pop came home, she told him of her desire to buy some fresh food from this vendor, and Pop replied, “So, just tell him what you want!” (Although my father was born in Ashtabula, Ohio, he was brought up and later married in Italy.) However, he always considered himself “strictly American.” “But I don’t speak English!,” she cried. “He’s Italian---like you!” he responded. My mother was overjoyed, and within a few weeks, started having chats with the fruit and vegetable man, in Italian! During a conversation with my father one night, she mentioned that “the man with the truck was named Albert.”

“What else did he tell you?” Pop asked. “He told me his wife, Carmela, was pregnant and since they lived on the same street as we did, would I be willing to be friends with her as they couldn’t socialize because she only spoke Italian.” “What did you say?” asked Pop. I said it would be like an answer to a prayer! “He would like us to visit him and his wife at their home, to make our acquaintance. She’s pregnant and has difficulty getting around. Would you take me there? I’d like so much to meet her. “Okay, okay,” replied Pop, “now, lets eat!” The next day, when Albert came around, Mom asked if she could meet his wife--then the two of them could be friends---living on the same street and speaking the same language---it was as if the good Lord had planned it that way. On the following morning, my mother once again asked Albert if we could visit his wife, “to become acquainted.” He didn’t even have to think about it. “Sure!” he quickly responded. “When?” she asked. “On Sunday,” he replied--that’s my day off.” When Albert passed our home on Saturday, he said to Mom, “I wrote my address and my wife’s name down for you. Please come on Sunday, at noontime, with your husband and children. We’ll have lunch together and get acquainted, okay?”

“Oh, yes, yes” she replied,-“I can hardly wait to meet her! Thank you so much!” On Sunday, after mass, we walked over to Albert’s home. His wife came to the door, smiling shyly, and extending her hand to my father, said, (in Italian), “What a pleasure it is to meet friends whom I can speak to in my own language! My name is Carmela, what’s yours?” My father, after giving his name, introduced my mother, my brother and me. She hugged us, one by one, and then led us into her home. She had already set the dining room table and the aroma of the food she had prepared was like walking into our own home. During our meal, Carmela told us that although she was happy to be having a baby, she was also frightened. All her life she had suffered from rheumatic heart disease and she had been told by many doctors that “she would be taking her life into her own hands if she became pregnant.” She looked at her husband, and lowering her eyelashes softly continued, “I never forgot that warning, but, sometimes fate steps in, and unexpected things happen.” All of a sudden her husband stood up, slammed his fist on the table and shouted, “BASTA! (enough), they came here to have lunch and become acquainted, not to hear about your problems! Now, let’s eat!” My parents looked at each other, and Mom, getting up from her chair, walked toward Carmela, “Please, let

me help you,” she said, as she put her arm around Carmela’s shoulders, trying to console her. We ate our meal, which was delicious, and then prepared to leave. “Carmela should get some rest now. I’ll come by to see her during the week,” my mother said. “Thank you for the delicious meal and warm welcome.” We all left immediately, and as I looked back into the dining room on our way out, saw Carmela being scolded by her husband, while she cringed in a corner, sobbing. My heart went out to her. She’s married to a beast, I thought to myself. What will he be like with his child? I dreaded the thought. Carmela gave birth to a son, born at home. He was named “Joseph”, Joey for short. My parents were asked to be his Godparents, so my brother and I were told that we now had another “brother,” whom we were to love and protect, always. One week after the birth, Carmela died. As is the Italian custom, my parents, as “Godparents”, wanted to take the baby home, promising to take care of him for whatever period of time was necessary. We took him home and welcomed our “new baby brother.” He was with us for several years and was an absolute joy. His father saw him on Sundays only. He didn’t have time during the rest of the week, he had to work! When Joey was seven years old, his father came to our house one Sunday. As

soon as he entered, he said, “I can’t stay long, but what I have to say is brief. I’m getting married to someone I’ve known for several years. She bought all her produce from me. She’s a bit older than I, but she never married because she had to take care of her mother and father. They both died and now she and I are going to be married so I want my boy back!” Albert and Anna were married, and after the wedding ceremony, without going on a honeymoon, or spending a bit of time alone together, they came for Joey. The youngster thought he was just going for a visit to his father’s home at first, but when he saw that his clothes and toys were going with him, started screaming, “I don’t want to go, I want to stay here! I want “Mama Rosa” (my mother). Three days later, there was a knock on our door. When my father opened it, there stood Albert, his new wife and little Joey. Joey leaped into my father’s arms, screaming hysterically. My mother ran to us, grabbing Joey into her arms, kissing him, while he would not let go of her. She looked at his Dad and before she could ask why this was happening, he yelled out, “You want him, you can have him! I never want to see him or hear about him again! He’s nothing but a pain in the ass!” As my mother embraced Joey, leading him into our apartment, my father turned to Albert and said, “Don’t ever come for Joey or to my home again. He will always be cared for and loved, and so he was!

EXTRA! EXTRA! YOU CAN NOW VISIT THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE OF YOUR CVE Reporter FROM THE COMFORT OF YOUR HOME

cvereporter.com Papers for the entire year wil be available for viewing 24/7


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Sounding Board Volunteer Spotlight Photo & Text by Barbara Nathan Marcus

Myriam Sachs Meet Myriam Sachs. Sachs is an interesting example of volunteering and just what can be achieved as a part time resident (since 2002) of CVE. She is almost, but not quite retired. As a Director

of Ashby B, and also Chair of the Civic and Cultural Committee, Sachs is a very active woman who loves to be involved in the community. Born in Romania, she moved to Israel at the age

of 10. There (but sometime later, of course) she met and married Joe and they moved to Montreal: she has dual American and Canadian Citizenship. Sachs worked as a High School French Teacher in Montreal and “my summer immersion course at The University of Montreal is a wonderful opportunity to teach French to students from all over Canada and at the end of five weeks to go back to retirement.” she quips. Sachs is more than just a pretty face although that she has a pretty face is self evident, is an added bonus. Indeed, everyone this reporter knows has a “pretty face” because folks are judged by their souls outward. (So much for that.) And ardent readers, we did not discuss her age. Sachs has family in Hollywood, Florida and Austin, Texas. She and her daughter in Hollywood “work together on a perpetual horoscope calendar using the paintings of her late father.” She says,” another

The Art of the Stroke By SHELLY BASKIN I recently had a stroke. Many, in the Village, have suffered strokes, broken bones, and even heart attacks. Others have had knee or hip replacements and many other serious surgeries. I never gave these things much thought other than to feel sorry for the sufferer, wish him or her well, and be on my way. Sometimes, I would even send them a card. But, I had a stroke. I didn’t know what caused it. None of my doctors did. They all said I was lucky, and that the “shot” I received within the first three hours was key. My remaining disabilities are leg numbness and right hand difficulties. Everyone said I was fortunate. My outlook is, and has always been, “there are others worse off than me.” I still believe that even though I do not as of now, have much control over my right hand which they tell me takes much longer to heal. My outlook has changed forever. So, in a way, it wasn’t a total loss. I learned that we must all learn to adapt and “roll with the punches.” I learned never to take life for granted. For me health is no longer a “given.” It must be nurtured each day; it must be celebrated each hour that is ours. Good health is priceless

and can be lost in seconds. We can, none of us, ever forget that. I can talk about the excellent hospital treatment, the caring staff and the outstanding EMS providers to myself and others in the Village, and the loving professionals at the rehab center. They are all much appreciated by myself, and my family. I learned over many weeks that the health providers are very special. I never came across such caring and professional people in all of my experience and work over a period of fifty years. Every one of them was an angel while dealing with our problems, even though, I learned that some health problems in their families were much worse than mine were. I learned that it is up to each individual to work toward their own rehabilitation. I learned that physical as well as occupational therapy must be accomplished. Physical is done on the lower body and the latter is performed on the hand, which, I understand, is often the most complex. The hand is the last to recover and, at this point we can only hope about what the final

outcome will be in regard to how much of my hand will recover. But, I also became aware as to what my future is to be. And, this is why I titled this essay “THE ART OF THE STROKE.” My next phase of recovery and life is to help others with disabilities by speaking out, speaking for, and speaking up for the disabled, and to make friends more aware of the difficulties they suffer.. Those that are acquainted with me know I have a “big” mouth that often gets me into some kind of trouble. But, I don’t care. I had a stroke and this, I feel, entitles me to be some sort of a champion for others whether older, worse off, alone with little help, alone with more help, or just plain unable to recover, fully. I find that it takes much encouragement from family, and friends, to work with the disabled and encourage them to go on. Thankfully, I have both. We only go around, in life, once. Make it count. Visit your disabled friends. Make yourself known to them. Help and encourage them. For, you can never know, when you will be “in their shoes.” Or in their chair.

of her passions is to visit her two grandchildren in Austin, Texas and to spend the Jewish High Holidays together”. As a Director of Ashby B, she is the unofficial secretary. “I help Joe with all the paperwork and receive owners that have questions, who need help and I answer the phones and help elderly neighbors or newcomers and many other jobs that come up.” Also, because she is a Director, she likes to know what is “going on so I try to go to all the meetings” says Sachs. As Chair of The Civic and Cultural Committee, she and the other members are planning programs for November: a speaker from North East Focal Point and in December: a party for folks over ninety years young. Another member, Roslyn Nehls, is currently working on the “Save the Library” project. Sachs says this is just part of what is in the works. As you can see Sachs is a very engaged woman. This interview was conducted by email and because Sachs was in Austin part of the time, there was some difficulty

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getting her photo. Finally this interviewer said “that if it was not received by deadline, I would insert a photo of one of my grandcats Dusty.” Since it is imperative that my ardent readers get a full perspective, here is a wee photo of Dusty, one of the four grandcats and two granddogs and two granddaughters that we visit in Toronto.

Dusty Want to be a volunteer? Want to be involved in the CVE Community? Do you have a few hours to spare? Know a person for the Volunteer Spotlight? Contact me at: barbplusbobm@aol. com or through the Reporter co-ordinates.


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Atlantic City, Here I Come! By PAULINE MIZRACH One more time: I’m reflecting on my days at Atlantic City, New Jersey during the 1960s. Historically, Atlantic City is the city famous for its boardwalk, casinos, sandy beaches, its role as the inspiration for the game of Monopoly. It is a resort community located on Absecon Island on the Atlantic Ocean. Atlantic City was incorporated on May 1, 1854 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. Historic Hotels: During the early part of the 20th Century, Atlantic City went through a radical building boom. Many of the modest boarding

houses were replaced by large hotels. Three of the most distinctive of these were the Marlborough, the Blenheim, and the Troymore hotels. As time went by additional large hotels were constructed along the boardwalk. Bally’s was constructed later close to this location. Demise and Rebirth: By the late 1960s tourism had declined and consisted mostly of the elderly. The neighborhood known as the inlet became impoverished. Even prior to the advent of legalized gambling, many of these hotels had been demolished. Atlantic City had

come to play “second fiddle” to Las Vegas, Nevada yet still, some of the smaller hotels off the boardwalk survived. Changes and Moving Forward to Rebirth: Games, games, games! Many hotels offered fine dining, vouchers to play the casino machines, glamorous popular shows, including the Rat Pack entertainers (Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis, Jr. and others) and the thrill of poker and other games of chance. In 1976 the vast Meadowlands Sports Complex opened in Atlantic City. Atlantic City, Here I Come! I’m remembering the 1970s

Going Home (A letter to my writing class) By ELI COHEN Most snowbirds seem to know the ropes when it comes time to leave sunny Florida and head back up north. Packing the suitcases, often bulging with last minute insertions of a favorite outfit, temporarily discontinuing the newspaper and telephone, returning the rented modem, the trip to the ticket office to give your return envelope for the next season’s shows, etc. But the next morning at 6:00 a.m. sharp, with the van loaded and in darkness, you take off. We breathe a sigh of relief that yes we are finally going home. After driving 500 miles a day, we arrive home, usually at 2:30 p.m. after almost three days on the road. We stretch our weary legs and start looking at the familiar surroundings of our own home that we haven’t seen in four months. We are thankful that the weather is in the 40’s and there is no snow in sight. We rest for a few hours then

start hauling the stuff from our van into the house. It’s exhausting but necessary. Naturally we eat out that night, call all our kin and tell them that we have arrived safely and lie that we feel fine. Since my wife and I have real estate holdings down on the cape in Massachusetts, reality sets in. A tenant calls up and says her stove isn’t working, so we send a serviceman to correct the situation.. An hour later, a call from a new tenant…”She’s parking in my space, tell upstairs tenant to park elsewhere” she says. Another call from someone wanting an apartment. There is a problem in that she talks in broken English with Portuguese words intertwined in her conversation. My wife’s face grimaces as she tries to understand. So it goes when we get home. There will be no sunny beaches or warm water pools for us before July. In the meantime, we try

to manage our properties ourselves without the help of a professional manager. Twice a month we travel to Freybur, Maine to oversee our property there, which is a three hour drive away. It’s just six miles from North Conway, NH a favorite shopping Mecca and there is no sales tax which is a rarity in New England. We manage to balance our Temple activities and social life in between trips to our real estate holdings. It is a busy schedule. That is why the four month respite here in CVE rejuvenates both me and my wife. It helps to some extent to separate ourselves from our business. We look forward to it every year, especially as Thanksgiving approaches, as we usually leave for Florida a day or so later. So as this is my last assignment from Sandy, I’d like to thank the class for their indulgence and sign off.

– wandering off and on the jitney for transportation, exploring and walking around alone; exploring the fishing pier and continuing along the downtown section, into the Harlem neighborhood. I checked out the small cafes, coffee shops, stores and people. One day, by chance, I caught the show of Sammy Davis, Jr. in an off-beat club. One More Time: On this year’s trip, I was soaking it all in, walking along the boardwalk in familiar territory. I explored the old trails, picking up the pieces as I redeemed my voucher coupons at the Taj Mahal

Hotel Casino. I watched the players and then sat on the boardwalk bench just watching the passing parade of seniors walking in groups or in pairs. There were bicycle riders, children eating ice cream cones and flipflopping along at their own pace. I’m reliving 10 years of my favorite places and the changes in the new luxury hotels. Later on my return to my chartered bus, I stopped to buy postal picture cards and ate pizza at an outdoor restaurant on the boardwalk. My son Steve was waiting for me at the local stop, One More Time.


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A Snowbird Reports: North vs. South? By JANICE ZAMSKY It’s both good and yet, not so good, to be back home (Milwaukee, Wisconsin) once again. After sweltering in Deerfield’s May humidity and high temperatures, we are now freezing with the thermometer in the fifties during the day and forties during the evenings. Shortly before we left CVE for our annual migration north, a neighbor asked me if I had just washed my hair. I informed her, “No, I’m sweating.” Now, I’m enjoying the cold as much as the Florida high temps and humidity! (just kidding, of course.) We were buoyed by the good news from CVE (so much rain that the Florida rooms in my building, including ours, had enough water on the floors to need cleaning up with a shop vac). In our usually quiet suburb, we were informed that we just missed a recent “Wild West” incident. Evidently there had been a bank robbery, police chase and

shoot-out on the main drag about one-half mile from our home. This was a daytime incident. I understand the police received the public’s wrath for their chase and subsequent shoot-out when people were out and about – putting innocent lives in possible peril. Florida has no monopoly on crime – even in sleepy residential and suburban areas. I am having a great deal of distress in getting the contents of my suitcases back into the closets. Friends advise me to stay packed – as we’ll be returning to CVE in late October. Here’s one about my “holier than thou” attitude: Whenever we visited a doctor’s office in Florida, in addition to being asked for our Medicare and health insurance cards, we were always requested to produce a picture ID, (like a drivers license). I would so selfrighteously exclaim “We never have to show an ID up North, because nobody there would do insurance fraud!”

Well, guess what? Now, in all medical offices here in the Milwaukee area, we are asked to show picture ID’s. I’m told that this is going to be a federal law very shortly. Economic report: numerous restaurants and retail stores have closed. Malls have numerous empty spaces (especially the large outlet mall in northern Illinois, Gurnee Mills). Stores have an abundance of “clearance” bargains everywhere, but I have “closet problems” both North and South! Nothing else to report here, except that I have been living exclusively in fleece-backed warm-up suits while you, dear readers, are frolicking around in fashionable shorts and tank tops.

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And Then the Neighborhood Changed By JERRY WOLF During the daylight hours our street is calm and easy going. Chattering scholars from a nearby school walk to and fro. When darkness comes, the street is deserted. It wasn’t always that way. People used to take evening strolls and kids coquetted in the darkness. Youngsters went out to play under the care of grownups, but no more. On a sunny day my wife walked into our local butcher shop and found it strangely deserted. She called out for service and nobody answered. As she turned around to walk out, she felt a hand grab her, as someone tried to yank the gold chain she was wearing from her neck while uttering a curse. She turned and saw the culprit; a well dressed young man who motioned to a pistol he had at his waist. That quieted her and then he and two other guys ran out into a waiting car. She had walked into a holdup! Two years later we heard

the news that the local supermarket down the street also had a holdup, but this time the thugs shot and killed the manager, who balked at turning over the cash. They then wounded the lady at the cash register when she screamed. This took place a block and a half from our house. Last month new neighbors moved in next door. They were a young couple who owned two late model cars. One they drove to work, but the other, a 2008 Montero, was left in the barred carport. In the pure daylight of early morning, thieves broke down the barred fence, but had to give up when the gate in front of the Montero needed more time to bring down. They left unsatisfied. This could happen in the USA, but it happened in Heredia, Costa Rica. The reason is complicated, but eerily similar to other happenings in both countries – drugs, especially cocaine.

It is well known that the major source of this drug is the country of Colombia. Tons of cocaine are shipped by water on the Pacific and are carried across the isthmus to the Atlantic, where it is transferred to boats which take it to the United States. At other times, humans called “mules” swallow it wrapped in layers of condoms. Illegal aliens often take the chance to make big money, carrying it. Sometimes, in Costa Rica, it is sold to local dealers and addicts or, worse, converted to crack, one smoke of which creates instant addicts. This is the curse that makes trigger-happy bandits and holdup men. The no-good-niks who killed the grocer, or who robbed the daily take from the butcher, were never caught, but we can still remember the good old days when we would stroll the lane together at night, without fear or danger.

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VOLUME 32, NUMBER 10

United Order of True Sisters Text and Photos By JULES KESSELMAN

About 100 members of the United Order of True Sisters Inc. gathered in our Clubhouse Party Room to install a new slate of officers for the year 2009-2010. The UOTS

mission is helping patients afflicted with Cancer, by providing emotional and financial support to the patients and their families. Four worthy charities each

received a $300 donation. Capt. Mike Harper and Lt. Robert Reich accepted for the Fire Rescue. Donna DeFronzo and Frieda Caides accepted for NE Focal Point, Stacy

Davis accepted for Ronald McDonald House and Kim Neil accepted for Camp Good Grief. Camp Good Grief is sponsored by Hospice By The Sea which offers a weekend

bereavement camp for children who have experienced the death of a loved one. The camp welcomes children between the ages of 5-15 years old.

Chairperson Betty Swinkin installing President Frieda Weiss

L/R Chairperson Betty Swinkin; President Frieda Weiss; Treasurer Sheila Simms; V.P. Marilyn Asner; Comm. Member Kitty Cole, seated Recording Secretary Jo O’Callaghan

Licensed or Unlicensed? By JUDY OLMSTEAD Photos by ROSS GILSON The scene depicted in these photographs is all too familiar in Century Village. The president of the building who took this picture was unable to get the contractor/handyman or the unit owner to remove the debris while he was working or to perform the work inside the unit. Nor would

either of them furnish proof of a license and insurance. The sad part is that the unit owner was probably not saving any money by using an unlicensed uninsured handyman to do the job. There are multiple problems depicted in this picture. First, it poses a danger to others in the building with

Tools and materials on common element

equipment and debris lying around and cords crossing over the walkway. Second, it is damaging the lawn. Third, if the workman, a resident, or a guest is hurt, the building association may be sued. I know of one building that requires a $500.00 deposit from all contractors on the premises to be used

in the event of damage by the contractor. I also know of at least one handyman who posted notices on the building bulletin boards and scammed the unit owners who hired them. For help in locating a licensed professional, go to www.MyFloridaLicense. com or www.BobVila.com/

MyFloridaLicense/. Both of these sites were listed in a brochure put out by The Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. Their telephone number is 1-850-487-1395. If you do not have a computer, ask a neighbor for help in verifying the contractor you plan to hire.

Unsafe saw table on common element with power cable across walkway


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Durham V Tree Dedication in honor of Mary T. Amorini Text by VIRGINIA HOGAN & Photo by JULES KESSELMAN Several residents attended a Blanchard Magnolia Tree Dedication in memory of Mary T. Amorini. She died on February 28th while serving as Treasurer of the Durham V Condo Association. President Virginia Hogan gave a short speech about the time and effort Mary donated to the association without ever complaining. She was a very kind person, and it was noted how she will be missed by all. A Dedication Certificate will be presented to Mary’s husband, Pat Amorini L/R: Carol Chylinski; Marty Davidson; Elinor Davidson; Durham V President. Virginia Hogan; Manny Rosen; Larry Gordon; Bob Hogan; David Stein; SidetteStein. Missing Pat; Joe & Rick Amorini

VISITORS ARE NOT BEING CALLED IN AT THE FRONT GATE CAUSING DELAYS AND CONFUSION PLEASE CALL ALL VISITORS INTO THE AUTOMATED SYSTEM BY DIALING 954 421-2556 AND CLEARLY SPEAK THE NAME OF YOUR VISITOR WHEN PROMPTED TO DO SO. CALLS FOR VISITORS ARRIVING THE FOLLOWING DAY MUST BE MADE AFTER 8:30 PM. FOR A SPEEDY ENTRY, PLEASE MAKE SURE ALL VISITORS HAVE YOUR FULL NAME AND ADDRESS AND YOUR TELEPHONE NUMBER.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP!

The Swarm of Bees By BOB WINSTON One little honeybee by my window flew; Soon came another – then there were two. Two happy honeybees in the apple tree; One more bee came buzzing up – then there were three. Three busy honeybees starting to explore. Another bee came to help – then there were four. Four laden honeybees flying to the hive; They were joined by one more bee – then there were five. Five tired honeybees with the others mix; Now there’s a swarm of them – a hundred times six. -Elsa Gorham Baker My kids loved that ditty almost as much as we did when they were toddlers. In later years Hollywood released several B-grade horror films, i.e. Terror out of the Sky, Deadly Invasion of the Killer Bee, Nightmare, The Savage Bees, and so on and so on. I saw all of them, and they compare favorably with probably the worst movie ever made, i.e. Plan 9 From Outer Space. The Rosens, a patient couple, got a little tired of swatting the numerous bees that seemed to congregate daily in the patio portion of their unit. “I wish they didn’t like us so much,” Al and Laverne lamented. “Admittedly we’re sweet, but not that sweet.” An inspection of our gut-

ter system, for an entirely different reason, revealed an unusual growth under one of the eaves. Further investigation revealed a mass was visible that extended below one of the eaves-trough. This appendage seemed an attraction to bees that, like fighter jets hovered around it in a protective mode. This called for something other than a handyman. A professional bee removal service was contacted immediately and it was determined what we were dealing with – a colony of honey bees that took up residency in Oakridge D. Moreover they extended themselves and settled in the walls of the fourth floor and possibly beyond. The Plot Thickens: Enter a Possible Hollywood Production The human characters in this forthcoming epic are the Rosens. The protagonists, a hundred thousand, or more honey bees had taken up residency. The setting: Century Village, more specifically Oakridge D. Epilogue Over one hundred thousand bees were exterminated! Over one hundred and fifty pounds of honey was removed. Affected drywall was removed from the Rosen’s unit. At this writing hundreds of bees’ corpses are being swept up daily. The residents of Oakridge D are keeping

Photos by AL MILLER a wary eye on the skies and hope that the plague is over. The Rosen’s are waiting for

Hollywood to contact them for a possible sequel. A suggested title: Plan 9 For CVE.

Bee Hive outside the Rosens Apartment

Inside the Rosens Closet

Attention: CVE Residents Starting 2009, the Reporter will have a new In Loving Memory Section. Please send via e-mail to cvereporter@hotmail.com or fax to 954421-9269 or hand deliver to Reporter office,ATTN: Gloria Olmstead.


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Active CVE Republican Club New and regular members call for updated meeting information. Call or fax Ron Goldfarb at 954-596-5198. Alzheimer’s Association Support Groups. Free for families and caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s. Locations in North, Central and South Broward. For a group in your area, call 954-726-0011 or 24 hr. helping hotline at 1-800-272-3900. American Red Magen David for Israel (ARMDI) Freedom Chapter of Deerfield Beach meets the fourth Wednesday of the month, 11:30 a.m. in Temple Beth Israel. For further information call Rose Trugman 954-4286627 or Rose Vaupen 954-426-2392. Americans United for Separation of Church & State New chapter being formed. Primary mission is to educate public regarding constitutional guarantee of church and state separation. We are concerned about book banning, schools teaching religious theology disguised as scientific theory. For further information, call Barbara Miranda at 954-422-5958. AMIT (Americans for Israel and Torah) meets second Monday of every month at Young Israel Synagogue at 12:30p.m. For information, Norma 954-428-2386. Art Club of CVE meetings will be held on the second Friday of each month (November thru April), from 10 a.m. to noon in Clubhouse Room GP-A. Membership is $12. We have interesting programs, trips & exhibitions. Artists and non-artists are welcome. For information call Ginette Beauvais, Acting President (October through April) at 954-482-8493. Astronomy Club Next meeting will be held in November. Call Norma 954-480-8938 or Jerry 954-428-9381. Ballroom Dance Club meets every Thursday in the Exercise Room at 7:30 to 9 p.m. at no charge. Singles and couples welcome. For information, call Ernie Feder 954-418-8895. B’nai B’rith Unit #2995 for Men and Women. The following is a schedule of membership meetings for the year 2009-2010. Membership meetings July and August No Meetings, September 24, 2009 6:30 p.m., October 22, 2009, 6:30 p.m., November 19, 2009, 6:30 p.m., December 24, 2009, 6:30 p.m. April 23, 2010, 6:30 p.m., May 21, 2010, 6:30 p.m., June 25, 2010, 6:30 p.m. Board meetings for the year 2009-2010 are as follows: September 13, 2009, 10:00 a.m., October 18, 2009, 10:00 a.m., November 15, 2009, 10:00 a.m., Dr. Waxman will attend this meeting, December 20, 2009, 10:00 a.m., April 12, 2010, 10:00 a.m., May 17, 2010, 10:00 a.m., June 14, 2010, 10:00 a.m. All meetings will be held in the Activity Center includes board and membership. For further information contact Dave Polak 954-420-0096 or Jack Galit 954-428-6029. Bible Study Group meets every Thursday in the clubhouse from 1 - 3 p.m. Study the old and new

JULY 2009

testaments. All welcome. For further information, call Roslyn Nehls at 954698-6184. Billiard Club of CVE If you are interested in joining, call Al Feinberg at 954-428-7624 for further information.

D, Thursdays from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. to share thoughts, feelings and concerns in a private confidential setting. It is open to everyone and is free of charge. For Information call Paul Greenwald, Ph.D. 954-483-5300.

Bowling Club of CVE meets every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. at Strikes of Boca (formerly Boca Bowl), Town Center Rd and Military Trail. All welcome. Come join us and have fun. For information, call Nelson at 561-8653864.

Century Camera Club meets the first & third Tuesdays at 2:30 p.m. in Room F, at Clubhouse. Demonstrations, lectures, competitions, instructions, exhibits, shows and field trips are planned. All who are interested in photography are invited. For information call Jerry Raines 954 427 6785.

Broward Council of Na’Amat USA (formerly Pioneer Women) meets fourth Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Na’Amat Council office, 1721 N. State Road 7, Suite H, Margate. For information, call 954-327-0770.

Century Juniors Club of CVE. Active, couples only, social club meets at 7 p.m. second Thursday of each month in Clubhouse, Room N, accepting new members. For information call Harriet at 954-426-3008.

Broward County Support Group meets every Thursday in Clubhouse, Room C, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Choraleers CVE produced and directed by Bill Weinhaus, meets every Wednesday, 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse Party Room. We rehearse for a once a year concert in our theater. If you enjoy singing join us. For information, call Irene Greenberg, President 954-426-0628.

Broward Homebound Program your donations will enable elderly and disabled residents to live independently at home with dignity. For further information, call Diane or Marie at 954-786-2484. Cameo Drama Club meetings takes place the first and third Tuesday of the month in Room G. If interested call 954-570-8884. Canadian Club of CVE. The Canadian Club of CVE has been in operation since 1976 as a social club for Canadians wintering in Century Village, Deerfield Beach. In 2009-10, the regular monthly meetings are held on the second Thursday of each month, December thru March at 10 a.m. in the Club House party room, with an informative or entertaining program following a short business session. During the winter season, the Club organizes several social events, including weekly bowling on Mondays, a welcome brunch in December and a closing Bar-B-Q in March. Outings to various activities, including an NHL hockey game and a cruise are part of the activities. Membership is $5 per person per year. Registration takes place every Friday between 10 a.m. and noon in the CVE clubhouse upper lobby as of November 27. For more information, contact Co-President Dorothy Stober (CVE 954-426-4097 or Montreal 514-4856362) or Co- President Sidney Margles (CVE 954-596-0179 or Montreal 514485-9388). Check the Canadian Club website at www.canadianclubcve.com for updates as they occur. Catholic Social Club Catholic Mass Team meets every Saturday at 5:45 p.m. in Le Club Activity Room A, open to all denominations. Catholic Social Club Catholic Mass Team and Choir meet every Saturday at 5:45 p.m. Mass begins at 6:15 p.m. every Saturday, same room. Father James, Pastor of Our Lady of Mercy Church, is our Celebrant. For further information, call Mary Ann Braun at 954-571-2266. Center for Group Counseling’s SAGES (Senior Adult Group Experiences) meets at the Clubhouse Room

City University of New York (CUNY) Alumni Club Next meeting in the fall. All CUNY graduates and their spouses are welcome. We have Interesting programs and field trips. For information, call Norma 954-4808938, Geri 954-360-9725 or Rosalie 954-427-1593. Classical Civilization Club meets every Wednesday, alternating with the Egyptology Club, at 1:30 p.m. in Clubhouse room C. Learn about all aspects of the Greek and Roman World. Call Lewis 954-421-8934. Clubhouse Bingo every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. in the party room. It is new and exciting and lots of fun. Only dabbers are used, no more chips. A six pack sells for $3, the Early Bird and Bingo Special $1. The Early Bird and Bingo Players Special each pays $75. Bingo will be played all year. For more information call David 954-4282849. Cornerstone Community Baptist Church, Pastor Bret M. Lovitz, Worship Services 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m., Wednesday Service 7 p.m., CCBC Youth Group 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., For information call 954-421-2530 CVE Duplicate Bridge Club. Games Monday, Tuesday and Saturday, 12:00 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Card Room B. For information, call Irving Ruga at 954-698-9741. CVE Interfaith Prayer hotline: 954-571-1763 continuing the work of the late Geri Hope, has Catholic and Jewish residents praying in their own homes from the same prayer list page. Call the Prayer line at any time to request prayer for yourself or others. Requests may be anonymous. Just state the specific need, with the name or initials of the person needing prayer. Miracles still happen. For information call Mary Anne Surrette at 954-7340095.

CVE Magic Club Monday, 2 p.m., discussions Magic Learning, speakers, discuss magic, conventions, demonstrations. For information call 954698-9334. CVE Mandolin Orchestra now meets every Monday afternoon from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Clubhouse in General Purpose Room. Musicians who can play cello, viola or clarinet are invited. For further information, call Vincent Zappi at 954-428-1794. CVE Sewing Club meets every Tuesday from 10 am. to 12 noon in the Sewing Room. For further information, call Rita at 954-571-1645 CVE Shuffleboard Club meets first Friday of each month at 10:30 a.m. at the Clubhouse in Room A. Come join us for fun and friendship. For information, call Alan Brigell at 954-4262085 or Eugene Metz at 954- 422-8903. CVE String Chamber Group is open to capable musicians. Come and get a musical workout year round on Wednesdays 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the mezzanine (3rd floor of clubhouse) music library office next to elevator. For information call Blanche 954-426-4513. CVE Symphony Guild supports our Symphony Orchestra. For further information contact President Bea Guccione, 954-426-3540. For membership in the Guild phone Kitty Cole, 954-3607956. CVE Volleyball Club meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 9 a.m. and beyond, next to tennis court. All invited. Call Harry Liner 954-426-4853 or Harry Chizeck 954-426-3178. Dance With Us for Folk and Line Dancing meets on Tuesday from 12 noon to 2 p.m. in the Health Club. No Charge. For information call Gloria 954-480-6474 or Jerry 954-698-9240. Deerfield Beach Computer Club meets every Friday, except holidays, at Pompano Beach Highlands Park, 1650 N.E. 50th Court, which is two blocks east of Dixie Highway off 48th Street from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. For information Barry Cowen at 954-725-9331, Gerry Gerstenberg at 954 941-6689 or Roy at 954-429-9472. Deerfield Beach Democratic Club meets the second Monday of the month at 7:00 p.m., at Temple Beth Israel, 201 S. Military Trail, Deerfield Beach, Fl., 33442 Stimulating political discussions. All invited. Refreshments served. For information: call Bernie Parness President at 954 426 1284 Deerfield Progressive Forum meets Saturdays, 10 a.m. to noon, in Le Club for lecture/discussion sessions on political, economic and social issues. For information call Julie Bloom at 954 428-1598. Deer-Raton Lions Club meets on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Atlantic Bread Co. 296 S. Federal Highway in Deerfield Beach. For information call George Gsegnet 954-419-9647.


JULY 2009 District 65 U.A.W. (formerly South Florida Retirees) meets every third month on the third Tuesday of the month, 12 noon, at the Activity Center. Updated reports will be made on the 65 Security Plan. Please attend and bring new members. For further information, call Pearl Hill 954-421-7776. New York Retirees DC37: District Council 37 Retirees. Next Meeting held at Temple Anshdi Shalom 7099 Atlantic Ave. Delray, 33436. For information call Chairman Vincent Socci 561-451-3643. Egyptology Club meets for group study, discussion and videos every Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. in General Purpose Room C. Future meetings will concentrate on the history, culture and art of Ancient Egypt. The club will continue with the video lectures by Dr. Bob Brier. For further information, call Golda 954-360-7377. Emunah of America meets third Wednesday every month at 12 noon in the Young Israel Synagogue in Century Plaza. Light lunch and interesting program. All cordially welcome. For information, about this chapter call Ina Ciocca at 954-360-0740, Selma at 954-427-8674 or Pearl at 954-426-0189. Friends of Deerfield Beach Arboretum 2841 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Free tour of the Arboretum every Friday 10 a.m. and first Saturday of each month at 10 a.m., Seminars held at 7 p.m. in recreation room of Constitution Park. All seminars followed with an auction featuring plants, herbs and trees from our nursery. Refreshments served. All invited. Volunteers needed to help spread mulch, weed and participate in planting activities. For further information, call 954-480-4494. Hadassah Deerfield Beach meets monthly on the third Monday at noon at Temple Beth Israel. Refreshments served. Interesting topics. For information, call Gert 954-421-0945 or Adele at 954 427-4970. Hebrew Speaking Circle is formed to meet in the Clubhouse. For information, call Dr. Lee Lubin 954-4288642. Hispanic Club meets at the Clubhouse every second Sunday of each month in Music Room A from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. For information call Judith Smith at 954-427-8248.. Come and meet new friends and help plan club “outings” to various park picnics, museums, restaurants, etc. The President of the club is Judith Smith from Colombia, South America. Humanist of the Gold Coast meets at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2601 St. Andrews Blvd., Boca Raton. Exact date to be advised in future issue. For information contact Dr. Robert Griffin 954-426-5021. Italian American Club, your heritage, meets second Monday of each month at 11 a.m. in the Clubhouse Party Room. Join us for fun. Some of our functions: Pizza Parties, Picnics (the Italian Way), Trips, Lunch/Dinner Theatre, Guest Speakers and more. Contacts all year: Lena Radicella 954-428-2184, Lucille Carlucci 954421-2406 and Toni Ponto 954-428-0286. JOIN, JOIN, JOIN. Jelly Belly Dancers Free Belly Dance lessons. Learn to Belly Dance

for fun and exercise! All ages, sizes and shapes welcomed. No registration required. For further information call Sandy 954-421-2541.

ed in protecting our federal pensions, COLAS and other entitlements. For further information and transportation, call Rita Daniels 954-428-9022.

Jet Setters Social Club Active, Jet Setters, widows, widowers and singles social club. Join a great NEW sophisticated singles group. Trips, dining experiences, plays, concerts, art museums, upscale shopping excursions, etc. No dues. For information call Lila 954-596-9949.

National Council of Jewish Woman. Meetings are held at the Clubhouse, Room N, at 12 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month, October through April. For information concerning the organization & events call Sylvia at 954-421-8870 or Frances at 954-428-1336.

Jewish War Veterans U.S.A. Post 265 and Ladies Auxiliary of CVE will hold an organization meeting on Thursday, May 21, 2009 at 1 p.m. in Room G at the Clubhouse. All who are interested are welcome. One does not need to have served in the Armed Forces or be related to a veteran to attend. Any questions, please call Kitty Cole at 954-360-7956.

Nature Club will meet third Friday of every month from November to April in Clubhouse Room A at 10 a.m. A different speaker is at each meeting and several trips each year are enjoyed by the members. These trips are to a variety of nature sites. For information call Shelly Baskin, 954-428-0634.

Knitting Club of CVE meets every Monday from 1 to 3 p.m. in Sewing Room at Clubhouse. We welcome beginners and experienced knitters and crotchetiers. If you have an “Itch to Stitch” come and have fun and make someone happy. Call Florence 954-698-9421. L’Alliance Francophone CVE. Join more than 800 French-speaking residents of the Village, mostly snowbirds from Canada. The association was established in 1995, offer great activities. For information, call Yvan Sinotte 954-425-4355 or Pierrette Pelletier 954428-4158. L’Alliance Francophone of CVE. Si vous parlez Français, joignez-vous aux 800 personnes déjà members de notre association. Nous avons de nombreuses activites tres diversifies a vous proposer. Pour toute information appeler Yvan Sinotte 954-425-4355 ou Pierrette Pelletier 954-428-4158. Lapidary Club members only, work every Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Lapidary Room. Supervisor must be present. Sessions will be added as needed. For information call Walter Reich 954-421-6875 or Victor Goldring 954-418-2174. Lets Talk meets 2nd and 4th Tuesday each month, 2 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Room E. Discussions, Daytrips, films will be topics of the day. For further information call Gladys 954-421-9232, Irene 954-418-9156, Shirley 954-427-0951. Mended Hearts Cardiac Support Group an affiliate of the American Heart Association, meets the 1st and 3rd Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. Heart Healthy Snacks will be served. Open to all cardiac patients and their families in the community. Located at 7300 Del Prado Circle South, Boca Raton. For information call 561-392-3000. Mr. & Mrs. Club Come and meet new friends and socialize. Ages 55-73. Monthly activities are being planned. For information, call Buddy at 954427-7407.

Newbies Come and meet new people interested in social activities, dinners and trips. We meet the 1st Tuesday of the month from November to April, Room F, 7 p.m. For information, call Virginia at 954-426-9455 or Beverly at 954-428-3705. New Covenant Church Celebration Service every Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and Evening Service and Bible Study every Wednesday at 6:45 p.m. For further information, call 954-781-3170. New Horizons Church of Deerfield Worship Service 10 a.m., Sunday School 10:30a.m .For information call church 954-427-3045. New York Transit Retirees of Florida meets the second Wednesday of the month at 11 a.m. at Centura Park Clubhouse, 2395 N. W. 36th Ave, Coconut Creek. Keep informed of your pensions and medical benefits. For information, call 561-479-2149. North East Focal Senior Center: Adult Day Care service, Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m .for individuals with dementia, Alzheimer or memory loss. Contact Mary Jo Bodnick, Case Manager at 954-4804463. Ballroom Dance lessons every Tuesday 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., “Hot Topic” discussions every Tuesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Open Water Color Painting class every Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact Laura Newman at 954-480-4447.Silver Sneakers class by Humana first Thursday monthly from 12 noon to 1 p.m. Beginner Computer lessons offered one-on-one at $40 for six one-hour lessons. Contact Laura Newman 954-480-4447 for appointment. Vision Impaired Support group every Wednesday 12 noon to 1 p.m. Tai Chi every Thursday, 12 noon to 1 p.m.; Arm Chair Fitness every Friday, 12 noon to 12:30 p.m,; Stretching/ Yoga Lite every Monday 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.. Line Dancing ($4 donation) for beginners/intermediates every Friday 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Volunteers required to demonstrate and assist in Floral Arrangements. Contact Claire Riccardi 954-480-4447.

Na’Amat USA For further information, contact Marjorie Moidel at 954-970-8609.

Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church, 5201 N. Military Trail, Deerfield Beach, Fl. Services Monday to Friday, 9 a.m., Saturday Vigil 4 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., and 11 a.m. by Rev. James Parappally, Pastor. For further information, call 954-421-3246.

National Association of Retired Federal Employees (NARFE) meets fourth Wednesday monthly at John Knox Village at 1 p.m. We are interest-

Parent & Adult Children Club meets the first Sunday of the month, Room F. This is a Social Club. Learn nutrition tips, exercise tips, meet

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new people, outings. The parent and adult child must come to the meetings together. If one does not live in the Village invite them to attend the meeting with you. For further information call Linda 954-725-3762. Pflag (Parents, Family and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) will meet on the second Tuesday of each month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Clubhouse, Room F. For information, call Abe at 954- 571-8448 or Dorothy at 954-4228508. Philadelphian’s and Neighbors Club meets 2nd Tuesday of the month at 2 p.m. in Clubhouse, Room October through March. Entertainment at every meeting. Greet old and new friends. For further information call Selma Edelman, 954-421-6423 or her cell phone 954-675-3998. You can also call Bea Lerman 954-421-3497. Philosophy of CVE meetings is held each Monday in Room A at the Clubhouse from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. All residents and friends are welcome. Our schedule begins in November and lasts until mid-March. Starting with Opera, other topics will include the environment, humor, liberty, law, a piano recital and a variety of other cultural themes. For details, call Dr. Bob Griffin 954-596-0463 Pythian Sisters, Bright Star Temple #36 meets first and third Tuesday of every month at noon in the Activity Center, Room B. Interesting meetings, refreshments served. Become a member. Information, Ruth Goldberg 954-427-5226 or Irene Greenberg 954-426-0628. Red Hatters Club, The JCP Red Hatters meet the second Wednesday of each month in the clubhouse. Monthly outings planned. Requirement for membership is a Red Hat and Purple Dress, Blouse, Pants etc. must be worn on outings. For more information call Josephine Privitera at 954-425-7026. Russian Club will be meeting every third Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the home of Galina Baraz, 2064 Ventnor P. For further information, contact Galina at 954-428-3870. Saint Ambrose Catholic Church, Pastor Rev. Bryan Dalton, Daily Masses 7:30 a.m., 11 a.m., 7 p.m., Saturday morning Vigil Masses 4 p.m., 5:30 p.m., Sunday Masses 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12 noon, 6 p.m., Confessions Saturday, 11 a.m. to 12 noon, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., For information call church 954-427-2225. Scrabbleers meets every Thursday at 7 p.m. in Room C at Clubhouse. All scrabble players welcome. Bring set if possible. For information, call R. Levin 954-427-4092. Selma’s Jewish Discussion Group meets first and third Wednesday of each month at Clubhouse, Room F at 10:30 a.m. All denominations welcome. For further information, call Pearl Keiler at 954-421-8719. Senior Volleyball for men and women on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the Volleyball Court, next to the main tennis courts back of the Clubhouse. Everyone, who attends, plays. Call Max Amichai Heppner 954-596-0484, E-mail: Heppnershanamax@aol.com.


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CVE REPORTER

JULY 2009 Issued July 2009

The Happenings Sunrise Senior Living’s events and occasions for Seniors and their Families at The Horizon Club

There’s always something happening at The Horizon Club. Join us for one or all of the activities listed below. Call us to learn more about these and other educational, social and cultural events and programs. Bring your friends along, or come and meet new friends. Call or visit us today to learn more.

Date: Thursday, July 2nd Time: 1:00pm - 2:00pm

Sterling University Lecture Series: American Exceptionality

The future, by definition, is full of uncertainty, but the exceptionality of America throughout its history is beyond dispute. Welcome back acclaimed historian and speaker Phil Leto, III, JD as he recounts the most prominent challenges, people and events in time. Featured Topic: The Story Behind the Declaration of Independence.

Date: Tuesday, July 14th Time: 11:30am - 1:30pm

Lunch and Learn: Driver Safety

Date: Wednesday, July 15th Time: 4:30pm - 6:30pm

Lecture and Book Signing

Date: Thursday, July 16th Time: 1:00pm - 2:00pm

Sterling University Lecture Series

Date: Thursday, July 16th Time: 3:00pm - 4:00pm

Cocktail Party

Date: Thursday, July 23rd Time: 11:30am - 1:30pm

Join Tom Hosea of AAA Auto Club as he gives driving safety tips, regarding up-to-date, important safety issues including the topics of your car, other drivers, and your driving environment.

The Fort Lauderdale Diet- The Cardiologist’s Solution for the Calorie Calamity. Learn a simple approach to a healthier lifestyle with local authors cardiologist Charles D. Russo, MD, FACC and registered dietitian Darlene Moppert, MS, RD. Light refreshments served.

Join us for a continuation of our “American Exceptionality” series. Feaured Topic: The Man from Illinois who Prevented a Nation from Falling Apart: Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War.

Kick up your heels as we celebrate America- live entertainment, cocktails, appetizers and dancing at this fun event.

Lunch and Learn: Ask The Doctor

Bring all your unanswered health questions and chat with doctors from North Broward Hospital.

Seating is limited! RSVP to Dana Berger at 954-481-2304 or horizonclub.mic@sunriseseniorliving.com for the event(s) of your choice. The Horizon Club 1208 South Military Trail, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 954-481-2304

Assisted Living Facility #5422

Atech will inspect your existing fire alarm system ABSOLUTELY FREE during the month of July. This special is available for all 4 story buildings in Century Village.

You’ve Seen Our Vans Throughout Century Village, Atech Fire & Security, The Name You Trust.

FIRE ALARMS - INSPECTIONS - REPAIRS UPGRADES - SERVICING ALL SYSTEMS


JULY 2009 Sisterhood of Young Israel of Deerfield Beach meets at the Synagogue the first Tuesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. Interesting speakers, exciting programs and refreshments served. Gift Shop now open Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. Everyone welcome. For further information call Helen Hagler 954-360-9939 or Tobi Kleiman 954-725-3776. Sisterhood of Temple Beth Israel meets on second Thursday of each month at 11:30 am. A mini lunch is served followed by an interesting program. For further information call the Temple office at 954-421-7060 . Sixty-five Social Club accepting new members couples only, one of who must be 70 or under. For information, call Lillian Jaffe at 954-3602941. Social Single is a social club for singles who are young at heart. We enjoy monthly outings, dinners, shows as well as monthly club brunches at local restaurants. Meetings are held the second Monday of each month in the Clubhouse, Room G at 7 p.m. For more information, call Nermie at 954-421-6931 or Sheila at 954-725-1521. SOCO (Symposium of Concerned Owners) meets the second and fourth Friday of each month in the Clubhouse. In-dept lectures and discussions with guest speakers. For information, call Jeff Chester at 954-429-9285. SoftBall Players now forming Century Village teams. No age limitations. Call Ed Obeid at 954-421-2228. South Florida Gold Coast Chapter of Myasthenia Gravis support group meets second Saturday each month at

1 p.m. at the North Broward Medical Center, I-95 and Sample Road. For information call Gladys or Evelyn 954429-0455. St. Louis Club of CVE meets the first Wednesday, every other month, beginning in August for lunch. For information call Sol Mitchell 954-4287497. Stained Glass Club meets first Wednesday of every month until April at 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse Stained Glass room. For further information, call Harry Liner at 954-426-4853. Stamp and Coin Club meets every 4th Thursday at 12 noon to 2 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Room C on the 1st floor. Residents and guests are invited to have their stamps and coins there to sell, buy & trade. For more information call Rafael Vance 954-421-8579. Stock Market Discussion Club meets first and third Monday each month at 10 a.m. Room N. Exchange information about stocks, mutual funds, ETF’s and bonds. No fee involved. For further information call Jim 954-596-2233 or Bill 954-698-0423. Talking Book Club the JBL Library, in conjunction with the Low Vision Group in CVE is forming a monthly Talking Book Club. Each participant will receive the same audio book. A representative for the JBI Library will facilitate the book discussion once a month. The group will meet the second Tuesday of the month at 10:30 am. For information call Janet Agmund 954-428-0711 or Goldie Witrock at the library 954689-0207. Tai-Chi. The class will be on Wednesday from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Exercise Room at Clubhouse with instructor, Terry. Come join our class and get rid of stress

Temple Beth Israel (Conservative, Egalitarian) Services Friday evening 7:30 p.m. with Oneg Shabbat. Saturday morning 9 a.m. to noon with Kiddush. Minyon Monday and Thursday 8:30 a.m. Library Monday thru Thursday 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for all Village Residents. Ongoing book sale. The library will be closed for the months of June, July and up to August 13. Call Temple office for more information, 954-421-7060. Temple B’nai Shalom (Reform) Services are conducted every Friday at 8 p.m. at Le Club by Rabbi Alton M. Winters and Cantor, Gary Sherman. Oneg Shabbat follows every week. For additional information call William Schmier 954 428-8231. The Auxiliary meets the fourth Monday of every month at 10 a.m. For further information, contact Julia Bale 954 427 6669 or Bea Rosner 954 360 7760. The Theosophical Society of Deerfield located at 831 SE 9th Street, phone number 954-420-0908 offers a free Sunday Speaker’s Forum every week from 3:30 to 5 p.m. In addition we have many interesting classes during the day and evenings, also without charge. To obtain a free quarterly bulletin call the lodge at the above number or Lillian Mayer, a CVE resident for more information about specific classes we offer at 954-360-7080. United Federation of Teachers/ Retired Teachers Chapter Meetings at Temple Anshei Shalom, W. Atlantic Ave. West of Jog, Delray. For further information, call Hilda Cohen 954-428-6805. United Club No. 7 (Retirees of ILGWU & ACTWU) meets on the first Thursday or first Saturday of each month in the Clubhouse, Room N at 1

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p.m. For information, call Bea Jacobs at 954 427-0665. United Order True Sisters meets every fourth Tuesday at the Clubhouse, Room N, lower level, near the Billiard Room at 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information about this organization contact President Frieda Weiss, 954419-9143 or Betty Swinkin, Membership Chairperson, 954-570-9526. SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT : On June 23, 2009 at 12:30 p.m. we will have a complementary luncheon supplied by Integracare Rehabilitation. This function will take place in the Party Room of the Clubhouse. Visionally Impaired Persons (VIP) meets the first Wednesday monthly in Room E at 10:30 a.m. We exchange information and have guest speakers. We also have a book club and plan trips to seminars. All are welcome Contact Janel Agmund 954 428-0711.. Waves (Navy Gals) Meets every month on the first Saturday at 12 noon at the Olive Garden on Federal Highway in Ft. Lauderdale. For further information, call Eunice Westin at 954-427-7119. We Care of CVE still available for supplies (wheelchairs, walkers, canes, etc.) only. Contact Barbara Brown at 954-5749675. Women Marines Association membership is open to women who serve or have served honorably in the U.S. Marine Corp or U.S. Marine Reserves. Many people are not aware of our existence. For information, call Ruth Beisner at 954-428-1637. Workmen’s Circle, Branch 1051 meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday at South County Civic Center on Jog Rd. or information call, Miriam Guz 561-495-7378.


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CVE REPORTER

JULY 2009

Want To Take A Trip? UNITED ORDER OF TRUE SISTERS is having a cruise on the Royal Caribbean’s ENCHANTMENT OF THE SEAS, starting October 3 to 8, 2009. Ports of Call are Ft. Lauderdale, Grand Cayman, Cozumel. Inside cabin N $455.00 per person double occupancy, Inside cabin M $465.00 per person double occupancy. Outside cabin I $520.00 per person double occupancy. Outside cabin H $530.00 per person double occupancy. Port charges, all taxes and bus transfers included. $100.00 per person deposit. Final payment due July 20, 2009. Insurance is strongly recommended and not included in the price. Inside cabin insurance $45, Outside cabin insurance $50 per person. For reservations call Jean Keats 954-4216311.

ONE CALL for your HEALTH, LIFE and FINANCIAL insurance solutions.

Medicare supplement insurance

Fixed annuities

Final expense insurance

Medicare Advantage health plans

Individual and temporary health insurance

Medicare Part D prescription drug plans

Call Humana MarketPOINT today:

Note: All organizations are requested to send in their trip plans to the Reporter for the 2008-2009 season.

1-800-336-6719

GH_22829

B’NAI BRITH UNIT 2995 has an extremely low priced cruise, leaving on November 30, 2009 for 6 days and 5 nights on the Navigator of the Sea, a 135,000 tons and 3,000 passengers. Inside cabin is only $380 or $440 per person, double occupancy, on the seventh floor and $530 for an outside cabin on the third floor, this includes all taxes, port charges and transportation from Century Village in Deerfield. Tips for the bus driver and luggage handler in Miami are included. An experienced leader will be attached to the group for the same price. Insurance is strongly recommended. As long as rooms are available. For further information call Dave Polak 954-4200096.

BRO 06/09


JULY 2009

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Trips Travels with Sandy-Part I By CHARLES K. PARNESS Israel We were told before we started on our trip that our guides get you up early, and keep you busy all day. This was absolutely true. The tour was tiring, but we saw and did so much, that it was all worthwhile. One misconception that most tourists have is that due to the continual conflict with neighboring countries, the State of Israel is an armed camp. This is totally untrue. We did see some troops of young army recruits 17 to 18 year olds at some of the memorial sites, but their presence was that of tourists visiting the same attractions as we did. I thought it might be part of their indoctrination on becoming Israeli soldiers. Israel may be beset with many problems, but it was certainly not apparent on the faces of the people. This was further emphasized when, in the heart of Jerusalem, we saw streets filled with Muslems, Christians and Jews all going about their business and religious practices without exhibiting any rancor or animosity. The word Shalom is a common greeting in Israel but it also means peace, which is what we saw. The country is filled with historical sites, many of which are the result of one civilization building upon another. Long before this place had any religious significance, the land had been fought over for thousands of years by Babylonians, Assyrians, Egyptians, Hittites, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Crusaders, Ottoman Turks and the British to name a few. One of the major reasons for so many to fight over this relatively small piece of land is an old real estate slogan – location, location, location. It was the land link between Africa, Europe and Asia and whoever controlled this land controlled the profitable trade routes. Tel-Aviv / Jaffa After supper on our first evening in Tel-Aviv, we strolled on the pleasant beach. On the beach is exercise, gym equipment for the more energetic. The next day we visited the Diaspora Museum. The museum portrayed the history of the Jewish people and how they lived throughout the world. This year is the 100th anniversary of the building of Tel-Aviv. It is the liveliest of all Israeli cities, and some have called it the New York City of Israel. I believe the name represents old and

new with “Tel” representing an ancient excavation and “Aviv” means spring. We traveled to the city of Jaffa, which once was an Egyptian fort. Jaffa, mostly populated by Arabs, is immediately south of Tel-Aviv, and is part of the greater TelAviv area In Jaffa, we walked the streets, parks and an archaeological dig. We crossed a small bridge with zodiac signs called the “Wishing Bridge” and viewed an interesting bell tower. Tel-Aviv / Caesarea The next day in Tel-Aviv, we saw the place where a leader of Israel, Yitzhak Rabin, was assassinated, and then visited Founders Square and Independence Hall where the independence of the State of Israel was declared on May 14, 1948. The presentation was very emotional for most of the over 100 tourists who attended. Later, we drove to the city of Caesarea located on the Mediterranean Sea. This is a large archeological dig, many of which are found throughout Israel. We walked the main thoroughfare. Unlike our streets which slope to the center to carry off rain water, their streets slope to

the edges. Down the center runs a sewer covered with stone caps. We saw the impressive restored ruins of Roman bath houses, private rooms, shops, a communal toilet area, an amphitheater, and a place where visiting dignitaries could address the crowds. The Crusaders later occupied this site, and gateways and walls that they built can also be seen. We also visited an ancient Aqueduct which is still standing after 2000 years. Our next stop was Atlit – used as a detention compound for Jewish immigrants. These were people who arrived in Israel illegally and were seized by the British during the period when Israel was under the British mandate. We continued by bus to Mt. Carmel in Haifa. Haifa Haifa is a magnificent city. The many hills reminded me of San Francisco. The whole city is divided into three levels – top level is primarily residential, the next lower level is commercial and the lowest level is devoted to shipping. From our hotel room, we had a great view of the city below us and its beautiful harbor. The city

has had a major increase of Russian immigrants in the last few years as evidenced by the numerous businesses with Russian language signs. These signs are frequently seen on real estate and appliance stores. The Israeli government has a unique way of dealing with these immigrants. They put everyone on welfare, not to encourage loafers, but to give the new arrivals a chance to integrate with the community and find places of employment. They also provide special mortgage provisions enabling the immigrants within their first five years in Israel, to obtain lower costs and longer payouts. In addition, the immigrants are entitled to a waiver of the value added tax encouraging them to purchase appliances. This system appears to be working successfully. We visited the Tel Megiddo National Park which featured another archaeological dig. This location was the center of many battles between Babylonia and Assyrian empires with the Egyptian empire.. Some of us descended many steps to an ancient underground passageway which led to the hidden water supply for the Megiddo fortress. By the

way, if you do come to Israel for a similar tour, get yourself a good pair of walking shoes. Believe me you will need it. Loafers are definitely a no-no. Next we visited a Druze Village and had coffee in a Druze home. Our host had once served with the Israeli armed forces. The Druze are an Arab people who rejected the concept of Mohammed as being the Messiah. During the 1948 war of Independence, they felt they would be better off under a country run by Jews than one run by militant Moslems, and they joined with the Jewish people in winning Israeli independence. We ate at a Druze restaurant, and had our first taste of an Israeli staple – falafel. The Druze village was interesting, and one store had its large sign displaying its business in Arabic, Hebrew and English. The next day we stopped at the magnificent Bahai Temple. The care of its botanical grounds is a religious experience to its followers. The religious sect originated in Persia. The garden is on a very steep hillside and deserved the countless photos taken of the grounds.


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Licorice- Fun Flavor, Herbal Medicine By ELLEN KAMHI, PhD RN

Licorice is a traditional herbal remedy with an ancient history. The Latin name of Licorice is Glycyrrhiza glabra. The plant family known as glycyrrhiza, is a group of at least 26 varieties of plants in the Pea family. Licorice is a perennial herb that grows to approximately three to seven feet. The large tap root and its side runners can attain lengths of over three feet. The official medicine, Radix glycyrrhiza is derived from these roots, which are unearthed in the fall and dried. It is mainly cultivated in Spain, India, Turkey, China, Italy and S.W. Asia. The first written mention of Licorice was recorded in the ancient Chinese medical work, “Divine Husband’s Classic” of the Materia Medica, as Gan Cao (Kan-Tsao) or Sweet root. The Chinese believed that licorice root was unique in that it entered all 12 acupuncture meridians, and directed the actions of other herbs in the complex formulas of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Licorice is used for coughs, sore throats, asthma, to clear pathogenic heat (a sign of microbial infection in TCM), and to increase Qi, (vital energy). These ancient applications of Licorice indeed are accurate reflections of modern pharmacological research. So much was licorice revered, that it is an ingredient in 60% of all traditional Chinese medicinal formulas. Licorice also was written about in ancient Assyrian tablets and Egyptian papyri, like the noted “Codex Ebers”. Linneus coined the term “glycyrrhiza” from Glykys, meaning sweet, and rhiza, or root. Licorice root is used for arthritis and other painful afflictions due to its ability to block the degradation of corticosteroids. By allowing cortisone to have a longer half life, two benefits occur. The amount and duration of pharmaceutical drug corticosteroid therapy, which has many negative side effects, can be reduced, and the efficacy of the natural steroids produced in the body by the adrenal glands is enhanced. Licorice can aid patients decrease the use of toxic drugs, such as cortisone and help to reduce pain naturally. Licorice root displays a wide range of powerful free radical scavenging antioxidant activities. Components naturally present in licorice are potent antioxidants against the free radicals which cause LDL (‘bad’ cholesterol) to oxidize. Since

LDL oxidation is a key event in the formation of the early atherosclerotic lesions, the use of licorice may decrease atherosclerosis. Other components found in licorice have been shown to protect the mitochondria (energy production centers) of liver cells. Licorice has been shown in scientific studies to have several specific effects improving the function of the immune system. It improves the white blood cell’s ability to engulf unwanted invaders, as well as increasing the body’s production of T cells. In addition, licorice can interfere with the ability of viruses to replicate and cause infection. Licorice has also been docu-

mented to have anti-bacterial effects against Streptococcus mutants, one major cause of dental cavities. Modern research has shown that it has beneficial effects on the endocrine system, adrenal glands, and liver; it is also a systemic anti-inflammatory. The antiirritant effect on the gastrointestinal system is thought to be due to flavonoid derivatives of licorice called steroidal saponin glycosides, which exert a protective effect on the lining of the digestive system. Licorice root is used internationally for its anti-ulcer and healing effects on the gastrointestinal system. Licorice root has also been shown to reduce

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gastric bleeding which is a well documented side effect caused by the use of nonsteoridal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Licorice flavors candies, liqueurs, ice cream, chewing gum and bakery items with good reason! One of its major components, glycyrrhizin is 50 times sweeter than cane sugar. It increases the amount of foam in stout beers, and is a common ingredient in Italian licorice candies. Licorice has a distinctive flavor, but most licorice candies in the U.S. do not contain true licorice. Instead they are flavored artificially or with anise. The use of Licorice root may cause high blood pres-

sure. One of the main studies that examined the link between licorice root and high blood pressure found that individuals who experienced these or other side effects commonly used over 3000 mg per day of licorice, usually through eating a lot of real licorice candy! Licorice should not be used by people with severe hypertension, active kidney disease or depleted potassium levels without consulting a knowledgeable health care practitioner. However the form of licorice called DGL (deglycyrrhizized), does not generate these concerns. DGL licorice is often used to help settle the stomach.

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Another Plus for CVE By PAULINE MIZRACH They say you’re never too old to learn. After living here in the Village for almost 30 years, I’ve discovered a plus that I never knew about. In the past few weeks I’ve had visits from two of my granddaughters, their husbands and their little sons. Of course we availed ourselves of the swimming pools, but this time we also took the little ones for a ride on our new buses. The first little one (great grandson#1) was com-

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pletely entranced with the experience. He, like me, his great grandmother, has only been accustomed to being transported in the family car. He was three and a half years old at the time that we took the #6 bus. But this is not about the kid, it’s about the bus drivers. As we rode through the Durham area, the driver knew exactly where each of his passengers needed to get off. I noticed that he greeted each one as they climbed

aboard at the Clubhouse starting point. As they exited, he was equally cordial. Yesterday the second family was here and we took great grandson #2 on the bus. He is only one and one half years old. He too looked around in amazement - this was so much bigger than Daddy’s car. He threw kisses and smiled at each passenger that looked in his direction. The bus was nice and cool and there was soft music playing, that, and the motion of the vehicle, need I say more? We call it the Rockabye Express. His eyes closed and his mom and gram were stuck where they were for a double trip. But, as I said this is not about my two gorgeous, intelligent, charming, friendly great grandchildren, it’s about the bus drivers. This second driver was a friendly, smiling gal. She not only greeted embarking passengers but also seemed to know most of them by name. One lady told us that she is the best driver on any of the routes.

Taking the ride twice around, I couldn’t help noticing that in one instant she told Mrs. So and So, that the next stop was hers. Each of the passengers never had to pull on the buzzer because she knew where they needed to get off. As we rode, one man on the steps of a building waved to her as we passed, and another lady standing in the door of a laundry room, gave her a big smile and a wave. She said a few nice

things to everyone, proving what a lovely human being she is. I enjoyed this so much that I am almost sorry that I don’t have a reason to use these buses more often. So many things are great here in Century Village, but I felt that this is another one of the pluses that many of us don’t know about regarding the offerings available for living in CVE. Try it you’ll like it.


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The Clan Kennedy By SY BLUM, Associate Editor It is likely that the headline above does not evoke much enthusiasm for the newer generation here in CVE. Be that as it may, the fact remains that the “Kennedy” name has probably appeared in the news media over the latter half of the 20th Century more than any other. Historically, it started when Naval Officer John Fitzgerald Kennedy was seriously injured when his PT boat was rammed and sunk by a Japanese destroyer during World War II. Despite being seriously wounded, he assisted in saving several of his comrades. He never completely recovered from his wounds. Fast forward some 66 years where we find the youngest and lone survivor of the four Kennedy sons, Edward Moore Kennedy, tenaciously clinging to life after a very serious brain tumor. Between these two events lies a story that is not only unique but probably unprecedented as far as family histories go. The patriarch of the family, Joseph Patrick Kennedy and his wife, the former Rose Fitzgerald, were the offspring of Irish immigrants, who migrated to Boston during the Irish Potato Famine in the latter 19th Century. Through hard work and determination both the Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys became financial and political successes. John Fitzgerald (Honey Fitz) became Mayor of Boston in 1906. Joseph Kennedy, once a stevedore, opened a tavern, which in those days was the center of politics, business and everything else. Joe Kennedy prospered as a result and became a wealthy man. His only son, Joseph Patrick, had an easy life. He eventually married Rose Fitzgerald, a strict Catholic who did not believe in birth control. As a result they had nine children, the youngest, Edward Moore Kennedy, the Ted Kennedy we know today, was born on February 22, 1932.

Joseph Patrick Kennedy, eschewing his ability to live a life of leisure, worked diligently and ruthlessly to accumulate a fortune in his own right, which became the foundation of the successes and tragedies of his progeny. He was a shipbuilder, banker, liquor distributor (including bootlegging), realtor and movie producer. From Day One he was determined that none of his children would ever have to work for a living. He established a million-dollar trust fund for each of his nine offspring: John, Joseph, Jr., Robert, Edward (Ted), Jean, Rosemary, Kathleen, Eunice and Patricia. He instilled in his children the importance of working for the people by using their wealth and time to forge a better life for the ordinary citizen. In retrospect, they tried mightily to accomplish those wishes. From reading the foregoing, the uninformed reader would probably come away with the belief that this family was destined for a happy and rewarding future. Unfortunately, nothing could be further from the truth: virtually every member of the family was touched by tragedy. Most prominent, of course, was the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy; prior to that, Joe, Jr. was shot down during World War II; Robert Kennedy was assassinated; Kathleen was killed in an airplane crash in Europe, Ted was seriously injured in a plane crash and has never completely recovered; Rosemary was retarded and spent her long life in a mental institution. What has frequently been called the Kennedy “Curse” also extends to some of their offspring: JFK lost two children: one was stillborn and the other at a very early age to a infant illness; and we must all be aware, that his son, JFK,Jr. was killed in 1999 in a plane crash near the Kennedy Hyannis Port compound.

In addition, there were many other unfortunate, sometimes tragic incidents among the extended Kennedy family. Aside from the tragic incidents recorded above was the life style of Joseph P. Kennedy Sr., himself. He was, among other things, a notorious womanizer, having a long-time affair with movie star, Gloria Swanson, among others. Because Rose, his wife, was determined to keep the marriage intact and because of her love for her husband, she tolerated his indiscretions. Her modus operandi was to shop ‘til she dropped and travel to all parts of the world. Because of his financial support of the Democratic Party and his work for President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Joseph Kennedy was appointed Ambassador to the Court of St. James (England). The family reveled in the appointment and sponsored many social events in London. However, here Ambassador Kennedy took another wrong turn. There was considerable evidence that he was sympathetic to the rise of Adolph Hitler, soon to become Chancellor of Germany. Worse, he was led to believe the anti-Semitic propaganda put out by the Nazis. When word of his doings got back to President Roosevelt, Kennedy was forced to resign. It is said FDR was so infuriated by these events that he was quoted as saying, “I don’t ever want to see that s.o.b. again.” Dear reader: the foregoing facts come from a 2009 book by a team from the Boston Globe and is called Last Lion. It is really about Ted Kennedy, who, during his lifetime was deeply involved in the lives of all the Kennedys. Ted Kennedy, a long time U.S. Senator since 1964 and as of this writing, is still in office, despite being diagnosed with a brain tumor on May 17, 2008. During his long time tenure, the youngest Kennedy has tried to follow the wishes of his father and has worked very hard to that end. He introduced literally thousands of bills in Congress to benefit the working man and his family. Many of them became law. At one time, he was considered prime presidential material. That is until the night of July 18, 1969. Ted Kennedy was at a get together for the female workers who were instrumental to the success of the Democratic party. I feel it is not necessary to go into the gory details of that night on the tiny island of Chappaquiddick. Different

versions of the tragedy have appeared throughout the years. The real truth will probably never be revealed. We do know that Senator Kennedy and one of the female workers, Mary Jo Kopechne, left the party together. The reason given was that Kennedy was tired and wanted to go back to his hotel. He also intimated that Mary Jo was also under the weather. There was a lot of eye-lifting immediately. For one thing, Ted never before asked for the keys to his car; he was always accompanied and driven by his chauffeur, and Mary Jo left without her personal belongings. What actually happened next is open to conjecture. We do know that Ted Kennedy was a fast and aggressive driver, be it a car or a boat. We also know that his Oldsmo-

bile wound up at the bottom of a creek, that Kennedy miraculously escaped and Mary Jo did not. We also know that it took a long time before Kennedy was able (or willing) to call for help. How or why it happened and whether Kennedy was really telling the truth, has ever since been a source of dispute. The only thing that is certain is the event at Chappaquiddick Island negated all the hard work and accomplishments of a man who in other ways gave his utmost for the “little guy.” Let us hope and pray that through the miracles of world class medical intervention, Senator Edward M. Kennedy makes a complete recovery and in so doing puts a positive conclusion to the story of The Clan Kennedy.


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As I See It By ROLF GRAYSON GREED There is a saying “God’s mills grind slowly but finely.” It seems to be an endemic trait in human nature to get as much as possible for as little as possible, and the more the better. This drive for more and more has a hidden trap, which in bargain buying frenzy disappears from the front lobe of our brain and blinds us from reality. Why this drive towards more and more? The TV advertising blitz sells storage places to people who have too much so that it overwhelms them in their home. Too bad many people fall for this obvious idiocy and put into storage things they did not need in the first place. Speaking from experience, after we sold our house a few years ago and drastically reduced our new living space, things that we thought we needed went into storage, and I mean dead storage. After returning from our winter sojourn from Florida and having dutifully paid our monthly storage fees, a quick survey of our treasures revealed that we did not need them in the first place. We actually had paid triple or more storage fees than their replacement value. We consider ourselves fiscally responsible and do not buy or spend money on things we do not have or do not have the ability to pay for at the end of the month. We realize however, that we are not the norm. Recent statistics showed that the total credit card debt in this country is well over $8000.00 per family. When we remove from this equation the prompt payers and there are fortunately a good many of them, this translates into huge sums of individual

money owed. Unfortunately this is also not a diminishing number as usury like rates of interest added to the principal number by financial institutions barely make a dent in the outstanding debt. Transferring this same prevailing mentality into the corporate world we see very clearly the ensuing ramifications.. Our own number one global powerhouse and the pride of this nation, General Motors (and they are not the only one) has shown how quickly this built on sand mentality lasts, and how severely it impacts our na-

tion. Remembering my own experience in the real world, employed as a Director of Manufacturing in a major defense plant, nothing mattered more than the monthly bottom line. Thrown into the wind were R&D (research & development) and other many badly needed improvements in manufacturing methods which all became subservient to the controller and his monthly statement. Because of the attractive bottom line, General Motors, with the help of some governmental “bail outs” produced highly profitable gas guzzlers such as Hummers

and SUVs. Exorbitant gas price gauging soon brought reality to the buying public, causing the sales of these monstrosities to plummet. While the fun lasted executives took home bonuses by the barrel. The union not to be outdone demanded and obtained salaries and benefits no marketing corporation could sustain. The current financial collapse therefore could have been easily foreseen but was ignored. This is true also for our home buyers, who willingly let themselves be duped into buying homes way out of their league and therefore inviting assured failure.

Now our nation faces the reality where unfortunately the innocent and dutifully taxpaying conservative money manager goes down the drain with the guilty and greedy ones. Even our Gastroenterologists tell us; too much food intake does not only cause obesity but also organ failures. Nature, the thing we like to ignore because we are so much smarter, has and always will have the last word and upper hand and unless we learn to live within our means and in moderation, we will pay for it both individually, as a nation and as a world.


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Mockingbirds By JAMES W. GRODSKY We are fortunate to live in a community with lots of flora and fauna. Our bird population is large and varied – white ibis, ospreys, palm warblers, turkey vultures, gallinules, egrets, herons, kestrels, screech owls, and mockingbirds among many others. Our mockingbird population is very large and all over the place. When I was a boy in Memphis, the house in back of our place, and on the next street over had a flag pole somewhere between 20-30 feet high. It was the favorite perch of our local mockingbird. He would sit on the flagpole, singing away and would flutter up a few feet while singing and settle back down to continue his song. This is typical of mockingbirds – they add a lot of music and style to our lives. The alley that separated our backyard from the adjoining backyard was a pathway for many things. A boy from Arkansas lived a few doors from the flagpole house on the other side of the alley and was an ardent (but very unskilled) marbles player. He seemed to have an unlimited supply of marbles because we played for hours every week and I consistently won, and got to keep the marbles he lost. My friend didn’t seem to care – so we kept playing and he kept losing and my supply of marbles kept getting bigger and bigger. Mockingbirds are aggressive and brave birds. They used to torment my daughter’s cat, Patches, dive-bombing her whenever she and the birds were in the backyard together. Frequently we saw Patches on her back with claws in the air, while a mockingbird repeatedly dove to peck her as she attempted to fend the bird off. I never, in all these battles, saw Patches able to even touch a mockingbird, but the bird pecked her repeatedly. In my boyhood days, mockingbirds were Southern birds – but as the years went by they expanded their range. So today mockingbirds are seen in NJ and NY and maybe even further north. Many bird species have expanded their range over my lifetime, but the “mocker” has expanded it enormously. They adapt well to cities – so they are seen in sizeable numbers in metropolitan areas. To those of you who are not familiar with them, mockingbirds are large (9 -11”) gray, long-tailed birds with white markings and large white patches on the wings. They are very recognizable whether perched or in flight. Their song is also very easy to recognize, it has a huge variety of melodies; one melody will

be repeated three or four times, and then another, and another and another. You might listen for a long time and never hear a melody repeated. Some time age I wrote a poem entitled Apology to a Mockingbird. Here it is:

still, And dinner music is a work of art. But when you sing at 3 a.m., Your purest notes I must condemn, And tell you that you must, At once depart.

You’re mighty good, I will confess, I’d have to give a hearty “Yes” If asked about your musical élan. Your voice is sweet. Each note is true, The tempo’s fine, and entire nous, You are a most impressive artisan. Your breakfast tunes give me a thrill. Your luncheon songs are better

You’ll have to change your singing scheme. I need some Z’s, perchance to dream, And won’t give up my sleep Without a fight. What’s that? You say You’re just like me – Insomnia to the Nth degree And that’s the reason That you sing at night. I apologize!

The Family of Temple B’Nai Shalom Rabbi Alton Winters ~ Cantor Gary Sherman

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JULY 2009

Do you work? Need a bar code? Call I.D. office or COOCVE for an appointment.

SAVE OUR LIBRARY Petitions Available At COOCVE Office For Details Call Steven Fine 954421-5566 x-214

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LIBRARY Petitions Available At COOCVE Office For Details Call Steven Fine 954421-5566 x-214


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What’s Bugging You? By HARRY L. KATZ “Termites!” Just the word sparks fear and anxiety with most of our transplanted Northerners. Here is some perspective on the termite threat. We have two kinds of termites: the subterranean termite and the dry wood termite. Northerners had only the subterranean termites to be concerned with. We have both species, the subterraneans and the dry woods to deal with. For our residents in the high rises, the damage possible by the subs is relatively negligible because of the

construction of our four story condos. With all walls and floors being concrete, damage is possible only to door and window frames, or stored cardboard boxes on the ground floor. However, the annual emergence of swarms of flying subterranean termites is enough to cause mental anguish to most residents. In the two story wooden condos however, damage to their wood members can be serious because of the size of the colony. The subterranean termite colony can contain several hundred thousand termites, a sharp contrast with

Hello Fellow American By NANCY A. GUERETTE The Fourth of July is the birthday of our nation. The Continental Congress declared the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and it has since become a National Holiday. 13 Colonies joining together to make our nation13 separate states and joining together to unify our country as one. Our History recalls: ”Taxation without Representation,” the dumping of tea in Boston Harbor, and “Paul Revere’s ride” in Boston, Massachusetts; all done with the intention of obtaining our independence from England. Many years later, more states joined our union. We now number 51 states. All these states working to-

gether under one name, The United States of America. Our country’s business is run by our elected President, Congress, (House of Representatives and Senate) and the Supreme Court. Power with a built in set of checks and balances. Our Government is not perfect, nor are the Americans who live here. But “When Push Comes to Shove” and when things are rough Americans tend to stick together to see through the crisis. Americans are a special people who love their freedom. God Bless America and may it always be “The Home of the Free and the Brave”

the dry wood termite colony which can contain only a few hundred. A mature colony of subterranean termites can eat two feet of a 2x4 in one year. The subterranean termites feed on the root systems of dead trees or shrubs that have extended beneath the building slab. After the roots are eaten, the termites find an opening and build mud tunnels to a new source of cellulose in the apartment. Our irrigation of ornamentals provides a steady source of the all important moisture supply for the proliferation of the colony. A fauna of microorganisms in the termite’s gut breaks down the cellulose into useable nutrients. Subterranean termites constantly solicit anal excrement from their buddies for the vital microorganisms needed to digest the wood fibers. The mega population of the

subterranean termite colony is far above that of the dry wood termite which takes ten years to reach a population of 1000. They cannot nest in the soil, only in cells which they hollow out in the wood. They do this inside a picture frame, a wooden table or chair leg, a baseboard or a wood artifact brought in from the Islands which is already infested. There can be more than one nest in an apartment. A few of the dry wood termite swarmers, the reproductives, begin emerging when the colony is four years old. They shed their wings after emerging, find a mate and a crevice in wood to start a new colony. It is unlikely that a few shed wings will be noticed when the floor or window sill is cleaned. What could be noticed, however, is the presence of sand like fecal pellets that are scattered be-

low a tiny hole in a door jamb, a picture frame or wood furniture. These fecal pellets are then expelled by the termite after it has squeezed them dry by powerful anal muscles. Being fastidious housekeepers they then carry the pellets and drop them, year round, out of a small opening that they made. The pellets then scatter below the opening. Finding the tiny opening above the scattering of the pellets is the only way you know that you have dry wood termites. So watch out for the pellets and a tiny hole in a wood member above it. Condos can be responsible for dry wood termite infestations at common areas, such as a front door jamb or window. Inside, an infestation from a wooden statue or picture frame or furniture is not common area.

Ask Bea By BEA LITNER Vacation Insurance Dear Bea, I am planning a family cruise at the end of July and have a question. Are there doctors on cruise ships? Doris Dear Doris: Every season there are more and bigger cruise ships leaving our shore and the question of doctors does come up. All cruise ships have qualified doctors and nurses who are equipped to handle emergencies. Most ships, like the Princess Line, for example,

carry X-Ray machines, EKG machines, portable oxygen cylinders, cardiac monitors, defibrillators and external pacemakers. The pharmacies are well-stocked for emergencies, but it is advisable to bring extra medications of your own, even your own first-aid kits. Note: Payment is required for all medical services and cannot be charged to shipboard accounts. However, these charges are refundable if you have health insurance and you will be reimbursed.

Dancing at the Beach You will be delighted to find that there is fun at our beach. On Tuesday evenings there is dancing at the main beach parking lot, which is roped off for the event. The band starts at 7:00 p.m. Bring your chairs. Dance and enjoy. By the way, if you have a disabled tag for your car, you may park for up to four hours free, at any meter. Come and enjoy the dancing or just people watch. Lucky Us at 70-Plus Here is a good investment in your health insurance. It is beginning to pay off. Your secrets are safe with your friends because they can’t remember them either! Happy and thoughtful Fourth of July. Send your queries to Ask Bea at the Reporter office.


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Women During the Civil War By BETTY SCHWARTZ, Assistant to the Editor At the time of the Civil War, women couldn’t vote. They largely depended upon men to survive. In return they were expected to devote their time and talents entirely to their husbands, children and large extended families. That was the Victorian ideal, which was mostly aimed at middle and upper class women. However, for working-class and immigrant women, farm girls, and poor women of every kind, life was very hard. When the Civil War broke out a private in the Union Army made $13 a month, which was easily double what a woman could earn as a laundress, a seamstress, or even a maid.

Documented facts tell us that hundreds of women masqueraded as men during the war. Many joined for both patriotic and economic reasons. One interesting case was that of Jennie Hodgers who emigrated from Ireland during the 1850s, perhaps as a stowaway. In the United States she worked in a shoe factory. On August 3, 1862 she enlisted in the 95th Illinois Infantry regiment using the name Albert Cashier and served in the army of Tennessee under Ulysses S. Grant. Albert fought in approximately 40 battles. He was captured by the Confederates in one battle and is said to

have knocked down his guard with his own rifle and managed to get safely back to his own regiment. No one ever guessed that he was really a woman, and accounts by her fellow comrades indicate that they just assumed that Albert was a small, somewhat shy man. He served for over three uninterrupted years and was mustered out in 1865. After the war Albert had to make a decision. If he continued living as a man, it was more likely that he would find work, keep the friends he had made during the war and be part of a respected community of Civil War veterans. He could have a bank account

and could vote in elections. If he decided to go back to being a woman he felt that he would have lost his entire life. And so, Jennie Hodges decided to continue her life as a man. During the following years Albert Cashier worked at many jobs. He was a farm hand, church janitor, cemetery worker and street lamplighter. He even voted in elections and later claimed a veteran’s pension. In November 1910 Cashier was hit by a car and broke his leg. A physician discovered his sex was female, but agreed to remain quiet for the time being. In 1911, Cashier

was moved to the Soldier and Sailors home in Quincy, Illinois. He lived there until his mind deteriorated and he was consequently moved to an insane asylum. A couple of attendants discovered his sex was female, and forced him to wear a dress. Albert Cashier died on October 10, 1915. He was buried in the uniform he had kept intact all those years. His tombstone was inscribed “Albert D.J. Cashier, Co. G, 95 Illinois, Inf.” In the 1970s a second tombstone, inscribed with both of his names, was placed beside his first.

A Jewish Food Dictionary By SAM GLASSMAN Latkes A pancake-like structure, not to be confused with anything the House of Pancakes would put out. In a latke, the oil is in the pancake. It is made with potatoes, onions, eggs and matzo meal. Latkes can be eaten with applesauce but never with maple syrup. There is a rumor, that in the time of the Maccabees, they lit a latke by mistake and it burned for eight days. What is certain is that you will have heartburn for the same amount of time. It’s a good thing! Matzoh The Egyptians’ revenge for leaving slavery. It consists of a simple mix of flour and water – no eggs or flavor at all. When made well, it could actually taste like cardboard. Its redeeming value is that it does fill you up and stays with you for a long time. However, it is recommended that you eat a few prunes soon after. Kasha Varnishkes One of the little-known delicacies which is even more difficult to pronounce than to cook. It has nothing to do with Varnish, but is basically a mixture of buckwheat and bow-tie macaroni (noodles). Why a bow-tie? Many sages discussed this and agreed that some Jewish mother decided that “You can’t come to the table without a tie” or God forbid, “An elbow on my table?” Blintzes Not to be confused with the German war machine. Can you imagine the N.J. Post 1939 headlines: “Germans drop tons of cheese and blueberry blintzes over Poland – shortage of sour cream expected.” Basically this is the Jewish answer to crepe Suzette. Kishka

You know from Haggis? Well, this ain’t it. In the old days they would take an intestine and stuff it. Today we use parchment paper or plastic. And what do you stuff it with? Carrots, celery, onions, flour and spices. But the trick is not to cook it alone but to add it to the cholent (see below) and let it cook for 24 hours until there is no chance whatsoever that there is any nutritional value left. Kreplach It sounds worse than it tastes. There is a Rabbinical debate about its origins. One Rabbi claims it began when a fortune cookie fell into his chicken soup. The other claims it started in an Italian restaurant. Either way it can be soft, hard, or soggy and the amount of meat inside depends on whether it is your mother or mother-in-law who cooked it. Cholent This combination of noxious gases had been the secret weapon of Jews for centuries. The unique combination of beans, barley, potatoes, and bones or meat is meant to stick to your ribs and anything else it comes into contact with. At a fancy Mexican restaurant (kosher of course) I once heard this comment from a youngster who had just had his first taste of Mexican fried beans: “What! Do they serve leftover cholent here too?” My wife once tried something unusual for guests: She made

cholent burgers for Sunday night supper. The guests never came back. Gefilte Fish A few years ago, I had problems with the filter in my fish pond and a few of them got rather stuck and mangled. My son (five years old) looked at them and commented, “Is that why we call it ‘Ge Filtered Fish’?” Originally, it was a carp stuffed with a minced fish and vegetable mixture. Today, it usually comprises of small fish balls eaten with horse radish (chrain) which is judged on its relative strength in bringing tears to your eyes at 100 paces. Bagels How can we finish without the quintessential Jewish food, the bagel? Like most foods, there are legends surrounding the bagel although I don’t know any. There have been persistent rumors that the inventors of the bagel were the Norwegians who couldn’t get anyone to buy smoked lox. Think about it: Can you picture yourself eating lox on white bread? Rye? A cracker? Naaa. They looked for something hard and almost indigestible which could take the spread of cream cheese and which doesn’t take up too much room on the plate. And why the hole? The truth is that many philosophers believe the hole is the essence and the dough is only there for emphasis.


JULY 2009

CVE Duplicate Bridge ClubWinners By BERNICE RUGA May 2009 Saturday 5/2/09 S. Babich/R. Colman – P. Tepper/C. Holtzman 5/9/09 B. Wais/D. Leviss – R. Davis/R. Devorin 5/16/09 G. Schulhoff/B. Weinberg – B. Kamhi/E. Sales 5/23/09 R. Silverman/B. Feldstein – R. Davis/R. Devorin 5/30/09 P. Tepper/J. Crown – R. Davis/R. Devorin Monday 5/4/09 B. Weinberg/D. Leviss – B. Ruga/I. Ruga 5/11/09

D. Connell/B. Feldstein – B. Wais/T. Lauria 5/18/09 G. Schulhoff/L. Fertik – J. Wasserman/R. Wasserman 5/25/09 D. Connell/P. Tepper – B. Cordes/C. Parness Tuesday 5/5/09 S. Bhatt/B. Weinberg – F. Beaudin/B. Derobertis 5/12/09 D. Connell/R. Schwartz – B. Wais/R. Silverman 5/19/09 D. Connell/P. Tepper – R. Silverman/B. Wais 5/26/09 B. Ruga/I. Ruga – M. Cohen/L. Mandelbaum

Bridge

By IRVING RUGA When you are responding to your partner’s Michaels Cue Bid it would behoove you to keep the Law of Total Tricks in mind. For those of you who are shaky on the Law, let us put it this way: the greater the number of trumps held, the more you should probably bid. Please keep in mind that this is generally meant to guide you when you have lots of trump and nothing else special about your hand. Another important point we would like to make: you should not value any honors

you may have in the minor suits when your partner shows the majors. Yes, we are sorry. You should count the ace, but lesser honors will not carry their weight since partner always has a singleton or doubleton in each of the minors. For the scientific bidders: when the responder bids 2NT instead of naming a major, this bid means he is trying for game with a balanced hand with high cards. The fit will be an 8-card fit with no singletons in responder’s hand and only 3-trump.

The Puzzler #11 By: CHARLES K. PARNESS Last month, we told about the three really intelligent new move-ins to Century Village East - Al, Bess and Clarence who decided to try out for the CVE Logic Club. The initiation was naturally a test in logic. However, after the first test which Clarence won, they all agreed that the test was not fair to all participants. So they asked the test proctor for another test and here it is. The test proctor blindfolded the three participants and led them into a room and explained the test. Each participant would have a spot of paint, either white or black, painted on their foreheads. No one could see the spot painted on their own forehead. When the blindfolds were removed, each would look at the

other two participants, and if they saw one white spot or two white spots, they were to raise their right hand. Then, if one could announce the color of the spot on their own forehead, and explain how they knew it, they would win the test. The test proctor painted a white spot on each of their foreheads. The blindfolds were removed, and since each participant saw at least one white spot on a forehead, they all raised their right hand. After a few minutes of thinking, Al, the smartest of the three announced that he had a white spot on his forehead and that he could prove it. Your task is to explain how Al deduced that he had a white spot on his forehead. Go to it.

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Clubhouse Library News By GLORIA S. SHOMER Remember back in the day when July meant picnics in the park, Fourth of July parades held in honor of our veterans, and children finally freed from school? Having the kids home for the summer didn’t bother me at all. The first thing we did was to go to the library and select fun books. Reading for pleasure was a summer bonus for my family because you didn’t have to make a book report. I’m here to tell you that nothing has changed except that school begins in August instead of after Labor Day. It’s funny because in Florida back-to-school-sales begin right after July fourth. Labor Day arrives with a full display of Halloween décor in the stores and we can even see turkey centerpieces. Believe it or not, there are already Christmas trees stocked on the high shelves in BJ’s. I’m writing this column on May 30, but can Christmas carols be far behind? Things in the library have been a little different this month because we have a new “resident.” One day last month we looked down to see a very audacious green lizard. He didn’t run away when approached but made himself (herself) quite comfortable among the stacks.

When he becomes annoyed with all the attention that he receives he hides behind the bookcase next to the reserve desk. Although all attempts at capturing him have failed and the door is always open, he seems to want to stay. He was given some water and he took a bath in it. He seems to eat mainly bugs, which is a very helpful thing in our library. I hope he’s still there when I get back from California. It’s very nice to have a library lizard. Even though attendance is down, we are still being stocked with the latest books by our most popular authors. Danielle Steel has written a new book called Matters of the Heart. It deals with love, jealousy, and obsession, but what else is new? That is the reason she is so popular with her readers. On a lighter vein, Debbie Macomb has taken us back to the yarn shop with her brand new book, Summer on Blossom Street. I love this series because her character’s lives seem so much like ours. Nora Roberts is releasing the first book of a new four book series called the Bride Quartet. It’s called Vision in White, and it deals with the reunion of old friends who have gathered for a wedding. All sorts of love affairs begin with lots of treachery, lots of mystery

and the promise of keeping up with these characters in the next three books. Nora Roberts does not disappoint. I’d advise you to come in to our library and sign up for it. I suspect there might be a long wait for these books. By the way, I would advise you to join or rejoin our Friends of the Library. There are many benefits to being a member. For the two dollars that you pay you will be entitled to reserve any of the reserve books. These are the newest volumes straight off the New York Times best seller list. You will also receive a free book from our sale shelves. Membership also entitles you entry into our monthly lottery drawing for a free book. This month’s lucky winner is Frieda Safdia. (I know she works here, but that’s the luck of the draw.) We are still in need of plant clippings, containers and pots. Our plant lady, Bea Sosnovy is very busy lending her magic to the lovely foliage that springs from her hands. Please come visit us. Our boutique yields many amazing items; some very useful and some very beautiful. Come in and look around. We’d love to meet you.

THE PUZZLER #10 SOLUTION FROM JUNE ISSUE Clarence asked himself, “How come Al could not tell?” If both Bess and Clarence have a red hat (there were only two red hats), then Al had to know that he had a blue hat. Since Al did not know, then Bess or Clarence

had at least one blue hat. Clarence then asked himself the following, “Suppose I had a red hat. If so, then Bess must know she had a blue hat. If she had had a red hat, then Al would have solved the problem but

he did not. Bess knows this but also cannot solve the problem. Since I (Clarence) cannot have a red hat, therefore, I must have a blue hat!” And there you have it!


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JULY 2009

Movie Review July By SANDRA PARNESS PAUL BLART, MALL COP-Safety never takes a holiday. When a shopping mall is overtaken by a gang of organized crooks, it’s up to the mild-mannered security guard to save the day. Starring Kevin James, Shirley Knight. PG, 91 minutes. Playing Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 2 & 8 p.m., Thursday, July 2, 2009, 8 p.m., Friday, July 3, 2009, 8 p.m. TWO LOVERS-Filmed in Brighton Beach, New York. A Brooklyn-set romantic drama about a Jewish bachelor torn between the family friend his parents wish he would marry and his beautiful but volatile new nonJewish neighbor. Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Gwyneth Paltrow, Isabella Rosselini. R, 110 minutes. Playing Sunday, July 5, 2009, 8 p.m., Monday, July 6, 2009, 2 & 8 p.m., Wednesday, July 8, 2009, 2 & 8 p.m. VALKYRIE-Many saw evil. They dared to stop it. Based on actual events, a plot to assassinate Hitler is

unfurled during the height of WWII. Starring Tom Cruise, Bill Nighy. PG-13, 120 minutes. Playing Thursday, July 9, 2009, 8 p.m., Friday, July 10, 2009, 8 p.m., Sunday, July 12, 2009, 8 p.m., Monday, July 13, 2009, 2 & 8 p.m.

ring Tovah Feldshuh, Bobby Goldman. R, 100 minutes. Rated R for Adult Situations. Playing Monday, July 20, 2009, 8 p.m., Wednesday, July 22, 2009, 2 & 8 p.m., Thursday, July 23, 2009, 8 p.m., Friday, July 24, 2009, 8 p.m.

CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON-Life isn’t measured in minutes, but in moments. Tells the story of Benjamin Button, a man who starts aging backwards with bizarre consequences. Starring Cate Blanchett, Brad Pitt, Julia Ormond, Tilda Swinton. PG-13, 166 minutes. Playing Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 2 p.m., Thursday, July 16, 2009, 7 p.m., Friday, July 17, 2009, 7 p.m., Sunday, July 19, 2009, 7 p.m., Monday, July 20, 2009, 2 p.m.

BRIDE WARS-Even best friends can’t share the same wedding day. Two best friends become rivals when they schedule their respective weddings on the same day. Starring Kate Hudson, Anne Hathaway, Candice Bergen. PG, 89 minutes. Playing Sunday, July 26, 2009, 8 p.m., Monday, July 27, 2009, 2 & 8 p.m., Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 2 & 8 p.m.

O JERUSALEM-The historic struggle for Jerusalem and the birth of Israel. A tale of friendship between two men, one Jewish and the other Arab, as the state of Israel is being created. Star-

TAKEN-The time for revenge has come. A former spy relies on his old skills to save his estranged daughter, who has been forced into the slave trade. Starring Liam Neeson, Famke Janssen. PG-13, 91 minutes. Playing Thursday, July 30, 2009 8 p.m., Friday, July 31, 2009 8 p.m.

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Plant the Seeds Plant the seeds of understanding, It’s really not that demanding, It means respect, for people of every nation, It is something that is for all time, and must never be on vacation. Plant the seeds of love for all, Whether they be big or small, Whether they be Black, White, Yellow, or Tan, Be a regular compassionate one, if you can. Plant the seeds for economic reasons, So it will bear fruit, for all seasons. Let’s clean the streams, the rivers, and also the air, Let’s show the world, that we really care. Plant the seeds for plants and trees, For herbs, fruits, vegetables, and other necessities, Life is such a precious commodity, Let’s not treat it as if it were an oddity. Plant the seeds of Peace, not war, Let’s save this planet for our children, whom we adore, Now is the time to fulfill our dreams, And you would be shocked, it’s not as difficult as it seems.

Prose & Poetry Another Question

- GEORGE SHEVELOVE

The Generation Gap

How do I, 2009 second generation Jewish American begin to reconcile the complexities of our legacy the Shoah, the Holocaust. I read, see films walk museums hear docents’ talks speak to friends – friends of friends…

I’m a senior citizen although I feel sixteen Our grown kids think they know more than we, it seems They criticize what we wear they say it ain’t “hep”, Mother dear But I know what’s comfortable and pretty too

Know, with passing years I must assume some role to cradle truth – of who succumbed, who survived who held hope, who defied if only in my poem…

Now who once dressed you also tied your shoe? The only thing that I can say is that your children will also be smarter than you and will tell you so one fine day…

- SANDY WICKER

Let’s Dance

- SANDI LEHMAN

The man I loved, the man I loved Is not with me today, The man I love, the man I love Went on his own way, And I believe, I lost a chance To be happy anymore, You are my stranger for this dance, Let’s dance, let’s dance, “Seňor.” Please, hold me tight and whirl, and spin Around the dancing floor, Help to forget that he has been My true beloved before What do you whisper in my ears? You also are lonely man, You want to give me love and share A chance at life again. Oh! I don’t promise anything, My thoughts are far away, I don’t refuse, but what I mean: Let’s dance, let’s dance today. - IZABELLA JUCHNEWICZ

The Book of Life Life is like a book, each chapter tells a story… A mystery, a drama, a tale of fame or glory. And all of our adventures appear upon its pages… Our trails and our triumphs which occur in many stages. The plot may not be clear until we reach the end. Even then we may have questions, for we wish to comprehend. We may ask, “Who is the author? Is it God or is it I? I’ve suffered much adversity, am I wrong for asking why?” ‘Tis better not to question, for confusion may cause pain. If we read between the lines we’ll no longer doubt in vain. We discover that our fate comes not from outside forces, But lies within our attitudes and our emotional resources. The Book of Life can teach us that every challenge is a gift. The lessons that we learn thus give our souls a priceless lift. So let’s accept our stories with faith and gratitude, Treasuring every chapter that we have now reviewed. - NORMA LOCKER

Summer in Florida Summer in South Florida is awful they say. Even the Snowbirds stay far away. What surprises me most, mosquitoes are few Up North they were always biting you. Ants here in Florida are always everywhere Despite efforts to exterminate them, They always re-appear. When you think of Arizona and Texas early nineties is not very hot. Except for the humidity, you can cut like a knive a lot. Surviving summers in Florida isn’t difficult you see. Going from air conditioned houses to cars to cool stores ,is a reality. A house with a pool is an asset they say, Even children down the block, will come over to play. Programs at the Libraries and YMCA’s are a must Summer camps on a cool lake are really a plus. I dislike summer here as you can see. But living up North would not work for me. I use a walker and on snow and on ice I would get nowhere. I might even fall and break a hip I guess I’ll just stay here! - NANCY A. GUERETTE

We Must Learn to Understand Ourselves Parents – teachers – religious leaders – state We all possess ingredients that make us “hate” – And yet – most of us attempt to fashion youth into a perfect mold – When we – ourselves – are common clay and fashioned in a far from perfect human form. For how can the unloved teacher – love? And parent – too? How can the fearful – ever free another soul from fear? How can the insecure – make another feel secure? How can the ineffectual – make another feel his worth? How can the aggressive – teach another to be kind? And how can the defiant ones – expect a meek reply? They cannot – and they will not – Until the day – we better learn to understand our inner selves – Our biased thoughts – our attitudes – our special temperaments. Until the day – we learn to give a little – and take a little Until the day we gain from our remembered feelings – a newer insight into a troubled time in our own life. - DORY LEVISS


JULY 2009

SUDOKU Sudoku doesn’t require any special math skills or calculations. It is a simple and fun game of logic -- all that’s needed is brains and concentration.

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There is really only one rule to Sudoku: Fill in the game board so that the numbers 1 through 9 occur exactly once in each row, column, and 3x3 box. The numbers can appear in any order and diagonals are not considered. Your initial game board will consist of several numbers that are already placed. Those numbers cannot be changed. Your goal is to fill in the empty squares following the simple rule above. 1. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each row. 2. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each column. 3. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each 3x3 box. 4. A complete Sudoku puzzle contains the numbers 1 through 9 in every row, column, and 3x3 box. Hint: Start with a square that only has three numbers missing. Look at surrounding squares and grids to see which numbers you need to fill that 3x3 grid. SOLUTION ON PAGE 34B

JUMBLE

CRYPTOGRAM

By CHARLES K PARNESS

1) STOGH _ ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) 2) REMBEM ( _) _ ( _) _ ( _) _ 3) UNDOM ( _) ( _) _ ( _) ( _) 4) GUARE ( _) ( _) ( _ ) _ _ 5) BUMLEH ( _) ( _) _ _ _ _ What you might call an Israeli street vendor: “ ( _) ( _)( _) // ( _)( _)( _)( _) //( _)( _)( _)( _) ( _) ( _) // ( _) ( _) ( _)

By CHARLES K PARNESS

abc / de / bffgdfhed /fe / ikbf / lmhfhln / nbc. fkgmg / kbn / dgogm / pggd / ngf / qa / b / nfbfqg / hd / kedem / es / b / lmhfhl. nhpgrhqn Hint: The letter e appearing above stands for the letter O

Unscramble each word, then use the letters in the brackets to solve the jumble. Solution on page 34B

SOLUTION ON PAGE 34B


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Cooke’s Look at Books By RICHARD WILLIAM COOKE A monthly look at books of interest – new and, occasionally, not-so-new, fiction and nonfiction -- currently available at your public library, local bookstore or from online booksellers. Mrs. Astor Regrets By Meryl Gordon, Houghton Miflin, 336 Pages, $28.00 For decades, Brooke Astor was the undisputed queen of New York society. She gave millions to The Metropolitan Opera, The Metropolitan Museum and The New York Public Library. Heir to the $200 million Astor family fortune, she regularly went out to dinner arrayed in over $100,000 worth of diamonds and emeralds. She made it a point to visit Harlem neighborhood associations – also the beneficiaries of her generosity – dressed in regal splendor and never without her trademark white gloves. “People would be disappointed if I showed up looking like everybody else!” she said. Unfortunately, while much of Mrs. Astor’s 105-year-long life – she died in 2007 -- was spent as a beloved philanthropist and wealthy-beyondbelief aristocrat, she spent her last few years sleeping in a tattered nightgown, on a urine-stained couch, in an unheated room in her twostory Park Avenue luxury apartment. How Mrs. Astor met this fate is splendidly documented in this new book, subtitled The Hidden Betrayals of a Family Beyond Reproach. Author Gordon paints a riveting portrait of Anthony Marshall, Mrs. Astor’s only child, as she details his alleged mistreatment of his mother and his swindling of millions from his mother’s estate – allegations brought against Marshall by his own son, Philip, Mrs. Astor’s grandson. In an incredible feat of reporting, Gordon got everyone to speak, from Nancy Reagan, Henry Kissinger, Annette de la Renta and David Rockefeller – all part of Brooke’s elite social circle – to Mrs. Astor’s devoted staff and her warring family members. The result is this behind-the-headlines account of the unraveling of the Astor dynasty. Reading more like fiction than fact, this inside look at high society, big money, blue blood, family feuds and criminal charges is both spellbinding and heartbreaking. Highly recommended. When You Lie About Your Age, the Terrorists Win By Carol Leifer, Villard Books, 190 Pages, $24.00 Long Island native, Carol

Leifer, began her career as a stand-up comic in such well-known New York clubs as The Comic Strip, Catch A Rising Star and The Improv. Her big break came when David Letterman unexpectedly showed up at The Comic Strip one night and personally caught her show – which led to twenty-five appearances for Leifer on Letterman’s late-night TV show. From there she was catapulted to writing for “Saturday Night Live,” “Seinfeld,” “The Ellen Show,” “The Larry Sanders Show,” and, in addition, scripted, produced and starred in HBO and Showtime specials. Her greatest career dream came true when she appeared with Johnny Carson on “The Tonight Show” two months prior to her retirement. Now this Emmy-nominated writer has come out with her first book – a laugh-outloud look at life, love and family. At times hilarious – her take on being a Jewish woman, for example – at times dramatic – the day her doctor, after a mammogram, said he saw something suspicious in her breast – and at times poignant when she describes, after a “lifetime of marrying men,” she falls in love with a woman who has two dogs. “And I don’t even like dogs!” Fast forward several years. The couple is happily living together with an adopted child – and seven dogs. Leifer writes philosophically, “The beauty of getting older that nobody tells you is that so many of the fears that you had when you were young have already happened. And you’ve figured them out and weathered each one like a champ.” But she also writes, “Jews have the lowest incidence of suicide among all religions… My only hunch would be that in our deepest darkest moments there’s this still small voice that’s like, ‘Oh, my God, I hate my life! I can’t believe it! I don’t want to go on!’ Then, after a heavy sigh, hope springs eternal – ‘Oh, look! Cake! ” How can you not laugh? The Kindly Ones By Jonathan Littell, Harper Collins, 992 Pages, $29.99 Publishers took an enormous gamble by bringing this novel – already an international literary cause célébre having sold over a million copies in Europe alone – to the United States. This fictionalized memoir of a remorseless former Nazi SS officer has had difficulty

finding an audience in this country. Will the publishers make back the reported $1 million advance they paid to its author? That’s yet to be decided. What is known is that The Kindly Ones is both monumental in scale and penetrating in insight. Author Littell, an American living in Barcelona, Spain, chose to write the book in French –the language of a country that has bestowed upon the novel its two most prestigious literary prizes. However, while the book has sparked wide admiration both in America and abroad, it has also met with fierce criticism for its scenes of depravity and, according to one reviewer, “willful sensationalism.” The book’s subject, Max Aue, is a highly cultured, university-educated lawyer, a multi-lingual lover of music, art and literature, as well as consummate bureaucrat. He’s also an unrepentant monster who becomes a cog in the pulverizing wheel that was Hitler’s Final Solution. Following the war, Aue finds a safe-haven and a new identity as a respectable, well-married bourgeois and is head of a provincial French linen factory. While he continues to justify his activities as a Nazi, as the story, unfolds he offers glimpses into his troubled childhood and early family dysfunctional while circumnavigating the incendiary core of his – and his country’s – moral corruption. The best that can be said for this pointlessly dense nearly one-thousand-page tome is that it both raises and challenges long-held notions of individual culpability and universal blame. Just Take My Heart By Mary Higgins Clark, Simon & Schuster, 336 Pages, $25.95 As sure as each summer brings another season of warm days and beach trips so, too, each summer brings a new Mary Higgins Clark novel. This year is no exception. Clark’s Just Take My Heart appears on bookshelves just in time for summertime reading. Author Clark never set out to write bestselling suspense thrillers. Suddenly widowed at an early age and left with five children to raise and a large New Jersey house to maintain, she quickly discovered that she needed to supplement her salary as a Manhattan radio script writer. So she set about doing

what she knew best, writing. She rose every morning at 5 a.m. to write as many pages as she could of a book she hoped would sell and produce income, before getting breakfast for her brood before heading off to the city to her daytime job. Little did she know how successful she would become. Her first thriller, Where Are the Children?, morphed into a mega-hit. To date, Clark has penned twenty-seven thrillers and they have all landed on top of The New York Times’ bestseller list. By her own admission, “America’s Queen of Suspense” does not aim to produce great literature. Her objective is to tell a good and gripping story and this she achieves in spades.

Clark is also adroit in capitalizing on a current topic or trend and cleverly weaves that into each of her new novels. For example, Just Take My Heart addresses the littleunderstood, but documented, medical phenomenon of people who have received heart transplants taking on the traits and memories of the person who originally “owned” the heart. Clark makes it work. She throws some theatrical agents into the mix, a husband accused of murdering his wife, a young New York theatrical student whose roommate ends up with a bullet in her brain, a dog who needs a babysitter and – voila! – another successful Clark tale.


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Sudoku Solution: Cryptogram Solution: PAY NO ATTENTION TO WHAT CRITICS SAY. THERE HAS NEVER BEEN SET UP A STATUE IN HONOR OF A CRITIC. SIBELIUS

Jumble Solution: 1) Ghost 2) Member 3) Mound 4) Auger 5) Humble Answer: “The Good Hummus Man“

2009 Area Chair and Vice Chair


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The

Reporter

your source for village

information.

cvereporter.com

New Bus Procedure for the West Route (to Deerfield Mall, etc.)

Guaranteed Seats

1. At the Clubhouse, tickets will be handed out on a firstcome, first-served basis up to the seating capacity of the bus. 2. When the bus arrives at the Clubhouse, residents with tickets will board. The tickets will be collected as you enter the bus. Note: This does not apply to the internal CVE bus system, only the external West Route.

The system will begin on April 1, 2009.


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ANNUITY OWNERS COULD PAY UP TO 40% TO THE IRS IN TAXES! Many annuity owners are positioned to lose a significant portion of their annuity’s value to taxes, and most are not even aware of the problem. The IRS is not required to notify annuity owners about an exemption to the tax code that could save thousands of dollars in income and estate taxes. A complimentary booklet is available that shows current annuity owners how to avoid mistakes and possibly save thousands! This complimentary booklet creates an awareness around the most costly annuity owner mistakes and provides tips and strategies to help you make the most of your hard-earned assets. Call (877) 856-7986 today to get your no-cost, no-obligation copy of the 16-page “Guide to Avoiding Common Annuity Mistakes” and learn how to potentially:

• Avoid paying unnecessary taxes • Increase your retirement income by properly handling your annuity • Avoid mistakes that could cost you or your beneficiaries thousands of dollars

Bill Gruntler, LUTCF Asset Protection Group Registered Representative and securities offered through Packerland Brokerage Services, Inc. an unaffiliated entity, Member FINRA & SIPC

Call (877) 856-7986 today for your complimentary 16-page booklet!


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Reporter July 2009 Volume 32 Number 10  

Ira and Michelle flanked by family and close friends Ira Grossman and Tina Silverman Tina Silverman flanked by admirers of her husband Marty...

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