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Board of Directors of COOCVE Meets THIRD TUESDAY of the Month at 9:30 a.m. in the Party Room Official Monthly News/Magazine of the Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida

FEBRUARY 2009

SECTION A, 48 PAGES

VOLUME 32, NUMBER 5

Our Elected COOCVE Officers for 2009 By JUDY OLMSTEAD

Steven H. Fine President

Charles Parness Vice President

VOTING RESULTS..... THE COUNT IS IN. Our election was held January 20, 2009. President Steven H. Fine 154* Ira Grossman 64 1st VP Jeff Chester Charles Parness

74 143*

James McLear 2nd Vice President

On January 20, 2009, the COOCVE Board of Directors elected Steven Fine for President, Charles Parness for 1st Vice-President, Jim McLear as 2nd Vice-President and Ken Barnett as Treasurer. Also elected by acclamation, as Sergeant of Arms, were Arthur Dove,

Ken Barnett Treasurer

Al Miller and Arlene Fine. Only the offices of President and 1st Vice-President were contested. Each of the four candidates spoke for five minutes presenting information about their respective backgrounds, reasons for wanting to serve and their plans for the future. When

the results were announced, Ira Grossman turned over the gavel to Steven Fine who then thanked Ira for his many years of service to the community. The process did not run as smoothly as the elections in See ELECTIONS, pg 5A

CVE Reporter Has Moved To A Beautiful New Location By ANITA LYNN

Elected by Acclamation 2nd VP - James McLear 3rd VP - VACANT Treasurer - Ken Barnett 1st Sergeant at Arms - Arthur Dove 2nd Sergeant at Arms - Al Miller 3rd Sergeant at Arms - Arlene Fine *Winners Reporter staff in their new home

IN THIS ISSUE: Board of Directors ......................... 3A starts on 5A Village Minutes.............................

Letters to the Editor...................... 6A starts on 14A Condo News.................................

The CVE Reporter has moved to an exciting new office, just around the corner from their old office. It’s

News & Views............................... 15A

much larger, brighter and the staff is very excited about it! Upon my arrival, receptionist Sharon McLear,

greeted me with a welcoming smile! Right away, she let me know that she is very happy with the new location! Everyone is particularly

pleased with the solid glass exterior that lets the sun shine right on in, making the See OFFICE, pg 5A

Consumer Interest........................ 29A Political Scene.............................. 30A Our Commissioner........................ 30A starts on 32A Remembering the Past..................

Sounding Board ............................ 38A starts on 39A Up Front/Personal..........................

Feature of the month..................... 5B Health Matters............................... 10B Sports ........................................... 11B starts on Observations................................. 12B starts on 17B You Should Know.......................... starts on 20B Arts/Entertainment .......................

Happy Valentine’s Day

NEW TRANSPORTATION SCHEDULE See Pages 38B-39B

Happy President’s Day


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COOCVE Board of Directors Meeting January 20, 2009 President Ira Grossman called the meeting to order at approximately 9:35 a.m., and Arlene Fine led the Pledge of Allegiance followed by a moment of silence. President Grossman informed the directors that there was important new business concerning our bus service, which he would move up in the agenda immediately following the elections. He then asked the Secretary to read the minutes of the previous meeting of December 16, 2008, the reading of which the directors waived and approved, as published in the January issue of the Reporter. A representative of the Community Affairs Department of the Broward County Sheriff’s Office spoke about crimes in the Village, which she noted were far fewer than in other communities. The Deputy mentioned a couple of grand thefts which, in response to a Director’s question, she identified as thefts of air conditioners. The Director urged residents to note always the serial numbers in order to crack down on the theft and resale of a/c units. President Grossman then turned over the meeting to Joe Sachs for the Nominating Committee. Joe explained the

voting procedures and then invited the two candidates for President, incumbent Ira Grossman and challenger Steven H. Fine, and the two candidates for 1st Vice President, Jeff Chester and Charlie Parness to speak. After all four candidates spoke, Joe called up the directors, by association, to cast their ballots. When voting concluded, President Grossman offered Jeff Chester the floor to address the directors. Jeff presented the following motion: “Resolved, that Master Management shall extend the hours of minibus service on the West Route to 7:00 p.m.” The motion was seconded and several directors spoke in favor. One director offered a friendly amendment, accepted by Jeff, to add additional stops along Hillsboro Boulevard, as the public bus used to do. Dan Glickman noted, however, that private vehicles are not authorized to stop on Hillsboro Boulevard itself. Dan also cautioned that adding stops would lengthen the route’s duration and would add to its costs which the Village would have to pay for. Don Kaplan noted that this resolution would serve only as a recommendation to

Master Management which is governed by its own 15-member board, elected by the COOCVE Directors. After discussion, the motion came to a vote as follows: “Resolved, that Master Management shall extend the hours of minibus service on the West Route to 7:00 p.m. and make additional stops along Hillsboro Boulevard, where feasible.” The motion passed overwhelmingly, with only two votes opposed. Jeff Chester then presented the following motion: “Resolved, that Master Management shall schedule internal minibus service every half-hour throughout the year.” At present, internal minibus service is scheduled for every half hour, from October through April, and for every hour, from May through September. A number of directors spoke in favor of the motion as a matter of great convenience for the residents who make Century Village their full-time home, not just a seasonal vacation site. The directors overwhelmingly approved this motion, as well, with only two opposed. Jeff Chester then presented a motion to have Master

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Management stop any further expenditure of funds to investigate the possible purchase of the golf course property in Century Village which is owned and operated by a third party. Two directors spoke against this motion, saying that the CVE directors shouldn’t try to “micro-manage” Master Management and that residents should bring up such matters at Master Management’s monthly meetings. Dan Glickman moved to postpone, indefinitely, the motion; the directors then voted in favor of this indefinite postponement by the requisite 2/3 majority, as determined by the Chair. President Grossman then asked to defer further new business in order to let Joe Sachs announce the results of the election. On behalf of the Nominating Committee, Joe announced that the directors had elected Steven H. Fine as President and Charlie Parness as 1st Vice President. Joe also noted that James McLear was elected 2nd Vice President, unopposed, and Ken Barnett as Treasurer, also unopposed, as were 1st Sergeant of Arms, Art Dove, 2nd Sergeant of Arms, Al Miller and 3rd Sergeant of Arms, Arlene Fine. President Grossman then handed over the gavel to new President Steve Fine to conduct the remainder of the

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meeting. Steven thanked Ira for all his hard work, as President, on behalf of the Village. President Fine invited directors to approach the mike with new business. Bob Bender presented the final report for 2008 of the COOCVE Civic and Cultural Committee, noting the presence of Judy Schneider of the Committee, as well. The report cited the successful Hurricane Preparedness Seminar, attended by more than 100 residents, an upcoming puppet opera for art lovers of all ages in February and an upcoming Recycling Seminar in March. The Committee’s report also included recommendations to COOCVE regarding the Reporter, COOCVE Committee funding and publicity, elections and getting resident input to the Recreation Committee on programming. Bob gave the Chair a written copy of the Committee’s Final Report of 2008. Several other directors made comments regarding the comments about the buses, stop signs and the portion of the Hillsboro Boulevard perimeter fence to the west, where a squad car had driven through and left a gap. Noting that a quorum was no longer present, the remaining directors voted to adjourn at 11:33 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Ken Barnett as Secretary.


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Village Minutes Minutes of Special Master Management Board Meeting December 30, 2008 President, Donna Capobianco called the meeting to order at 10:00 am on Tuesday, December 30, 2008. In attendance were, Reva Behr, Donna Capobianco, Harry Chizeck, Dick Ciocca, Donna Dowling, Anthony Falco, Gene Goldman, Jules Kesselman, Jack Kornfield, Susan Koser, Charles Parness, Mel Schmier and Ira Somerset. Reva Behr led the Board in the Pledge of Allegiance, and moment of silence. Legal Fund Donna Capobianco announced the legal fund has expensed just over $11,000 of the original $15,000. A motion was made and seconded, discussed and amended to replenish the fund in the amount not to exceed an additional $15,000. The motion passed 11:2. Payments to CSS A motion was made and seconded to cease all payments to Century Services Systems effective immediately. After discussion, the motion passed 12-1. Administration Position Change Donna Capobianco explained the need to change the duties of the administrative assistant position. The change would provide a professional support person to upgrade the current Administrative position. A motion was made and seconded to approve

the hiring of a professional administrative assistant at a salary up to $16.00/hour. After discussion, the motion passed unanimously. A motion was made and seconded to approve funds not to exceed $1,500 to advertise for the administrative assistant position. Motion passed unanimously. Trespass Affidavit The BSO is asking that a Trespass Affidavit be signed by MM to be kept on file at their office. The Affidavit allows BSO Sheriffs to take action against unwanted entrants in CVE once BSO has been called. In addition to the support we receive, the Sheriff would create a record of the incident for future reference. Under the statute, associations are covered; corporations that are separate such as CenDeer and MM are not covered under the same statue, and a separate agreement should be made. A motion was made and seconded to authorize the president to sign the affidavit. After discussion, the motion passed 12-1. Repair to Fence in Newport This fence section was damaged by a motor vehicle over the weekend. The owner’s insurance company is moving on this, so there is no need to address it. Bench Pads Bob Dolson requested approval to proceed with

the installation of 40 concrete bus bench pads at a cost of $15,840 (approximately $396/bench pad). A motion was made and seconded to approve the concrete slabs from McCabe Brothers per Bob Dolson’s recommendation. During discussion it was suggested that the benches be bolted to the pad. The motion was defeated five to seven with one abstention. It was suggested that we revisit this issue at a later date to clarify questions that members had. A motion was made and seconded to reconsider the purchase of the 40 bench pads and to include the securing of the benches to the pad. After discussion, the motion passed eight to five. A motion was made and seconded to reconsider the original motion (to approve the concrete slabs per Bob Dolson’s recommendation) as amended to include $1,000 to secure the benches to the pad. Motion passed 8-4. Application of Bar Codes at the Clubhouse The Chair of the Security Committee presented a report recommending that the bar codes be attached to the cars at the Clubhouse so that residents would have one-stop for all their ID needs, and would include one day when the office is open until 7:00 pm. The Committee suggested that

it would be advisable to pay for a security guard to apply the bar codes Monday and Friday noon to 4:00 pm, and Wednesday 5:00 – 7:00 pm providing the RecCom and DRF agree. A motion was made and seconded to give the ID office the authority to have the bar codes applied at the Clubhouse by the security guard. Because of objections by some board members to paying for a service that could be done by volunteers, Donna Capobianco asked for a Board Member put together a program to have volunteers apply the bar codes. Charles Parness volunteered to be responsible for assuring that the times were covered by volunteers. Charles stated that he will distribute flyers to the area chairs and solicit volunteers to install the bar codes. In light of the offer to supervise the volunteers by Mr. Parness, the motion was withdrawn. A motion was made and seconded to allow the ID office to issue the barcode/ sticker to each resident who will be responsible for its application. After a discussion, a motion was made and seconded to table the motion. Motion to table passed nine to two.. A motion was made and seconded to adjourn: meeting adjourned at 11:57am. Respectfully submitted, Donna Capobianco

Elections

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December. When Jeff Chester who was a candidate for 1st Vice-President spoke, directors and residents disrupted his presentation. Neither Ira Grossman as sitting President of COOCVE nor Joe Sachs as chairperson of the Nominating Committee stopped the outbursts, and Jeff had to remind the audience that in a democracy we still have the freedom of speech. The meeting was called back to order by Joe Sachs, and the votes were cast by secret ballot. In his presentation to the Board, Steven Fine announced that if elected president of COOCVE, he would continue to serve as editor of the Reporter. He also stated that he would select well-qualified residents of the Village to serve on the eight appointed committees, with Recreation continuing to be elected by the Board of Directors. He hopes to make COOCVE stronger and more in tune with the needs of the community. He and his vice-presidents will continue to be available to the residents who have questions or need assistance.

Office

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office bright and cheerful. As I was walked around, I was truly impressed with the spacious cubicles, the spacious and well fit ambiance. Carol Carr mentioned how she is enjoying the amenities of the new office but said she really loves working at the CVE Reporter because of the wonderful comraderie from the others working at each of those desks. Amazing, but… I saw nothing but smiles and pleasure on each of the faces of this dedicated team of volunteers who are enjoying their fresh space.. The new Office has almost twice the square footage of the old quarters used by the Reporter. Betty Schwartz, the Assistant to the Editor, commented that she is really enjoying the additional drawers and storage in her desk. Arlene Fine confided that she was so grateful to have a place to hang up her Grandchildren’s pictures! When I spoke with Estelle Sabsels, a 16 year dedicated volunteer at CVE Reporter and Sales Consultant she agreed whole-heartedly that this definitely was a very positive move that would benefit everyone in the Village. A VERY SMART MOVE INDEED! Congratulations!


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Editor-in-Chief STEVEN H. FINE Assistant to the Editor Betty Schwartz Editorial Staff Seymour Blum Judy Olmstead Wendy Rosenzveig Betty Schwartz Activities Editor Sandy Parness

Sid Birns

Production Sid Goldstein Christie Voss Photo Journalists Jules Kesselman Al Miller

Advertising Consultants Susan Dove Arlene Fine Estelle Sabsels Office Staff Norman Bloom, Seymour Blum, Carol Carr, Susan Dove, Arlene Fine, Bea Litner, Sharon McLear, Sandy Parness, Toni Ponto, Betty Schwartz, Gert Schwartz, Estelle Sabsels Staff Cartoonist Alan G. Rifkin Alvin Sherman 1913-2000

Business Manager Steven H. Fine

Circulation Outside Pubs., Inc. Barbara Turner

y far the most popular and widely read segment of our publication is the Letter-tothe Editor columns. We encourage letters that enable our readers to “sound off” on any subject. However, we will not print letters from the same person on the same subject in two consecutive issues. Also, letters must be from CVE residents, must be signed and, if possible type-written double-spaced. Please include your phone number. When we receive letters about applicable contracts, please remember the Reporter does not endorse any single company. Residents are free to make their own choices each year. Criterion for letters that will not be published: Letters in poor taste, demeaning and vastly untrue.

Art Director Christie Voss

Columnists and Regular Contributors Shelly Baskin, Harvey Beaber, Sid Birns, Evelyn Bloom, Norman L. Bloom, Sy Blum, Mary Catherine Castro, Herb Charatz, Marion G. Cohen, Richard William Cooke, Senator Ted Deutch, Arlene Fine, Jack Galit, Max Garber, Gilbert Gordon, Rolf Grayson, Broward Commissioner Kristin Jacobs, Harry L. Katz, Louis Kaufman, Jules Kesselman, Richard Koenig, Rosalind Lerman, Jess Levin, Dory Leviss, Bea Litner, Dr. Norma Locker, Rosalind Mandell, Pauline Mizrach, Judy Olmstead, Nelia Panza, Lori Parrish, Charles Parness, Phyllis Pistolis, Commissioner Marty Popelsky, Eva Rachesky, Betty Schwartz, Gloria Shomer, Rosalyn Spitzer, Helene Wayne, Carl Weitz, Lucille Weitz, Jerry Wolf, Robert Winston, Janice Zamsky.

B

Proofreaders Sid Goldstein, Bea Litner Betty Schwartz, Norman L. Bloom

The CENTURY VILLAGE EAST REPORTER is published monthly and distributed,without charge, to the residents of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida. It is published for the edification of said residents, and contains reports of the monthly meetings of the corporations, Board of Directors and its Committees, as well as news, bus and theater schedules, and contributed articles of current interest to the residents. The Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Inc. aka COOCVE,a not-for-profit corporation, its officers, directors, editors, staff, any committee people are not responsible for typographical errors or misrepresentations in any advertisements or article. They are not responsible and assume no liability for the content of, or any opinions expressed in, any contributed articles which represent the author’s own opinions and not necessarily the opinion of COOCVE. Acceptance of advertising for products or services in no way constitutes an official endorsement of the product. Residents are advised to check with the person they are hiring to be sure he is licensed and insured.

The Mail Bag

Scaling Downwards in our Present Economy To The Editor: Last year, prior to Christmas, Towne Center in Boca Raton displayed a $125,000 vehicle, a Maserati, in the mall. This year, two cars were featured: a Porsche priced at $89,000 and a budget (depends on whose budget) vehicle, a $38,000 Mercedes. (You wouldn’t even want the Porsche, trust me. It’s a real gas guzzler.) You do see an occasional, mammoth Cadillac Escalade or Lincoln Navigator, but sighting of these vehicles is getting rarer. Autos you do see a lot of: Toyota Corollas,

From the President By STEVEN H. FINE, President COOCVE I would like to first thank you for your overwhelming support of my candidacy for President of COOCVE. The margin of victory is a clear indication that the residents of Century Village want a change in leadership and I promise to give 100% effort to make the changes we need. As I promised in my speech, I am now engaged in the process of vetting candidates for our eight appointed Standing Committees which are as follows: Advisory, Audit, Budget & Finance, By Laws, Civic & Cultural, Grievance, Insurance & Contract Negotiations. All prospective candidates will be interviewed by me as well as my 1st and 2nd Vice Presidents. We will collectively

choose the most qualified, experienced and competent candidates available. In addition, Don Kaplan, former President of Master Management, has graciously offered his expertise in assisting the executive Board of COOCVE. I have appointed Don to the position of Special Assistant to the President. While Don will not have the abil-

ity to vote, he will be attending meetings (Master Management, Recreation and Area Chair) and report directly to me. More changes are forthcoming and I look forward to working and meeting with you all. Last, but not least, I wish to thank Ira Grossman for his many years of good service to our community. Ira has worked tirelessly at trying to satisfy the needs of the people living in Century Village. I am proud to live in Century Village (Florida’s best kept secret), elated to serve as your president, and I look forward with you all to a year of solid achievement. Once again, thank you for your confidence in me.

Kias, Hyundais, Nissans and plenty of Hondas. American carmakers not only have to give us more affordable, gas efficient vehicles, but make them more dependable and less likely to need costly repairs. A recent newspaper article stated that the United States Army uses Mercedes ambulances on the battlefields because of their reliability. What does that say for the big three American vehicle manufacturers? Janice Zamsky Cambridge D Might Makes Right To The Editor: The recent long overdue retaliatory strike against the terrorist group Hamas, created as expected a verbal firestorm. The fact that thousands of rockets had fallen onto the territory of a sovereign member state of the UN mattered little to anyone. The most amusing of all responses is the one from Russia. Not six months ago they militarily invaded the neighboring state of Georgia whose head of state made what they perceived to be threatening remarks. Remember Chechnia? What would they have done to Hamas if only one rocket had fallen on Russia’s soil? Enough said. Rolf Grayson Richmond ‘A’ Missing Flag To The Editor: I have been in touch with various members of Master Management, over the past year, concerning the United

States flag at the Front Gate. It was torn and not removed. It was removed and then not replaced. There was no light at night shining on Old Glory. Again, there is no flag. For several weeks the flag is missing and I, and many others, want it replaced – immediately! There is no reason why we should not have our flag flying proudly. Do these members who are responsible not see it missing, daily? Do they not care? This is, by far, the easiest job they have to perform when comparing replacing the stars and stripes with their other tasks such as signs, irrigation, transportation, garbage, etc., all in their domain. Volunteers are what make Century Village run and prosper. I say, if the easy task of replacing and lighting a flag daily, for us to look at when riding through the front gate cannot be achieved, then the Village has a real problem. If the easy jobs cannot be handled, then what about the difficult ones? Shelly Baskin Richmond F Insurance To the Editor Misinformation and misleading statements about the CVE insurance program for 2009 should not be featured on page one of the Reporter, and I urge you to correct the record for your readers. Ms. Olmsted says Citizens “was the only company that could cover the property damage portion of our coverage” for our associations. This just is not consistent with the facts! Several highly rated, financially viable, national and international insurance companies are available to write See INSURANCE., pg 13A


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Village Minutes COOCVE Recreation Committee Meeting January 13, 2009 The meeting was called to order at 9:30 a.m. In attendance were: Shelly Baskin, Donna Dowling, Anita Fine, Nancy Giordano, Danielle Lobono, and Bill Schmeir. COOCVE was represented by Ira Grossman and DRF by: Dan Cruz, Mark Levy, Eva Rachesky and Monica Wells During roll-call, Nancy acknowledged new Committee Member, Arlene Fine, and stated that the other new Committee Member, Ronald Popp, was out with a medical issue. Election of Officers Danielle nominated Nancy Giordano as Chairperson. Nomination was seconded and passed unanimously. Bill nominated Danielle Lobono as Vice-Chair. Nomination was seconded and passed unanimously. A motion was made, and passed, to waive the reading of the minutes from the December 9, 2008 meeting. Correspondence Nancy read a letter from a resident concerning dissatisfaction with the method of monthly advance ticket sales. Eva responded that she has met with the Ticket Office Supervisor and has initiated some changes to improve the monthly advance sale of tickets. Nancy said she has more correspondence that will be brought up later in the meeting. Committee Member Reports Shelly Baskin said he had something for new business later. Bill Schmeir reported that at their weekly inspections he has found the pool areas and Clubhouse clean; however, during inspection it was noted that some of the new chairs have started to have black spots appear on the strapping and no one knows why. He said that Tom McMann of T&M is going to call the manufacturer to see if they can provide an answer and solution. Nancy asked if it is the newest chairs or the chairs bought previously; Eva said she would look into it. Danielle Lobono said she had nothing to report at this time. Donna Dowling, in Abby Koffler’s absence, gave the Entertainment Profit and Loss Report. She reported that the profit for December was $32,904.44. There were complaints about two shows. She stated that Abby is aware of the complaints; however, the other shows were satisfactory. Abby will be at the next committee meeting and will provide additional details. The theater sound is being upgraded and the DVD system is performing excellently. Bill mentioned that the entertainment for New Year’s Eve was excellent but the entertain-

er politicized, which was not appropriate. He further stated that the show that had been scheduled the previous weekend, which was also excellent, would have been better suited for the holiday. Donna acknowledged this and said Abby was aware of the complaints and would take that into consideration for next year. Shelly asked if hotel costs are included in the monies paid to the performers and Eva indicated that the cost is factored in as part of the contract. Ira inquired into the propriety of audience participation in shows by getting up and dancing in the aisles. The general response was that this is not unusual and is, in fact, often encouraged by the performers. Danielle inquired whether there is a cut off for people to be let into the theater after a show has begun. Eva said there is no cut off but that late arrivals are seated in the back of the theater. DRF Reports Monica Wells End-of-Year Report: Monica reviewed the report which had been presented to the committee in November. For the benefit of the new committee members and other interested parties, she presented an overview of the fiscal budget which ended on October 31st. Revenues for the year were $4.9 million which includes recreation fees, theater sales and all other revenues. The actual $5.1 million includes a surplus of $174,000 over budget due to monies received for Hurricane Wilma. Total budget expenses were $4.7 million, leaving a surplus of $339,000. Nancy stated that part of that money will be directed to completion of the pool houses that were started in the previous fiscal year. Nancy also reminded the audience that of the monies collected each month for the recreation fee, only $44 is actually designated for operations, i.e. to run the Clubhouse and satellite pools. Changes in Lockbox Processing: Monica said there has been a change in the monthly recreation payment processing. For 14 years, a lockbox company has been used that operated out of Tampa, charging only 11 cents per piece. The company is closing the Tampa office and will charge 19 cents per piece if we continue to use them. We have made an agreement with them to use their software but do the processing, in house, at a considerable savings. We began this on December 1st. There has as yet been no hiring of new employees for the process, although that will be evaluated as time progresses. In addition, we renegotiated our contract with the courier system that

we have been using, bringing about some additional savings. Nancy inquired about methods of payment; Monica said that 51% of units are paying through ACH (Direct Debit) or electronically. The more units whose payment is processed in this manner, the greater the savings for the community. Nancy concurred saying that the savings means more money to put into the community. Eva stated that this information does appear from time to time in the “Most Commonly Asked Questions” portion of the Reporter. Public Adjuster Update: The adjuster has not been able to get additional funds for us yet but he is still trying. Mark Levy Real Estate Office: Mark stated that in the 1990s the real estate office was located in the shopping center just outside of the Village. He met with Trinchi, and an agreement was reached that the real estate office could be located within the Village. There was no written contract, just a handshake deal. He affirmed his desire for fairness to all parties in renegotiating this agreement and has worked toward this through proposals and information that has been provided to the party that was acting on the Recreation Committee’s behalf. Unfortunately, there has been considerable lag time on responses back to his office and he has resubmitted several times. He explained that the proposed figures were arrived at by comparing costs and size to the other three real estate offices in the other Villages. Mark stated that they feel $18,000 should more than cover the cost for the past usage and $300 per month going forward should cover the expenses that will be incurred by the office. He wants to maintain good relations with the community and is more than willing to pay his fair share; therefore, he has asked Dan to put a meter in place to establish actual use of electricity and water as this agreement moves forward. Business Interruption Insurance: Nancy asked if Mark could explain how the Business Interruption insurance works and why some units are covered and others are not. He stated that this was a fairly straightforward situation. During the 1970s or early 80s (prior to his involvement with the Village) there had been some litigation which took place between the developer/ owners, etc. (This litigation was never actually filed, only proposed.) The first 3,340 apartments sold before the Amended Condominium Act passed had 99-year leases – the other 5,400 were sold after the Amended

Condominium Act had passed. The attorney representing that group put in a provision that in the event that there was a casualty and the company collected business interruption and also collected recreation rent, they couldn’t double dip and would have to reimburse. So when the theater had to be rebuilt, after the hurricane, there was a loss of use. A claim was submitted on behalf of the 3,340 residents, and the insurance company reimbursed those units for business interruption. The other 5,400 units didn’t get the reimbursement as they didn’t have a legal right, under their contract, to collect the money. Mark’s thought on solving this inequity would be to have the Recreation Committee, ratified by COOCVE, using the language of the agreement for the 3,340 reach an agreement contractually that any reimbursement be put into the Recreation operating account so everyone would be able to benefit. Mark mentioned that he has done something of this nature in Pembroke and is quite willing to work with CVE on this if they wish. Insurance Question: Due to the need for Mark and Monica to leave for another meeting, a question from the audience concerning insurance deductibles for the recreation areas was permitted. Mark and Monica explained that the insurance this year is per location and, within location, per building. On the buildings, the deductible is $100,000 and for the Clubhouse the deductible is 5% of the value of the property which would be approximately $900,000. Eva Rachesky and Dan Cruz Entertainment/Equipment Maintenance Budget Line Item #78-1203: Equipment purchase and improvements had been budgeted and approved by the Committee but the $41,210.46 was omitted from the line. The line will show as over-budget for the year. Century Village Has Talent: Eva informed the committee that there are 35 contestants for the talent show and the tryouts are on February 27th. Danielle said that an audience is needed; residents should come to offer support to the participants. The talent show will be held in the Party Room from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Eva said the talent applicants should come in by at least 1:00 p.m., if not before. Nancy commented that they are hoping this will become an annual event. Expansion of Exercise Room Patio: Eva reported that to expand the Strength Room (weights) out into the patio area, adjacent to the existing room, the cost would be approximately $80,000.

Nancy inquired what would need to be done to affect the proposed change. Dan said the floor would need to be leveled, the patio area would need to be opened up from the existing room, the exterior walls enclosed and windows installed. Air conditioning, sprinklers, etc. would have to be expanded into the area, but the first step would be to hire an architect; he requested approval from the committee to move forward to obtain bids. Nancy made a motion for “Dan to move forward to hire an architect to enclose and expand the exercise patio.” Motion was seconded by Danielle and passed unanimously. Members discussed the lengthy process for obtaining permits. For this reason, they all agreed that the approval process must begin early in order to be ready for work to proceed during the summer months. Guest use of exercise areas: Eva reported that she had been waiting for the second influx of seasonal residents to arrive so a proper evaluation of the volume of resident users could be done. She, along with the Athletic Supervisor, has determined that a fair schedule for guest use would be from 1:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. When asked if guests could use equipment not being used during the “off” time, Eva advised that they had to put something in place that would be enforceable by the Security staff as otherwise security personnel would have to be continually making judgment calls. Committee members agreed with this policy. Replacement of Cardio/ Locker Room Air Handlers: Eva reports that new air handlers are needed for this area, and Dan states the existing units are 25 years old, need replacement and new units will be more cost effective. The new units would cost $50,000 and since it will take months to get the units in, the order process needs to start now so the units can be installed in the summer. Donna made a motion: “Replacement of Air Handlers for the Cardio and Locker Rooms.” Motion was seconded by Bill and passed unanimously. Nancy stated that the committee is trying to improve the infrastructure of the Clubhouse. Things haven’t been done for a very long time and each budget year they are trying to get things done. She asked Dan how many big-ticket items remain to be replaced. Dan informed her that there are five of the bigger units to be replaced still, although the really big items – the Chillers – have already been done. Replacement of Theater Air Handlers and Frequency Drive: Eva reports that new units are needed for the theater. Dan said the unit is 27 years See RECREATION., pg 11A


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Village Minutes Master Management Commentary By DONNA CAPOBIANCO, President/ Master Management New coupon, irrigation, transportation, landscaping and other major changes and work are all going on. We are working hard to respond and move forward. Coupons: Master Management’s new service company, Seacrest, has sent you a letter, coupons and a new Authorization Form for Direct Payments (ACH DEBIT). Please read the letter carefully as it deals with 3 important issues: 1. To make your payments WITH coupons, please send a check for $86 along with the corresponding coupon to the Miami address using the mail labels on the back inside cover of your coupon book. Send payments timely to avoid late fees. You can drop them in the Master Management boxes at the Clubhouse as well. 2. The letter also indicates you can make payments WITHOUT a coupon and/ or use your own bank’s BILL PAY system to make your payments monthly. As no coupon will go with your BILL PAY payment from your own bank, please be sure to use the West Palm mailing address provided in the letter and below. If for any reason you did not receive your coupons, please call Seacrest to notify them. In the interim, to avoid late fees, send your $86 monthly check with your complete name, CVE address and phone number to: Seacrest Services, Inc. 2400 Centrepark W. Dr. #175

West Palm Beach, FL 33409 3. Seacrest requires a new authorization form in order to automatically extract Direct Payments (ACH DEBIT) from your bank account. If you want to get back to this easy, “one less thing to think about” method, just complete the new Authorization Form for Direct Payments (ACH DEBIT) that came with your coupons, attach a voided check and send it in to the West Palm Beach address above or on the form no later than Feb. 1. If received by Feb. 1. you will have your new electronic funds transfer set up and Seacrest will be able to extract payments starting March 1. Just send checks for January and February. If you have any further questions, please call Seacrest directly: Customer Service: 1-888928-6465 or Accounting: 1-888-926-6467. Irrigation: Two projects are being undertaken in the first quarter to restore the existing, neglected village irrigation system:

Project 1: MM, via Seacrest, our new management company, will fix all Association and MM sprinkler heads and valves that can be repaired/replaced. There will be no cost to the Associations for this work. At this writing Westbury is already completed Project 2: MM will repair/ replace needed pumps and electrical equipment so water can be delivered throughout the village. The two projects together are intended to bring our 30 year old existing system into as full operation as possible until future modernization plans are decided. Seacrest will water each area weekly and provide a watering schedule to the various Association management companies in February. The IDG consulting project testing is completed and we await the report on recommendations for system improvement and modernization. Transportation: Many riders are providing helpful and constructive criticism to help us determine improvements to fine tune our new service. They are calling in their complaints, comments and compliments directly to Quality Transportation. Quality has been very responsive and whatever can be remedied quickly they do and what needs MM input or planning, we work on together. We sincerely appreciate your constructive input and encourage

you to call 954-791-2505, and if applicable, please provide route number and date and time of occurrence. Good news! We are taking majority requests to add or change stops very seriously as well. Considerations for adding stops include feasibility/safety for the bus to get into and out of the location, the route time impact and if the stop is already accommodated by the BCT #48 bus or has a BCT stop near it. We are very pleased to announce that although we cannot enter the J&J’s Farm parking lot safely, we just received confirmation we can use the BCT stop on Hillsboro very near it. West route buses are now stopping near J&J’s and the outside schedule will be updated as soon as possible to reflect the change. Again, welcoming input, the Executive Board and COOCVE voted to make a recommendation to MM to lengthen the hours of the West route to 7 PM and run inside routes every half hour all year round, versus the plan to run hourly over the summer. Along with other additions to service, we will be working out the details and assessments needed in an effort to accommodate this recommendation and will report back to COOCVE as soon as possible. One thing that might help you avoid having to wait for a bus or having a seat is planning your outings for lower demand times. Route transportation systems accommodate people throughout

a daily schedule and are not set to accommodate everyone wanting to leave at the same time, such as a charter. City buses, when full with early morning working commuters, pass you by. Your choice is to wait for the next bus, or if not a working commuter, plan to take the bus later in the morning when the rush dies down. As most in the village have flexibility, the buses usually have many seats available later in the morning through early afternoon. It is useful to remember that the #48 county bus runs east and west along Hillsboro and stops at many of the doctor’s offices and plazas, etc. Landscaping: Main gate landscaping and irrigation work is under way, by popular request, to help face lift our front entrance. Accidents: Need your help. If you see someone driving who knocks down a light pole, runs into a street sign, etc. and just takes off, please try to get a license plate number or call us with a name and address if you know the person. These are maintenance repairs and replacements that come out of all our monthly fees and should be reimbursed by that person’s auto insurance coverage. Your help with this will help all of us. Change is not easy on any of us, including your volunteer Board of Master Management. Although not able to please everyone, we are working hard to do all we can to make sure that the necessary changes go as smoothly as possible.


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Village Minutes Council of Area Chairmen January 14, 2009 Chairman Joe Rubino called the meeting to order at 9:37 a.m. Representing their areas were Peter Patton, Hy Shoub, Norm Kaplan, Dan Glickman, Bill Goddard, Brenda Pomposello, Eleanor Wollman, Philip Norris, Patty Bender, Rhonda Pitone, Jules Kesselman, Jack Trobman, Jack Galit, Basil Hales, Ruth Porter, Charles Parness and Bruce Gursey. Attending from Seacrest Services were Anthony D’Amato and several supervisors; from COOCVE were Ira Grossman, Steve Fine and Jim McLear; from Master Management were Donna Capobianco and Ira Somerset. There was no representation from the Recreation Committee. The question period started with Seacrest. Mr. D’Amato pointed out they were scheduling meetings with area chairs to handle the many questions as this new era gets started. They have been flooded with phone calls and have added lines to handle the volume. Questions were asked about the handling of monthly insurance payments for those associations financing, staffing, landscaping and ser-

vices provided under property management. Seacrest is in the process of testing irrigation systems at each building and plans to have an irrigation schedule in February. Since the coupons being handled by Seacrest are coming out late, there will be no late payment charge for January. Those who wish to set up or continue with electronic fund transfers should follow the instructions they receive and should make their initial payment by check. Several asked about applications for sales and rentals. A request call should be made to Seacrest, and the forms will be delivered to associations. It was also pointed out that calls should be made for requested work, and a work order will be written. Buildings will receive monthly reports so they will be able to follow the disposition of these work orders. Seacrest is in the process of inspecting buildings and will make a report to the associations for any follow-up that may be necessary. It was also pointed out that association forms, required by the State, will be handled by Seacrest. Mr. D’Amato closed by saying he understands that they will

not always receive positive comments and asked they be given the opportunity to make any necessary corrections. Requests can be made by email to www.seacrestservices.com or by calling 1-888-928-6465. Ira Grossman pointed out that Mark Bogen, attorney for COOCVE, and many building associations have begun holding one-on-one meetings for those who have questions and problems that need solving. It is necessary to call Judy Kirschner at Mr. Bogen’s office and an appointment will be scheduled. A question was asked, “Why belong to COOCVE?” If buildings do not belong, they will have no representation to vote on motions at meetings, to vote for COOCVE officers, to vote for Master Management Board members or to vote for members of the Recreation Committee. It was also pointed out that our documents need updating and the filing could be done through COOCVE rather than each association going through the process on their own. Jeff Chester asked if any information had been distributed about the area chair elections

to be held in January. Chairman Rubino said he had not done anything but intended to remind all at the close of the meeting. As a result of this discussion, Dan Glickman made a motion that the chairman appoint a committee to prepare, by early fall, the proper procedures for future area chair elections. Motion passed by a vote of 13-1. There were many questions about the new mini-buses, and Donna Capobianco said these problems were being passed on to Quality Coach for possible correction. Comments can be made directly to Quality by calling 954-791-2505 or by filling out a form at the Master Management office. Master Management is working closely with Quality and looking at ridership numbers being gathered to consider changes that may be needed for the outside routes. A suggestion was made that an Area Chair Committee be formed to work with Master Management on this issue. Ira Grossman said he had received many complaints about the reduction of mini-bus service from April to November. Jeff Chester reminded the gathering that a motion was made at the executive committee meeting to extend the hours for the outside routes

and to continue full service for both the inside and outside routes year round. A second motion, at that meeting, requested Master Management to stop any further expenditure concerning the purchase of the golf course. Both motions passed overwhelmingly and were to be made at the January COOCVE meeting. Hy Shoub asked about the meeting that was to be scheduled with Comcast. The answer was that a meeting would be held in January, and we will look forward to a report. It was pointed out that there had been previous discussions about shelters at bus stops. Donna pointed out that where damaged benches were being placed, a pad would be installed that could accommodate a shelter. With shelters costing $14,000, and the need for 127, this would be a million dollar plus project. Jeff Chester suggested future budgeting could include a yearly installation over a period of time. The Chairman reminded everyone to hold their area chair elections before the end of the month, and new officers would be elected for the Council at the February meeting. The meeting was adjourned at 11:15 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Joe Rubino, Chairman


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Village Minutes Minutes of Master Management Board January 15, 2009 Minutes of Master Management Board Meeting 1-15-09 President, Donna Capobianco called the meeting to order at 9:30 am on Thursday, January 15, 2009. In attendance were, Donna Capobianco, Harry Chizeck, Donna Dowling, Anthony Falco, Jules Kesselman, Jack Kornfield, Susan Koser, Bill Morse, Charles Parness, Mel Schmier and Ira Somerset. Guest present was Bob Dolson, Business ManagerSeacrest Jack Kornfield led the meeting in the Pledge of Allegiance, and moment of silence. Donna Capobianco distributed copies of the minutes from the December 30, 2008 Board meeting for approval. A motion was made and seconded to discuss and approve these minutes at the next Board meeting. A new procedure will be implemented regarding correspondence. Office will scan the correspondence and send to the Board. At the Board meetings Bob Dolson, Business Manger, will report on the categories and actions. Correspondence – Bob Dolson Bus Standing Near Keswick – Standing area has been moved closer to the Clubhouse. Bus Stop Benches – Those that are not safe are being replaced; damaged bus benches will be replaced one at a time. Cables – complaint that the broadband cost is too high and no French/Canadian channels; MM Comcast Committee will be meeting with Comcast. Insurance Adjustments – When final accounting is received from CMM, Bill Morse will resolve open issues. Irrigation – attempting to restore irrigation as quickly as possible, the IDG field survey is almost complete. Pole lights – FPL has been notified and they will be repaired as quickly as possible. Roads – Roadways near Farnham K and Cambridge E will be addressed. Tilford Pool – Replacement of shower curtains and repair on heater have been completed. Traffic Control, Road and Street Signs – Signage to control traffic at Cambridge and the Temple are being reviewed. Sign at Durham O will be relocated. A request for a street sign at Prescott and other missing street signs are being inventoried and will be submitted to Board for approval. A request for speed bumps is not under consideration at this time. Complaint of driving habits in CVE – senior driving courses are available at the clubhouse. Jack Kornfield asked Bob Dolson to check if the benches require anchoring and re-

port back to the Board in two months. Presidents Report Donna Capobianco discussed notes from the COOCVE Executive Meeting. Everyone seems pleased with the new signs. The following motions were made and passed at the COOCVE Executive meeting; 1. Bus service for shopping be extended to 5pm and bus service run every half hour – year round. 2. MM shall stop any further expenditure in MM purchasing the golf course. These motions will then go to the COOCVE body and if approved, come to MM in the form of a recommendation. Donna Capobianco stated that there will be an unexpected increase in security costs of approximately $9,000 for the year to add guard hours as the new BCT #48 bus schedule is starting a lot earlier (enters village with non CVE residents on board). A motion was made and passed to appropriate a sum not to exceed $9,000 to cover the increase time in BCT buses for additional security coverage. Motion passed 7-3 (opposed votes were Jules Kesselman, Bill Morse, and Harry Chizeck) A motion was made and seconded that it be standard procedure for all committees to advise every Board Member of time and location of any workshop by e-mail. Motion defeated 3-6 (opposed votes were Harry Chizeck, Donna Dowling, Anthony Falco, Jules Kesselman, Susan Koser, Ira Somerset; abstained was Bill Morse) Business Manager’s Report - Bob Dolson Bob reported on projects that have been completed such as; repairs to walkways along west drive; renewal lake maintenance contract; serviced gatehouse at Hillsboro; 2009 priorities have been established; repairs to FPL light poles; serviced AC units in MM building; serviced Tilford pool heater; soliciting bids for AC unit at LeClub; bus benches and pads ordered, install to begin week of 1/26/09; irrigation issues addressed and action plan established to just bring current system up to working order until reports are in and system upgrades/modernization plans are determined and approved. Road overlay between Oakridge P&Q to begin week of 1/26/09-expected time frame is three days; soliciting bids for roof repairs at Activity Center, MM Office building; soliciting bids for fence repairs at Newport and Ventnor. Financial Report - Bill Morse The CVE Master Manage-

ment Financial Report prepared by Bill Morse was distributed to all Board members and discussed in detail. For the month of December 2008; Net Income was $-25,506 (negative net income is due to a 5th week of Security Guard service, increase in water and sewage from previous months.); Total Expenses were $724,279 and Total Income was $698,772. YTD Net Income was $187,797; Total Expenses $8,232,153; Total Income $8,419,951. Total Assets $2,792,558; Total Liabilities $1,107,036; Total Equity $1,685,522. Net status of assessments receivable from monthly coupons is unavailable. Net status of prepaid assessments from monthly coupons is unavailable. Net status of uncollected January 1, 2008 from village insurance is $55,669 uncollected. Century Maintenance has not provided MM any December reports. The village insurance pot owes Associations roughly $137,000. Also, approx $55,000 is owed by Associations to the insurance pot. The net amount available is approximately $82,000. MM is not in a position to pay out to some buildings if some buildings still owe money. Security Committee – A. Affixing Bar Codes Susan Koser discussed affixing barcodes to the cars at the Clubhouse on Monday and Friday from 12-4pm and Wed from 5-7pm. After a detailed discussion, a motion was made and seconded that the barcodes be affixed at the Clubhouse and to have Angel of United Security hire a guard to affix the barcodes for two hours a week year round on Monday and Friday shifts from April through October. This is 32 weeks at eight hours and 52 weeks at two hours for a total 360 hours not to exceed $4,320 per year. Jack Kornfield asked that all future motions be sent to the Board for review prior to Board meetings. Charles Parness then asked for a list of members on the Security Committee. A substitute motion was made and seconded to use volunteers at the Clubhouse. A motion was then made and seconded to table the discussion for a future date. Motion approved 9-1 (Jack Kornfield opposed) Security Committee B: Consideration of Rules for Vendor ID’s Ira Somerset discussed with the Board security rules for vendors/contractors working at CVE. After a discussion, a motion was made that the requirements be adopted and that the rules for vendor/contractors working at CVE be adopted. No second to motion. Motion will not proceed.

Old Business Irrigation Donna Capobianco discussed with the Board the current irrigation issue and that MM is responsible for irrigation. While MM is getting the system operational, Seacrest will be out watering every association once a week. Bob Dolson stated that about 25% of the 40 pumps currently are not working. Within three months from the start date the pumps will be operational. A motion was made and seconded to appropriate up to $18,000 for pumps and electrical equipment and repairs. Motion passed unanimously. Pavement of path at east gate to SW 10th Jack Kornfield discussed project. Donna Capobianco asked the Board if they want to support this as a MM project. The Board agreed that it is not a MM project and does not support this. New Business CPA: Reynolds & Piccano Annual Agreement A motion was made and seconded to approve the $8,000 year end financials and audit work for CPA Reynolds & Piccano services. Motion passed unanimously. Jack Kornfield abstained. Seacrest mailing labels A motion was made by Jack that MM will not assess late fees for delays caused by Seacrest-supplied labels. Without penalty, unit owners with coupons may hand address envelopes containing the coupon and payment-check to: CVE Master Management Company, Inc., PO Box 166451 Miami, FL 33118-6451. There was no second to the motion. Motion will not proceed A motion was made by Jack and seconded that unit owners without coupons are to make their check payable to CVE MM, and write their unit’s address on the “memo” line on the face of the check. The check may be deposited at the ID office MM drop box or mailed to CVE MM CO Seacrest Services, INC. 2400 Centrepark W. Dr. #175 West Palm Beach, FL 33409; until April, no additional fees will be applied if the payment is received by the 10th of each month. Motion defeated 3-4 (no votes were Anthony Falco, Harry Chizeck, Ira Somerset, Charles Parness; abstained were Donna Dowling, Jules Kesselman) Bus Policies: Wheelchairs and Standing Donna Cappobianco discussed with the Board the issues on wheelchairs and standing. BCT stated all history to-date, the policy is that they ask the rider what they prefer and do not strap down wheelchairs unless asked by the person. BCT stated they are likely changing this policy to emulate Miami Dade, strapping wheelchairs that can be

strapped (many new large electronic models can not be strapped) with no rider choice. Regarding the standing issue, BCT stated that it is advantageous to allow persons to stand as long as they are behind the white line. A motion was made and seconded that it be a policy of CVE MM that no standing be allowed on buses contracted by MM. Motion defeated 3-6 (No votes were Bill Morse, Anthony Falco, Harry Chizeck, Ira Somerset, Donna Dowling, Susan Koser) A motion was made and seconded that it be a policy of CVE MM that if a wheelchair can be strapped down it should be done on all CVE buses. Motion defeated 3-4 (no votes were Bill Morse, Anthony Falco, Donna Dowling, Susan Koser; Abstained Harry Chizeck, Mel Schmier) A motion was made and seconded that it be a policy of CVE MM that if a wheelchair can be strapped down it should be done on all CVE buses provided the person agrees. Motion passed unanimously. Charlie Parness asked Donna Capobianco to have the transportation committee look into the exit doors. The rear door is marked as an emergency exit but it is blocked by a seat. Donna Capobianco stated that per contract, the vendor must meet DOT and other requirements. This is not a policy issue and there is no transportation committee as there was no volunteer to chair the committee. A Transportation Policy committee will be considered for appointment. A motion was made by Harry and seconded to have the activity center rooms free to the residents of CVE. A motion was made and seconded to table this discussion until next meeting. Motion passed unanimously. A motion was made and seconded to repair the two perimeter fences for approximately $2,200. Motion passed unanimously. A motion was made and seconded to adjourn the meeting. Motion passed unanimously. Good and Welfare: Open Mic Comments: 1. If there is a head on accident, there is no way you can get out because you cannot get out the back door and the windows cannot get pushed out 2. With regard to the standing room policy, you did not consider those that are standing – if they fall and injure someone else. 3. When you have a contractor and you don’t like them, it should be a Board decision not an individual decision whether to use them or not. Respectfully submitted, Donna Capobianco


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old and is a 60-ton unit. The cost would be approximately $93,000. Dan said this cost includes the silencers. Nancy commented that they are making improvements that can’t be seen but that are no less important. Nancy made a motion “To move forward to replace Air Handlers & Silencers for the Theater and have Dan get bids for the project.” Motion was seconded by Danielle and passed unanimously. Theater Sound System: Speakers are in the process of being installed in the balcony and should greatly improve the sound quality in that area. Cen-Deer Coupons: Eva stated that there had been a bit of a problem with Building Presidents coming forward to pick up coupons for handout to their residents. Three building presidents refused to pickup the coupons; however, two of the buildings changed their minds. The third building president is still refusing to pick up and distribute the coupons. An effort was made by the Cen-Deer staff to contact people in the one remaining building to advise them that the coupons are available in the Cen-Deer Office, but it was only possible to contact a small number of unit owners. For that reason Eva wanted to present to the Committee, for their consideration, the possibility that they might want to mail the recreation payment coupons for next year; the cost would be approximately $5,000. After discussion among the committee members, it was decided that the coupon hand-out arrangement would continue as it has in the past. Committee members were in agreement that the monies that would have to be spent in postage could be put to better use elsewhere. Laptop Station in Clubhouse: Eva presented information on laptop computer stations that could be purchased, assembled and set up on the Mezzanine/Balcony area for laptop use. There would be six to ten stations for use and there should be no need to purchase chairs as there are some old chairs that can be reupholstered and restained. Nancy said she would also check on computer furniture options and report back at the next meeting. Minimum Wage: Eva wanted to bring to the Committee’s attention that minimum wage increased in January and will increase again in July. Pool Drain Law: Dan reported on the Public Pool Drain Law, stating that the Federal Law went into effect on December 19, 2008. He says there is a long waiting list for new drain covers. Because our drains are not standard size, we will have to have the drains designed by an engineer and be built. An engineer has been

hired who was recommended by the Board of Health. Dan said having this engineer working with us is beneficial because the County recognizes that we are working on this issue and knows exactly where we are in the process. Dan informed the Committee that the expense for these drains would be in the 2010 budget. He said he would leave a list of the requirements in the Staff Office for those residents who might be interested. Dan continued to discuss the complexities of the process and the steps that will have to be taken. He reminded the Committee and audience that this is a National Law and has affected pools all over the country. Shuffleboard Court: Eva reports that the resurfacing of the shuffleboard courts has been completed, and there is a tournament scheduled for this week. She did say that there were some minor questions about the court surface but they are being worked out. Umbrellas: Eva reports that there have been requests for shade at the shuffleboard, volley ball, etc. courts. There are not enough of the existing umbrellas for the 20 courts. She said the canvas umbrellas bought four years ago have held up very well and still look new. Another 20 to 25 umbrellas will be needed, and the cost would be approximately $3,000 to $5,000 with the less expensive having only a one-year warranty. The higher priced ones have a two to three- year warranty. Eva requested committee authorization to acquire samples for review at the next meeting. Nancy asked if a more permanent solution would be better. Eva said that she had looked into a permanent overhang, and the cost would be around $100,000. The Committee authorized Eva to present samples for consideration at the next Recreation meeting. Grantham Pool House: Dan reported that the tile work is in progress. Once tiling is done, the flooring will be poured; it will take five days for the flooring to set. The Grantham pool has taken longer as there were more problems with this pool house. Markham Pool House: Dan informed the committee that the flooring for this pool house is completed, and the toilets are being installed. Later this week, the partitions will be put in. Nancy commented that the Committee realizes that people have been disappointed that the pools have been down for most of the season but this renovation has been 30 years in coming; when it is finally completed, residents will be able to enjoy new, top-of-the line pool houses. The Committee has been making an effort to improve the Village, and everyone should bear in mind that good things take time. She also stated that they have learned that the

process takes longer than they had realized; therefore, they will be sure to start these projects much, much sooner. Sunday in the Park: This has had a positive response, although there have been a few requests to change back to the previous schedule but basically everything seems to be OK. Eva informed the Committee that the picnic tables have been installed; garbage cans and fire extinguishers have been put in place. She said interest has been expressed in using the area for some buildings’ End-of-Year Parties. A point of information is that someone has stolen some of the metal table numbers. Nancy made another request for a trash can to be placed by the recycling dumpster; Dan acknowledged and said he would have one put in place. Giovanni Update: The golf course is expecting a check from the insurance company momentarily and will begin the repair process as soon as the funds arrive. They will be working on returning the building to the proper condition, but it will take time. They will have to hire an architect, pull permits, etc. Dan said that this is all the responsibility of the golf course since they have the lease. He also said that, as information is made available, the Committee will be informed. Nancy and Eva commented that the golf course does offer hamburgers and hotdogs for purchase in their facility, and they are considering offering some breakfast items such as bagels for purchase. Old Business Green Auto Stickers: The rule was recently passed that if you had two cars, you had to have something in writing from the building in order to get the extra sticker from the ID office. Nancy said she wasn’t in agreement with the change that had been made previously limiting the parking stickers to just one per unit and felt that there should be a return to the previous rule. Bill stated that he didn’t agree with the decision either and questioned becoming involved in Building business as Recreation has no jurisdiction in these matters. Bill made a motion “That the system for issuing green stickers on cars go back to the way it was.” Motion was seconded by Nancy and passed unanimously. Century Real Estate: There was some discussion of the offer received by Mark Levy concerning the use of the building for the real estate office. Nancy read aloud the proposal that had been presented. Shelly asked if $300 would cover the electrical, etc. costs. Dan will have a meter installed by next week that will provide information as to usage and costs. It was agreed to table this item for next month. Pavers for Pools: Shelly requested a list of the schedule

for the pool paver installations. Eva said she would provide a copy of the schedule. Filming of Activities: Shelly stated that due to lack of technical expertise the filming hasn’t moved forward. He proposed that a presentation of photos in a slideshow format be inserted on a CD for presentation on Channel 98. Nancy asked if he would be able to work on this and he agreed. New Business No Trespassing Affidavit: Eva said she will advise the committee as soon as she has any information. Holocaust Memorial: Bill stated that B’nai Shalom Synagogue, which meets at Le Club, requests permission to hold a Holocaust Memorial in the Party Room in April. He said the event last year was very successful with over 400 people attending. Bill said the memorial will be only for people in the Village and will not be advertised outside. Nancy made a motion “To allow William Schmeir to have a Holocaust memorial program in the Party Room some time in April.” Motion was seconded by Shelly and passed unanimously. Bar Codes: Donna reported that Master Management, Security and Cen-Deer met about possibly having the bar codes installed at the Clubhouse. It would be for a total of ten hours, four hours on Monday and Friday and two hours Wednesday evenings during the ID Office evening hours. There would be no costs involved for Recreation. Parking would be in the back of the Clubhouse and Master Management would be responsible for providing personnel to apply the bar codes. Bill had reservations regarding this arrangement and stated that he felt bar code applications should continue to be at the Master Management Office. After some additional discussion, a motion was presented. Nancy made a motion “To allow them to use Recreation property to install bar codes.” Motion was seconded by Donna and passed four to two, with Bill and Arlene being the dissenting votes. Pelican Newspaper: A Pompano Beach publication has requested permission to place newspaper boxes in the Clubhouse for residents of the Village. After some discussion, Nancy made a motion to allow the publication to be placed in the Clubhouse; however, there was no second so the motion did not pass. Handouts in Staff Office: There was an issue regarding handouts promoting a show being presented at Le Club, “Puss ‘n Boots”. The show promoter who is a resident wanted to place a flyer promoting the show in the Staff Office but she presented the flyer four months in advance. Eva felt the issue

should be brought to the attention of the Committee in order to establish a reasonable timeline for distribution of flyers. Eva stated that during the “off” season there is more space since there aren’t as many activities, but during season there are so many handouts that they actually have to be rotated. Generally, a flyer isn’t put out more than a month or so before an event takes place. The Committee was in agreement that the time frame of one month to six weeks was reasonable. Card Rooms: Bill reported that there seems to be a problem in the card rooms with groups of people claiming that they had reserved tables per Pat Hughes in the Staff Office. He says these people hold extra tables, in reserve, that they don’t even use. They have signs made up that they place on the tables they want to use. Eva responded that there are three card rooms available, two on the second level and one on the ground level of the Clubhouse. She stated that tables can’t be reserved and reservation signs have not been approved, nor has Pat provided permission to anyone concerning table reservations. She did say that, in the interest of peace and to lessen arguments, she had worked out an agreement that the domino players, who can be noisy, play on the west side of the upstairs card room. Eva acknowledged that this is an ongoing issue; she is continuing to work on it but, basically, people need to have respect for each other and learn to get along regardless of nationality or whether or not they are a full-time or part-time residents. Projector Screens: Bill said he was approached by a resident about getting projection screens for the GPE and F rooms. Eva said there is a permanent screen in the F room and a screen in the Party Room. She said that a screen for GPA would be useful. After some general discussion, it was decided that Dan would look into projection screens for GPA. Lighting at Clubhouse: Committee members voiced concerns over a need for lighting on the driveways at the base of the hill, in front of the Clubhouse. Dan acknowledged their concerns and will address the issue. Nancy reviewed the dates and times for meetings scheduled over the next few weeks. Noise at Petanque Court: Residents complained that there was some sort of extremely loud celebration by a group of French Canadians at the petanque courts yesterday. Eva agreed, saying there were huge speakers being used. She said staff addressed the problem as quickly as possible, and the speakers were removed. The group agreed that this would not happen again. Respectfully submitted, Meredith Harris


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Village Minutes COOCVE Executive Committee Meeting January 12, 2009 President Ira Grossman called the meeting to order at approximately 9:30 a.m., and the attendees Pledged Allegiance and observed a minute of silence on behalf of those fallen in service to our country, and dear departed ones. The attendees waived a reading of the minutes of the previous meeting of December 8, 2008. Bob Bender a guest at the meeting, asked that the minutes be amended to mention that he had made a proposal at the previous meeting, as a member of the Civic Committee, for several changes in the operation and format of the Reporter. Bob then gave Ira a written summary of the proposal. The attendees voted to include this change and approve the minutes as amended. In response to the proposal, President Grossman noted that the COOCVE President submits nominations for the Reporter’s Board to the COOCVE Board of Directors at the latter’s April meeting. Ira then opened the floor to questions and comments to Donna Capobianco for Master Management. One Chairman asked about the public posting of felony charges against a CVE resident. Donna said that she had confirmed with counsel that we could indeed post this Notice, such as through a link on the www.cvedb.com website, and pointed out that she had worked on this matter with CVE Security, COOCVE, the Clubhouse staff, and the Broward County Sheriff’s office. Master Management then passed on this Notice to the Area Chairmen for dissemination. In response to a

question, Steve Fine indicated that the Reporter would post the Notice as well. A number of Chairmen questioned the reliability and adequacy of CVE’s new bus service. Donna asked for understanding of the obstacles Master Management faced. The first problem was lack of time. From the time we knew that Broward County was definitely cutting back its service, Master Management had only three months to go out and put in place a contract with a new provider. Normally it takes more than twice as long to get involved with a new provider. The other major constraint was money. Master Management wanted to keep the new service within the same approximately $1.2 million budget as before, as it was already having to raise its rates $6 per month this year due to factors beyond its control (municipal water and sewerage charges). The third problem is an on-going one under Master Management’s charter. It must charge everyone the same for common services, whether a resident uses it or not. Therefore, while those at the meeting were saying it was unfair to full-time residents to cut back service in the summer months (from ½ hour intervals to hourly intervals), other owners are asking why they have to pay so much for something they don’t use, or use for only a portion of the year. Joe Rubino of Durham asked Donna about moving his Area’s sign, and gave her a letter explaining the problem. Ira Somerset said that Master Management was already

aware of the problem, and working on finding a solution. Jeff Chester then noted that Master Management is sitting on about $1 million in cash, and that it had spent about $15,000 in legal fees to investigate matters pertaining to a possible purchase of the golf course property. Jeff called for making Master Management more responsive to the wishes of the COOCVE constituency. Jeff then presented two motions: 1) Extend the hours of bus service to the shopping centers to 5 p.m. (it now ends at 3 p.m. on week-days, and 4:30 p.m. on week-ends). 2) That Master Management cease and desist from making any further expenditures related to a possible purchase of the golf course property. Hyman Schoub noted that these resolutions could serve only as recommendations. Jeff said that if these motions were adopted here and by the COOCVE Board of Directors, he would move for the COOCVE Board of Directors to remove any director of Master Management who refused to follow our recommendations. On the first motion, to extend the hours of bus service, the attendees voted in favor by a vote of 10 for, and three against. Motion approved. In discussion of the second motion, for Master Management to stop spending any money towards a purchase of the golf course property, Charlie Parness explained, as a member of Master Management, that the reason they had undertaken the study to consider the purchase, was as a “defensive” move to avoid undesireable development of the property by the current owner. Don Kaplan noted that when he was a member of Master Management two years ago, Master Management had at that time turned down an offer by the golf course owner to consider a purchase, and had resolved to oppose the plan of development the owner had in mind. Several attendees noted that it would be difficult to obtain the variances to pursue any development, and difficult to get financing for such a project in the current and foreseeable economic environment. The attendees then voted on the second motion, that Master Management cease all expenditures towards purchase of the golf course, and approved it unanimously. Motion approved. In the general discussion that followed, several Chairmen noted delays in Seacrest

taking over its duties, such as getting coupon books to residents, especially to seasonal residents at their primary addresses, and in watering, which is likely to take Seacrest until March to start on a regular basis. Joe Rubino noted that Associations better have enough cash on hand to pay their insurance policies’ premiums initial payments, by February 1st, as we no longer have Master Management to cover the short-falls. Jeff Chester said he understands that the Recreation Committee has set aside its $400,000 budget surplus from last year, into a reserve to pay for its hurricane deductible amount. Jeff opined that there are higher priorities for that money, and chances are it will never be used for the stated purpose, but by someone coming into the Committee with his own wish list. Jeff urged COOCVE officers to take an interest in what happens in the Recreation Committee’s almost $5 million budget. Donna Capobianco noted that on Master Management’s part, it is very glad to have cash resources on hand with which to weather the expected delays in receipts over the first few months of the change over from Century to Seacrest. Charlie Parness noted that Master Manage-

ment is not allowed to keep reserve funds. Hyman Schoub of Cambridge raised points about the Federal rules on 55+ communities. Jeff Chester recommended we defer such discussion for the workshop that the Advisory Committee plans to sponsor on this subject, as noted in the previous Executive Committee meeting. Norm Kaplan of Farnham noted that he and many other building Presidents have been bringing in appraisers to try to obtain lower insurance valuations and thus lower their deductibles. Norm expressed disappointment that the Insurance Committee hadn’t arranged such appraisals for the entire Village as a group. Jeff Chester cautioned that lower appraisals might save money in the short-run, but leave an Association dangerously exposed in the case of a major loss. Joe Rubino and several other building Presidents in attendance said that Cen-Deer is refusing to mail out its coupon books for the New Year, saying it lacks the budget for the postage. Attendees said they are resisting Cen-Deer’s pressure, feeling that our payments should be more than adequate for Cen-Deer to cover bulk mailing charges. The attendees moved to adjourn the Meeting, at 10:55 a.m. Respectfully submitted by Ken Barnett


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our CVE property insurance and all other required coverages - at rates and on terms that are beneficial for the associations. The only reason they were not considered by our “Insurance Committee” none of whom had a whiff of experience managing or conducting a property-casualty insurance business - was the false premise that they could not or should not consider buying “non-admitted” or socalled “surplus lines” insurance, because non-admitted insurance is not protected by the Florida Insurance Guaranty Fund. Your readers are entitled to know that the largest U.S.corporations and insurance buyers regularly purchase surplus lines insurance, using the advice of professional risk managers they have hired. They also should know that the first criterion used by professional risk managers and insurance buyers when purchasing insurance is the financial rating of the insurance company selected. And Citizens’ Insurance Company is AN UNRATED CARRIER because the financial rating agencies do not consider it worthy of any rating associated with financial dependability! There are better insurance companies and programs available in the market, if we would only let them bid for our association accounts! Unfortunately, this information will not be available to your readers, even if it is printed in the February Reporter. And it is most unlikely that individual association presidents will exercise the kind of due diligence that should precede agreement to purchases the size of this annual insurance requirement. Accordingly, it seems that the editors of the Reporter are our only hope of seriously vetting the facts about insurance market sellers, products and prices, BEFORE associations make buying decisions with inadequate or misleading information. Herman Shwide Durham B Editor’s Note: (In response, Judy Olmstead states as follows: “I stand by my statement that Citizens was the only carrier that would insure ALL of the buildings in Century Village. I have been told that some of the high rises may be able to get another carrier, but not the gardens at this time. If the writer knows of another admitted carrier, he should let us know. I also stand by my position that we should not contract with non-admitted carriers for our primary building insurance.”

Let’s Consider All Sides of the Issues To the Editor: I was disappointed at the COOCVE meeting of January 22, and feel compelled to make several very important points that some people never even consider when voting resolutions were put forward by Jeff Chester. It is wonderful to instruct Master Management to extend the new bus service to the Deerfield Mall by some four and half hours of daily service, but at what cost? It is also wonderful to instruct Master Management to ensure bus service within the Village on the half hour throughout the year instead of during the winter months, but at what cost? It was also foolhardy to try and instruct Master Management to cease discussions and/or negotiations for purchase of the golf course, a resolution which did not come to a vote. Now let me speak as a co-owner, perhaps one of the new breed of younger coowners. My wife and I have no need for the bus service, but we are prepared to pay our share of this co-operative undertaking. But I do play golf, and believe that the golf course is one of the attractive items of our Village which should be owned by all of us. It is true there are operating costs, and golfers pay a fee for its use, unlike the bus users who are fully subsidized. If it is good enough for all to subsidize the bus service for only part of the co-owners and residents, why is it not proper for all co-owners to share in the ownership of the golf course, and if necessary, subsidize that operation? The bus transportation now costs in the half million dollar range and will only be higher if the proposed additions are made. If Master Management has the funds to do so, then so be it. If Master Management can negotiate to buy the golf course back from private hands, at a time when real estate value is at a low point, so much the better. If we do become co-owners of the golf course, an easy formula can be devised to provide each condo with its “value”, and for future sales, that can be incorporated in the sale price as is done in numerous gated communities in South Florida. Let’s have an informed and thorough discussion about these issues…not resolutions brought up at the last minute...before votes take place. Sidney Margles Lyndhurst J A Helping Hand To the Editor: The rabbi in Canada told us a story that everyone

should understand. He was in Toronto, Canada and went through the drive-in window at McDonalds. The cashier told him the guy in front of him in line had already paid for his coffee. He drove fast to catch up to the guy who told him to pass the favor on. Grandpop told me a long time ago that everyone will learn from that. The following week he was in Montreal, Canada and some guy paid his toll at the bridge using the same system. Wow! It was contagious. He drove over to Quebec, Canada and everywhere he went the same practice was going on. I make it my business to help everyone who looks like they could use a hand. If the car is sitting at the side of the road I get out of my car, I put my flashers on and ask if they need help. It makes me feel good every night when I go to bed to know that I have performed a mitzvah that day and the recipient did not know my name. Sam Glassman Cambridge D Let there be peace on earth To the Editor: Let there be peace in Century Village East. Let there be diverse opinions with civility and democratic right and respect for someone to have an opinion other than ours. Let there be a nonexistence of nasty, insulting characterizations of well meaning people who volunteer their time on our umbrella boards (no long line of super professional residents waiting on line to take their place.) Let there be less self importance, but more importance on putting forth opinions based on research and fact. I humbly wish all a healthy HAPPY NEW YEAR! FRED ZUCKER Cambridge F

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Condo News Coalition For CVE Homebound By MARION G. COHEN “My mother, Yolanda Cebbalo, is receiving personal care services, and we are very satisfied with the personnel providing these services in her home. We rate the services as excellent. Thank you very much.” “My sister Jewel and her family would like to thank you for the services being given to Jewel. We appreciate the funding and thoughtfulness of people who care for the disabled.” “Thanks so much for all your funding that is helping to provide services for my wife. God bless you all!” “Thank you for the services being provided for my wife. The young woman sent to help her with personal care is very good and very helpful, and the case worker from the Broward Homebound Program is very cooperative. Thanks again!” These are some of the testimonials submitted to the Broward Homebound Program office by clients and their relatives. Like many other health related organizations, the Homebound Program evaluates the services rendered by requesting evaluations from those served. Who are the clients of the Homebound Program? They are your neighbors. The Coalition has come to the rescue of many of our frail and disabled residents by subsidizing part of the cost of a health care assistant to help people who have difficulty with ambulating, bathing, dressing and toileting functions. It allows patients to be independent and function at their highest level. They do not want

to be institutionalized. How are funds raised to assist these clients? Once a year, in the month of February, an appeal letter is sent out to every household in Century Village requesting a donation to this worthy cause. However, many residents mail in their contributions without waiting for the appeal letter. A blurb on this page describing services rendered by the Homebound Program also lists where a contribution can be made. Contributions are made by Clubs, Temples, Building Organizations and the Reporter. We thank Young Israel of Deerfield Beach for their contribution of $1,000. The limited space of this article does not allow us to list all contributions. Needless to say, they are all greatly appreciated.

Contributions of $25 or greater made by residents during this fiscal year are as follows: $50 Nellie Strauss $25 Jean Berkowitz, Louis and Judith Ennis, Donald and Esther Goldberg, D. and E. Goldman, Janet Monteiro, Helen Rapport Unfortunately, many candidates for our services do not read this column. But you did! We want to assist them if they are in need of the services of medical aides and cannot afford to pay the full cost of same. We plead with you to become the eyes and ears of your neighbors. Inform them and help them contact us! Please read our supplementary summary of the services of the Homebound Program listed in this paper.

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Condo News News & Views By JUDY OLMSTEAD

There were two incidents of trespassers entering the Village in early December. Security was immediately notified by alert residents, who were able to detain the trespassers until the BSO arrived. One owner reported that he admitted one of those trespassers into his unit to use his bathroom and a bottle of cologne was later found to be missing. Why anyone would allow a complete stranger into his home is beyond me. These incidents involved outsiders climbing over the fence behind Ventnor and Newport buildings. At a subsequent Master Management meeting, the Board approved the signing of an affidavit by the President which gives the BSO authority to remove anyone not legally in the Village.

The issue of who is responsible for repairing the fences is an ongoing problem and needs to be addressed by COOCVE, Master Management, and the Area Chairs that are involved. There was also a collision between a trolley and a passenger vehicle in December while both vehicles were proceeding down the ramp from the clubhouse. This caused a traffic tie-up and an argument ensued between a pedestrian and a driver. The pedestrian banged on the top of one of the automobiles and, when the driver exited his vehicle, a physical altercation occurred. The pedestrian pushed the driver down onto the cement causing a serious head injury and then left the man bleeding on the pavement while he

ran into the clubhouse. Such behavior in an over 55 community is unbelievable, but it happened right here. I hope that by the time this article is distributed in the February Reporter that the Markham pool, if not the Grantham pool, is open. It is unfortunate that they were not open when the winter season began because of the crowds that we saw over the Christmas holidays. I wanted to point out, however, that construction started the day after Labor Day and that,

when it was approved by the Recreation Committee, the pools were supposed to reopen on December 1st, causing minimal inconvenience to everyone. While no one condones the delays in obtaining permits and inspections, which appears to be a constant occurrence in Deerfield Beach, I want to emphasize that the Recreation Committee fully expected the pools to be open before the snowbirds returned or shortly thereafter. Another lesson learned the hard way. On a similar note, published in the Sun-Sentinel on January 11, 2009 was an article about how all swimming pools, except those at single-family homes, are now required by federal law to have new drain covers which are domed instead of flat. The covers are designed to prevent swimmers from being trapped underwater by drain suction. There was a quote by Joanne

Jackson a vice president with Cen-West, the private company that manages the recreational facilities for South Florida’s four Century Village retirement communities. “They will have to drain the pools down to do the installation.” It is estimated that it will cost residents of condominium properties hundreds, if not thousands of dollars, to comply with the 2007 Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act passed by Congress last year. This Act required all public pools and spas to have covers installed by December 19, 2008. At the January Recreation Committee meeting, Dan Cruz explained that the contractors/engineers licensed to replace the covers are overwhelmed with requests and that he is working with them to design a cover for our pools that will comply with the Act. They had tried to get an exemption for the Century Villages, but they were turned down. Considering the ongoing water restrictions in Florida, it also makes no sense to have to drain every pool in Florida, but since it is currently Federal Law, it appears to be a losing battle. Stay tuned for updates. Another way to stay current on what is happening in the Village is to periodically turn on Channel 98 in order to watch the Master Management, Recreation, and Deerfield Commissioner’s meetings currently showing at 9:00 a.m., noon, and 3:00 p.m. They are working on repeating the broadcasts in the evenings and weekends. If you recently bought a new TV, it is necessary to run auto scan so that it will pick up Channel 98. If that still does not work, you will need to have a Comcast technician come to your unit. The election for Mayor of Deerfield Beach and Commissioner for District 3, which includes Century Village, will be held on March 10, 2009. Running for Mayor (in alphabetical order) are Caryl Berner, Albert R. Capellini, Donald L. Cleveland, C. Don Petersen, Jr., Peggy Noland, and Jean M. Robb. Running for Commissioner are Jurandir T. Albuquerque, Donna Capobianco, and Marty Popelsky. A large bus will be provided free of charge by Quality Coach, our transportation company, beginning at 9:00 a.m. the day of the elections so that residents can go directly to and from the Club House in order to vote. Typically, there is a low voter turnout for local elections, but given that the Commissioner represents us in Deerfield Beach, it should be every bit as important as our COOCVE elections. Mark the date on your calendar so you don’t forget to vote. Registered voters may also request an absentee ballot from the Board of Elections by calling 954-357-7055.


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Condo News Nobody Asked Me, But… By HARVEY BEABER Man! How time flies! The new calendar year 2009 is two months old already.

We have a new President of the good old USA, the honorable Barack Obama;

and he inherited a pack of economic troubles here. He is going to do a fantastic job

getting our great country straightened out, but it will take time – unfortunately, a lot of time. We all have to be patient and co-operative and accept certain ideas

and decisions. I am not any happier about it than you are, but we have to go along with him. I have confidence in him and his administration to do what is good and right for the citizens of America. God bless him and our country! In the meantime, don’t give up on the month of February. It is the reminder to us that the winter is shortly coming to an end. Fortunately, this winter was not too bad. Before we know it, the warm weather will be here and we’ll all be in the swimming pools! That’s really something to look forward too. Ah, yes! And don’t forget about our golf and tennis. Yes! We living here in CVE are a community of senior citizens, but we came here to continue to enjoy life and the month of February should be a favorite for us – remembering our youth, the good old working days, looking forward to the two Presidential holidays we got off; and the best thing in this month of February was St Valentine’s Day! Lover’s Day! Yeah! Those were the good old days! If nothing else, we can still remember them. Especially going to those romantic restaurants with that extra special person. Some of us are lucky enough to still have that extra special person with us now. Those of us that don’t, still have those beautiful special memories to fall back on. They will live forever, with us. We, here in CVE, are a very lucky community of senior citizens. Some of our areas are pushing 30 years of age; we have worn out many of our past leaders, but we have new, energetic people stepping forward to carry on and keep Century Village East the best darn condo to live in, in Broward County, Florida. Yeah! Yeah! I know, nobody asked me, but… God Bless America!!!


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Condo News Recreation’s Most Commonly Asked Questions By EVA RACHESKY Administration/Cen-Deer Communities Office I have been told that the monthly payment to Cen-Deer is for the Recreation Lease, but I have also heard that the money goes to Operations – which is correct? Both are correct. Your monthly recreation fee includes $44 that is for the operation of the Recreation facilities; the remainder of your payment covers the Recreation Lease. I received notice that there is a $2.00 increase in my payment to Cen-Deer. Why is there an increase? There have been increases in the cost of operating the Recreation facilities. Electricity has greatly increased; supplies, parts and equipment costs have also increased. The small increase in the CenDeer payment will help offset these increases. Staff Office What is the procedure for admitting speakers or entertainers to Club, Area or Building meetings in the Clubhouse? In order to have a speaker or entertainer admitted to the Clubhouse for a function, a Speaker Pass is needed. The Speaker Pass Form can be picked up, by a resident, from the Staff Office, filled out and returned. When the form is

returned, a Clubhouse Speaker Pass will be issued. It is the responsibility of the Club/ resident to provide the pass to their guest. They will also need to call Security at the Main Gate to have the person admitted into the Village. ID Department How can I show the Clubhouse to my family without buying a pass? All persons wishing to tour the Clubhouse must be accompanied by a resident. The tour should last no longer than one hour. The Resident’s ID must be left with the guard prior to the tour and picked up at the completion of the tour. Theater What is proper theater audience protocol? Leaving the theater prior to the end of the show is extremely rude and disruptive to the rest of the audience and to the performers. The buses have been asked to wait so that everyone will make it to their bus for the ride home. Also, theater attendees should turn off all pagers, watches with alarms, beepers and cell phones prior to the performance. Not only are these items disturbing to the audience and performers, but some electronic devices, especially those with radio

components, can cause interference with our performance sound system. Please refrain from calling out requests to the performers during the show. Also, please refrain from bringing in chewing gum, food and cigarette lighters into the theater. Athletic Department What is the proper footwear for the exercise and equipment area? It is very important that appropriate shoes be worn when doing any kind of exercise. Appropriate footwear would be tennis / athletic shoes with lace up or Velcro fastenings. Residents should not be wearing flip-flops, high heels, sandals, sneakers without backs or any other type of street shoe or boot. What are the hours that our guests can use the exercise facilities? We have recently adjusted the hours of use for guests during season. The new hours are 1:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. daily during season, which runs from November through March. Recreation Maintenance What happens when feces are found in the pool and how is the pool cleaned? When feces are found in the pool, health regulations and common sense dictates

the pool be closed immediately. As soon as possible, the Recreation Pool Maintenance Staff will come to the pool and remove the matter from the water. At that point, they will begin to treat the water by adding chemicals. This is referred to as Shock Treatment. The water has to be shocked with an extremely strong dose of chemicals to ensure that no bacteria remain from the feces; in addition, the pool filters are also cycling the water, assisting in the cleaning and disinfecting process. Because of the strong chemical dose, the pool must remain closed for 24 hours. After that time, the pool is once again safe for swimmers to enter and enjoy the water. Class Office How do I register for Defensive Driving? Registration must be in person at the Class Office, and you will need your driver’s license and your CVE ID card to register. The Defensive Driving Class is offered monthly and consists of a two-day course held on successive Wednesdays. Registration is accepted for the current month only. AARP requires that the payment for this course must be by check only; couples taking the course must pay by separate checks. Evening/Weekend Staff Office How late is the Staff Office and Clubhouse open? The evening staff covers the

Staff Office and Clubhouse activities scheduled weekdays from 5:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. and on the weekends, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. The indoor pool, locker rooms and exercise rooms are closed at 9:00 p.m. to enable cleaning staff to restore the rooms to order before the building closes for the evening. Residents will generally have access to most other areas of the Clubhouse until approximately 10:30-10:45 p.m., when the Security staff starts to check on the rooms and lock them up for the overnight hours. Ticket Office When can we purchase tickets for a guest or a companion? There are three ways to purchase tickets for a guest. 1) If you have a single Guest Pass on the back of your CVE ID card, you can buy a ticket for your guest when they go on sale each month, without the guest being present. Note: If you do not have this option on your ID card, you must first purchase a Guest Pass (with the guest present) at the ID Office. 2) Present CVE Guest Pass at ticket window no more than three business days before the show. 3) Present CVE Guest Pass at ticket window one hour before the show.

Fire Walls – Class Action Lawsuit

COOCVE Committee Volunteers Needed

By JUDY OLMSTEAD

By CHARLES K. PARNESS

On Monday, January 26, 2009, Joseph D. Garrity, Esquire, and Suzanne Weiss, Esquire, of the firm of GarrityWeiss, P.A., met with boards and unit owners of garden style associations to discuss the ongoing class action lawsuit against the Comcast cable company. The Garrity-Weiss firm specializes in construction defect litigation. A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of Ventnor B and other garden associations arising from the holes made in the fire walls in attics when the cable wire was originally installed. A lawsuit has been filed and the 120 day discovery allowed in Federal Court has now passed. Mr. Garrity intends to file a motion to have the lawsuit certified as a class action. He will be sending out notices to all garden associations offering them the opportunity to opt in to the class action. He is having problems identifying the current presidents and board members, so, if you are interested, you can contact him at 561-470-6381. His email address is jgarrity@gwlawfirm.

net. He estimates the cost of repair at between $5,000.00 and $10,000.00 per fire wall because of the current code requirements. His fee will be 40% of a verdict or settlement plus expenses, which includes the costs of experts. For more information, contact Mr. Garrity or Ms. Weiss.

Every year, the President of COOCVE selects volunteers to serve on eight standing committees. It is these committees that share in the running of our Village. Please lend your knowledge and/ or experience and/or education for the betterment of your community. Sign-up sheets will be available at the COOCVE Office, Monday

through Thursday. The hours are 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon and 12:30 to 3:00 p.m. Additional sign-up sheets will be available at the COOCVE Board of Directors meeting in the Clubhouse Party Room at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, February 17, 2009. You can volunteer for more than one committee. The following lists the name and a brief description

of the function of each committee: ADVISORY: Advisory capacity for COOCVE, member associations and unit owners; seek and recommend retention of counsel and their advice, when necessary. AUDIT: Need accounting background or CPA firm experience; responsible for producing an Annual Report. BUDGET AND FINANCE: Responsible for financial structure and budget preparation. BYLAWS: Review bylaws and proposed amendments; propose amendments. CIVIC AND CULTURAL: Civic activities (local, county, state) of a non-partisan political matter. GRIEVANCE: Process grievances against COOCVE directors, area chairs or officers. INSURANCE: Counsel and advice on all phases of insurance for COOCVE, member associations and unit owners. CONTRACT NEGOTIATION: Review all contracts, new or a renewal, and negotiate contracts.


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Condo News When Will Giovanni’s Reopen? By JUDY OLMSTEAD After speaking to John Giovanni and Sherri Mansell, Chief Financial Officer for Fairways Investors who are the current owners of the golf course, it appears that the restaurant will not reopen this season. It will be at least eight to twelve weeks, exclusive of any permit delays, to complete the reconstruction. This is because the walls will need to be knocked down in order to bring the building up to code, with hurricane-proof windows required as well. As reported in the August issue of the Reporter, an elderly resident lost control of his vehicle and literally drove through the restaurant on August 24, 2008. It was originally believed that the driver’s automobile insurance would be sufficient to cover the cost of repair and replacement needed to reopen the restaurant. State Farm Insurance Company obtained engineering and architectural plans and an estimate from an approved contractor, giving everyone hope of a speedy rebuild. Within two weeks, John Giovanni also obtained estimates to support his claim for damages. As it turned out, the driver had inadequate

limits to cover the damages that he caused; and John had allowed his insurance to lapse. Because of the loss of income to John, the claim only continues to grow. But now that Fairways’ carrier has approved reconstruction, repairs should commence as soon as permits are obtained from the city. John and his family are paying a hefty price for the accident that damaged the structure and nearly killed or injured his wife and daughter. Since the accident, John has been hospitalized for high blood pressure and complications from diabetes. All of this, he relates to the stress of losing his sole source of income after the closing of the restaurant. Although the insurance company for the golf course was immediately put on notice of the accident, the claim was not submitted to them until it was determined that neither John nor the golf course could settle with State Farm because of the inadequate coverage. The insurance company for the golf course had to approve Fairways’ claim for property damage and then a settlement will be reached between Fairways, John Giovanni and State

Farm. The owners of the golf course, who had a longterm lease with Giovanni, fully intend to repair the building and feel that it is also in their best interest for a restaurant to reopen as quickly as possible. In the interim, they have tables and chairs outside the Pro Shop where coffee, soft drinks, beer and grilled hot dogs and hamburgers are available to residents of the Village. While they cannot, and do not intend to, take the place of a full-service restaurant, they are open to suggestions from our residents on other items that can be served to fill the gap until construction is completed. If Century Village residents would like to be able to stop before or after activities at the Clubhouse for pastries or bagels or have other ideas, there is a suggestion box at the Pro Shop. The golf course will try to increase their offerings as a temporary measure. While John and his family are suffering the most because they are out of business during the winter season, it is believed that the restaurant will reopen this summer and be available to everyone next year.

Income Tax Assistance by Appointment Federal income tax assistance in the preparation of 2008 tax returns will again be sponsored by AARP TAXAIDE in conjunction with the IRS program, Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE). This free service will be available at the Clubhouse by appointment only in the Party Room every Monday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. beginning February 2, 2009 – April 13, 2009. Appointments can be made for any Monday in the Staff Office starting Monday, January 5, 2009 and daily thereafter. When coming to have your tax return prepared,

please bring all necessary information and fill in as much of the return as possible. 1. List dividends and interest received on Schedule B. 2. If you are not using the standard deduction then itemize deductions on Schedule A. 3. List capital gains and losses and capital gains distributions on Schedule D. 4. Bring all forms, 1099s and your social security report for the previous year. 5. Be sure to bring your copy of last year’s tax return.

Do you work? Need a bar code? Call I.D. office or COOCVE for an appointment.


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Phyllis’ kitchen By PHYLLIS PISTOLIS

Phyllis’

Kitchen HORSERADISH STEAK (4 Servings) 1 ¼ lb. Boneless Round Steak ½ cup All Purpose Flour ½ tsp. Salt ½ tsp. Pepper ¼ cup Vegetable Oil 1 cup Water ¼ cup Prepared Horseradish Cut steak into serving size pieces. Combine flour, salt and pepper to coat the steak. Brown in hot oil. Add water. Top each piece of steak with horseradish, cover, turn down heat and simmer 45 minutes. PEANUT BUTTER PUFFS (12 Cookies) 1 Egg White 6 Tbsp Sugar Dash Salt ¼ Cup Peanut Butter Beat egg white with salt till soft peaks form. Gradually add sugar, beating till soft peaks form. Stir in peanut butter. Drop from teaspoon one inch apart on greased cookie sheet. Bake 325 degrees for 18 minutes until lightly browned. Cool slightly before removing from pan.

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FEBRUARY 2009

Consumer Interest “Ask Lori…Parrish on Appraisal”

Broward County Property Appraiser Lori Parrish Answers Your Questions… Help Us Complete Your Residential Property Survey Dear Lori, Our family received your News for Broward Taxpayers Newsletter with the 2009 Homestead Exemption renewal mailing. On the back of the newsletter is a residential property survey your office wants us to complete. Why is this survey so important? J. H., Pembroke Pines, FL The Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office is continuing to upgrade our Computer Assisted Mass Appraisal (CAMA) system to better serve the taxpayers. We are requesting your assistance in updating our property records. We are transitioning from a rather antiquated system which never tracked physical details of properties such as the number of bedrooms and bathrooms, carport and garage spaces, pools, etc. If you received our newsletter in the mail with your Homestead renewal notice, you have the option of completing this quick survey online at www.bcpa.net/survey using

I strongly urge you to complete this special residential survey. Please take a few minutes to help ensure our records about your property are accurate. While completing the property survey is purely voluntary, any assistance you provide will help ensure you pay no more than your fair share of taxes. the PIN number printed on your renewal receipt. If you do not have a PIN number or you do not have a home computer, you must use the printed form to participate. Please see the back page of our newsletter if you’d prefer to respond using the printed form. However, the online form is the quickest to complete. Be sure to look up your property on our website as we’ve added more building sketches. Just click on the blue “See Sketch” link on the lower right-hand side of the property record page – and please call 954.357.6831, if you see any errors in the sketch of your home.

If you have any questions about this survey, please contact our Residential Appraisal Division at 954.357.6831 or email jchesler@bcpa.net. IMPORTANT: If you previously completed this survey, you do not need to resubmit it this year. Thank you in advance for all your help in making our office even better. Sincerely, Lori Parrish, CFA If you have a question for Lori, please call her office at 954-357-6904, or email her at Lori @bcpa.net or write to her at the Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office, 115 South Andrews Avenue, Room 111, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301.

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My presence in the Village The topic of the upcoming workshop is Coral Reefs, presented by Troy Craig, with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Coral Reef Conservation Program and Southeast Coral Reef Initiative. Mr. Craig will talk about the reefs off South Florida and Deerfield’s beaches, the benefits they provide and how we can ensure that these natural wonders can be enjoyed by current and future generations. Light refreshments will be served. Free. Residential Paper Shredding Event Sat., Feb. 14, 10 AM - Noon Recycling Drop-Off Center, 401 SW 4 St. Call for cost. CHECKS ONLY for under 10 boxes/ bags For more information, call

954-480-1420 62nd Annual Founders’ Days Join us for Founders’ Days, February 12-15, held on Ocean Way, (SE 21st Ave.), on beautiful Deerfield Beach, between Hillsboro Blvd. and SE 2nd St. In addition to arts and crafts and food vendors, the event includes a Saturday morning parade and bed race, auto and motorcycle shows, a family carnival, live entertainment all weekend and a grand fireworks display Saturday, February 14 at 9 PM. This year’s theme is Under the Sea. Entertainment on Friday night will be the ORIGINAL RHONDELS at 7 PM, followed with a headline concert at 9 PM by the LEGENDS OF SURF MUSIC with Al Jardine, original member of the Beach Boys, Dean Torrence, original member of Jan and Dean and the Surf City Allstars, former touring musi-

cians with The Beach Boys. There will also be a full lineup of entertainment all day Saturday and Sunday. FREE trolley service to and from the festival, with FREE parking available at the Cove Shopping Center and St. Ambrose Church For more information, call 954-480-4433 or visit www.foundersdays.com. Remember that I am your only full time Commissioner. I am always there to assist you in any way I can. Call me any time. I will be glad to help you resolve your problems. City Office Phone: 954-480-4218 City Assistant Phone 954-480-4263 Home Phone: 954-427-7272 Regards & Good Health Marty Popelsky Your District 3 Commissioner

offset drastic cuts during the regular Legislative Session. During the Special Session, I introduced a bi-partisan resolution on the floor of the Senate expressing solidarity with Israel and supporting the right of Israel to defend itself from attacks by Hamas. The resolution, sponsored in the House by Majority Leader Adam Hasner was supported by all members of the Florida

Legislature. As the attacks in Gaza escalated over the past month, we are reminded that we must continue to offer support to those who fight terrorists around the world. In my first session as a Senator, I sponsored the Protecting Florida’s Investments Act, which led to the divestment of some $1 billion of Florida’s pension funds from companies engaging in business with Iran. It is vital, now more than ever, that we send a message to the government of Iran that the State of

Florida will not support the development of a nuclear weapons program. This year, Representative Hasner and I will sponsor legislation that will ease the process for cities and counties also wanting to divest. I will also continue to work with other states who wish to follow Florida’s lead in divestment. I encourage you to share your thoughts with me on these issues, or any issues facing the Florida Legislature by contacting Deutch.Ted.Web@ flsenate.gov.

By MARTY POPELSKY, Commissioner District 3 This week at City Hall an historic event took place. The three remaining votes on the commission had to pick temporary commissioners from two districts. The Mayor was removed by the Governor and a commissioner resigned. I take a firm stand on ethics and the need to enforce them strictly. With that in mind I submitted the Broward County code of ethics to the city attorney to review with the intent of getting them adopted as soon as possible. Credentials that are real and can be verified are important tools in selection of our commissioners. Some people buy credentials on line from unaccredited Universities instead of earning them. Look carefully and ask questions. Some well meaning candi-

dates have too much to do with other agendas to serve your needs. UPCOMING CITY EVENTS Environmental Education Series - Coral Reef Talk Feb. 7, 9 AM International Fishing Pier, 200 NE 21st Ave. For more information, call 954-426-9206

From the Senate By TED DEUTCH This past month, I traveled to Tallahassee to tackle the $2.3 billion dollar budget shortfall facing the state of Florida. My colleagues and I worked to find ways to reduce spending, without severely damaging vital programs and services. I am deeply concerned about the impact these cuts could have on public education and healthcare, and I am hopeful we might also examine new

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Once Upon a Time… By HERB CHARATZ

For 16 years, Sandy and I lived in a two-family house; we were downstairs and her parents lived upstairs. Sandy was teaching just a few blocks away. She was teaching the sixth grade and had a unique relationship with her students and with the other children in the school. Those who knew her and called her Sandy, either as a neighbor, or as the mother of Renee and Debra, before she became a teacher in their school, were permitted to continue calling her by her first name after school hours. During school hours, she was Mrs. Charatz to all. During the week, when her day had ended, Sandy would come straight home

to be there for her family. On Fridays, however, it was a different story. Since the girls did not have to do homework, they were permitted to go upstairs where Nana would be putting the finishing touches on the special Friday night dinner to welcome the Sabbath. Poppy would close his kosher butcher store very early, and it was a treat for them to have this extra time with him. Sandy, on the other hand, made very good use of this time, shopping or whatever. This particular Friday, she decided to catch up on work in her classroom. There were bulletin boards to change and decorations

for the season to display. She could not complete the work she planned to do on the walls until she sat at her desk cutting, pasting and preparing. She was totally engrossed in her art work and did not realize how early it got dark, at that time of the year, until she happened to glance at the window and saw that it was dark – real dark. When she looked at the clock, she was shocked to see that it was almost six o’clock. She realized that she had not intended to stay that long, had not said anything to her parents about being late, and she was now causing them unnecessary worry about her. She

quickly gathered her things and closed the light in her room – total, total blackness. She opened the door to the hallway – total, total blackness. The only thing she could see in the distance,at the end of the hallway, was a dull, eerie red light, which at closer range indicated the word Exit. She held one hand on the wall and inched her way down, literally unable to see her own hand in front of her. Sandy was extra, super careful walking down from the fourth floor to the first, thinking how disastrous it would be if she fell and broke a leg in this situation! She finally made her way to the front door which

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was open from the inside but would lock behind her if she stepped outside. She thought she was finally safe until she saw that the gate was locked – an iron gate about six feet tall and topped off with another foot of spikes! In the meantime, back at the house, we were very upset. I suggested that perhaps there was something doing at the school which she had forgotten to tell us about. The only way to find out was to go to the school, and that’s what my father-in-law and I did. We didn’t tell my mother-in-law or my daughters but Dad and I were checking every alley we passed on our way, thinking she was a possible victim of a mugging. When we arrived at the school, it was completely dark. We were about to turn around but something compelled us to walk around the block and in the darkness, we almost missed her peering out from a crack in the door! We assured her she could let go of the door and that we would somehow rescue her. I went home to return with a ladder, certain to rescue my princess – but after lifting it over the gate to her side, and having her ascend, it would be a job for her to climb over the spikes and then what??? How would she get down??? We saw two youngsters walking down the street. Sandy’s first impulse was to get down off the ladder and hide, but it was too late. They were boys from her class and one was already saying, “Hi Sandy.” Then the other boy chimed in, “Hi Sandy.” “Hey,” the first boy said, “You can’t call her Sandy. You didn’t know her before she was a teacher in our school.” “Oh yeah, sorry. Hi Mrs. Charatz.” Sandy greeted them and asked them to approach her. She explained that she was busy fixing up the classroom and got locked in the building. Could they please help, if their parents had a ladder we could use? “Sure, my dad has a ladder. We’ll be right back!” Needless to say, they returned with the second ladder: our rescue was complete. Mrs. Charatz told the boys that she was afraid the principal might be cross with her for staying so late at the school. The boys quickly explained to my dad and me that they had the nicest looking classroom in the whole school and said she was the best teacher in the school. They told her not to worry, they would never tell anyone what happened. And they didn’t.


FEBRUARY 2009

A.P. Appetizing & Pickle Barrels By JACK GALIT Whenever I order a delivery from the Pickle Barrel deli, I get a mental picture of the pickle barrels in A.P. Appetizing Store on E. 10 Street on the outer limit of the east side of New York City during the 1920s. These barrels were uncovered, usually located near the door, so that customers could reach into the ones marked Sour, Half Sour. I saw many customers handle more than one before picking out their choice(s). Not a very healthy process but the thinking was that the acids in each barrel would clean off the hands before the next pick. In those days people didn’t think of calling the Health Department about this situation. Beside, the telephone was only known to be inside a telephone booth inside the corner drug store where the druggist allowed young messengers to call residents to the phone in order to get the two to three cent tip from the person called. A nickel tip was unusual. Residents assumed that the owners of the appetizing store, Alter and his wife Esther who were known to be kosher, were therefore handling the merchandise in a hygienic way. Their store was a secondary hangout for neighborhood children. We were friends of their youngsters with whom we associated on Saturday and Sunday evenings; more so in the summer months. However, Goldberg’s candy store across the street was our primary hangout. The owner’s son, Harry, helped his folks, thereby enabling them to rest during evenings and weekend afternoons. Their son, Moish, helped his adopted sister Ida, who was actually his cousin. Ida relieved the Goldbergs on their time off, working behind the counter. She did not slice lox, sable, sturgeon or other smoked fish but handled all the other products. Alter P. and Esther did all the slicing and their busiest hours were Fridays until 3-4 p.m. and Sunday mornings. Alter was a reserved type, but Esther was the heart of the business. She was a dynamic personality, business wise, interactive with customers who really appreciated the attention this reddish blond beautiful woman showed them over and

beyond the sale. The scoop among the Yiddish-speaking neighbors (who didn’t realize I understood) was that Esther’s older sister, the doyenne of that family, had set up her sister in that business as Alter wasn’t much of a wage earner. (She also had arranged for the adoptions of Ida, two brothers and herself, due to the need to find a home for another sister’s children because of some tragedy.) This older sister owned a large Linens & Things type store located near East Broadway and Grand Street in lower Manhattan, that did a fine wholesale and retail business. I met Ida’s older brother Hoo-

ney, who eventually managed the business, and also met a younger brother. It was from this relationship that I gained three undershirts, three shorts, three pairs of socks presented to me by Ida, as my Bar Mitzvah gift, which came from that store. A. P. Appetizing was a socializing center until the family moved to E. Harlem where they lived above an expanded appetizing store. The pickled peppers belonged in #2. The store was open on the Sabbath as it was located in an Italian neighborhood. I lost touch afterwards.

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1 Bed / 1 Bath – Garden Apt Westbury G – All tile, next to pool, walk to plaza……………………………..………… $37,000.00 Keswick A – Cozy, first floor, beautiful view of foliage from patio…………..…….…….$34,900.00 Durham G _ One bedroom, first floor, on water……………………………………………$33,000.00 Wesbury A – furnished garden, near Century Plaza………………………………………..$31,500.00 Tilford X – One bedroom garden, furnished on lagoon…………………………………….$32,500.00 Tilford E – Renovated one bedroom, unfurnished …………………………………………$39,995.00 Ventnor F – First floor one bedroom garden………………………………………………..$29,500.00 Ventnor I - All tile, encl patio with hurricane impacted windows………………………..$34,000.00 1 Bed / 1.5 Baths Oakridge C – 18” diagonal tile, newer appliances, clean………………………………….$47,900.00 Cambridge F – Includes Piano, all tile, many extras………………………………………$60,000.00 Westbury F – Fabulous water view, extra large 1 bedroom deluxe……..………………...$59,900.00 Durham P – A nice area. Walk to pool and clubhouse……………………………………......$37,000.00 Lyndhurst M – Tile & Wood flooring, Newer appliances, encl patio...………………….$73,000.00 Westbury E – Best condition for least amount of money………………………………….$39,995.00 Markham H – Remodeled, ceramic tile, first floor……………………………………….$49,900.00 Westbury E – Pleasant, first floor, newly painted…………………………………………$39,900.00 Newport N – Beige Carpet, Great view, unfurnished ……………………………………..$52,000.00 Newport Q – Galley kitchen, new carpet, encl patio…………….…………………..……..$49,900.00 Westbury K- Garden one bedroom, 1.5 bath, first floor, unfurnished………………...….$44,990.00 Ellesmere B – One bedroom deluxe, on the golfcourse…………………….………………$51,900.00 Ellesmere A – One bedroom, carpet, on golfcourse……………..………………………….$55,000.00 Oakridge O – One bedroom garden with wood floors…………………………..…………$35,000.00 Berkshire B – Attractive apartment ready to move into……………………………………$50,000.00 Berkshire B – Updated gourmet style kitchen, Exquisite furnishings……………………..$70,000.00 Newport S – Beautiful water view from patio, galley kitchen…………………………….$59,900.00 Cambridge E – Magnificent water view, not to be missed, across from clubhouse………$55,000.00 Ventnor M – Totally remodeled, first floor unit, large tile throughout……………………$39,999.00 2 Bed / 1.5 Baths Swansea B – 1,000 SqFt, Encl porch, new A/C, New Roof………………………………..$59,900.00 Markham R – Plenty of sunshine, cheerful, priced to sell, bring offers…………………...$59,900.00 Farnham P – First floor, corner, new cabinets, shows well …………………………….…$59,500.00 Keswick B – Cottage quaint, corner, remodeled, on golf-course………………………….$69,900.00 Upminster M – Two bedroom, near pool and plaza………………………………………..$69,000.00 Richmond D – Two bedroom, second floor, corner ………………………………………..$69,000.00 Tilford C - Furnished garden, near Powerline Road, on lagoon……………………….$62,500.00 Westbury D – Clean garden apartment, Walk to Plaza……………………………………..$59,900.00 Westbury D – Completely remodeled porch, walk to Century Plaza ………………..…….$59,900.00 Tilford H – Corner, first floor unit with a great water view, encl patio…………………….$65,000.00 Berkshire A – Extremely well located near pool, plaza & clubhouse…………………..…..$72,500.00 Oakridge A – First floor corner, with the most beautiful lake view from patio……………..$75,000.00 Cambridge F – Second floor deluxe apt, with a magnificent lake view…………………….$59,900.00 2 Beds / 2 Baths Oakridge D – Newly renovated, with wood cabinets & Granite tops in kitchen……….…$98,000.00 Oakridge U – 1100 SqFt, luxury, magnificent lake view…………………….………….$129,000.00 Richmond C – Two bedroom luxury, located near military trail entrance…………..…..$110,000.00 Richmond F – Two bedroom luxury, with fantastic golf view………………..……………$85,000.00 Keswick C – Two bedroom luxury, first floor, near clubhouse, golf course view…..……..$110,000.00 Keswick C – Luxury two bedroom, near clubhouse, near golfcourse……………………..$122,000.00


FEBRUARY 2009

The Girls That Glowed is credited with assisting her discoveries. Having not realized the toxicity of radium, she developed radiation syndrome, and in1934 died of complications from radium poisoning She won the Nobel Prize for her pioneering work. This story is not finished yet, as I discovered that the Environmental Protection Agency, to this day, is still attempting to decontaminate the two acres where the factory stood, as well as thirty-seven homes in West Orange, Montclair, and Glen Ridge, possibly the homes of ex-employees of U.S. Radium.

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Trees

By JERRY WOLF

For my Bar Mitzvah, in 1936, I received a wristwatch. It didn’t keep good time, but it had a distinctive charm as the numbers lit up in the darkness. Always a fire eater, I held it under the covers at night and fantasized that I was an infantry captain, planning a night advance, coordinated by a luminous timepiece and directed by a compass that had illuminated points. I didn’t know then that my watch, and thousands like it, had brought suffering and heartache upon so many young women who were hired for their delicate hands, which could apply undark paint which was produced by the U.S. Radium Company, whose main plant was in Orange, New Jersey. In the twenties and thirties, radium was not considered dangerous, until several of the girls began losing their teeth, and their jaw bones became brittle and porous. Later on blood problems developed, and the cause and effects became obvious. To make matters worse, some of the women painted their teeth and fingernails so that they could entertain their boyfriends when the lights went out. At work, painting the numbers on the watch faces was routine, but painting the number eight was tricky, until the supervisors recommended getting a fine point on their brushes by using their lips and tongues. Eventually there were lawsuits, with the result that each affected woman, still living, was awarded $10,000 dollars from the U.S. Radium Co. (This is the equivalent of $100,000 in today’s money.) Marie Curie pioneered the discoveries in radium. Today, x-rays are given routinely by doctors and dentists all over the world. Marie Curie noted that dense material such as bones and metal photographed darker than surrounding material. She married Pierre Curie who

CVE REPORTER

By SARAH S. FRIEDMAN The recent feature article about Trees by Aviva Ravel brought back many memories. When I was a high school student, I spent some time visiting friends in Newburyport, MA. While there, I was able to look through one of their student journals and was amazed to find the whole issue filled with amended versions of Joyce Kilmer’s poem—probably a class assignment. Intrigued by the idea, I submitted my own adaptation as a composition in my English class. I can remember only the first verse: I think that I shall never see

A person with a lovely knee One that is all filled with dimples One that is all free of pimples. The teacher, who was head of the department, gave me an “A”. A friend requested my essays so he could use them in his class. He offered my Kilmer poem and was promptly given an “F” with a great deal of castigation for desecrating this sacred piece of literature. His teacher also taught French and was known for easily giving out “double A’s” in that subject. Many years later in my

married adult life, our family moved to New Brunswick, N.J., which I discovered was the home and museum of Joyce Kilmer and whose chief tourist attraction was the original tree. Civic and school tributes to the home-town hero were frequent. While there, a heated controversy arose about saving the tree, which was slowly dying. It finally had to be done. A chain saw was used to destroy it while residents rushed to retrieve even a small piece of the tree as a memento. After several moves, I have to admit that our piece was somewhere lost along the way.


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My Unfriendly Donna By JACK SHULMAN

It was a beautiful day before Labor Day, September 1960. All vacationers were leaving after their summer hiatus, cleaning out their bungalows of waste and household items that they had no use for. We were regular homesteaders, and we were planning for the next day which was the start of school for our three children. The radio and television announced that Hurricane Donna might hit Long Island, NY. Sherry, my oldest, was attending school at Far Rockaway High School. My other daughter, Elsa, at Cordoza Junior High School, was to be bussed from about two miles away. My son, Larry, was in

kindergarten at the school only a few blocks away. As it was the first day of school, my children were dressed in their new clothes. When they went to school, the sun was shining and all was quiet. By 10:00 a.m., the clouds rolled in and it started to rain with a light wind. We were living in Rockaway which is a peninsula one-half mile wide, the bay on one side, the ocean on the other. By 11:30 a.m., the ocean and the bay became one. All the streets flooded, and the debris was floating through them. The lights and power failed. My first thought was my children. The only communication was the telephone. I called Cordoza Junior

High School regarding my daughter Elsa. The school was in the lowland area, and I was most concerned. We were told that they may bus them back during the eye of the storm. During the height of the hurricane, I decided to pick up Larry, trying to get there through my neighbor’s backyards and taking a rope so that I could tie him to my back. Water in the streets was three to four feet deep with muck and mire. Some of the electric and telephone lines were down. When it concerns your family, you forget that you may get electrocuted from live wires. When I got to his classroom, the teacher was trying to calm the children who were crying. Being so close to the school, the teacher allowed me to take Larry home. The wind and the hard rain made it almost impossible to walk just a few hundred yards, especially through the mud in the neighbors’ yards but I finally made it. My wife was sure happy to see us back home safely. Without electricity, we had no refrigeration; our food was taking a healthy beating. We knew that we would not have electricity for a few days so we tried to cook up the food that would spoil. By early afternoon, the storm seemed to have ended and the sun came up. Nobody believed that there was a storm, but the streets had six to eight feet of water on them. This is the behavior of a hurricane. Cordoza High School called to tell us that Elsa’s bus would drop the children at the high point of the area, which is a service station five blocks from our home. I grabbed a vinyl air mattress, blew air into it and decided to get Elsa. I swam on the mattress through the main street. I saw a door floating, grabbed it and put it on the mattress; it looked like a float. Elsa and a friend were standing on the car lift at the garage. I came over to the lift so Elsa and her friend could get on. When Elsa stepped on in the middle and sat down, her friend stepped on the side; the back end went down, and we all landed in the water. The mattress did the trick; we all held on to it and got home safe. Sherry was no problem; she slept at one of her friend’s house and was safe. We weathered the storm.


FEBRUARY 2009

The Customer Is Always Right By NELIA PANZA

After graduating from Theodore Roosevelt High School, in the Bronx, I was finding it quite difficult to find employment because I was only 16 years old. I was absolutely thrilled, therefore, when I was hired by Macy’s on 34th Street, in Manhattan, during the Christmas season. I was trained as a teller and worked in the D.A. Department (Depositor’s Account.) When the period of employment ended, right after the holidays, I was asked if I would be interested in full-time work. I was overjoyed! I thought I would continue as a teller in the D.A. Department, but I was told I would be assigned to work in the repair shop. “What would I be required to do there?” I asked. “Well, customers will be coming in for repairs to be done on their irons, broilers, vacuum cleaners, and so forth.” “But I don’t know anything about those things!” I wailed. “All you have to do is write a note, listing the customer’s complaint, than take the item and the note to the repairmen in the department and he will take it from there. Okay?” “Okay,” I replied. I needed that job so badly, I’d try anything!” As customers came to my counter with irons, vacuum cleaners, electric ovens, etc. informing me of their problems, I would make a note of their complaint, then take that and their item into the repair shop, which was directly behind me. After giving a brief description of the customer’s complaint, Andy, the repairman, would examine the item, come out to speak personally with the customer and explain what had to be done and what the charge would be. It was a pleasant, easy job and I loved it, especially since Andy, a Scotsman, had such a terrific sense of humor. It was a joy to work with him. I had been there for several months, when, shortly after a holiday season, a woman came to my counter. Banging her fist on the counter, she screamed, “Where the hell is everybody? Maybe if there were some live bodies with brains around, things would work the way they were meant to!” “How may I help you?” I asked. “You can’t do a damn thing for me! I want to talk to the repairman—now!!!’ “Well, if you give me an

idea of what’s wrong with your vacuum cleaner, I can pass that information on to the repairman, then he’ll discuss it with you.” “I ain’t telling you anything! Get me the repairman, NOW and I’ll tell him myself! Move it!” I knew better then to argue with her, so I went to the repair shop area, behind my counter and gave Andy a brief description of what had occurred. “Well, I can see this is going to be fun, so I’ll handle it personally,” he replied, with a smile. I followed him out to the counter, and, approaching the customer, Andy asked, “What seems to be the problem, madam ?” “This so-called vacuum cleaner doesn’t pick up a damn thing! How am I supposed to clean my rugs with this piece of crap?” she screamed. “Well, just let me examine it first, then we can discuss what the problem might be,” he answered. As she handed him the vacuum cleaner, he peeked into the hose attached to it, and winked at me, as he took it into his repair shop. A short time later, he came out, pulling the vacuum along, and carrying the hose. He approached the customer, and handing her the hose, said, “The reason the vacuum isn’t picking up what’s on the carpet is because it’s completely stuffed with other matter.” “What are you implying?” she yelled. “The hose is blocked with all the matter picked up from the rug and the air can’t get through to pick up

what’s still there, “he replied. “Are you calling me a slob?” she screamed. “No, madam, I’m just saying there’s no room for anything to get through the hose and into the bag, it’s already stuffed.” All of a sudden, she pulled the hose from his hand, swung it at his head, cutting his cheek with the rim of the hose. As he felt and saw the blood on his face, and streaming down his shirt, he automatically put one hand in front of his face, while with the other, pushed her away. At that point, she started screaming, “He’s trying to kill me! Help me!” As the customers clustered around them, she grabbed the hose and struck him, over and over again, with all her might! By now, his cheek and nose had been

CVE REPORTER

slashed by the metal and were bleeding profusely, while she continued screaming, “Look what he’s doing to me! This man’s a nut! Help me! Call the police!” The supervisor and nearby sales people ran to us, trying to help calm her down, but she was a mad dog and poor Andy was on the floor, bleeding from his face, neck and arms. All of a sudden, the manager and the guard in our area, ran over to them, trying to calm the mad woman, while Andy kept losing his balance while trying to get to his feet. Our medic was called, and, as he tried to calm this mad woman, she swung the vacuum hose with all her might, hitting him on the side of his head, knocking him out. Thankfully, someone had called the police and Andy was escorted to an ambulance, while the customer was taken to the manager’s

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office, since she refused to go to the hospital. She wanted her own doctor to take care of her. She was escorted to our medical office and treated there until a family member came to the area to pick her up and take her to a “real” doctor. When Andy returned to the shop, several hours later, his supervisor approached him and said, “You can go home now, Andy, and when you feel up to it, you’d better start looking for another job. You’re fired!” “But why? She started this whole thing, I had no choice but to defend myself!” “There’s nothing more to discuss. Good-bye.” As Andy walked away, my heart went out to him. He was a hard worker and a fine man. But, he no longer had a job! And why? “Because the customer is always right!”


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CVE REPORTER

FEBRUARY 2009

Sounding Board The Art of a Friend

Obituaries

By SHELLY BASKIN

By GLORIA OLMSTEAD

Many of us from New Jersey were transplants from New York City or Brooklyn. The Garden State was also the friendly State. Most friends were “a dime a dozen.” Good friends might have been “two for a dollar,” but true friends are priceless. This issue has been much discussed and opinions thrown about. Articles on this subject abound, and there are books galore on the subject. We all had our share of friends and friendly people in the North. They were all

over and all around. It was nice! It was fun! As we advance in age, slightly, I feel friends are more important than ever. We look to them for advice and maybe a ride or two. We look for them to fill up a few spaces at our restaurant outings. We look to them to keep us company at the movies. Mostly, we are happy when we are asked to “fill in at their table,” especially for a good home-cooked meal. I found that here in the Village, good and true friends are not rare but are

everywhere. I found that this is the place to be in retirement. It is not only in the building or at the synagogue that friends are evident. Nor are friends only found at the pool or in different clubs. To me, the old saying still rings true. That is “to have a friend, you must be a friend.” Each of us must be out there and aware of our surroundings. “A friend in need is a friend indeed,” was stated by each of our mothers many times over. What is a friend? We each have our own definition. Mine has become more evident in the past few years. The most interesting part of living here in Century Village is schmoozing with neighbors and new friends from everywhere— Canada, Israel, Oregon, Michigan and of course, New York, New Jersey and especially Long Island. Over the years, friends were close and just down the block or across the street. Friends were a bike ride away or a trolley ride to the next section of town. They were a short walk or skate ride from home. To me, loyalty is right up there. Do you dismiss someone because he or she has a different thought? To me, a friend is family. They know your grandchildren’s names and you know theirs. When their family visits, it is as though you are almost as happy to see them as your own flesh and blood. To me, caring is sharing your thoughts, your pain, your ideas, your lunch and even your kitchen. A true friend cares. To me, a friend can never be too bothered enough not to be helpful. To me, we must give more than we receive because it is better to do so. Did you read the Good Book lately? In Century, as we are winding our years down, it is especially heart warming and delightful to count many people as friends, people from all walks of life, people from everywhere that did everything. Some give us their experiences with such vivid mind pictures that we may feel we were there with them in that time and place. Whatever it will be – we are here, we are now, we are alive! Open your hearts and a next good friend can be nearby – even in your own building.

In Loving Memory Asofsky

Jerry Asofsky passed away in December, 2008. Jerry was a stalwart in the battle to reform CVE.

Difilippo

Phil Difilippo passed away on January 7, 2009. He is survived by his wife Carol, daughters Debra and Nancy, son Curtis and four grandchildren, Crystal, Chelsea, Emily and Cailyn. He lived in Markham R.

Leibowitz

Harvey Leibowitz passed away on January 21, 2009. He is survived by his wife Susan, daughter Paige, son Leslie

02/28/09

and four grandchildren, William, Jonathan, Jordan and Jagger. Harvey was the Supervisor of Security at Century Village. He lived in Markham K.

Shevelove

George Shevelove recently passed away. He was a contributor to the Reporter. He lived at Prescott M. Please submit your announcements to CVE Reporter, Attention: Gloria Olmstead. She can be reached at 954-480-2653.


FEBRUARY 2009

CVE REPORTER

Beware of Alligators, For Many Reasons! By NORMAN L. BLOOM This is an unusual fish story for you. Early in January of this year, their Uncle Dennis took me and my two youngest grandsons, 12 and 7, to a fishing pier set up along a lake and wildlife area. It is located in a massive game preserve park just west of West Palm Beach here in Florida. My little guy, Justin, had never been fishing before but he picked up the skill of casting his line quite nicely. Uncle Dennis was a good teacher and supplied the fishing gear and even the live bait. Unfortunately, as Dennis put it, although the day

and the fishing were good, the catching was not. No one on the pier, and there were at least 20 other visitors, had caught any fish. As sevenyear-olds do, Justin became bored with the fruitless casting and put down his fishing rod to go look at the eight to nine foot alligator that had parked itself in the waters right below our pier. You could almost touch this ugly beast from there, although no one dared of course. This was one mean looking animal. It apparently had become used to the presence of people and did not bother to avoid them. The park had

notices up which warned visitors to avoid contact with the alligators and not to feed them or provoke them. No one was going to provoke this monster! As the morning slowly passed, with no fish being caught, Justin drifted between looking at the alligator, from the pier above and looking inside Uncle Dennis’ special container in which he was holding tiny, live silver fish he used for bait. Once in a while, Justin would cast his line in for a brief period but the patience needed for fishing was understandably lacking at his age. So it was

a surprise when Justin was called over by one of the adult fishermen. This man was near to where Justin had left his bait and hook in the water, and he told Justin that he was sure that Justin had a fish on his line! Justin grabbed his pole and began reeling it with all the speed he could muster. It was a large bass, and it was well hooked and coming nearer and nearer to the pier as Justin continued to reel in. Suddenly, there was a tremendous splash of water and a loud chomping sound that came from the waters right below Justin. The alligator

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that had lain motionless all morning, in the same spot, had suddenly moved very quickly and grabbed Justin’s fish with that loud chomp. It looked back at Justin with a ferocious glare, and the fish in its mouth, as if to say, “It’s mine. You want to fight me for it?” I suppose it is likely that this alligator frequently lingered by this pier for just this kind of opportunity, to snare a fish, without much effort, by stealing it from the fishermen. But we did not know this and certainly Justin did not either. All he knows is that the first fish he ever caught was stolen from him by a giant alligator! Do you think that will remain in his memory for a while?

It’s a Small World After All By SANDI LEHMAN The day before Christmas and Hanukkah, I took the #1 trolley and went to the Famous Store to pick up some appetizing foods such as pickled herring, hand-sliced nova, cookies, candies, etc. as my daughter Linda, her husband David, and my two darling grandchildren, Evan and Alec, would be visiting me for the holidays. As I left Famous, I carried out my two large shopping bags en route to the bus stop across Military Trail. I was walking next to another lady also carrying her shopping from the Famous Store. Being the friendly person that I am, I asked this lady, “Do you live in Century Village?” She said, “Yes,” and we started walking together and having a pleasant and friendly conversation.

I asked her where she lived before she came to Century Village, and she said, “I used to live in Montreal, Canada.” Then I said, “My father’s relatives came from Montreal, too,” and mentioned my uncles had a big factory called the Ideal Dress Company whereupon she said, “My husband worked for your uncles.” I told her I visited Montreal one time, many years ago when I attended the wedding of my uncle’s son. She said “I know about your whole family and of that wedding, too.” I also mentioned another aunt and uncle of mine, and she said she was friends with these relatives, too. In fact, she attended my uncle’s funeral and that of my first cousin. It so happened that when my cousin was told his

father passed away, he had a heart attack and died. It was sad that a father and son died the same day; this lady attended their funeral and knew my aunt well. This, indeed, was quite a revelation from a stranger I had just met. Then I asked her what building in Century Village she lived in. When she told me, I said “my dear friends live in your building also.” Of course, she knew them, too. Is it not a small world, after all, when two friendly people living in Century Village in Deerfield Beach who never spoke to each other before, knew one’s relatives so well? And out of all the many, many buildings at Century Village, she lived in the same building as my close friend? Indeed, it is a small world after all!!!

Together we are one


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CVE REPORTER

FEBRUARY 2009

Sister to Sister By LUCILLE C. WEITZ Does one ever really comprehend the essence of, or truly understand, people close to ourselves? Even in the most intimate of relationships, for example that of husband and wife, the persona that is presented to the other is merely that, a persona. That persona is often, or at times, offered for the sake of peace, for convenience, for comfort or for convention. Our thoughts remain forever just, our thoughts, intimately our own and revealed in public only with our advice and consent. Yet the feelings of a sister to a sister, possibly never expressed, can help sustain each one through life; and at the hour of parting are a bond that can never be broken; for that bond is the knowledge that throughout their lives each just knew! My sister, Rhoda, showed so much promise in all of the years that she was growing up, she was beautiful, brilliant in her studies and multi-talented. She possessed a lovely singing voice inherited from our mother, and she studied seriously for the opera. She also had an artistic talent, winning several art prizes and was linguistically gifted. When Rhoda visited Paris, the French thought that she was surely native-born. The devastating blow of her mental illness came when she was at the height of her powers. It distorted her sense of reality and affected her relationships with parents, relatives and friends. But all was not bleak. There were bright spots: her marriage to Charles Blend, a gentleman distinguished in every possible way, her wonderful children, Jonathan and Patti, and her adorable and adored grandchildren, Michelle and Travis. And then came another special gift: late in her life, her marriage to Norman Penlington who was a comfort to her, a companion and a great stabilizer. Hollywood often portrays a skewed version of the mentally ill. In reality, they give off clues about their state of mind. They suffer from delusions which are in essence a distorted view of reality. They often feel persecuted, and they lash out at those who are nearest and dearest to them. They become impossible to live with, and it took a saint like my brother-in-law to withstand and endure Rhoda’s behavioral idiosyncrasies. Hollywood leads us to believe that all a relative has to do is stand by the mentally-ill person’s side and all will then be well. Love

alone cannot cure a mentallyill patient. It takes medication, often many tries to find just the right one, since most mental diseases are of chemical imbalance. Psychological therapy by itself will never do the job. So much for the fraudulent shrinks who lead you to believe otherwise. When I think about my sister Rhoda and the life that she could have led if it were not for her insidious disease, I go through a sort of grieving process for the person she might have been if her development had not been short-

circuited. In essence, you are really looking at two people, the real person and the ill person. The young person of great promise is destroyed; the beautiful and talented scholar is no longer with you. She is replaced by a suspicious, delusional stranger who sarcastically challenges every word you utter; one who completely withdraws from her normal society in an effort to hide. And so, I try to focus on Rhoda’s disappointments and triumphs, knowing what we meant to each other in the so-called good years. As the line from that very wonderful song says, “Love is never gone…”


FEBRUARY 2009

A Leather-Bound Book By AVIVA RAVEL No one is allowed to touch our father’s books. They are lined up in a row, grim, awesome prisoners on the shelves behind the glass door of the cabinet. When our grandfather gave up his flat on Colonial and moved to the Old People’s Home on Esplanade, our father inherited the books which were brought from Lithuania many years before. He calls them sforim in Hebrew, to set them apart from ordinary books. Some are tall and thick, others slim and small, all have black covers. Sometimes, when he’s not tired after work, he sets one of the black books on the dining table and reads to himself, his lips moving, savoring the words like he’s sipping a delicious chocolate milkshake. I lean forward and look over his shoulder. The tiny words, in Hebrew and Aramaic are arranged in short and long columns. “There are over three million words in the Talmud,” our father says tapping a page emphatically, “and they teach us the Laws, how to behave and even about medicine.” He speaks with the authority of someone who excelled in his studies at the Yeshiva. It’s a dark October evening and a rare tranquility has settled over the family. We’re listening to a drama with Bette Davis on Cecil B. DeMille’s Lux Radio Theatre. When it’s over, our mother’s eyes are brimming with tears. She loves sad, romantic stories and songs. “All right, children, to bed,” she says, “school tomorrow,” and she rises to clean up the remains of supper in the kitchen. “Wait,” our father says, “you think that was a good story on the radio?” We stare at him. He had been reading the Yiddish paper and seemingly paid no attention to what he calls the narishkeiten on the radio. “Sit down, everybody,” he says, “and I’ll tell you a real story.” From the cabinet, he carefully withdraws an ancient leather-bound book that had been tucked behind the tall volumes of Talmud. I had left my arithmetic homework for last, and now that it’s late I’m afraid I won’t finish it and I’ll get a big fat zero in Mrs. Yule’s ledger. “Where are you going?” our father demands sternly. “To get my homework.” “Your homework is more important than your father?” He pokes the air with his long forefinger for emphasis. I say nothing and resume my seat, wondering if he’ll sign a note for the teacher explaining that I couldn’t finish my

arithmetic problems because I was listening to his story. The idea starts a giggle in my throat which he stifles with a fierce look. “The story is about this book. Listen with your ears and head, all of you, so you’ll understand and remember.” Helen, humming a Yiddish lullaby, is putting her doll to sleep in a shoe box. “Pick her up,” he says to our mother. “I want everyone to listen.” “She’s only six years old.” “When I was six I knew all of Braishis by heart. I don’t want noise and moving around when I’m talking.” Fortunately, our little brother is fast asleep in his crib in our parents’ bedroom. I scoop Helen up in my arms and hold her on my lap. Bena stops drawing her picture and grimaces surreptitiously in my direction. Our mother’s face relaxes into a slow smile, as she settles comfortably in her chair. I recognize the expression; it is one of admiration. She didn’t have much of an education in her village in Rumania and only one year at night school to learn English before she married and started raising a family. She admires our father for his knowledge and is always ready to listen to his stories. “When I was ten years old, a tall stranger comes to our town in Lita, a stranger with a long black coat, a fur hat, and black boots. Of course, the Rabbi sends him to our house.” He raises his angular shoulders. “We have the finest house in town. My grandfather owns the mill, and my mother is educated in four languages. Everybody comes to her to read and write their letters. She even knows English because in 1880 she visits her cousin in Cornwall.” I wonder why she didn’t have the good sense to stay in the country. “The stranger is from England, so the Rabbi knows what he is doing. A visitor comes to town, you have to welcome him. It’s Friday night; you have to give him a meal and take him to shul. I don’t have to teach you about hospitality. The stranger speaks to my mother. She is very educated and my father is also educated. He is a teacher, but my mother,” he points at me, “you are named for her, is smarter, and beautiful too, it goes without saying. So I watch the stranger and imagine he is one of the angels that came to visit Avrom. “Little boys, you know, have imagination,” he says relishing the memory. “On Shabbos my father takes the stranger to shul. They come

home for dinner; when the sun goes down, he thanks us for the welcome and gives my mother this book for a present. He taps it with his finger to hold our attention. “It will bring you good luck,” the stranger says, “so carry it with you wherever you go.” After the stranger leaves, my mother looks at the book and says to me, “This is not for us,” and she puts it in the box of clothes for charity. But I am a little boy, I believe in good luck and magic so I take the book and hide it in my drawer. “That’s the end of the first part. If anyone wants to go to the bathroom, you can go now.” He glances at his watch, lights a Sweet Caporal and reclines contentedly in his chair. “In five minutes, I will finish the story.” I hand Helen, who has fallen asleep, to our mother and make for the bathroom, with Bena tagging closely behind. “Monkey see, monkey do,” I tease. She counters with, “Ink pink, a bottle of ink, the cork fell out and you stink.” As it happens, neither of us has to go but we pull the toilet chain, turn on the tap and splash water on each other, shrieking and whooping. Our father shouts from the dining room, “Okay, enough in there, come out!” We scramble to our seats, anxious to hear the rest of the story, all the while wiping our hands on each other’s dresses. When he has our undivided attention and our mother has returned, he resumes. “Soon I’m seventeen; they call me to go to the army. My mother cries, my father tears his hair, but they take me anyway.” He withdraws a sepia postcard photograph that had been inserted between the yellowing pages of the book. He stares at it for a moment before showing it to us, and I can tell he is proud. “Here I am a soldier in the Russian army, in a Finnish regiment. It says here we are in Villmanstrand.” We examine the photo of our father in uniform with brass buttons, high collar, a white braid around the right shoulder and an army cap with a decorative button in the center. He is wearing high boots. A rifle, attached to a wide belt that crosses his chest from shoulder to waist, dangles at his side. The photo captured a young version of our father with his familiar cynical expression, high cheekbones, narrow eyes and prominent nose. The two other soldiers in the photo maintain a stiff pose in front of the camera, each holds a cigarette between forefinger and middle finger; they all sport moustaches. I wonder when our father

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shaved his off. He sets the photo on the table and covers it protectively with his hand. “When I go, I take the book with me for good luck. They put me in the cavalry. I like horses, so in the beginning I don’t mind. But the officer in charge, Kapinski is his name, is a terrible anti-Semite. He hears there’s a Jew in the company so he says, “To him I give the wild grey horse. Nobody can manage him. He kicks and throws everybody off. He gets the monster.” “The horse is not wild, but he is plenty sore; like me. It’s no life in the Russian army for man or horse. So I talk to him, I give him sugar from my meals and the good grain they save for the officer’s horses. I tell him we have no choice; we are in this together. If he doesn’t behave, I’ll be in trouble and they’ll make boots and glue from him. So, at last, he listens. I call him Perl for my sister. It is a male horse, but I still call him Perl because I love my older sister who takes care of me like a mother. Nobody believes how I manage my horse.” “One day I am walking with Perl to the stable and this Kapinski comes by with his big belly and his stick. His face is red like wine, and he smells like a tavern. He shouts at me, ‘Jew, why don’t you polish your buttons?’ He hits me so hard, with his stick, I let go of the reins and fall off the horse. Just as Kapinski is walking away, Perl lifts a leg and gives him such a hard kick, he falls down and doesn’t move. The other soldiers are afraid to breathe and the officers look frightened. Nobody touches me; they think I have magic powers over the horse. They carry Kapinski away, and I never see him again, I hope he had a miserable death.” Our father takes a deep puff on his cigarette and flicks the ashes somewhere in the vicinity of the ashtray. “Watch what you’re doing,” our mother says, “Just because you were a big shot in the Russian army doesn’t mean you can dirty the table.” And she wipes the stray ashes with her apron. “A person can’t tell a story in peace in this house,” he says, staring at our mother. She stares back. “Finish the cigarette already; the smoke is choking the children.” He puts the butt out. “You’re satisfied?” “Yeah, I’m satisfied.” “Can I talk now?” “Sure, go ahead, who’s stopping you?” “Anyway, they don’t do anything to me yet,” our father says, as though the interruption never happened.

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“But I know my life in the army isn’t worth two cents. Sooner or later they will blame me. So at night I hold the book in my hand and think; a thought comes to my head. I write my mother and tell her she has to get me out. A few weeks go by and the new officer calls me to his office and tells me I will go home for two weeks because my mother is dying. I say goodbye to Perl. I tell him I have to go away, and I cry. The horse cries too.” A skeptical smile plays on our mother’s lips. “Don’t laugh. Those were real tears in the horse’s eyes. He understands what I am saying. He knows when I go, they will slaughter him because he is wild, wild for everybody but not for me.” Our father’s voice quavers, he withdraws a crumpled handkerchief from his pocket and blows into it. “You think it is funny to cry for a horse? Let me tell you, he was my best friend.” The customary stern expression in his brown eyes has softened. “When I go home, my mother is alive and well. She tells me she sent a nice present to the new officer, in Canadian dollars, that came from her uncle in Montreal; that’s why he let me go. Not long after, the pogromnicks turn the town upside down. They come into our house. Perl, Itzik my little brother Doovid and I hide in the cellar. But they find my mother and stab her. I hear her screams; it’s like the earth opened up. Itzik is very brave and strong, he belongs to the Bilu. He runs out and tries to fight them. They beat him until he is dead. My mother is hurt bad but she lives. She says I have to go to this farmer, who grandfather buys his wheat from, and he’ll smuggle me across the border in a wagon of hay. My mother wants to save me from the pogromnicks and the army. I never see my mother and sister again; they die later in the flu epidemic.” Tears glisten in the corners of his eyes. Our mother gently puts a hand on his shoulder. It is very quiet in the room except for the light October rain tapping on the window as we wait for our father to resume his story. “I don’t forget to take the magic book. It keeps me alive when I travel through Europe. I suffer from cold, hunger, heat, but I go on. How? With this book! I come to an inn. I can’t talk German, Polish, French, but I show the book and they give me food, a room, sometimes a little money for the way. I jump on trains and hide in the baggage. I go by foot See BOOK, pg 42A


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Books

FEBRUARY 2009

continued from pg 41A

until I have no soles on my shoes; I have to put pieces of cardboard inside. Once I am sick, an old woman finds me on the street, a fat woman with three pointy teeth. I show her the book and she takes me in.” He pauses to clear his throat and resumes. “There is a big cross on the wall, and every day before she goes out, she kneels and prays to it. When I get well and say goodbye, she is sorry. She wants to adopt me for a son.” Our father’s forehead knots in introspection, but he dismisses the memory with a swift wag of his hand. “After many months, I don’t know how long, I come to England. The big war in Europe has started. The Uncle from Montreal is a lawyer and

becomes a member of Parliament. He sends me a ticket for a ship that’s called the Lusitania. One year later, the same ship sinks in the war and almost everybody drowns. When I arrive in Canada, I have no trouble with the immigration. I just show the book, and they let me pass.” He leans back in his chair and asks me to bring him a glass of Kik. Drops of rain dribble zig-zag designs on the window panes. I hear someone picking through the garbage in the lane between our flat and the tiny synagogue next door. “So what happened next?” Bena asks. Her eyes are wide and round like sunflowers, her hands forming fists on her lap. “Soon the story is finished. Everything comes to an end; stories, a good

meal, life. No matter what you do, it comes to an end. You are wondering about this book? I’ll tell you; patience. In this world, a person needs patience.” The glass in his hand is shaking as he puts it to his lips, takes a long slurp and hands it to our mother. A spark of affection flickers between them. “In Montreal, my Uncle finds me a job. I also work in Timmins and New York, and then I marry your mother. I still keep the book. I don’t believe in magic no more, but it is a memory from my childhood.” His gaze falls on me. “Come here, Chavaleh; you are the oldest. You can read the best; read what it says.” He opens the book, and I stare at the ornate print on the flyleaf. “So, you can’t

read all of a sudden?” “The Gospel according to St. Matthew,” I finally say. There is a dead silence in the room. The rain has come to a sudden halt. Ghosts of centuries seem to hover over the dim room, their silent screams reliving my father’s eternal rage. He says nothing for a moment, only his lips are moving. Then he folds his arms across his chest, and a smile parts his bony face. His laughter is unbearable; the sound is hollow, as though it’s coming from a dead man mocking his pallbearers from the coffin. “Some joke, eh? Some joke.” He laughs and laughs, tears streaming down his face, as he repeats the words over and over again. “Some joke, some joke.”


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Reaching Six Scores and Ten Plus By SHULA ROBIN Last Tuesday, Nelly invited me for lunch. She is 86, and I recently turned 88. Most older seniors have stopped inviting anyone of their families and friends to their home, but rather now meet in restaurants. The effort involved in preparing and serving refreshments became too arduous for them. But for Nelly and myself (Solway is my name) old habits still persist. From time to time, we do invite family and friends for dinners, lunches or get togethers. We have become much slower and get tired easily. However, the effort gets forgotten after some rest, while the pleasure persists. Nelly and I are the last of the Mohicans from a reading group consisting of over 20 people. We gathered regularly, every three weeks, in each others homes to discuss books of our choice, led by a moderator who was a volunteer from amongst us. Although we read and discussed the same book, it was astonishing how some people understood the characters or ideas in a completely different way; it was most interesting. Our Book Club gatherings were followed by buffet-style dinners and warm socializing. Over the years, we have become very close friends. No effort was spared in setting the tables with an esthetic sense of presentation for the food, drinks, flowers, candles, matching napkins and much laughter. But all of a sudden, one member after another started dying and became irreplaceable losses, leaving behind heart-warming memories. As we age, we must learn to live with our losses; there is no other way. Nelly gave me an enthusiastic welcome and complimented me on the outfit I was wearing. As usual, she prepared a scrumptious meal. While admiring her table with its colorful dishes, I exclaimed with enthusiasm, “Nelly, how lucky we are, still living alone in our apartments, taking care of ourselves and doing whatever we please. We attend movies, theatres, lectures, concerts, operas and ballets, especially when they are affordable.” Solway interjected, “Indeed, thanks to advanced technology we can even enjoy London’s famous Covent Garden ballet productions and presentations of New York’s Metropolitan Opera. What an inspiration! What joy they bring!” In complete contrast to our activities, Nelly re-

marked, “I recently visited two neighbors who moved to luxurious retirement apartments. The place is very clean, with spacious sitting areas, all decorated with plants and lovely paintings on the walls. There is a dining room with tables covered with white tablecloths, seating mostly four people and even more, if requested. On every floor, they have a tastefully-decorated area serving as a den for relaxation. On the top floor, they have a special movie room showing mostly old movies for everyone to enjoy. The roof garden serves for relaxation and enjoyment of fresh air, depending on the weather. The retirement home provides occasional entertainment like dancing, concerts and lectures, as well. The residents bitterly complain about the food, claiming it is tasteless and monotonous. Breakfast is the best meal of the day. Having to pay a minimum of $3,000 a month for rent and upkeep, many can’t afford to eat out in their favorite restaurants. I feel sorry for those who have no other choice than to stay put where they are.” I asked Nelly, “Did you ever eat there?” She replied, “Yes. As a matter of fact, I had lunch recently and a long time ago I was invited for dinner. Personally, I didn’t find the food bad at all. But at least it could have been served with a bit more imagination. The courses were served with long intervals in between. Probably there were not enough waiters to go around. Since time is still of value to me,

I resented the waste of it. The worst part for me was sitting with strangers at the table, whose interest was concentrated entirely on me because I was a novelty to them. They kept repeating the same questions over and over again, demanding my total attention. They deprived me from saying even one word to my friend. I could see that the ones I met suffered some sort of dementia. Caught unprepared, I berated myself for lacking compassion. My impression of this retirement home was that these retired people should be able to pursue some interest, but most of them become lazy and bored.” Suddenly, Nelly remembered my trip to Scandinavia and asked, “Solway, how would you compare the seniors’ lot there with our own in Canada?” This question triggered an immediate remembrance of my honeymoon, with my late husband, to the Scandinavian countries. Although so many years had evaporated since then, details of the trip remained fresh in my mind, especially the ones dealing with the Golden Agers. The government tries to keep all the pensioners in their own habitats for as long as possible. It provides them with all kinds of help, recruiting some neighbors to help with shopping, others with cleaning, cooking, accompanying them to doctors’ appointments, walks in the park or visiting family and friends. We have learned that this was less costly than keeping them in homes for the aged. I fully agree with this approach.

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“Me, too,” Nelly exclaimed. We were most pleasantly surprised while visiting a kindergarten class in Copenhagen, where we noticed a couple of young men. I approached one of them to ask whether he was a visitor or working. With luminous eyes, he replied, “Yes, Madam, I work here and love working with these young children. They are delightful! You see, here in Denmark, we have many single mothers. It is important to provide the children with substitute father figures.” Nelly and I keep asking why such a wonderful country like Canada does not learn from others these practical and realistic approaches. In other aspects, there is a lot to learn from Canada, too, like Ontario with OHIP and Wheel-Trans. I refer to a wonderful experience and surprise; namely, I made an arrangement with WheelTrans to drive to a doctor’s appointment and back home. The driver was very punctual and brought me half an hour early. As soon as I arrived at the doctor’s office, I saw a large notice saying that the office was closed but would reopen the next morning. I was dumbfounded and disappointed. What shall I do now? I thought of a practical solution while walking along the twisting corridor where I found one office with its door open and no clients, only a receptionist at her desk. I approached the lovely, young woman and asked for her help. She was most obliging and phoned the Wheel-Trans for me. When I spoke to the invisible person at the other end of the telephone, she said, “A taxi will pick you up from the doctor’s office in 45 minutes to drive you back

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home.” Our lunch get together came to an end. On the way home, I got thinking about people my age and the younger seniors, wondering about the concept of morality or lack of it. Two of my dear friends to whom fate is unkind are staying at a well-known, geriatric institute, suffering from advanced cases of Alzheimer’s disease. Both of them stopped recognizing their most-beloved children or members of the family and friends. Their devoted sons and daughters keep paying for full-time attendants, which is a tremendous financial burden. This becomes a burden for the government as well. I am absolutely sure that these two friends of mine would much rather be helped to die in dignity then be kept alive only because their hearts did not stop beating. When there is no hope for such individuals, I think that it would be absolutely moral to help them die without suffering any pain. The government could, and should, channel the funds saved by improving the lot of so many needy old people. My attitude derives from my great love for each human being. We are living in a world that changes every day and so are our perceptions. What was right and moral, years ago, does not necessarily apply in our third millennium, with its technology and changing values. For me, every person of advanced age represents this historical perspective. Every person is a living person, and everyone deserves to be treated with dignity.


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Coverage for all residents of Century Village with great service at very affordable rates. Did you know that beginning January 1st, 2009 all owners of Condominiums in Florida are required to have a Condominium Insurance policy? We can write this policy for you at a rate you can afford. Stop by our office or call for a Free Quote!

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02/28/2009

02/28/2009

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VOLUME 32, NUMBER 5

Des Amies Francophones British Ladies Tea Party Text by CELINE MARINIER, Photos by JULES KESSELMAN

L/R Mado Doucet, Janine Caron & Celine Marinier having their afternoon tea with cookies

Des Amies Francophones “British Ladies” in their finery At 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, January 17, Jocelyn, Therese, Marlene, Rolande, Celine, Jeanine, Pierette, Lucille, Ginette, Mado, Lili, Ghislaine, Gemma, Micheline, Jeanette, Monique and

Micheline Vincent serving her freshly baked “English” cookies

Isabelle dressed as British Ladies. They had a traditional English tea party at the Gazebo. The British Ladies were very well dressed and their delightful apparel was a treat for all eyes to see.

Tea was served with freshly baked English cookies. Congratulations to the innovator of this activity. It was a great success and will help keep spirits high in Century Village.

65 Social Club Installations Text & Photos By JULES KESSELMAN

Officers and Directors, Norma Weiner, Sandy Schmeir, Beverley Kornfield-Treasurer, Claire EskindSecretary,David Greenberg-MC, Arline Greenberg-President, Beverly Schmeir-1st VP, Lillian Jaffe 2nd VP, missing Milton Neufeld and Lucille Robins-Entertainment Chairperson

Murray Rose - Singer and Comedian

On January 4, about 80 members of the 65 Social Club celebrated their 23rd Annual Installation. This year it was held at the Boca Dunes

ALL PASSES (Guest, Companion & 30 Day) Will Now Be Issued By The I.D. Office They Will No Longer Be Available at The COOCVE Office

CC. As in many years past, the members danced to the great band of Bobby Barnett. The entertainment this year was performed by one of

Century Villages very own, Murray Rose. Murray is an accomplished comedian and singer. See SOCIAL, pg 15B

FREE BAR CODES FOR WEATHERED STICKERS NOW AVAILABLE First Must Be Validated At ID Office


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An Englishtown Tale By Bob Winston Editor’s Note: This month “An Englishtown Tale” by Bob Winston is our February Feature of the month. Englishtown is a small New Jersey town with historical ties to the American Revolution, but now it is more noted for what residents and visitors refer to as THE AUCTION. Arguably, it is one of the largest flea markets in the United States, but there is no question, that it is the largest such market in the Garden State. Roaming through the hundreds, more likely thousands of displays was like going on a treasure hunt. The offerings are primarily castoffs that outlived their usefulness. However there are occasions when a purchaser could find a one of a kind article. In such instances it is more than likely that it made its way to Englishtown by way of the heirs of the newly deceased. Kind of like a modified estate sale. I, like most of the Englishtown flea market regulars were addicts. We were forever seeking that elusive one-of-a-kind pot of gold. There is a karma about Englishtown. It constantly revitalizes the bygone years with resources that are seemingly inexhaustible. It is like the old faded snapshots in your photo album, but with a major difference. Englishtown resuscitates the old stuff with new old stuff each week. What’s more, unlike photos, most of the old new stuff is threedimensional. Dante, my best friend, and I made monthly pilgrimages to the market. It was a ritual that we had been doing for years. Like I said, you could find anything and everything there. Old furniture, used clothing, military memorabilia, pots, pans, paintings, jewelry, tools, you name it. Mostly junk, except for those very rare occasions when maybe, in your dreams you’d find a first edition of WAR AND PEACE… a signed autograph picture of Ty Cobb, a five carat diamond ring mistaken for costume jewelry...an original copy of the Declaration of Independence… more realistically though what you would find is junk, but who knows. Dante jokingly claimed that if you knew the right people, and where to look, you could even buy a slave at Englishtown. “Look,” I said to Dante, “why don’t we each go our own way and meet back at the car, say in two hours.” I always enjoyed Dante’s company. He was a real character; sometimes bizarre; always funny, but like me he understood that Englishtown

lent itself to solo explorations. He agreed. I began my adventure by looking through some old 78rpm phonograph records... Victor, Decca, Vocalion, Bluebird... too bad, my stereo system could only accommodate CD’s, and tapes, not phonograph records. It was apparent to the vendor that there would be no sale. He moved on to other browsers who had quickly filled the space I vacated. I made a few purchases, an old iron, a screw driver set, a MOXIE bottle and an EVERSHARP fountain pen in its original case that still had the manufacturer’s guarantee, guaranteed not for years, not for life, but guaranteed forever. The warranty wasn’t worth much since the company had long since ceased to exist. I lost track of time. Looking at my watch I became aware that the two hours that Dante and I had agreed upon was nearly up, and I had seen only a fraction of what the market had to offer. Returning to the car I caught sight of an old photo album that was laying haphazardly among some LOOK, LIFE, LIBERTY, and COLLIERS magazines. I could not resist viewing its contents. The seller was a seedy looking guy, in his mid fifties maybe early sixties. His four or five day beard blended with his grayish black hair, which fell in all directions on his head. I wasn’t really interested in evaluating his appearance except for the fact that I was downwind to a musty smell. At first I thought it was he, but it wasn’t body odor. It was more akin to the smell of a basement or attic that had been shut off from the rest of the world for years. It was possible that the stench came from the aged materials on the table. I was right. “Hey dude, if you’re interested, make an offer ‘cause I want to close up.” I grunted under my breath. He was about to say something but the arrival of new browsers required his attention and he left me alone. I welcomed his departure and looked through the album. It was quite large. The cover was a faded black, somewhat marred, but otherwise in pretty good condition. It obviously had been well cared for. I opened it and noted a signature, written in an elaborate cursive style. ABIGAIL LEWIS, Freehold, New Jersey, March 1893. I know a little about antiques. Not too much, but its commonly known that age in itself is not the only standard for gauging its value. In

many instances it is often the least important. With this thought in mind, I continued going through the pages. The contents were displayed, in chronological sequence. The earliest images depicted a young man in military garb. The pictures were captioned with dates and sometimes with other identifying notations. I have a pretty good background in American history, and was able to categorize most of the contents into specific time periods. It progressed roughly around the time of the Spanish-American War., and was a historical account of several generations of a family. A wedding invitation, circa 1908, announced the union of Abigail Lewis to William Augustus Cooper...pages later several military photographs of World War I vintage. Written captions identified several photographs as Lieutenant William Cooper... a nice looking man, stern, and proud in his officer’s uniform. Yellowish newspaper clippings from the NEW YORK TIMES, BOSTON GLOBE, and NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, proclaimed the end of World War I, “the war to end all wars.” More photos...toddler William Cooper Jr, circa 1919, dressed in his very finest Sunday garb and being held by his grandparents, Abigail and William Cooper. Another generation. I hastily skimmed the rest of the album…the vendor was getting testy…more photos, a motor car, looked like a 1930’s model… several more pictures of Jimmy, now quite a bit older… caption… At the Beach, Asbury Park, 1937. William Cooper Jr. again, this time in a marine uniform. Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, 1943. I realized I was already more than thirty minutes late. Looking toward the peddler, it was obvious he was annoyed. “Are you interested dude, I wanna go home!” “I’m interested, just give me a couple of more minutes.” He cursed under his breath. I couldn’t blame him, he already had most of his goods packed and was ready to go. I reached what I hoped I wouldn’t, the last page, and an obituary. William Cooper, MD died on April 28, 1964. Survived by his wife of fifty-three years, Abigail, a son, and several grandchildren. Three full paragraphs about his life from his early days to the present. It was a passing pageant.

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Since this was the late seventies I’m certain she too must have passed. One could only speculate as to how this album made its way to the Englishtown Auction. I strongly suspect that it was the remnant of an estate sale that no one wanted, until today. Historically, it probably had some value, but not an extraordinary amount. Maybe it would be of some interest to a local historical society. My feeling was that it was more personal than historical. I was going to buy it and I knew exactly what I was going to do with it. A voice nearby shouted, “How much?” It took me a second or two to realize the voice was mine. I was very late getting back to the car. Dante was there, waiting patiently. “Well, you really must have had a good time, what did you buy?” Hesitating for a moment … “Looked for an imaginary slave, no luck, so I settled for

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a MOXIE bottle. “That’s it? What’s that bulky package under your arm?” “Some old pictures, I thought I might be able to use, sort of an impulse buy.” He didn’t press me and I didn’t offer any more information. The evening turned very cold. I told my wife that I thought it was fireplace weather. She nodded in agreement. I used some old photographs and a cardboard cover from an old album to kindle the dry logs. The fire quickly caught. “How was THE AUCTION?” I poked at the wood with the fireplace tongs and watched as the flames turned the last of the photos to ashes “You know, what could you expect, the same as usual, just a lot of other people’s garbage.” To myself…”Rest in peace Abigail.”


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Active CVE Republican Club New and regular members call for updated meeting information. Call or fax Ron Goldfarb at 954-596-5198. Alzheimer’s Association Support Groups. Free for families and caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s. Locations in North, Central and South Broward. For a group in your area, call 954-726-0011 or 24 hr. helping hotline at 1-800-272-3900. American Red Magen David for Israel (ARMDI) Freedom Chapter of Deerfield Beach meets the fourth Wednesday of the month, 11:30 a.m. in Temple Beth Israel. For further information call Rose Trugman 954428-6627 or Rose Vaupen 954-4262392. Americans United for Separation of Church & State New chapter being formed. Primary mission is to educate public regarding constitutional guarantee of church and state separation. We are concerned about book banning, schools teaching religious theology disguised as scientific theory. For further information, call Barbara Miranda at 954-422-5958. AMIT (Americans for Israel and Torah) meets second Monday of every month at Young Israel Synagogue at 12:30p.m. For information, call Ellie 954-698-6075 or Norma 954-4282386. Art Club of CVE meetings will be held on the second Friday of each month (November thru April), from 10 a.m. to noon in Clubhouse Room GP-A. Membership is $12. We have interesting programs, trips & exhibitions. This year we will have an exhibition at Sugar Sand Park, February 25, 2009, under the theme of Silver Vision, you are invited to the Reception that will be held on February 7, and most importantly, don’t miss our Art Expo on March 7th & 8th ,2009. See paintings, sculptures and pottery plus works from our guest exhibitors: Lapidary, Stained Glass & the Camera Club. For information call Ginette Beauvais, Acting President (October through April) at 954-482-8493. Astronomy Club will meet each month beginning Tuesday, November 11 at 7 p.m. in room E. A telescope will be used for observation. Call Norma 954-480-8938 or Jerry 954-428-9381. Ballroom Dance Club meets every Thursday in the Exercise Room at 7:30 to 9 p.m. at no charge. Singles and couples welcome. For information, call Ernie Feder 954-418-8895. B’nai B’rith Unit #2995 for Men and Women. For information, call Dave Polak at 954-420-0096 or Jack Galit at 954-428-6029. Bible Study Group meets every Thursday in the clubhouse from 1 - 3 p.m. Study the old and new testaments. All welcome. For further information, call Roslyn Nehls at 954698-6184.

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Billiard Club of CVE If you are interested in joining, call Al Feinberg at 954-428-7624 for further information. Bowling Club of CVE meets every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. at Pompano Bowl, 2200 Federal Highway, Pompano. All welcome. Come join us and have fun. For information, call Betty Schwartz at 954-427-1157.

ences) meets at the Clubhouse Room D, Thursdays from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. to share thoughts, feelings and concerns in a private confidential setting. It is open to everyone and is free of charge. For Information call Paul Greenwald, Ph.D. 954-483-5300.

Brotherhood Temple Beth Israel Monthly Breakfast Meetings second Sunday of each month. For information, Al Freiman 954-429-0663, Temple 954-421-7060.

Century Camera Club meets every Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. in Room F, at Clubhouse. Demonstrations, lectures, competitions, instructions, exhibits, shows and field trips programmed. All who are interested in photography are invited. For information call Jerry Raines 954 427 6785.

Broward Council of Na’Amat USA (formerly Pioneer Women) meets fourth Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Na’Amat Council office, 1721 N. State Road 7, Suite H, Margate. For information, call 954-327-0770.

Century Juniors Club of CVE. Active, couples only, social club meets at 7 p.m. second Thursday of each month in Clubhouse, Room N, accepting new members. For information call Harriet at 954-426-3008.

Broward County Support Group meets every Thursday in Clubhouse, Room C, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Choraleers CVE produced and directed by Bill Weinhaus, meets every Wednesday, 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse Party Room. We rehearse for a once a year concert in our theater. If you enjoy singing join us. For information, call Irene Greenberg, President 954-426-0628.

Broward Homebound Program your donations will enable elderly and disabled residents to live independently at home with dignity. For further information, call Diane or Marie at 954-786-2484. Cameo Drama Club meetings takes place the first and third Tuesday of the month in Room G. Aviva Ravel’s new play to be presented in Le Club on Sunday, February 22 at 2 p.m. If interested call 954-570-8884. Canadian Club of CVE. The Canadian Club of CVE is a social club for Canadians wintering in Century Village. Monthly meetings are held on the second Thursday of each month, February 12 and March 12 at 10 am in the Club House party room, with an informative or entertaining program. Following the business portion of the meeting, our guest speaker on the subject of Talk Radio is Joe Cannon, a well known former Montreal broadcaster now living in Florida. The Club organizes several social events, and a Bar-B-Q on March 5. Outings to various activities, and a cruise January 23, are part of the activities. Membership is $5. a person per year. Registration takes place every Friday between 10 am and noon in the CVE clubhouse upper lobby. For membership information call Bertha Kahansky at 954-481-8365. For more information, contact Co-Presidents Dorothy Stober (Montreal 514-485-6362, CVE 954-4264097) or Sidney Margles (Montreal 514-485-9388 or CVE, 954-596-0179). Check our website at www.canadianclubcve.com for more details Catholic Social Club Catholic Mass Team meets every Saturday at 5:45 p.m. in Le Club Activity Room C, open to all denominations. Mass begins at 6:15 p.m. every Saturday, same room. Father James, Pastor of Our Lady of Mercy Church, is our Celebrant. For further information, call Mary Ann Braun at 954-571-2266. Center for Group Counseling’s SAGES (Senior Adult Group Experi-

City University of New York (CUNY) Alumni Club meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in Room G in the Clubhouse. All CUNY graduates and their spouses are welcome. We have Interesting programs and field trips. For information, call Norma 954-480-8938, Geri 954-360-9725 or Rosalie 954-427-1593. Classical Civilization Club meets every Wednesday, alternating with the Egyptology Club, at 1:30 p.m. in Clubhouse room C. Learn about all aspects of the Greek and Roman World. Call Lewis 954-421-8934. Clubhouse Bingo every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. in the party room. It is new and exciting and lots of fun. Only dabbers are used, no more chips. A six pack sells for $3, the Early Bird and Bingo Special $1. The Early Bird and Bingo Players Special each pays $75. Bingo will be played all year. For more information call David 954-4282849. Cornerstone Community Baptist Church, Pastor Bret M. Lovitz, Worship Services 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m., Wednesday Service 7 p.m., CCBC Youth Group 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., For information call 954-421-2530 CVE Duplicate Bridge Club. Games Monday, Tuesday and Saturday, 12:00 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Card Room B. For information, call Irving Ruga at 954-698-9741. CVE Interfaith Prayer hotline: 954-571-1763 continuing the work of the late Geri Hope, has Catholic and Jewish residents praying in their own homes from the same prayer list page. Call the Prayer line at any time to request prayer for yourself or others. Requests may be anonymous. Just state the specific need, with the

name or initials of the person needing prayer. Miracles still happen. For information call Mary Anne Surrette at 954-734-0095. CVE Magic Club Monday, 2 p.m., discussions Magic Learning, speakers, discuss magic, conventions, demonstrations. For information call 954698-9334. CVE Mandolin Orchestra now meets every Monday afternoon from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Clubhouse in General Purpose Room. Musicians who can play cello, viola or clarinet are invited. For further information, call Vincent Zappi at 954-428-1794. CVE Sewing Club meets every Tuesday from 10 am. to 12 noon in the Sewing Room. For further information, call Rita at 954-571-1645 CVE Shuffleboard Club meets first Friday of each month at 10:30 a.m. at the Clubhouse in Room A. Come join us for fun and friendship. For information, call Alan Brigell at 954-4262085 or Eugene Metz at 954- 422-8903. CVE String Chamber Group is open to capable musicians. Come and get a musical workout year round on Wednesdays 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the mezzanine (3rd floor of clubhouse) music library office next to elevator. For information call Blanche 954-4264513. CVE Symphony Guild supports our Symphony Orchestra. There will be a meeting open to the public in the clubhouse party room at 2 p.m. on March 1, 2009. Mary Margolius, the CVE Orchestra cellist, will perform favorite cello classics with her trio. To raise funds for the orchestra the Guild has arranged with the Broward Center for the Performing Arts for residents of Century Village to attend a matinee performance by the Miami Ballet on March 15th and a performance of the Marriage of Figaro by the Florida Grand Opera on Thursday evening, April 2nd. Details of these events can be found in the monthly column of the Guild in the Reporter. For further details contact President Bea Guccione, 954-426-3540. For membership in the Guild phone Jean Crown, 954-421-8121, or Kitty Cole, 954-360-7956. CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild supports our Symphony Orchestra. There will be a meeting open to the public in the Clubhouse Party Room at 2 p.m. on March 1, 2009. Professional musicians will entertain at both meetings. To raise funds for the orchestra the Guild has scheduled trips to the Broward Center for the Performing Arts to attend two operas and two ballet performances. In addition the Guild has planned a Fashion Show sponsored by Cold Water Creek of Boca on February 8, 2009. Details of these events can be found in the monthly column of the GUILD in the REPORTER, in fliers in the Staff Office, on Channel 99. For details contact President Bea Guccione, 954-426-3540. For membership in the Guild, phone Jean Crown, 954-421-8121 or Kitty Cole, 954-360-7956.


FEBRUARY 2009 CVE Volleyball Club meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 9 a.m. and beyond, next to tennis court. All invited. Call Harry Liner 954-4264853 or Harry Chizeck 954-426-3178. Dance With Us for Folk and Line Dancing meets on Tuesday from 12 noon to 2 p.m. in the Health Club. No Charge. For information call Gloria 954-480-6474 or Jerry 954-6989240. Deerfield Beach Computer Club meets every Friday, except holidays, at Pompano Beach Highlands Park, 1650 N.E. 50th Court, which is two blocks east of Dixie Highway off 48th Street from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. For information Barry Cowen at 954725-9331, Gerry Gerstenberg at 954 941-6689 or Roy at 954-429-9472. Deerfield Beach Democratic Club meets the second Monday of the month at 7:00 p.m. in Le Club. Stimulating political discussions. All invited. Refreshments served. For information: call Bernie Parness President at 954 426 1284 Deerfield Progressive Forum meets Saturdays, 10 a.m. to noon, in Le Club for lecture/discussion sessions on political, economic and social issues. For information call Julie Bloom at 954 428-1598. Deer-Raton Lions Club meets on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Atlantic Bread Co. 296 S. Federal Highway in Deerfield Beach. For information call George Gsegnet 954-419-9647.

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District 65 U.A.W. (formerly South Florida Retirees) meets every third month on the third Tuesday of the month, 12 noon, at the Activity Center. Updated reports will be made on the 65 Security Plan. Please attend and bring new members. For further information, call Pearl Hill 954-421-7776.

ments served. Interesting topics. For information, call Gert 954-421-0945 or Adele at 954 427-4970.

museums, upscale shopping excursions, etc. No dues. For information call Lila 954-596-9949.

Hebrew Speaking Circle is formed to meet in the Clubhouse. For information, call Dr. Lee Lubin 954-4288642.

Egyptology Club meets for group study, discussion and videos every Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. in General Purpose Room C. Future meetings will concentrate on the history, culture and art of Ancient Egypt. The club will continue with the video lectures by Dr. Bob Brier. For further information, call Golda 954-360-7377.

Hispanic Club meets at the Clubhouse every second Sunday of each month in Music Room A from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. For information call Mimi Lourenso at 954-725-5229. Come and meet new friends and help plan club “outings” to various park picnics, museums, restaurants, etc. The President of the club is Judith Smith from Colombia, South America.

Jewish War Veterans U.S.A. Post 265 and Ladies Auxiliary of CVE meets third Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. in Clubhouse Room F and G. Interesting informative programs. For information call, Al Freiman 954-4290663 or Bea Lerman 954-421-3497.

Emunah of America meets third Wednesday every month at 12 noon in the Young Israel Synagogue in Century Plaza. Light lunch and interesting program. All cordially welcome. For information, about this chapter call Ina Ciocca at 954-360-0740, Selma at 954-427-8674 or Pearl at 954-426-0189. Friends of Deerfield Beach Arboretum 2841 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Free tour of the Arboretum every Friday 10 a.m. and first Saturday of each month at 10 a.m., Seminars held at 7 p.m. in recreation room of Constitution Park. All seminars followed with an auction featuring plants, herbs and trees from our nursery. Refreshments served. All invited. Volunteers needed to help spread mulch, weed and participate in planting activities. For further information, call 954-480-4494. Hadassah Deerfield Beach meets monthly on the third Monday at noon at Temple Beth Israel. Refresh-

Humanist of the Gold Coast meets at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2601 St. Andrews Blvd., Boca Raton. Exact date to be advised in future issue. For information contact Dr. Robert Griffin 954-426-5021. Italian/American Club meets second Monday of each month at 11 a.m. in the Clubhouse Party Room. For information call Lena Radicella 954-428-2184. Jelly Belly Dancers Free Belly Dance lessons. Learn to Belly Dance for fun and exercise! All ages, sizes and shapes welcomed. No registration required. For further information call Sandy 954-421-2541. Jet Setters Social Club Active, Jet Setters, widows, widowers and singles social club. Join a great NEW sophisticated singles group. Trips, dining experiences, plays, concerts, art

Knitting Club of CVE meets every Monday from 1 to 3 p.m. in Sewing Room at Clubhouse. We welcome beginners and experienced knitters and crotchetiers. If you have an “Itch to Stitch” come and have fun and make someone happy. Call Florence 954-698-9421. L’Alliance Francophone CVE. Join more than 500 French-speaking residents of the Village, mostly snowbirds from Canada. The association was established in 1995. For information, call Pierette Pelletier 954-4266132 or Raymond Babeux 954-428 4158. L’Alliance Francophone of CVE. Si vous parlez Français, nous avons de nombreuses activitiées á vous proposer. Si vous êtes interessé appelez Pierrette Pelletier 954-426-6132 ou Raymond Babeux 954-428-4158. Lapidary Club members only, work every Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Lapidary Room. Supervisor must be present. Sessions will be added as needed. For information call Walter Reich 954421-6875 or Victor Goldring 954-4182174.


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Lets Talk meets 2nd and 4th Tuesday each month, 2 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Room E. Discussions, Daytrips, films will be topics of the day. For further information call Gladys 954-421-9232, Irene 954-4189156, Shirley 954-427-0951. Mended Hearts Cardiac Support Group an affiliate of the American Heart Association, meets the 1st and 3rd Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. Heart Healthy Snacks will be served. Open to all cardiac patients and their families in the community. Located at 7300 Del Prado Circle South, Boca Raton. For information call 561-392-3000. Mr. & Mrs. Club Come and meet new friends and socialize. Ages 55-73. Monthly activities are being planned. For information, call Buddy at 954-427-7407. Na’Amat USA For further information, contact Marjorie Moidel at 954-970-8609. National Association of Retired Federal Employees (NARFE) meets fourth Wednesday monthly at John Knox Village at 1 p.m. We are interested in protecting our federal pensions, COLAS and other entitlements. For further information and transportation, call Rita Daniels 954428-9022. National Council of Jewish Woman. Meetings are held at the Clubhouse, Room N, at 12 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month, October through April. The club have the following events, February 15, 2009 Sugar at the Stage Door, February 25, 2009 Card Party & March 5, 2009 Installation at Brooks. For information concerning the organization & events call Sylvia at 954-4218870 or Frances at 954-428-1336.

FEBRUARY 2009

Nature Club will meet third Friday of every month from November to April in Clubhouse Room A at 10 a.m. A different speaker is at each meeting and several trips each year are enjoyed by the members. These trips are to a variety of nature sites. For information call Shelly Baskin, 954-428-0634.

discussions every Tuesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Open Water Color Painting class every Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact Laura Newman at 954480-4447.Silver Sneakers class by Humana first Thursday monthly from 12 noon to 1 p.m. Beginner Computer lessons offered one-on-one at $40 for six one-hour lessons. Contact Laura Newman 954-480-4447 for appointment. Vision Impaired Support group every Wednesday 12 noon to 1 p.m. Tai Chi every Thursday, 12 noon to 1 p.m.; Arm Chair Fitness every Friday, 12 noon to 12:30 p.m,; Stretching/ Yoga Lite every Monday 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.. Line Dancing ($4 donation) for beginners/intermediates every Friday 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Volunteers required to demonstrate and assist in Floral Arrangements. Contact Ilean Sylk 954-480-4447.

Philadelphian’s and Neighbors Club meets 2nd Tuesday of the month at 2 p.m. in Clubhouse, Room October through March. Entertainment at every meeting. Greet old and new friends. For further information call Selma Edelman, 954-421-6423 or her cell phone 954-675-3998. You can also call Bea Lerman 954-421-3497.

Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church, 5201 N. Military Trail, Deerfield Beach, Fl. Services Monday to Friday, 9 a.m., Saturday Vigil 4 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., and 11 a.m. by Rev. James Parappally, Pastor. For further information, call 954-4213246.

Pythian Sisters, Bright Star Temple #36 meets first and third Tuesday of every month at noon in the Activity Center, Room B. Interesting meetings, refreshments served. Become a member. Information, Ruth Goldberg 954-427-5226 or Irene Greenberg 954426-0628.

New York Retirees DC37: Meetings held at B’nai Torah Congregation, 6261 S. W. 18th St., Boca Raton. Next meeting to be advised. For information, call Mildred 954-421-8527 or Vinnie at 561-451-3643.

Parent & Adult Children Club meets the first Sunday of the month, Room F. This is a Social Club. Learn nutrition tips, exercise tips, meet new people, outings. The parent and adult child must come to the meetings together. If one does not live in the Village invite them to attend the meeting with you. For further information call Linda 954-725-3762.

Red Hatters Club, The JCP Red Hatters meet the second Wednesday of each month in the clubhouse. Monthly outings planned. Requirement for membership is a Red Hat and Purple Dress, Blouse, Pants etc. must be worn on outings. For more information call Josephine Privitera at 954-425-7026.

North East Focal Senior Center: Adult Day Care service, Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m .for individuals with dementia, Alzheimer or memory loss. Contact Mary Jo Bodnick, Case Manager at 954-4804463. Ballroom Dance lessons every Tuesday 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., “Hot Topic”

Pflag (Parents, Family and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) will meet on the second Tuesday of each month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Clubhouse, Room F. For information, call Abe at 954- 571-8448 or Dorothy at 954-4228508.

Newbies Come and meet new people interested in social activities, dinners and trips. We meet the 1st Tuesday of the month from November to April, Room F, 7 p.m. For information, call Virginia at 954-426-9455 or Beverly at 954-428-3705. New Covenant Church Celebration Service every Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and Evening Service and Bible Study every Wednesday at 6:45 p.m. For further information, call 954-781-3170. New Horizons Church of Deerfield Worship Service 10 a.m., Sunday School 10:30a.m .For information call church 954-427-3045. New York Transit Retirees of Florida meets the second Wednesday of the month at 11 a.m. at Centura Park Clubhouse, 2395 N. W. 36th Ave., Coconut Creek. Keep informed of your pensions and medical benefits. For information, call 561-479-2149.

Philosophy of CVE meetings is held each Monday in Room A at the Clubhouse from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m, beginning November 17, 2008 All residents and friends are welcome. Our schedule begins in November and lasts until mid-March. Starting with Opera, other topics will include the environment, humor, liberty, law, a piano recital and a variety of other cultural themes. For details, call Dr. Bob Griffin 954-596-0463

Russian Club will be meeting every third Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the home of Galina Baraz, 2064 Ventnor P. For further information, contact Galina at 954-428-3870. Saint Ambrose Catholic Church, Pastor Rev. Bryan Dalton, Daily Masses 7:30 a.m., 11 a.m., 7 p.m.,


FEBRUARY 2009 Saturday morning Vigil Masses 4 p.m., 5:30 p.m., Sunday Masses 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12 noon, 6 p.m., Confessions Saturday, 11 a.m. to 12 noon, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., For information call church 954-427-2225. Scrabbleers meets every Thursday at 7 p.m. in Room C at Clubhouse. All scrabble players welcome. Bring set if possible. For information, call R. Levin 954-427-4092. Selma’s Jewish Discussion Group meets first and third Wednesday of each month at Clubhouse, Room F at 10:30 a.m. All denominations welcome. For further information, call Pearl Keiler at 954-421-8719. Senior Volleyball for men and women on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the Volleyball Court, next to the main tennis courts back of the Clubhouse. Everyone, who attends, plays. Call Max Amichai Heppner 954-596-0484, E-mail: Heppnershanamax@aol.com. Sisterhood of Young Israel of Deerfield Beach meets at the Synagogue the first Tuesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. Interesting speakers, exciting programs and refreshments served. Gift Shop now open Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. Everyone welcome. For further information call Helen Hagler 954-3609939 or Tobi Kleiman 954-725-3776. Sisterhood of Temple Beth Israel meets on second Thursday of each month at 11:30 am. A mini lunch is served followed by an interesting program. For further information call the Temple office at 954-421-7060 . Sixty-five Social Club accepting new members couples only, one of who must be 70 or under. For information, call Lillian Jaffe at 954-3602941. Social Single is a social club for singles who are young at heart. We enjoy monthly outings, dinners, shows as well as monthly club brunches at local restaurants. Meetings are held the second Monday of each month in the Clubhouse, Room G at 7 p.m. For more information, call Nermie at 954-421-6931 or Sheila at 954-725-1521.

SOCO (Symposium of Concerned Owners) meets the second and fourth Friday of each month in the Clubhouse. In-dept lectures and discussions with guest speakers. For information, call Jeff Chester at 954429-9285. SoftBall Players now forming Century Village teams. No age limitations. Call Ed Obeid at 954-421-2228. South Florida Gold Coast Chapter of Myasthenia Gravis support group meets second Saturday each month at 1 p.m. at the North Broward Medical Center, I-95 and Sample Road. For information call Gladys or Evelyn 954429-0455. St. Louis Club of CVE meets the first Wednesday, every other month, beginning in August for lunch. For information call Sol Mitchell 954-4287497. Stained Glass Club meets first Wednesday of every month until April at 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse Stained Glass room. For further information, call Harry Liner at 954-426-4853. Stamp and Coin Club meets every 4th Thursday at 12 noon to 2 p.m.. in Clubhouse, Room C on the 1st floor. Residents and guests are invited to have their stamps and coins there to sell, buy & trade. For more information call Rafael Vance 954-421-8579. Stock Market Discussion Club meets first and third Monday each month at 10 a.m. Room N. Exchange information about stocks, mutual funds, ETF’s and bonds. No fee involved. For further information call Jim 954-596-2233 or Bill 954-698-0423. Talking Book Club the JBL Library, in conjunction with the Low Vision Group in CVE is forming a monthly Talking Book Club. Each participant will receive the same audio book. A representative for the JBI Library will facilitate the book discussion once a month. The group will meet the second Tuesday of the month at 10:30 am. For information call Janet Agmund 954-428-0711 or Goldie Witrock at the library 954-689-0207. Tai-Chi class will start on November 5. The class will be on Wednesday

from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Exercise Room at Clubhouse with instructor, Terry. Come join our class and get rid of stress Temple Beth Israel (Conservative, Egalitarian) Services Friday evening 7:30 p.m. with Oneg Shabbat. Saturday morning 9 a.m. to noon with Kiddush. Library Monday thru Thursday 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for all Village Residents. Ongoing book sale. Cantor Bell lecture series Jewish Composers on Broadway, first Wednesday each month, December 3 through May 6, 11 a.m. to noon, $10 fee for series. Call Temple office for more information, 954-421-7060. Temple B’nai Shalom (Reform) Services are conducted every Friday at 8 p.m. at Le Club by Rabbi Alton M. Winters and Cantor, Gary Sherman. Oneg Shabbat follows every week. For additional information call William Schmier 954 428-8231. The Auxiliary meets the fourth Monday of every month at 10 a.m. For further information, contact Julia Bale 954 427 6669 or Bea Rosner 954 360 7760. The Theosophical Society of Deerfield located at 831 SE 9th Street, phone number 954-420-0908 offers a free Sunday Speaker’s Forum every week from 3:30 to 5 p.m. In addition we have many interesting classes during the day and evenings, also without charge. To obtain a free quarterly bulletin call the lodge at the above number or Lillian Mayer, a CVE resident for more information about specific classes we offer at 954-360-7080. TNT (THURSDAY NIGHT TALENT) OPEN-MIKE NOW at 6 PM. Residents meet every Thursday evening year-round, in the Clubhouse, Music Room A. Everyone who wishes is given up to five minutes to entertain us with songs, jokes, a musical instrument, a reading, a dance, a story, etc. Audience-only visitors also invited. All talent levels, ages, and languages needed. For further information, call Mary Anne Surrette, (954) 734-0095. Pianists-by-ear highly welcome. United Federation of Teachers/ Retired Teachers Chapter Meetings at Temple Anshei Shalom, W. Atlantic Ave. West of Jog, Delray. For further

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CVE REPORTER

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information, call Hilda Cohen 954428-6805. United Club No. 7 (Retirees of ILGWU & ACTWU) meets on the first Thursday or first Saturday of each month in the Clubhouse, Room N at 1 p.m. For information, call Bea Jacobs at 954 427-0665. United Order True Sisters meets every fourth Tuesday at the Clubhouse, Room N, lower level, near the Billiard Room at 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For information about this organization contact President Frieda Weiss, 954419-9143 or Betty Swinkin, Membership Chairperson, 954-570-9526. Visionally Impaired Persons (VIP) meets the first Wednesday monthly in Room E at 10:30 a.m. We exchange information and have guest speakers. We also have a book club and plan trips to seminars. All are welcome Contact Janel Agmund 954 428-0711.. Waves (Navy Gals) Meets every month on the first Saturday at 12 noon at the Olive Garden on Federal Highway in Ft. Lauderdale. For further information, call Eunice Westin at 954-427-7119. We Care of CVE still available for supplies (wheelchairs, walkers, canes, etc.) only. Contact Barbara Brown at 954-574-9675. . Wit, Wisdom & Humor Enjoy, Discuss & Laugh 2nd & 4th Friday of each month, starting November 14, 1:30 p.m. Room N at the Clubhouse. 954-698-9334. Women Marines Association membership is open to women who serve or have served honorably in the U.S. Marine Corp or U.S. Marine Reserves. Many people are not aware of our existence. For information, call Ruth Beisner at 954-428-1637. Workmen’s Circle, Branch 1051 meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday at South County Civic Center on Jog Rd. or information call, Miriam Guz 561-495-7378.


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CVE REPORTER

FEBRUARY 2009

Healthcare Reform – Your Input? By ELLEN KAMHI, PhD RN

In my role as an active member of a vibrant community of natural health care practitioners, I was very excited to learn that the Obama-Biden team, under the leadership of the incoming Secretary of Health, Tom Daschle, requested input from community groups as we begin the work of re-defining health care policy in America. I signed up to be a moderator of one of these country-wide groups and set a date and time for the meeting. I am involved with a group of health care professionals who act as community activists and educators. We put on health expos, radio and TV productions for professionals and consumers who are interested in learning costeffective and scientifically-validated health care modalities. Scientific studies are increasingly verifying the concept that natural medicine, with a strong base of healthy eating and consistent exercise, leads to a decrease in health care expense, as well as human suffering. We are interested in increased access to cost-effective and scientifically-validated health care modalities, through insurance re-imbursement and the broadening of availability of Flexible Spending Accounts/Health Savings Accounts, that allow consumers to choose access to health care with pre-tax dollars. We have an interest in the passage of House Concurrent Resolution 406, which supports education and access to healthy eating practices and exercise as a basis of any health care policy. When I signed up as a group moderator, I received instructions on how to run the meeting. It was wonderful to get an outline of procedures and questions that would be universally used by all the groups meeting around the country. When I received my Moderators Instruction Packet, I was overwhelmed with a sense of joy when I read the instructions. In my many years working on government projects, I have never before been explicitly instructed to respect, empower and include, as a mandate for my role as an organizer! Here is an excerpt directly from the Health Care Community Discussion: Host and Moderator Guide: http:// change.gov/moderatorguide How to Be a Successful Moderator: The key to being a successful moderator is to remember and employ these key principles: Respect, Empower and Include Respect: Every attendee

should be treated with respect. No one should feel that their views were ignored or dismissed without being heard. Vigorous debate is encouraged, and attendees can disagree without being disagreeable. Empower: Whenever possible, entrust attendees with responsibility over the meeting’s procedure and its substantive contribution. These meetings are not occasions for experts to listen to everyday people and then decide what is best. They are an opportunity for attendees to come together to diagnose the health care problems facing their community and propose solutions. Include: Strive to incorporate everyone’s concerns and opinions in the discussion and submission. Each attendee’s views matter – whatever their background, beliefs, or previous political involvement. Even when there is disagreement, strive to find common ground. I could hardly believe that these words were coming from a government-sponsored document! Each participant received a Participants Guide to help focus the discussion on how our country can best format policy that would most effectively deliver affordable, high-quality health care to all Americans. Our group included individuals with diverse life experiences and ideas. As moderator, I consolidated the proposals of the group. Here are some highlights: The biggest issue is the need to include integrative health care because it addresses the cause of illness and not merely treating symptoms. Health care should be health focused instead of disease focused. Health Freedom. Any universal health care must accept licensed integrative practitioner, and promote true prevention – catching illness at the root cause. No mandatory vaccinations. Instead of employer-based coverage, we proposed personal coverage that can be paid for with pre-tax dollars. This frees people to change jobs and take their health insurance with them for life. Reward individuals for staying healthy, such as maintaining a healthy weight, blood pressure, fat intake level, etc. Many current health insurance programs do this now, by having lower rates for individuals at a lower risk for developing illness. However, low- cost catastrophic policies should be available to all, not dependent on preexisting conditions.

Helpful Health Hints By DR. NORMA LOCKER

In closing, I would like to suggest that you take action to be sure your interests in health care reform are heard! Visit www.change.gov to input your ideas. I would also like to include more information about House Resolution 406. This resolution calls for Congress to ensure that any reengineering of the U.S. health care system: (1) incorporates sustainable wellness programs that address the underlying causal factors of chronic disease; (2) ensures public access to strategies for improving individual health through lifestyle change; (3) provides patient-centered care that addresses personal health needs and that encourages patients to improve wellness through lifestyle changes and scientifically-based therapies that facilitate the body’s inherent ability to maintain and restore optimal health; and (4) utilizes defined standards to determine when wellness and health promotion activities will be useful based on the patient’s diet, exercise habits and individual and family health histories. Alert your Congress person of your support of this legislation at link below: http://capwiz.com/ naturopathic/issues/ alert/?alertid=11779946 Stay Healthy! Ellen Kamhi PhD RN, The Natural Nurse®, can be heard on radio daily. She is the author of several books, including The Natural Medicine Chest. Dr. Kamhi has been involved in natural health care for over four decades. She answers consumer questions at www. naturesanswer.com and has a private nutrition consultation practice. www.naturalnurse. com 800-829-0918

Cherries This luscious fruit can be found year-round frozen or fresh during the short harvest season in summer. Cherries offer a heavy helping of anthocyanins, the antioxidant which contributes to their rich, reddish-purple color. Anthocyanins ease inflammation and prevent chronic illnesses. They also block the same enzymes targeted by aspirin. That is why eating cherries help reduce pain in people with arthritis and gout. Cherry juice can also be found in your grocer’s health-food section. Healthier Choices • Instead of white potatoes try sweet potatoes. They are loaded with nutrients and naturally sweet. • Opt for a handful of walnuts in place of croutons in salads. They are tops in nutritional value for your heart. • Mash an avocado and spread it on your whole grain bread instead of mayonnaise for a delicious turkey sandwich. • Shitake mushrooms are tasty and they stimulate your immune system. Replace button mushrooms with shitakes.

• If you must have chocolate, choose the darkest variety containing 70% or more cocoa (in moderation). Ditch the milk chocolate. • Skip the drab iceberg lettuce and try tasty and nutrient-rich romaine. The greener the leaves, the healthier. • Almond butter is loaded with nutrients and flavor and high in protein. Give up the cream cheese and try it smooth or crunchy on your whole grain bread. Blend some cinnamon into it if you are having fruit. • All-purpose flour has all the nutritional value bleached out of it. In baking, use equal amounts of whole wheat and white flour. • Canola oil has more Omega-3 fats than any other common cooking oil. Use it in salads and cooking and baking. • Use yogurt in place of sour cream. Low or nonfat is preferable, but even whole milk yogurt has less than ½ the calories and 1/3 the saturated fat of reduced fat sour cream. If you must use whole milk yogurt, a teaspoon is more than enough.

Prevention By HELENE MAYER Prevent illness by eating a rainbow of colored food, preferably organic. Prevent stress through exercise. Prevent wars through arbitration, not warfare. Prevent crime through

early counseling and early detection. Prevent hunger through sprouting beans and grains. Prevent divorce through premarital counseling. Prevent poverty through all of the above and education.


FEBRUARY 2009

CVE REPORTER

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The Sporting Life Tennis – It’s a Love Game

CVE Bowling League

By DON MAIER

By LOUIS KAUFMAN

Well guys and gals, the tennis excitement is back. The courts are full and everyone is having a tennisful time. Get your tennis clothes on (by the way this was a suggestion by Ray Capobianco to dress accordingly.) It will make you look and feel better while playing tennis. A new deal with Mark our Pro is offering a special for anyone who wants to advance their game. The price is $75.00 for five lessons. You can’t beat that. You can see Mark at the Clubhouse Courts to make an appointment. Mark your calendars. There will be more Jamborees. The dates are as follows: February 15 Wear Red March 15 Wear Green These Jamborees the last I heard will be taking place at the Richmond Courts with refreshments and good times had by all. Put a big star on your calendar for the evening of March 19. This is the date of the Tennis Ball at the Carolina Club starting at 6 p.m. I will

have more on this later but start making your plans now. This is for the Captains of the Tennis Teams. If you have any newsworthy items, please E-Mail me at photoflash.don@ gmail.com or call me at home. My number is in the Tennis Directory. We now have a “Sunshine Committee”. the email address is: sunshine@cvetennis. com If anyone knows of any Tennis Member that is ill or injured, please let the “Sunshine Committee” know and they will try and cheer them up. *Tennis Tip* It is very important not to let your racket live in the trunk of your car. Especially when using natural gut strings, tension loss occurs quickly. Take good care of your racket and it will give you more wins in your games. I leave you with these words: Keep your eye on the ball, your racket ready and tennis in your heart.

Ol’ Man River that Ol’ Man River keeps on rolling along no matter what. Likewise our bowling family keeps on bowling and complaining about the drop in their averages which includes me. However, there are still some bowlers who consistently come up with a 200 score or close to it, such as Bob Hornby, Shelia Guenard, Lorraine Reilly, the Morciglios, father and son and a few others. As you all know the meeting on January 15th decided what the answer would be for the next seasons’ bowling. The vote was practically unanimous that we move back to Boca Bowl. Boca Bowl came up with a five year lease which gives us some security to our permanence. Betty and I therefore went to Boca Bowl, which is now called Strikes at Boca, and we signed a new contract for the 2009-2010 season, which will start on September 10. However, open bowling will start when we end the season at Pompano. Our daughter, son in-law and grandchildren came to visit and lit up the alley with their

existence. Our grandchildren participated in the bowling as pacers and had everybody rooting for them The Sponslers welcomed their first grandchild, Joshua Patrick. They are ecstatic. We wish them all good luck and most of all good health. For now, that will be all. See you next month. January 8, 2009 Milt Weisman 143; Whitey Bovitch 168, 147, 142 (457); Annette Cadesky 141; Abe Cadesky 174 (417); Eugene Stern 174, 144, 147 (465); Nelson Morciglio, Jr. 190 (458); Betty Schwartz 140; Roz Caliendo 153; Alan Hirschel 149; Pat Sponsler 146, 220, 175 (541); Nelson Morciglio 141, 166 (414); Esther Dimentberg 141; Andre Maimjuy 161, 177 (470); Shelia Guenard 165, 145, 160 (470); Vito Ferrantello 174 (420); Dave Maurer 159; Lorraine Reilly 160, 170 (446); Bob Hornby 149, 174 (452); Debbie Blackburn 143, 168 (431); Dorothy Elfont 164 (401); Marianne Morciglio 171 (431); January 15, 2009

Nelson Morciglio, Jr. 151, 179, 178 (508); Stuart Levine 168 (403); Milt Weisman 173; Whitey Bovitch 165, 167, 146 (478); Laurice Lutfy 149; Sal Darrigo 159, 190, 146 (495); Pat Sponsler 165, 144, 155 (464); Nelson Morciglio 178, 168, 142 (488); Andre Maimjuy 173, 162, 199 (534); Shelia Guenard 202, 177, 169 (548); Mel Ginsberg 162, 164 (421); Annette Cadesky 144, Hannah Horn 154, 166 (454); Alan Misonzmick, 145; Alan Hirschel 144; Lorraine Reilly 143, 153 (415); Bob Hornby 148, 210, 202 (560); Vito Ferrantello 172, 170 (477); Betty Schwartz 142, 164 (437) January 22, 2009 Dorothy Elfont 160 (406); Jeanette Dunn 152; Laurice Lutfy 145, 163 (439); Sal Darrigo 169, 196, 166 (530); Alan Hirschel 149; Sheldon Klein 191 (430); Lorraine Reilly 146, 150 (432); Bob Hornby 154, 164, 180 (498); Debbie Blackburn 151; Betty Schwartz 155, 160 (427); Annette Cadesky 143; Abe Cadesky 143; Hannah Horn 146, 141, 175 (462); Nelson Morciglio Jr. 168 (435); Stuart Levine 173 (409); Milt Weisman 160, 180, 164 (504); Whitey Bovitch 183 (447); Pat Sponsler 148, 217, 180 (545); Nelson Morciglio 151, 159, 171 (481).


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CVE REPORTER

FEBRUARY 2009

As I See It

By ROLF GRAYSON Our Washington Mess The revelation of that crook, Madoff, is just another symptom of a disease which has invaded our financial system and with it, our democracy, involving many nations worldwide. While Mr. Madoff’s actions are nothing short of criminal and should be punished accordingly, they are no different than the Russian roulette played by Wall Street with our money. Paraphrasing the Nobel laureate, Paul Krugman, in the New York Times, Madoff did things not very differently than the mortgage brokers of Wall Street. Hurrah, another red herring was found to divert the public’s attention from the real and larger problems besetting our financial system. According to the latest information available, banks and investment houses who so far received $350 billion bailout (taxpayers’) money, continue to pay astronomical salaries and bonuses to their executives using some financial jargon and gymnastics to obscure the truth. I was also amazed to hear them say that the vast experiences of these people deserve such salaries and make them invaluable

to the management of their institutions. If the collapse of our economy is a sign of that experienced management, we would all be better off to fire each and everyone of them and start from scratch unless, of course, they mean their devious ability to fool the public is what they need. This financial fiasco, however, is symptomatic of our society’s approach to free markets and global economy. The free market philosophers who encouraged the removal of all restrictions, allowing the market and Wall Street to regulate themselves, have proven once again (hopefully, permanently) that they are completely wrong, as human greed is ever present and unstoppable. Imagine sitting in front of a huge trough filled with money from which you can take almost with impunity, how many could, and would, resist while those charged with oversight look the other way or took as well? Although we read about warning signals having been voiced by some, those in charge, so intoxicated with their unheard of wealth, threw any and all cautions to

the wind and turned a deaf ear. Much worse than that, however, the CEOs of those institutions to whom we gave bailout money from our taxes, now spit in our face refusing to divulge how the huge sums of money were spent, while we wait in unemployment lines and food banks, losing our homes and life savings. The open question once again remains, why was Mr. Madoff the only one arrested while all those other swindlers and mortgage bundlers who knowingly sold worthless investments continue to live free and high on the hog? As if this mess was not enough! The older one gets the more intrusive and overwhelming our political system has become. Overriding all else are the astronomical sums of money collected and spent as they exert ultimate power and influence. It defies the imagination that, in this day and age where global communications are instant, this country requires two years of campaigning for anyone to run for elected office. No other country in the world spends more than two months, at best, to accomplish their elections. True, we are a large multi-ethnic country but there is no reason in the world that we should spend

all that time and money to elect a congressman, senator or even a president. It is also a given that much money is made by the corporate media, where that money so badly needed for our health care, infrastructure or school system, would much more benefit our country. Another major negative in this lengthy campaign is all the detrimental character assassination, which is a direct consequence of the need to repeat the same story over and over again. It does get so bad in the end that if anyone would take these inane accusations seriously, one would not only not vote for either candidate, but expect one or the other to be arrested. The most disturbing aspect of our election process, however, is the money being poured in by corporations or other types of political or quasi-political organizations which yields them undue influence. As one retiring elected official stated, 80% of their time in office is spent on fundraising for their next election, giving them little time to do the job they were elected for. If this new, and most promising administration taking over on January 20, 2009, a team whose solemn promise was change, would start with this insane, circus-like atmo-

sphere surrounding this very serious and important event, we would have gained much. 1. No more money by either private or corporate donors for any election. 2. An equal sum of money given to each legitimate candidate, by the government, to run his/her campaign. 3. The media must offer one debate, free of charge, which is all that is needed. 4. A complete end to any lobbyist giving anything whatsoever to any candidate or elected official, under any circumstances. 5. Election campaigns can last no longer than 90 days. 6. Foolproof voting machines must be identical all over the country. 7. Voters should be able to vote either in person, by mail or the internet. 8. Voting period to be one week and polls close at the same time all over the country. This is the only way any, and all, undue influence will be removed forever and we, the people, will finally elect the candidate of our choice without being hammered by brain-washing advertisements.


FEBRUARY 2009

CVE REPORTER

http:/www.xxxx.com By SY BLUM/ Associate Editor Dear Reader: does the headline to this article make any sense to you? If it does, welcome to the 21st Century. If it does not, perhaps you would be interested to learn what it means. As every computer user knows this is the key to the world in this new century. It is known as a web site address. Quite simply, when properly addressed, ie., replacing the xx with a specific name, you have entered the world of the Internet. What is the Internet, you ask? Actually, there is a very simple answer. It is basically the linking together of millions of computers around the world into one gigantic network . There is no central office, no controlling agency, and not much oversight, and, moreover, no one owns it. You gain access to the Internet by paying a fee to service providers who connect your computer to the Internet . . .and the world. There are very seldom any other charges. The Internet is believed to have been started around 1969 by a U.S. Department of Defense supply base in America’s Southwest. By linking their crude computers of that era to those of their suppliers (vendors) they hoped to expedite the entire procedure. Due to the obvious success of this experiment, other computer links were established. As computers became more sophisticated, more user friendly and more affordable, millions of computers joined the network from around the world.. This network is connected primarily by telephone cables, fiber optics, etc. so that any one computer can, with the proper address connect to any other computer anywhere in the world . . .in seconds! The Internet also provides a personal feature known as email. This is, essentially, a 21st

Century version of snail mail, which, of course, is known as the postal service. The use of e-mail enables an individual computer user to correspond with another (or many others,) again, anywhere in the world . . . in seconds. As the Internet continues to expand, its tentacles are beginning to encroach upon the long-established bastions of the world’s business, especially newspapers. For instance, within the lifetimes of all of us here in CVE the daily newspaper has been our principal means of learning what was going on in the world around us. With the advent of the computer that is no longer completely true. As most of us should be aware, the newspaper business is in deep trouble; circulation is down everywhere, ostensibly because of the Internet. As a result news reporting has been curtailed to the point that most of today’s newspapers are little more than shopping guides. What news they do contain is condensed to the point that you seldom get the whole story. To get that you very often find a line at the end of the article that says in effect, “For complete details go to www.Sun-Sentinel(or whatever).com.” Then, of course, there is the time factor. For a story to appear in a newspaper it must be set in type, made up into pages and printing plates and then printed. To say nothing of distributing and placing that newspaper at your doorstep. Of course, this takes time so that your morning newspaper seldom contains late news, sports results, etc. With computers, the news is on line within minutes of its occurrence, and remains so for most of the day. On a personal note, several times I have witnessed the end of a sports event on tele-

vision and then immediately switched to my computer and found the final score already there! Strangely enough, virtually all newspapers have online (read Internet) web sites. Which means you can read all the news in your area, or any other area, for free! This is supported, more or less, by online advertising accompanying the news. I must be missing something here, but it seems like economic suicide to me. In fact, television, to a lesser extent, is also suffering from the inroads of the Internet into our daily lives. As with newspapers, you frequently are referred to a web site to read the complete details of a TV news item. However, the overwhelming advantage (in my opinion) of using the Internet to access the news is the fact that you can avoid being locked in to an avalanche of seemingly neverending, suffocating commercials that dominate today’s television programs. As an example: it takes upward of three hours to televise a NFL (football) game that actually takes one hour to play, plus several two-minute time-outs and time-outs between quarters. All the rest is commercials which often are on the screen simultaneously with the action. Admittedly, there are many ads on the Internet, but for the most part they are not nearly so pervasive. One of the greatest advantages of using the Internet is the ability to find out information that would take a great deal of time by other measures. There are so-called search engines, which do exactly what the name implies. Foremost is Google. This almost unbelievable feature of the Internet was started by two young computer whizzes. By linking many thousands

of computers, each one full of information, Google is able to answer almost any question about almost any subject . . in seconds. I have used it countless times and have always received an answer of some sort. However, like all things, the Internet and the computer does have some downsides. For one thing, it is not for everyone. For senior citizens to learn to use it at this stage of our lives is asking a little much. But, it can be done if you are determined enough. It is definitely not rocket science.

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This writer was fortunate in that toward the end of my career as a typesetter, our plant switched over to computers and I was offered the chance to learn it. That was some 20 years ago and there has been a computer in my home ever since. In conclusion, please be assured that this article has not been written to embarrass in any way those of us who do not have computers. The purpose of this column is simply to present just one more facet of how the world is changing . . . and to invite you to get aboard if you are so inclined.


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CVE REPORTER

FEBRUARY 2009


FEBRUARY 2009

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A Little More Travel Stuff or You’ll Never Get Rich By HELENE WAYNE

This is a continuation of my dissertation on the joys of being a travel agent. Let’s start off this time with some places in Italy that were a joy to behold. We spent a few days wandering around Florence (Firenze) that is the city that the statue of David is in. When I walked around to the back of the statue I truly stood there in awe of the magnificence of this piece. His legs, ankles showed every blood vessel, and every muscle that you see in a living person’s legs. If he wasn’t so huge in size and made of marble, he could have been flesh and blood. We went up into the Seven Hills of Rome. There sits a palace that belonged to one of the popes, a magnificent

Social

continued from pg 1B

President Arline Greenberg introduced the new 2009-2010 officers and Board: Bernice Schmier, 1st V.P; Lillian Jaffe, 2nd V.P.; Beverly Kornfield, Treasurer and Claire Eskind, Secretary. The Board will consist of Norma Weiner, Sandy Schmeir, Milton Neufeld and Lucille Robins, the new Entertainment Chairperson, who will present an event for

building with gorgeous manicured gardens. Our travel agent’s warning to our clients was, if you cannot walk up stairs do not go down to see these majestic gardens. Going down is always easy, but there are no elevators to take you back up. Take a launch to the beach when you are in Venice. It is an opportunity for us average people to see how the other half lives. Out there, they have cabanas and massage tables right on the sand. All of this is on the Adriatic Sea. We ordered a wine cup. It is quite large, the color of the glass is red and it has gold leaf images on it. One is of a menorah, another is Moses and the Ten Commandments. Since it was so large and of course delicate, we had to

members to enjoy 12 months of the year. As is the custom, a small gift is given each year. This year, yours truly took a photo of each couple or single. The photo will be presented in a frame at our January meeting. The 65 Social Club is accepting new members. It is open to couples only, one of whom must be 70 or under. For information, call Lillian Jaffe at 954-360-2941

have it shipped home. We knew from experience that these companies are completely reliable and did not hesitate to pay and leave our shipping information with them. To shorten this story a bit, it did not arrive for months after we got home. We knew that it would take time, since it had to be blown and painted. We contacted them and were informed of the date it had been shipped (which was quite a while from the time that we were inquiring about it). I said I would shorten the story, well it seemed after much research there was a longshoreman’s strike in NYC and the crate was on the docks waiting for them to settle. It finally did arrive and we have enjoyed it ever since.

Part of the pleasure of this type of work is that you befriend people in the business when you make arrangements over the telephone. We did business with a small airline in upstate New York. Not only were they a small airline, but also their aircraft were small, nine seaters to be exact. We would speak to them mostly every day and our contacts became our (telephone) friends. They used to beg me to come up (free of course) on one of their planes and spend a couple of days with them. But “chicken” Wayne wasn’t about to ride up to northern NY State in one of those little toy planes they flew. Then one day, they called and said that they had ordered a new aircraft, a bigger one, so come on up now.

It turned out to be a 19 seater that still chills my bones when I think of it. When I turned them down again, we continued our friendship on Mr. Bell’s invention. The Piece de Resistance was the annual conventions presented by the wholesalers to whet the appetites of the many travel agents. It was always in a fancy hotel and they wined and dined us. It’s really a fun job, making plans for peoples’ vacations, almost makes you feel like you are on a constant holiday. I highly recommend it for folks who like going places (or feeling like they are). Travel Agents note: There are lots of perks in this type of work but, believe me you can never support a family with the salary scale offered.

Want to take a trip? UNITED ORDER OF TRUE SISTERS is having a cruise on the Royal Caribbean’s LIBERTY OF THE SEAS, starting April 25 to May 2, 2009. Ports of Call are San Juan, St. Maarten, Labadee, Haiti. Inside cabin $599.00 per person double occupancy, Outside cabin $749.00 per person double occupancy. Port charges, all taxes and bus transfers included. $250.00 per person deposit. Final payment due February 14, 2009. For reservations call Jean Keats 954-421-6311. Note: All organizations are requested to send in their trip plans to the Reporter for the 2008-2009 season.

Arline Greenberg-President


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CVE REPORTER

FEBRUARY 2009

Our Canadian Neighbors

My Kingdom For a Chair

By ELI COHEN

By CARL K. WEITZ

While anyone can tell by the eh retort to a question they don’t understand, that person is probably from our good neighbors to the North, I have learned from our Canadian friends that there are differences between us, some quirky, some baffling, some radical and some just funny. Geographically the Province of Quebec, in land area, is longer in area than if you drove from Montreal to Deerfield Beach. The Province of Saskatchewan refuses to go off of Eastern Daylight time, even if the other provinces are on a different schedule. The province of Alberta does not pay income tax as their oil output gives each of their residents tax relief. In currency, they have the Loonie one dollar coin, the two dollar coin is the Toonie and the least expensive paper currency is the five dollar bill. Queen Elizabeth adorns every denomination of the paper money and it comes in different colors as opposed to our greenbacks only. The Province of Quebec mandates snow tires on all vehicles during the winter which expires March 15.

Snowbirds vacationing here have to get coupons costing money to show they are in Florida and if they have to return there, it covers them. Margarine had to be white not yellow (to protect industry there, now rescinded). Also you could not get government approval for an outrageous name you would give to a newborn baby (since rescinded). Faucets are called taps in Canada. Different boards for different commodities like milk, chicken, eggs, meat, cheese, etc. set a minimum price that stores have to sell the above items for. Therefore it is more expensive for food, sometimes double what we pay. There are many political parties in Canada, including a Communist party with no seats in the government. Taxes are heavy with a 30 to 50 percent levy common, but their medical and hospital bills are covered by the government free of charge. Their colleges and universities, with McGill (like Harvard) a prime example, charge a low tuition fee of only $4000 yearly. In sports, hockey is still

their favorite with football and basketball trailing behind. In football their version features three downs, not four, and their field is 110 yards long, not 100 like ours, plus it is wider. Their only complaint is that there isn’t any newspaper space devoted to them and that the only time it is different is when the weather forecasters predict a cold front coming down from Canada. They also do not appreciate the tax inequity for snowbirds from Canada residing in Century Village. Their national anthem is short and sweet: O Canada Our home and native land True patriot love in all Thy Sons command With glowing hearts we see thee rise The True North strong and free! From far and wide O Canada we stand on guard for thee God keep our land glorious and free! O Canada we stand on guard for thee. O Canada we stand guard for thee.

A chair! A chair! How much for a chair? During the recent holiday season, you couldn’t spot an unoccupied chair or lounge at the Lyndhurst South pool. There were so many visitors that the usual suspects (residents), in some cases, were forced to supply their own chairs. Some were annoyed and disappointed but those with the right frame of mind enjoyed the sight of little ones frolicking in the pool to the delight of their parents and grandparents. Of course, another reason for the overcrowding was the temporary closing for repairs of the Grantham and Markham pools, both in the same general area. My kingdom for a chair! Have you peeked into our Clubhouse art rooms lately? It’s just amazing to see how many of our talented senior artists are taking advantage of what our community offers them in the realm of creativity. Some never reached their potential until their arrival at Century Village East. Keep up the wonderful work! When I stroll past the Clubhouse Staff Office, I am constantly impressed with the sheer volume of information that is disbursed, information about clubs, lectures, classes, courses, movies and shows. This is another reminder of how efficiently our community runs, thanks to our very professional staff. Do you have friends from up North who are interested in settling in South Florida? Be an agent for Century Village East which has the best in activity and entertainment. Tell them about our frequent professional shows and our

clay modeling and sculpture classes. Then go on to extol stained glass, lapidary, lectures on various topics, etc. In the area of athletics, mention the pentanque course (the French version of bocci), our splendid exercise room, the terrific golf course, multiple tennis courts, ping pong, shuffleboard and volleyball. Did I leave anything out? In addition to the very latest in exercise machines to keep you fit, we have the largest pool room that I have seen in any senior community. Did I fail to mention a frequent CVE activity, cards? Bridge, canasta, mahjong and poker seem to hold the most interest for our residents. All of this is available at low cost or no cost. Now let me tell you about an overwhelming experience that I had recently. In the waiting room of a doctor’s office I met an old friend, Al Lattman, who greeted me warmly and told his customary funny story. Al always had a joke or funny story to relate. He told me that he was 99 years of age. I told him that I would write him up in the next issue of the Reporter. Al said, “No, wait until I am 100 and then write me up!” Only about two weeks later, I spotted Al’s obituary notice in the Sun-Sentinel. Hail and farewell, Al! I and so many others will miss you. Bless you! Remember those old bumper stickers that made us laugh? Teachers Have More Class; Nurses Do It With Care; Hunters Do Anything For A Buck; Postmen Do It First Class. Stay well.

We are the next BEST THING TO FAMILY

Our name implies that we are the next best thing to family and our reputation supports it. We are senior advocates providing the following In-Home services in your community:

sPersonal Care Services sHomemaking sLive-in Service sBath Service sTuck-in Service sOvernight sMedical Escort

954-484-2773

Please ask about our Senior Referral Incentive Program Licensed (#299991002) and Insured. ©2008

www.almostfamily.com


FEBRUARY 2009

Hospital Errors By DR. SYLVIA PELLISH Hospitals can be dangerous places. Don’t be passive when you check into a hospital. Take an active role in your care and treatment to cut down some of the risks. There are bacteria and viruses that can make you very, very ill and even kill you. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states there are 1.7 million health care associated infections every year. Another way of stating this is - the number of lives lost to medical errors is roughly equivalent to a World Trade Center attack every two weeks during the year. A quarter of a million deaths in hospitals nationwide were found to be preventable (the Fifth Annual Health Grades Patient Safety on American Hospitals Study, 2008.) Germs can live for many days on surfaces and can cause severe infections. Beginning three to five days before surgery, shower or bathe daily with clorhexindine soap. It can be bought without a prescription. It will help remove any dangerous bacteria you may be carrying on your skin. On the day of your operation, remind your MD that you may need an antibiotic one hour before the incision. For many types of surgery, a pre-surgical antibiotic is necessary, but is often overlooked by busy hospital staff. Ask that hospital staff clean their hands before treating you. This is the single most important way to protect you in the hospital. Don’t be falsely assured by gloves. If caregivers have pulled on gloves without cleaning their hands first, the gloves are contaminated before they touch you. Before the doctor uses a stethoscope, ask that the flat surface be wiped with alcohol. Stethoscopes are often contaminated with staph and other dangerous bacteria because caregivers seldom take time to clean them between patients use. If you need a central line catheter ask your MD about the benefits of one that is antibiotic-impregnated. Avoid using a urinary tract catheter if possible, since they often cause infections. Less than one in 10 hospitals did a daily check on their patient’s continuing need of a catheter and when it should be removed. If you must have an IV, make sure its inserted and removed under clean conditions and changed every three to four days. Your skin should be cleaned at the site of insertion, and the person treating you should be wear-

ing gloves. Medication errors plague all of health care. How can you know if a nurse is giving you the wrong medicine or the wrong dosage? Make sure the medicine is for you. Ask the nurse to compare your ID with the name on the prescription before you take it. If you are worried about being too aggressive, just remember your life is at stake. The bottom line: the best way to survive the hospital is to practice good survival skills. Medicare has stopped payment for some preventable conditions caused by poor treatment in hospitals. Patients also won’t pay. Hos-

pitals will be required to bear the cost of their own mistakes (this is since October 1, 2008). Ailments caused by lack of quality controls that result in complications for the patients: 1. Incompatible blood transfusions. 2. Procedures to retrieve tools left in a patient. 3. Injuries related to a fall while in the hospital. 4. Bed sores or pressure ulcers. 5. Infections acquired by patients while staying at a hospital. 6. Catheter associated with urinary tract infections. 7. Infections that occur at the site of surgery. 8. Bubbles of air or gas

CVE REPORTER

entering the blood stream during medical procedures This year Medicare will list three more additional hospital errors to the non payment list. Consumers Union, which has been campaigning for bet-

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ter control of hospital infections, generally approves of the new rules. They believe it is going to be a very powerful incentive for hospitals to improve care.


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CVE REPORTER

FEBRUARY 2009

Ask Bea

What’s Bugging You?

By BEA LITNER

By HARRY L. KATZ

Dear Bea: What can you tell me about the Historical Society in Deerfield? Rose Dear Rose: The Deerfield Beach Historical Society is a nonprofit educational organization open for tours to the public. The Society is located at the meeting room of the Old School House Museum (behind City Hall, 232 NE 2nd Street, Deerfield. The Society offers “History at High Noon” the third Wednesday of the month from September to May, 12:00 -1:00 p.m. The programs still to come are: Feb. 18: Cindy Griffin speaks on Women in History. March 18: Tom Moore shares Historic Postcards. April 15: T.B.A. May 20: Deerfield History. Bring your bag lunch, drinks and dessert provided. For more information call Carolyn Morris, Executive Director, at 954 4290378. Or (www.deerfieldhistory.org)

Another place of history is The Historical Commission located at 151 S.W. 2nd Street, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. It was created in 1972 to encourage awareness of local history. For its programs and publications call 954 765-4670. The Historical Commission usually meets at 7:00 p.m. on the first Tuesday of every month. Plaza Library Upcoming events at the Library this month are: Israel’s Music – 60 Years, on Monday, February 9; 1.00 to 2:00 p.m. and Book Review Shut Up, I’m Talking, by Gregory Levey. This is a witty, insider take on Israel politics by a speech writer for the Israeli delegation to the United States and to Ariel Sharon. More “What the Bank Won’t Tell You.” 1. If a check bounces, you’re liable for a fee. 2. Sorry, we can’t afford to give out free toasters any more to new customers. Business is brutal! Send your questions to “Ask Bea” at the Reporter.

Fear occupies an inordinate part of our time. Fear of more illness, fear of the stock market, world politics, our children’s welfare and fear of the insects and other pests, etc. The universal fear that I would like to discuss is the fear of perceived danger of the toxicants that we use to control the pests. Living in an area that was once a semi-tropical swamp, we have perennial invasions of many pest species. We kill a colony of ants in the apartment, but another colony comes in to take its place. Most residents call the pest management people and wait for service; others are too impatient to wait for service and resort to using sprays, disregarding a subconscious fear of the danger of toxicants. Over 60 years ago, fear of toxicants was indeed real. That was before the BC (before Carson) Era and before the Environmental Protection Agency cancelled the registrations of most toxicants. I know of one case in which a woman disposed of her obnoxious husband by buying a tube of Electric Paste, in a hardware store, which

contained phosphoric acid rat bait. She squeezed some of it into his fourth glass of beer, and he died. The EPA has since removed all such toxicants from the retail market. In the process, however, they did a good job of overkill in warning of the dangers of all toxicants in our environment. This legislation all began after Rachel Carson published, Silent Spring, when a Congressional Committee was appointed to investigate the hazards of pesticides. A good friend of mine, Dr. Carroll Weil, was called to serve on that committee. He was president of the Toxicology Society of America and a Fellow at the Mellon Institute in Pittsburgh. The other members of the committee were all anti-pesticide people. The committee decided to ban the use of DDT because they said it was carcinogenic. Dr. Weill explained that the tests used to reach this conclusion were badly flawed. The committee argued late into the night, but Carroll would not agree to a unanimous decision to ban DDT. Finally, the committee promised that an addendum

by Weill could be published, and he gave up. This proved to be the death knell of millions of natives of third world countries who died of malaria from mosquitoes. DDT, that had prevented these deaths, has been taken off the market. One of the Myth Conceptions that plagues the mindset of the general public, as well as various regulatory communities, is that a low dose of a toxicant is just as bad as a gross dose that can cause a tumor, benign or cancerous. If this were true, according to Bruce Ames of the University of California at Berkley, we should not eat carrots, celery, parsley, mushrooms, cabbage, brussel sprouts, mustard, orange and grapefruit juices, pepper, cauliflower, broccoli, raspberry or pineapple. All these foods contain natural toxicants that cause cancer in rats or mice when they are tested at the same gross levels that are used to test pesticides. Dr. Ames further claims that the natural level of toxicants in these foods is far higher than the trace residues in treated foods. So, for those of you who are overly concerned about the pesticides that are on the market, all registered by the Environmental Protection Agency, you can remove pesticides from your worry list.


FEBRUARY 2009

CVE REPORTER

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Confusion Reigns – Payments to Seacrest

It Pays to Shop Around

By JANICE ZAMSKY

By ROLF GRAYSON

Making changes is never easy, especially when it is about payments and banking. As a college graduate, I don’t feel like I am a stupid idiot but I, like most people in my building, was very confused about this new process I called the Seacrest office and left a voice mail which was returned on the following day. When I spoke, and complained, to our dear Reporter Editor and COOCVE 2nd Vice-President, Steve Fine, he enlightened me completely, way better than the Seacrest mailings or presentations. Here is the sum and substance of all these confusing facts: 1. If you have Century Services for your appliances, air conditioning, etc. – this is not involved in this change. Century Services is a private company for which you pay an annual fee for your service contract. Do not associate it with the items listed below. 2. There are three differ-

ent funds you pay into, either monthly with coupons or by electronic direct payment withdrawal from your bank accounts (A, B and C). A. Cen-Deer: This is the one fund that stays the same. Seacrest is not involved with this fund. No changes for these payments, except for a very small increase of $2.00. Payments will continue exactly the same. B. CVE Master Management: In a letter dated December 15, 2008 and received on January 10, 2009, we were informed that Master Management will handle their payments through Seacrest for January and February (by the tenth of each month). The letter states a check for $86.00 per month, plus the monthly coupon, should be mailed or put into the drop box at the Clubhouse, inside next to the ID Office or outside in the drive-up box. C. Seacrest: As of January 12, the letter and coupon

book for Seacrest have not yet arrived. The January 10 payment date will be waived, as in item B, because of the lateness of these letters and coupon books. For items B and C, please follow the instructions in the respective mailings as to sending checks or establishing new electronic funds transfers from your bank for each, CVE Master Management and Seacrest Maintenance. Dear Editor: If it wasn’t for your most lucid explanation, I’d still be having restless nights. I can now resume getting my much-needed beauty sleep! P. S. If you do use the electronic funds transfer payment method, ask for a transaction history from your bank for December and January. Payments to Century Maintenance should not have been taken out of your account after December 15, 2008.

The Jews of India By BETTY SCHWARTZ, Assistant to the Editor I recently read a most interesting book entitled, The Girl From Foreign, by Sadia Shephard. It is the true story of a young woman whose mother is Muslim, father Christian and her grandmother was a Jew from India. She writes about her trip back to India to find her Jewish roots. This story so intrigued me that I had to research it and this is what I found. India is perhaps the only country in the world where Jews haven’t suffered antiSemitism from the natives. Judaism was one of the first religions to arrive in India. The first wave came to Kerala following the capture of Jerusalem and the destruction of their first temple there by the Babylonians in 597 BC. They were called Cochin Jews. They assimilated with the local population, and the community built synagogues and colonies there. A few centuries later, a shipwreck stranded seven Jewish families at Alibag, south of Mumbai. They were called Bene Israel; these families multiplied and integrated with the local Maharshtrian population and adopted their language, dress and food. They were nicknamed the Shanivar Teli (Saturday oilpressers) by the local population, as they abstained from work on Saturdays. Baghdadi Jews immigrated to India around 250 years ago from Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Syria and Yemen, settling down in the city of Mumbai and later spreading to Kolkata

and Burma. They were traders and quickly became one of the highest earning communities in the city. As philanthropists, some of them donated their wealth to public structures. The David Sassoon Docks and a Sassoon Library are some of the famous landmarks still standing today. Unfortunately, the Calcutta Jews left only a few traces of their presence for a century and a half in that metropolis – three impressive large synagogues, two small prayer halls, two schools and a cemetery. An estimated 9,000 people in the northeastern Indian states of Mizoram and Manipur started practicing Judaism in the 1970s, claiming to be descendants of the Tribe of Manasseh. They have since been recognized by Israel as a lost tribe and are formally called Bena Menashe. Unlike many parts of the world, Jews have historically

lived in India without antiSemitism from Indians. It was only a millennium and a half later, after their first arrival, when they suffered for being Jews. That is when the Portuguese, fresh from the Catholic Inquisition, arrived on India’s western shores and started persecuting the Jews they found. The majority of the Hindu community however, has been very tolerant towards Jews. There are perhaps 5,000 to 6,000 Jews remaining in India, and many of them are highly assimilated Bene Israel in Mumbai. The majority of Indian Jews have migrated to Israel since the creation of the modern state in 1948. As the Jewish community of India dies out, a part of India’s history dies with it. Unfortunately, the Jewish presence has been written over by contemporary India and is only visible to those in search of it.

The old, often used phrase, “The more things change, the more they stay the same,” Often true and applicable, the unavoidable fact is that things change. It is a part of life which has to be accepted as well. Having said that, we see that Century Village is no exception and provides us with ample ongoing changes. Hurricane Wilma was not only a massive storm causing extensive damage but it brought with it a new, and completely different, approach to the way we conduct business here in the Village. While Group One did an expeditious job as far as getting our Village back on track and our people responsible for getting them are to be complimented, they (Group One) left a lot of disappointment, bitterness and questions of integrity in their wake. The efforts of the COOCVE officers and Attorney Mark Bogen, along with his staff, brought a sense of sanity back to our Village. The resultant factor, now, is that each building is truly autonomous and must arrange their business themselves which I believe was the intention when CVE was originally created. One of the last community efforts undertaken by COOCVE in July of 2008 was the blanket appraisal of all buildings, raising our vastly under-priced

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buildings to a more current level. Subsequent to that, during monthly COOCVE meetings, they introduced an insurance broker who, in addition to the existing Plastridge Co., would now provide individual policies for each building and would no longer tie us to each other as the previous practice did. Some buildings are luckier than others. We in Richmond A are very fortunate to have an enterprising and thorough minded board member who was not satisfied with the status quo and happily accepted the assignment to investigate. And investigate he did! He first engaged a licensed and certified appraiser who reduced our existing July appraisal by almost one million dollars. This of course drastically lowered our premium. Having also found another insurance carrier, we now benefit from a reduction in insurance cost of between $3,000 and $4,000, plus a greatly reduced deductible. Not being satisfied with his accomplishments, he introduced anyone he could buttonhole and a number of other buildings followed our example. It is hoped that the readers of this article will be interested enough to investigate their own situation, and I am sure my fellow board members will be only too glad to pass along this information.


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CVE REPORTER

FEBRUARY 2009

Our World of Glass By HARRY LINER

Telescopes For thousands of years, men and women have sought the mysteries of the night skies. The science of mathematics and the human eye could only go so far. The quantum leap from the naked eye observation to instruments added vision was one of the great technological advances of mankind. It all began with the lens. The origin is unknown. The story of the telescope is full of mystery, intrigue and surrounded by controversy. As far back as 1300, spectacles were used by the Italians for eyesight improvement of close work. The Venetians were very secretive about their glass works, and were held under guard on the Isle of Murano so as not to reveal the secrets of their craft. The finest polished eye glasses came from Murano’s craftsmen. The secrets held for a while, then some of the skilled glass blowers made their way to Spain and north to Germany, France, England and Bohemia. All of Europe was experimenting in the production of eye glasses. As the story continues, the historians place the discovery of the telescope about 1600, in a little shop of an obscure Dutch spectacle maker named Hans Lippershey. Two children were playing with his lens, put two together, peered through them at a distant church tower and saw it magnified. Lippershey looked for himself and soon mounted lenses together creating his looker. In 1608, Lippershey tried to sell it to the Dutch Army but the offer was turned down because of claims from others that they had invented it. News of the invention spread rapidly. The same year the French ambassador at The Hague obtained one for King Henry IV, and the next year they were being sold in Paris and Germany under the name Dutch Trunks and cylinders. They soon appeared in Milan and Venice and by the end of the year they were being made in London. The most influential person connected with the telescope in the early days was the Italian scientist, Galileo. Within a month of Lippershey trying to sell his looker to the Dutch Army word of his invention reached Venice, when an unidentified stranger tried to sell one to the Senate, which referred the matter to its scientific adviser, Pablo Sarpi, who examined it. But

then the stranger and the instrument disappeared. Sarpi went to see Galileo, the city’s most respected instrument maker, who had just invented a new calculating machine. Sarpi described the new machine to Galileo, who then reinvented the instrument. The instrument was met with wide criticism and controversy, as many thought it did nothing other than create optical illusions. In March of 1610 Galileo published a description of his night sky observations. It astonished the learned world. He reported that the moon was not smooth, as previously believed, but rather rough and covered with craters. He explained that the Milky Way was composed of millions of stars and Jupiter had four moons. He challenged the long accepted geocentric view of the world system that the universe revolves around the Earth and accepted the heliocentric view that the solar system revolves around the Sun which was proposed 50 years earlier by Copernicus. Galileo had the proof. On April 14, 1611 a banquet was held in Galileo’s honor and the name of the instrument was named The Telescope. It was quickly accepted and then officially christened. The description of Galileo’s instrument was; a long thin tube where light passes in a straight line from aperture at the front objective lens to the eye piece at the opposite end of the tube. These have been called refractive telescopes, because the objective lens bends, or refracts light. Three hundred and eighty years later, in 1991, Colin Ronan, a historian of science and author of several works on astronomy, put forward the claim that the credit for the invention of the reflective telescope should go to Leonard Diggs. Leonard Diggs was an English mathematician and surveyor, whose device predates rival Dutch claims of 1608 by over thirty years. Mr. Ronan was invited to reconstruct a replica of Digges’ telescope. The design of the telescope is based on a description given in a manuscript report on military and naval inventions, written in 1578. Building the reflecting telescope, which consists of a convex lens at the front and a curved mirror mounted at the back, led to some surprising findings. Mr. Ronan discovered that when images are viewed from below or from the side they are

inverted. Enter Sir Isaac Newton a century later. Newton designed a reflecting telescope which also gives an inverted image, yet his drawings of a weathercock are portrayed upright. The solution to seeing an upright image requires a viewer to stand over the end and look backwards into the box. The version of the Digges’ telescope, which magnified images 11 times, has a small field of view of about 0.4 of a degree but this would have been very close to that of Galileo’s. Mr. Ronan is convinced that not only did the Diggs family (Leonard and Thomas) build the reflecting telescope, but also probably experimented with the refracting telescope of the kind which Dutch rivals sold in 1608 and which Galileo used in 1669. Since Sir Isaac Newton’s days, telescopes have multiplied ten-fold in area and scope. The findings that the larger the mirrors, and the finer the polishing, to allow light to access the aperture, the further the night sky can open its secrets and reveal its truths to the astronomers of the world. Some of the largest telescopes are perched on mountain tops all over the world. La Palma telescope in the Canary Island, Spain is the largest thus far, spanning 10.4 meters; Mauna Kea in Hawaii is 10 m.; in British Columbia, in Canada, the telescope is 6 m.; Cerro Paranal, Chili, a telescope is 8.2 m.; another large telescope is in Palomar Mt., California, 6 m.

If you are a traveler, spanning the globe, it would be the thrill of a lifetime to visit one of these observatories and check out the night

skies for yourself. “Nothing travels faster than light with the exception of bad news, which obeys its own laws.”


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Seniors May Qualify For A Power Wheelchair

Did you know... you still have time to change your Medicare Advantage plan? There’s still time to switch your Medicare Advantage health plan. But hurry! -ARCH ISYOURLASTOPPORTUNITYFORTHISYEAR “Humana helps me in this economic downturn, and allows me to keep more money. Services are outstanding. I think I get a lot for being a member of Humana.� Lois R., Humana Gold Choice Member Ž

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Medicare-approved HMO, PPO and PFFS plans available to anyone enrolled in both Part A and Part B of Medicare through age or disability. Enrollment period restrictions apply, call Humana for details. Copayments, service area and benefit limitations may apply. *Some exceptions may apply. M0006_ GHA03WLRR2

BRO 02/09

Medicare’s regulations now make it easier for seniors and others with debilitating conditions such as arthritis, stroke, heart and breathing problems, or diabetes, to obtain a power wheelchair at little or no cost. MIRACLE on WHEELS is trying to increase public awareness about the assistance options that allow seniors and the disabled to remain independent in their own homes rather than undergo difficult surgery or other expensive treatment, or resort to moving into a nursing home. These assistance options are available to anyone with problems getting around their home, or who are in danger of falling due to their medical condition. But they may become more limited in the near future, since Medicare may cut the amount they will allow for power chairs by 10 percent next year. So those who are suffering from any condition that severely limits their mobility should call Miracle on Wheels at 1-866-2006924 toll-free to learn about qualifying now for a power wheelchair at little or no cost.


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Birds of a Feather Text and Photo By JERRY SAXON down and land near our waterways. When they are hungry, they furiously peck the ground in search of small insects. They

Birds of a feather flock together, have you noticed? Flocks of ibis have invaded CVE. They tend to swoop

also appreciate handouts from Village residents. Our Village has been a good host to these friendly flocks.

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SUDOKU Sudoku doesn’t require any special math skills or calculations. It is a simple and fun game of logic -- all that’s needed is brains and concentration.

There is really only one rule to Sudoku: Fill in the game board so that the numbers 1 through 9 occur exactly once in each row, column, and 3x3 box. The numbers can appear in any order and diagonals are not considered. Your initial game board will consist of several numbers that are already placed. Those numbers cannot be changed. Your goal is to fill in the empty squares following the simple rule above. 1. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each row. 2. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each column. 3. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each 3x3 box. 4. A complete Sudoku puzzle contains the numbers 1 through 9 in every row, column, and 3x3 box. Hint: Start with a square that only has three numbers missing. Look at surrounding squares and grids to see which numbers you need to fill that 3x3 grid. SOLUTION ON PAGE 37B

JUMBLE

CRYPTOGRAM

By CHARLES K PARNESS

By CHARLES K PARNESS

1) OIGHTNN ( _) ( _) _ _ ( _) _( _) 2) BABIMODERR ( _) _ ( _) _ _ _ ( _) _ ( _) ( _) 3) YOANNE ( _) ( _) ( _) _ _ ( _) 4) CHELSAL ( _) _ ( _) _ _ ( _) _ 5) ASMALL ( _) ( _) _ ( _) _ _ What Quasimoto might have said: “ ( _) ( _)( _)( _) // ( _)( _) // ( _)( _)( _)( _) //

abc def pg bphf d jbdzf ybkpze xwlamew d gxalv. azof kam dlf dnadlc, xwflf pg zaxwIze kam odz ca. eabcd vfpl

( _) (_)( _)( _) // ( _) // ( _)( _)( _)( _) ?” Unscramble each word, then use the letters in the brackets to solve the jumble. Solution on page 37B

SOLUTION ON PAGE 37B


FEBRUARY 2009

CVE Duplicate Bridge Club Winners By BERNICE RUGA

December 2008 12/6/08: W. Kaufman/R. Silverman – S. Babich/W. Lillienfeld – H. Wiseman/J.. Wiseman – S. Cohen/S. Cohen. 12/13/08: G. Rothman/B. Weinberg – B. Levitt/B. Shtull – N. Cohen/B. Cohen

– S. Cohen/S. Cohen. 12-20-08: C. Krakower/S. Krakower – C. Hendler /M. Hendler. 12/27/08: D. Leviss/g. Rothman – S. Cohen/S. Cohen – B. Sudhaker/B. Weinberg – R. Davis/R. Devorin.

Bridge

By IRVING RUGA The words courtesy raise were first used by Freddy Hamilton, one of America’s great players. He was teaching bridge to a student who had just failed to raise him with the Kxxxx of his overcalled suit. The student was explaining that he had not bid because he only had three points. Freddy explained that when you have good trump support (such as Kxxxx), it is quite a good idea to give partner a courtesy raise, even if you have nothing else. “After all,” Freddy explained, “I just might have a very good hand with which I could not double.” This particular

partner never made that mistake again. Now that you understand the concept of raising your partner when you have good trump support, the question becomes, “How does my partner know if I have a courtesy raise or a good raise?” The answer is that with a good raise you must cuebid the opponent’s suit. This tells your partner who has just overcalled (or perhaps opened) that you not only have support for his suit, but that you also have a good hand. What constitutes a good hand? A hand with 10+ total points usually does.

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Calling All Readers By GLORIA S. SHOMER Here we are right in the middle of tourist season. We have survived all of the holiday dinners, taken the candles out of the menorahs and lovingly untrimmed the beautiful Christmas trees. Century Village has resumed its midseason lifestyle. Thanksgiving through New Year’s Eve has left us praying for world peace and diets that work. With the best intentions, we eagerly have put aside most of our New Year’s resolutions, after all this is the month we celebrate Valentine’s Day. Valentine’s Day – a day when we receive shiny boxes of chocolate, shiny boxes of red satin lingerie and hopefully, some beautiful treasures from our beautiful Library Boutique. Please come in and look around. Things in the library have miraculously remained the same. The price of becoming a Friend of the Library has remained the same. Two dollars allows you to personally reserve any of the New York Times best sellers. You will be personally notified when it is ready to be picked up. And you will receive a free book of your choice from our sales shelves. Last year, we instituted our new Library Lotto; when one of our Villagers joins up for the first time, he/ she automatically becomes eligible for their name to be drawn in the CVE Lotto. We also extend this privilege to those who are rejoining. I’ve enjoyed many new books this month. John Grogan, author of the New York Times bestseller Marley & Me has written a memoir titled The Longest Trip Home.

It’s about the different things that shape our lives. With his trademark blend of humor and pathos that made Marley & Me beloved by millions, John Grogan traces the universal journal each of us must take to find our unique place in the world. I’ve made a decision to reread every Anne River Siddons book on our shelves. Her newest book is Off Season. It is about loss, not only of a beloved husband, but of times gone by. Lilly has come to her beloved country home in Maine where she spent wonderful times with her husband. She carries his ashes to the shores of the ocean they both loved. How will she manage to go on without him? However, as she soon finds out, for all his devotion, her husband was a man of many secrets. Forced to reevaluate everything she believed about her marriage, she must not only mourn her husband, but learn how to forgive him. The thing that makes this novel so riveting is not the plot but the writing. Some of her sentences are pure poetry. This is one book where descriptions were so vivid that I actually smelled the tide coming in on Brighton Beach and felt the comfort that only being held by my father could bring. He told me that three special women were born in 1934 – Scarlett O’Hara, Mary Poppins and me. The winner of this month’s Lotto drawing is Bonnie Schwartz; please come and pick up your prize.

THE PUZZLER #5 SOLUTION FROM JANUARY ISSUE I did say this is a trick problem. Let us say that this trip is 200 miles long. At 50 miles an hour, the total trip would take 4 hours. Now if George drives the first half of the trip (a length of 100 miles) at 25 miles per hour, how long would that portion of the trip take? The answer

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The Puzzler #6 By: CHARLES K. PARNESS This is an easy problem. You can solve it by math or just reason it out. I‘ll provide both methods in the solution of this puzzler. Gladys, a resident of Century Village East has been having a hard time financially. She is a great baker, and decides to make some money by baking her specialty - apple pies, with a strawberry center. After completing the baking, she places each pie in a zip lock bag. Her plan is to take them to the Festival Mall and sell them there. The next day she starts out with all the pies she baked. On her catwalk, she meets Ethyl, a neighbor who wants some of her pies. Gladys sells her half of the pies she has plus half a pie. She rides the elevator to the first floor, and on exiting she meets another neighbor named Trudy. Trudy would also like some pies and Gladys sells Trudy half the pies she has left plus half a pie. Then as she is about to reach her car, she meets Sandy, another neighbor. Gladys sells Sandy half the pies she has left and half a pie. Gladys is more than thankful because of this last sale, Gladys has no pies left, and she does not have to waste gas going the Festival Mall. The question is this: How many pies did Gladys bake? Note, at no time did she divide, separate or cut any of the pies.

is four hours. Since driving the full length of the trip at 50 miles an hour will take the same four hours, George would have to travel at the speed of light for the second half of the trip, in order to average 50 miles an hour for the entire trip. As I said this is a trick problem.

Plumbing, Electrical, Remodeling, Repairs, Carpet, Wood, Laminate, Etc.


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CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild By MARION G. COHEN Do you attend the performances of our symphony orchestra? You are supporting an orchestra that is the pride and joy of our Village, as well as the community of Deerfield Beach. But the income from ticket sales is not sufficient to cover the cost of maintaining our orchestra. To raise funds for this purpose, the CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild was organized. Why should you join the Guild? Your support enables our symphony orchestra to bring you talented guest soloists, whose professionalism and virtuosity are recognized in the musical word. You receive invitations to attend two Open Meetings of the Guild at which professional musicians have been engaged to entertain you at no cost to you or your guests. Our fundraising activities are distinguished from others by a reputation for the difference. The orchestra that you support has gained the respect and admiration of the attending public, so much so that many of the performances are

sold out. The Orchestra has afforded an opportunity to so many of our residents to perform in its musical renderings, which are conducted by a professional conductor of renown. To reach its goal of raising funds for the Orchestra, the Guild plans trips to stage shows, ballets and operas. It also arranges a gala fashion show with entertainment, a luncheon and prizes. Members are privy to early notification of these events, permitting them to purchase tickets before the general public is informed. Most of these performances are sold out very early. If you have been procrastinating and have not paid your dues as of this date, please mail your dues of $10 for single membership and $12 for family membership to Jean Crown, Membership Chairperson, 173 Prescott I, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Since my last article in the Reporter, I have much to relate to bring you up to date with Guild events. On January 20, the CVE Symphony Orchestra

featured Alice Levinson, an established concert pianist, who has appeared throughout the New York metropolitan area and has performed as soloist in Carnegie Recital Hall, Town Hall and Steinway Hall. You may have attended our two-day trip with a difference to Naples and Fort Myers on January 27 and 28, 2009. The trip included a wine and cheese reception, a magic show, a musical dinner show of Church Basement Ladies, a narrated luncheon cruise on the intra-coastal waterway to the Gulf of Mexico aboard the Capt. J. P. and dolphin watching. Also, we dined, in style, at the historic Clewiston Inn. You will probably receive this issue of the Reporter the day following our Gala Fashion Show, scheduled for Sunday, February 8 in the Clubhouse Party Room. We like to describe our fashion show as the one with a difference. Why? Coldwater Creek, located at Town Center, will provide a narration by one of their managers. At the time of this writing, four professional

acts have been scheduled to entertain the attendees. Our luncheon is excellent, and you have your choice of menu. Finally, so many of you will be the recipients of a prize before you leave, so the day promises to be rewarding and entertaining from all aspects. On February 24, violinist Anton Miller, will join the CVE Symphony Orchestra as guest artist. Miller has appeared throughout the United States and abroad as soloist, chamber musician, recitalist and pedagogue. This Julliard graduate is currently on the violin and chamber music faculty at New York University and the Hart School of Music. On Sunday, March 1, join us at the Open Guild Meeting at 2:00 p.m. in the Party Room. There will be an excellent musical program by the Mary Margolius Cello Trio. Bring your friends, greet old acquaintances and make new ones. Tickets for the Miami Ballet at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts on Sunday, March 15, 2009 are sold outwaiting list only. The cost of $59, per person, includes transportation. Send your check to Treasurer Toni Ponto, 79 Prescott D. Please provide

your telephone number and the names of the attendees with whom you wish to sit. The performance will feature Concerto Barocco, music of Bach, choreographed by Balanchine; In the Night, music by Chopin, choreographed by Jerome Robbins; Symphony in C, Balanchine’s extravaganza, danced to Bizet’s stirring symphony. Tickets for Mozart’s opera, The Marriage of Figaro, to be performed on Thursday evening, April 2, 2009 are still available. This delicious comedy involving crossdressing, sexy servants and sex-crazed masters was a howling success from the onset – and although the 18th Century censors didn’t find its parody of the ruling class particularly amusing, we hope you’ll adore this evening of pure genius and joy. The cost of $74, per person, includes transportation. Send your check to Treasurer Toni Ponto, 79 Prescott D. Please provide your telephone number and the names of the attendees with whom you wish to sit. So, music lovers, I hope to see you at the opera or at the ballet or at the CVE Orchestra performance or at all of them!


FEBRUARY 2009

CVE Symphony Orchestra By BILL BRYAN

The CVE Symphony Orchestra Conductor, Dr. Clark McAlister, and the talented musicians brought the Auditorium to life again on Tuesday evening, January 20, by providing the CVE community with another musically-exhilarating program. As usual, the concert selections and professional guest musician, Alice Levinson, provided another program of dynamic performances. The Clubhouse Theater is still echoing from the evening’s performance of music written by Handel, Mozart, and Beethoven, as follows: Handel: Heroic March Mozart: Concerto No. 24 in C Minor (Alice Levinson, piano) Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 Century Village’s very own Alice Levinson performed Mozart’s Concerto No. 24 in C Minor for piano. Alice is a pianist, chamber musician and a conductor. She is a graduate of Brooklyn College, New York. She has performed at Town Hall, Weill Recital Hall and Gershwin Hall at Carnegie Hall. Mozart’s Concerto No. 24 in C Minor for Piano was composed in Vienna, in 1786, while he was also working on the Marriage of Figaro. It is said that in this piece of music, Mozart threw aside all considerations of accessibility, composing music that came straight from the heart. It is mentioned by several music writers that this is Mozart’s greatest concerto. Alice’s pyrotechnic performance was breathtaking. Her piano skill is definitely that of a master pianist. Her hands moved so quickly up and down the keyboard that they were almost a blur! As an encore, Alice played another inspiring piece written by Chopin. It was like a wonderful lullaby! We gratefully thank Alice for this inspirational and moving performance and for a most enjoyable evening. Following intermission, the orchestra played Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. The term symphony in orchestral music denotes the largest proportions. It is said that these words of Schicumann could

serve as a motto for the whole 19th Century. It is written that Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony is naturally of particular significance: the “fate symphony” or “through struggle to victory.” Anton Schindler, Beethoven’s secretary, wrote in his biography of Beethoven, in1840, that the key to his work was provided by its creator himself, when he spoke one day to the author the idea on which it was based with the words: Thus fate knocks at the door! when speaking of the opening of the first movement. Schott described the “shattering and violent effect of spectacular passages” in Beethoven’s music. Many audience members were quite moved by the evening’s performance. One in particular, in speaking about Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, mentioned that when Conductor, Dr. Clark McAlister, brought his hands down, the entire orchestra lowered the pitch of their playing. Then, wham! upon raising his hands, the full orchestra’s music pitched to the state of fury. It is hoped that this comment addresses Schott’s description of Beethoven’s Symphony of the “shattering and violent effect of spectacular passages.” Our next concert will be held on Tuesday, February 24, 2009 at 8:00 p.m. The program for this evening’s performance will be: Offenbach: La Vie Parisienne (Overture on Themes from the Operetta) Vieuxtemps: Yankee Doodle, Caprice burlesque, Op. 17 Wieniawski: Grande Polonaise De Concert, Op. 21 (Anton Miller, violin) David: Andante e Scherzo Capriccioso Op. 16 (Anton Miller, violin) Gounod: Symphony No. 1 in D Puccini: Three Arias for Orchestra (O Mio Babbino Caro from Gianni Schicchi; Humming Chorus from Madama Butterfly; and Musetta’s Waltz from La Boheme) Our professional guest performer for February 24 will be Anton Miller, violinist. Anton received his Bachelor of Music degree from Indiana University and was

awarded the prestigious Performer’s Certificate. He completed his Master of Music degree at the Juilliard School as a scholarship student of Dorothy DeLay. Since giving his Carnegie Hall concerto debut with the New York Chamber Orchestra, he has appeared with many orchestras in the United States and internationally. In addition to concert soloist, Mr. Miller has actively toured as a recitalist in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, England and China. In the United States, he has appeared at Alice Tully Hall, Bruno Walter Auditorium of Lincoln Center, Merkin Concert Hall and Weill Recital Hall of Carnegie Hall. Our fourth, and last, concert program of the 2008-2009 season will be: Mendelssohn: Hebrides Overture Saint-Saens: Concerto No. 2 (Roberta Rust, Piano) Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Note: the Conductor has the right to change the music listing at any time). It is again hopeful that this season’s concerts will attract full houses. The continuation of your CVE Orchestra is contingent upon the attendance of music lovers of all ages so tell all, bring a friend and please purchase tickets for each of the performances. After all, this is your symphony orchestra and how many communities have a Symphony Orchestra to claim their own? We most sincerely appreciate those who have made attendance at the concerts a significant part of their lives! We hope to see each and every one of you at our concerts in support of our new concert season of 2008-2009. As with all not-for-profit organizations our continuation is dependent upon a full house of concertgoers. Your CVE Symphony Orchestra needs your ongoing financial support (ticket purchases, donations, etc.) to succeed and to continue to bring annual concert programs to all of you. Please help us fill each and every one of the theater’s 1,600 seats during this concert season. We look forward to performing for all of you.

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In memoriom It is with deepest sympathy that we acknowledge the passing of two of our cherished orchestra musicians since last year’s concert season, Freda Brownstein, violinist and, Eleanor Mann, cellist.

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Freda and Eleanor were very accomplished musicians. They loved their instrument, the music and the CVESO. We feel assured that both Freda and Eleanor are “out there” somewhere looking after us.


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Movie Review-February

A Snowbird Reviews

By SANDRA PARNESS

By Janice Zamsky

8 p.m., Friday, February 20, 2009 8 p.m.

TRAITOR-The truth is complicated. When straight arrow FBI agent, Roy Clayton, heads up the investigation into a dangerous international conspiracy, all clues seem to lead back to former U.S. Special Operations officer, Samir Horn. Starring Don Cheadle, Guy Pearce PG-13 114 minutes Playing Monday, February 9, 2009 2 p.m., Wednesday, February 11, 2009 2 p.m., Friday, February 13, 2009 8 p.m., Sunday, February 15, 2009 8 p.m.

BRICK LANE- A young Bangladeshi woman, Nazneem, arrives in 1980’s London, leaving behind her beloved sister and home. Starring Tannishtha Chatterjee, Satish Kaushik PG-13, 102 minutes Playing Monday, February 23, 2009 2 & 8 p.m., Wednesday, February 25, 2009 2 p.m., Thursday, February 26, 2009 8 p.m., Monday, March 2, 2009 2 p.m.

MAN ON WIRE-1974, 1350 FEET UP. The artistic crime of the century. A look at tightrope walker Philippe Petit’s daring, but illegal, high-wire routine performed between New York City’s World Trade Center twin towers in 1974, what some consider, the artistic crime of the century. Starring Philippe Petit, Annie Allix, Jean-Louis Bondeau PG-13, 94 minutes. Playing Monday, February 16, 2009 2 & 8 p.m., Wednesday, February 18, 2009 2 p.m., Thursday, February 19, 2009

THE DUCHESS-There were three people in her marriage. A chronicle of the life of 18th Century aristocrat Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, who was reviled for her extravagant political and personal life. Starring Keira Knighley, Ralph Fiennes, Charlotte Rampling PG-13 110 minutes Playing Monday, March 2, 2009 8 p.m., Wednesday, March 4, 2009 2 p.m., Thursday, March 5, 2009 8 p.m., Friday, March 6, 2009 8 p.m., Monday, March 9, 2009 2 p.m.

Marty Brill – December 28, 2008 Heading into the height of our CVE winter season, there are three, four or even five shows a week. Therefore, I will try to be more brief in my reviews so I can leave space in the Reporter for more of the talented CVE writers who contribute to this great publication. Singer, Jon Zimmerman, opened the show on Sunday, December 28. Backed by a trio of musicians (a pianist, bass player and a drummer) the vocalist performed several foot-stomping rock and roll numbers which did not impress me. He redeemed himself with excellent renditions of Can’t Take my Eyes Off of You and two selections from West Side Story: Maria and Tonight. Scriptwriter turned comedian, Marty Brill, was a real treat. All of his jokes were original, no reruns for this performer. His delivery was rapid-fire (no memory lapses) and very audible. Formerly a writer for Mash and The Merv Griffin Show,

Brill is a well-experienced performer and actor. His humor hit a variety of targets: religions, politics, the stock market, and mothers (Italian, Irish and Jewish). His routine about past U.S. presidents featured great impersonations. I’ll try never to miss a comedian who’s been a scriptwriter; the program is sure to be imaginative and refreshing! Sol Zim In Concert – December 31, 2008 It was truly a special evening, spending New Year’s Eve with a superb entertainer like Sol Zim. Complete with a live four-piece band, Zim offered an appreciative CVE audience a little of everything – from opera to Broadway, Hebrew liturgical music to Yiddish favorites. An emotional Mameleh was his tribute to his mother. The emotional aria from the opera Turandot pleased fans of the late Pavarotti. Zim’s enthusiastic renditions of Am Israel Chai (Israel Shall Live), Sholem Aleichem and Adon Olam delighted the audience so much that Zim was easily persuaded to add 20 minutes

Our New Bar-B-Que Area Text and Photos by JULES KESSELMAN

Darria Robinson with 96 year old Adele Reed

Some of Newport S residents enjoying the beautiful day Not everyone knows that we have a new bar-b-que area between the Shuffle Board courts and the Gazebo. There are six grills and tables for the buildings/residents to use free of charge, by just getting a reservation from the staff office. On a beautiful, sunny and cool afternoon in January, President Carol

Cahill and the residents of Newport S were the first to take advantage of our new facility. Fifty people were present to enjoy delicious hot dogs and chicken with all the fixing’s and also comradery. Everyone had a name tag. This was a great way for the owners to get to know each other. Irving Kraus helping himself to the fixings

to his 90 minute show. The overtime portion was a real treat. Zim ran through the gamut of Broadway composers, offering a vocal sample of each one. It couldn’t get any better! Showboat – January 3, 2009 The live five-piece pit band was the best thing about this most mediocre production. Showboat, written by Oscar Hammerstein, is considered to be the first American musical. The live music was great; the costumes, the little bit of dancing and some of the vocal selections were good, but the acting certainly was another story, stodgy and amateurish. (Old Man River stood out as the best vocal solo). I do not enjoy writing a scathing review, but facts are facts. Many of the audience exited the theater at intermission. We sat in the back of the balcony (which was completely filled as this show was a sell-out) and saw and heard clearly most of the dialogue and vocal lyrics. However, (and not the fault of our balcony seating) at times, the sound system failed completely at certain dead spots on the stage, which did not add to the enhancement of this show. Freddie Roman – January 4, 2009 The new year is off to a much better start – I must report! Theatergoers rapidly recovered from the previous evening’s disaster, (a sinking Showboat) aided by top comedian, Freddie Roman, and his opener, vocalist Kathryn Morris, on Sunday evening, January 4. Singer Morris sang several love songs Taking a Chance on Love and Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered, then switched to swingier tunes like Blue Suede Shoes. Verdict: pleasant personality and voice, very versatile. Freddie Roman is always a treat – even if we’ve heard most of his material before. Since his Catskills on Broadway tour de force of about 40 years ago, this guy can do no wrong! He’s so likeable, his enunciation is great, his jokes are reruns – but nobody cares! The way he tells his very funny jokes, you can still get much enjoyment from hearing reruns. He touched upon the usual joke subjects: politics, sex and elderly couples, to name a few. His return engagements to CVE are always warmly welcomed – and justifiably so!


FEBRUARY 2009

Cooke’s Look at Books By RICHARD WILLIAM COOKE

A monthly look at books of interest – new and occasionally, not-so-new, fiction and nonfiction -- currently available at your public library, local bookstore or from online booksellers. Escape By Carolyn Jessop, Broadway Books, 413 pages, $24.95 “I was born into a radical polygamist cult. At eighteen, I became the fourth wife of a fifty-year old man. I had eight children in fifteen years. When our leader began to preach the apocalypse, I knew I had to get them out.” So writes Carolyn Jessop in this weird and shocking account of life in one of the most secretive religious groups in the United States. Jessop was born into the Fundamentalist Church of Latter-Day Saints, a group splintered from and renounced by the Mormon Church, and spent most of her life in Colorado City, Utah, the main base of the FLDS. Being coerced into arranged marriages with total strangers – often decades older then they were – was all she knew. What she didn’t know is that her husband’s whims would dictate her every move where they lived, how her children would be

treated, the money she earned as a schoolteacher, when they would have sex – which Carolyn could only refuse at her peril. No woman had ever escaped from the FLDS and managed to get her children out, too. But in 2003, Carolyn, with only $20 to her name, chose freedom over fear and fled her home with her eight children. Escape, written with co-author Laura Palmer, exposes a world tantamount to a prison camp, created by religious fanatics who, in the name of God, take over women’s lives. As one reviewer wrote, “This riveting book reminds us that truth can indeed be “much, much stranger than fiction.” Heat Lightning By John Sandford, Putnam, 388 pages, $26.95 In this latest John Sandford thriller, Virgil Flowers, the thirty-something, three-timesdivorced cop fond of wearing flowered hippie shirts and his blond hair long, is back, much to the delight of the author’s fans and critics. In Heat Lightning, Minnesota residents are shocked when mutilated bodies of war veterans are found near Vietnam Veteran War Memo-

rials – each one shot twice in the head and with a lemon stuffed into his mouth. Additional evidence indicates that the victims were viciously tortured before being killed. When the assassins continually manage to stay one step ahead of the police, the authorities put Virgil Flowers on the case. Yet even Flowers, with his razor-sharp intelligence, has trouble figuring this one out. As he digs deeper into the case, he gets a sinking feeling that there are many more potential victims out there. Can he find them before the killers do? His investigation leads him to a visiting professor who is also a prominent anti-war activist and his halfVietnamese daughter, Mai. But, as always, in Sandford thrillers things are not what they seem. Filled with audacious plotting, rich characters and the brilliant suspense that have made Sandford’s books so popular, Heat Lightning is a heart-pounding, roller-coaster of a ride that does not disappoint. The Place to Be By Roger Mudd, Public Affairs, 413 pages, $27.95 Roger Mudd joined CBS in

CVE Knitting Club Text and Photos by JULES KESSELMAN The CVE Knitting Club held their first Fair, in the Clubhouse Party Room, in January. The public was invited to see their handmade items such as sweaters, blankets, dolls, slippers, scarves, mittens, flowers and

many beautiful baby items. These items were available for purchase by the public. The proceeds from the sales will go to the True Sisters. Some of the blankets that were not sold will be donated to the Veterans’ Hospitals

for our wounded veterans. Unsold children’s hats will be donated to hospitals serving children who have cancer and have lost their hair due to chemotherapy.

CVE REPORTER

1961 and quickly became one of the network’s star TV reporters. He became a familiar face as he covered the historic Senate debate over the 1964 Civil Rights Act, appearing at the steps of Congress every morning, noon and night for the twelve weeks of the filibuster. Mudd was one of the half dozen major figures in the CBS News lineup of broadcasters at a time when the network’s standing as a provider was at its peak. In this fascinating new book – subtitled Washington, CBS and the Glory Days of Television News – Mudd gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at how the bureau worked during those “glory days” and writes of the rivalries, egos, pride, competition and ambitions of the star reporters who had to cope with the frustrations of conveying the world’s news to a national television audience and do it in thirty minutes, minus commercials. Roger Mudd worked alongside Dan Rather, Marvin Kalb, Daniel Schorr, Lesley Stahl, Connie Chung, George Herman, Bob Scheiffer and Eric Sevareid. Of The Place to Be, Bob Scheiffer, CBS News Chief Washington correspondent, writes, “Roger Mudd was the best of all of us and he tells the whole story of those days as only he could – the titanic battles with the government and our rivalries with each other mixed in with some of the funniest political yarns I have ever heard. I laughed out loud and even shed a tear or two.” And Jim Lehrer of PBS’s NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, adds, “Finally, somebody has chronicled what it takes to practice quality journalism on network television.”

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The Executor By Michael Kruger, Harcourt, 180 pages, $23.00 By turns, hilarious and heartbreaking, The Executor, written by one of Germany’s foremost literary figures, is a tale with a shocking twist of an ending. Following the suicide of his best friend, the book’s narrator is called to Turin, Italy to resolve the will and literary estate of this famous writer and professor. It’s no easy task, as Rudolf left behind not only a menagerie of house pets (a goose, several ducks, tortoises, a hedgehog, dwarf rabbits, a peacock and Caesar, the old dog), but a huge library of books and research materials. Somewhere under this mountain of papers lies Rudolf’s magnum opus, a work so great that he claimed it would be the “world’s last novel.” But the narrator has other obstacles to overcome. There’s the trio of women Rudolf left behind! Rudolf’s widow, Elsa; his fiercely protective secretary, the mysterious Marta; and his unlikely lover, Eva, a third-rate art historian who suddenly reappears. All three women are looking for something the narrator isn’t sure he can give. And his attempts to shield his dead friend from public scorn may backfire in ways he could never have imagined. Like all great friendships, this one turns out to have its secrets and, as the narrator attempts to piece together Rudolf’s unfinished last work, the reader is treated to a beguiling and completely satisfying meditation on just how much one artist can know of another.

Why We Became Snowbirds in CVE, Deerfield Beach By JANICE ZAMSKY If a picture is worth a thousand words, let this

Lila Kolinsky with one of her knitted dolls

picture of our home speak for itself!!

Sewing teacher, Rita Wyrgatsch, with a knitted child’s dress Milwaukee, Wisconsin – a.k.a. Siberia, USA, December, 2008


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FEBRUARY 2009

CVE REPORTER

Sudoku Solution: Cryptogram Solution:

OLD AGE IS LIKE A PLANE FLYING THROUGH A STORM. ONCE YOU ARE ABOARD, THERE IS NOTHING YOU CAN DO.

Jumble Solution: 1) Nothing 2) Bombardier 3) Anyone 4) Shellac 5) Llamas Answer: “Does My Name Ring A Bell?”

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Prose&

Brother, Can you… They’re bringin’ back that same ol’ song singin’ it like it was sung – Brother, Can you spare a dime? It’s the ol’ depression roll blues swingin’in from hard rock to no safe place face to face with daily news unpaid dues truth of truths recession Good jobs go prices high – prices low we don’t know how low is low… Dow Jones plunges credit’s sour rallies – losses in an hour Melancholy melody memory – reality work line/food line/ on-line tough time – Buddy, can you spare a dime? By SANDY WICKER

Valentine Memories

FEBRUARY 2009

Poetry

Soldiers

After the last salute the trumpet’s blare and marching boot, the last command and call to arms, the silent land where battle raged and left the page to history. Before the war we were boy scouts in love with uniforms and striking out. We spoke in fits and shouts enroute to school, without a doubt. The world lay at our feet, no challenge a scout could not meet. Before our stories were through we dug in, built families that grew. Grandchildren visit and want to see the medals and uniforms of our history. One thing is certain at this age, the battle is still in full rage. Loved ones lie in flowered fields, their armistice at rest, in peace. Old soldiers all are we, remembered by a red poppy.

Sunny Days in Florida On my daily walks In the morning, Remembering my doctor’s warning. Every person passing by Says “Hello, good morning.” I smile, feeling exhilarated By strangers. Walking, jogging, bicycling, Saying to me With music in their voices, “Hello, good morning.”

Live in Peace I try to justify life With a minimum of strife Proceeding down a path filled with flowers Without belligerence and dictatorial powers. A world filled with compassion And love that is never rationed A peaceful and trusting leadership Without guns and battleships. A Shangri-La right here at home With bells chiming in rhythm like a metronome Smiles on people’s faces Without concern for religions or races. A democracy of which we can be proud And we can shout it aloud Let there be peace in our time With a rhythmic beat of swing or ragtime. I sense new vibrations Signaling new sensations Where all people can live together With a tether that shall never sever. By GEORGE SHEVELOVE

Love stirs the soul with passion; a hunger for intimate contact Bodies blend, undulate, reach climax. Love stirs the soul with passion. Love brings peace, harmony and brotherhood. It connects all things, all beings. It strives to consummate eternity. Love completes the soul. By NORMA LOCKER

While in Toronto Where I reside, Cruel King Winter reigns Without mercy during Winter months. Feelings of well-being Envelope me every day During the winter months In Deerfield Beach, Sunny Florida.

Some got long stem roses in a white long shiny box By RONA SHEFLER By SHULA ROBIN Some got perfumes Wrapped in red ribbons Some got lace trimmed hearts Cupid Shot an Arrow At My Heart….And Missed of chocolates from an exclusive candy shoppe I could never understand males’ pathological fear of Valentines, Behaving as if this day is studded with active land mines. But after the flowers wither What is so downright agonizing about a day devoted to love? and the perfume drifts away A set-aside time for us to go over and above. and after the chocolates are gone too I still read the Valentine poem and love notes that you wrote me With your words My Darling, I love you. By SANDI LEHMAN

What Love Brings Love stirs the soul with music. Dulcet strains imbue every capillary The heart swells with joy when love is mutual. Love stirs the soul with music

Why not shower that special honey, With chocolates, flowers and even, money. You will always get thanked for a gift of bling, Yet, men come unglued, dithering and fumbling. The day has little to do with cards and presents, It is about emotions and your gracious presence. I have heard men state that this holiday is stupid, But, how can you not adore a cute, little Cupid? For those who are blessed with a significant other, Share something pleasurable with one another. We all know how hokey are hearts of red and doilies of lace, But, imagine the radiance of your lover’s face.

When I Was Young I still remember my old neighborhood I used to know All the local theaters with all its friendly shows The corner druggist we used to call Doc. He cured your aches and pains on the spot The days we bought from the sidewalk pushcarts, Instead of department stores, known as K MART Our school and street were safe and on the front stoop we sat When getting home late we carried a smile instead of a bat Played baseball in a lot full of sand Listening to a radio, was heavenly grand A teacher and a cop was held in high esteem And your mother sent you to school tidy and clean When a nickel was a nickel and a penny was a penny

It matters not whatever the gender, Just be generous, romantic and tender, My wish for all is a fun, happy Valentines Day, When expressions of love are allowed to come into play.

We were happy but never had enough of any So hold up your glass and fill it with wine Let’s drink a toast to the things We left behind.

By GLORIA DONNELLY

By BERLAND

Sometimes Sometimes we must face sorrow before we feel joy Sometimes we must feel sadness before happiness arrives Sometimes it’s necessary to struggle before we reach success Sometimes we have to cry deeply before a smile appears on our face. Sometimes we must lose ourselves before we find ourselves Sometimes we must face bleak darkness before we see the light Sometimes we will be surrounded by ugliness before we see bright beauty Sometimes we must hate before we can love. Sometimes we must look into the horror of our lives before we can find redemption. Sometimes we must experience deep pain before we find true pleasure and wonder in our lives. Sometimes. By JERRY SAXON


Century Village Deerfield Beach Theater Seating Plan

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Our 2008-2009 Season Has Many Broadway Musicals

MARTY BRILL

AL MARTINO

A CHORUS LINE - THE COMPLETE BROADWAY MUSICAL

STEVE SOLOMON’S

LENNY RUSH

“MY SISTER’S AN ONLY CHILD”

AMERICA DANCES

THE PLATTERS BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND

MORE BROAD WAY BROADW MUSICALS DAMN YANKEES DIRTY DANCING SHOW BOAT I LOVE A PIANO

RENEE TAYLOR & JOE BOLOGNA IN “IT HAD TO BE YOU”

DREAMGIRLS

FAVORITES

Together Again

CAVENDISH CLASSICS SOL ZIM THE INK SPOTS FRANKIE KEIN & MANUEL ARTE ADBACADABRA THE MUSIC OF “MAMMA MIA”

These shows are only a sampling of the great shows coming this season. For a complete listing, please see the advanced season brochure available at the staff office by mid July. All programs are subject to change, and/or modification.

The Annual Resident’s Show


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Attention: CVE Residents Starting 2009, the

Reporter will have a new Obituary Section. Please send via e-mail to cvereporter@ hotmail.com or fax to 954-421-9269 or hand deliver to

Reporter office, ATTN: Gloria Olmstead.


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GARDEN 1 BEDROOM 1 BATH PRESCOTT B LIFT IN BLDG. GARDEN VIEW, ENC. PATIO MARKHAM E FURNISHED, ALL TILE, BLDG HAS LIFT TILFORD T DECORATOR TOUCHES, PARTIALL FURNISHED TILFORD O FURNISHED, GROUND FLOOR, 2 A/C’S OAKRIDGE P BRIGHT & AIRY, MANY UPGRADES, GREAT LOCATION NEWPORT T FURNISHED, CURRENTLY RENTAL BLDG. OAKRIDGE E CHARMING DECORATED WITH A FLORIDA FLAIR, ALL TILE

$29,900 $40,000 $32,500 $35,000 $31,500 $35,900 $31,500

HI-RISE 1 BEDROOM 1 BATH HARWOOD C TOP FLOOR, NEW APPLIANCES, WATER VIEW

$46,000

HI-RISE 1 BEDROOM 2 BATH LUXURY GRANTHAM A FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW, STEPS TO CLUBHOUSE $59,900 GRANTHAM A FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW, STEPS TO CLUBHOUSE $69,900 GARDEN 1 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH DURHAM X COMPLETELY CLEANED OUT, FRESHLY PAINTED MARKHAM M CORNER, FURNISHED, RENTABLE BLDG. AT THIS TIME LYNDHURST F TILE & FLOATING WOOD FLOOR, WATER VIEW UPMINSTER M CORNER, GROUND FLOOR, NEW A/C, GARDEN VIEW FARNHAM L CORNER, LIFT IN BLDG. SCREEN PATIO, NEW A/C OAKRIDGE J FURNISHED, COMPLETELY REMODELED, ALL TILE VENTNOR R FURNISHED NICELY,ALLTILE, SCREEN PATIO WITH WROLL-UPS TILFORD F CORNER, GROUND FLOOR, FURNISHED, NEW A/C

$34,900 $67,000 $59,500 $79,00 $38,900 $59,000 $39,900 $46,777

GARDEN 2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH TILFORD J CORNER, FURNISHED, GARDEN VIEW, ENC. PATIO FARNHAM K GROUND FLOOR, FURNISHED, SHOWER IN MASTER BATH OAKRIDGE M FURNISHED, ALL TILE, REMODELED BATHS & KITCHEN TILFORD A ALL REMODELED, NEW KITCHEN & BATHS, ALL TILE VENTNOR E CORNER, FURNISHED, GARDEN VIEW FARNHAM K CORNER, GROUND FLOOR, FURNISHED, UPDATED TILFORD A ALL TILE, SHOWER IN BATH, WATER VIEW, SCREEN PATIO MARKHAM I CORNER, ALL RE-DONE, NEW WINDOWS, EXTRA CABINETS MARKHAM B CORNER, GROUND FLOOR, PARTIALLY FURNISHED OAKRIDGE Q CORNER, GARDEN VIEW, SCREEN PATIO, STEPS TO POOL

$67,000 $61,900 $63,500 $59,000 $53,900 $59,900 $61,500 $89,000 $61,900 $68,900

HI-RISE 1 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH CAMBRIDGE B FURNISHED, WATER VIEW, GREAT LOCATION BERKSHIRE B ALL, TILE, STALL SHOWER, POOL OUT BACK, CLEAN CAMBRIDGE A GREAT LOCATION, WALK TO POOL & PLAZA, FRESHLY PAINTED BERKSHIRE B ALL TILE, PARTIALLY FURNISHED, POOL VIEW

$62,000 $47,900 $59,900 $58,400

OTHER AVAILABLE PROPERTIES FOR YOUR INTEREST BOCA BARWOOD LOVELY 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH, FURNISHED, TOP FLOOR, STEPS TO POOL CORAL GATE CONDOMINIUM IN MARGATE LOVELY 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH WITH WASHER & DRYER IN UNIT BEAUTIFUL VIEWS

RENTALS GARDEN APARTMENTS MARKHAM M 1/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL - FURNISHED

$130,000 $79,000

$1,500.00 PER MONTH

CAMBRIDGE A CAMBRIDGE A SWANSEA A NEWPORT N HARWOOD D ELLESMERE A NEWPORT N NEWPORT Q BERKSHIRE B FARNHAM N HARWOOD F NEWPORT U HARWOOD D CAMBRIDGE A CAMBRIDGE F FARNHAM N CAMBRIDGE A

GROUND FLOOR, ALL TILE, WALK TO PLAZA & POOL GROUND FLOOR, ALL REMODELED, EXPANDED COOKS KITCHEN DECORATOR FURNISHED, STEPS TO POOL & PLAZA, ENC. PATIO FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW, STEPS TO POOL TOTALLY RE-DONE, GRANITE KITCHEN, MARBLE FLOORS COMPLETELY REMODELED, NEW KITCHEN & BATHS, ENC. PATIO GROUND FLOOR, WATER VIEW, STEPS TO POOL & TENNIS PENTHOUSE VIEW, NEW APPLIANCES, FURNISHED UPDATED BATH WITH SHOWER STALL, WALK TO POOL & PLAZA ALL TILE, FURNISHED, WATER VIEW, ENC. PATIO FURNISHED, ALL TILE, NEW APPLIANCES, ENC. PATIO WATER VIEW FURNISHED, SCREEN PATIO WATER VIEW, PARK OUT FRONT DOOR FURNISHED, WATER VIEW, ENC. PATIO, MINT CONDITION FURNISHED, ALL NEW KITCHEN WITH GRANITE COUNTERS FURNISHED, WATER VIEW, GREAT LOCATION ALL REMODELED, UPDATED KITCHEN & BATHS, ENC. PATIO FURNISHED, SHOWER STALL IN MASTER BATH, SCREEN PATIO

$55,000 $79,900 $47,000 $55,000 $77,500 $55,000 $39,000 $48,900 $48,000 $79,900 $79,900 $89,900 $59,900 $69,900 $69,900 $77,900 $63,900

HI-RISE 2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH SWANSEA B CORNER, BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO $76,000 ELLESMERE B EXTRA CABINETS IN KITCHEN, LARGE SCREEN PATIO $61,500 NEWPORT H COMPLETELY REMODELED, WATER VIEW, STEPS TO POOL $98,000 NEWPORT S WATER VIEW, ENC. PATIO, NEWLY RENOVATED KITCHEN & BATH $98,500 WESTBURY G CORNER, GROUND FLOOR, WATER VIEW, ENC. PATIO $64,500 HARWOOD E PARTIALLY FURNISHED, WATER VIEW FROM PATIO $60,000 FARNHAM N TOTALLY RE-DONE ALL NEW KITCHEN & BATHS, ENC. PATIO $95,900 OAKRIDGE A FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO WITH SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW $110,000 ASHBY D BEAUTIFUL WATER VIEW FROM ENCLOSED PATIO, UNFURNISHED $79,000 GRANTHAM F GREAT LOCATION, FURNISHED, SCREEN PATIO WROLL-UPS $79,900 LUXURY OAKRIDGE VENTNOR RICHMOND OAKRIDGE OAKRIDGE VENTNOR VENTNOR OAKRIDGE VENTNOR

2 BEDROOM 2 BATH U ALL RE-DONE, GRANITE KITCHEN, ENC. PATIO SLIDING WINDOWS G CORNER, FURNISHED, REMODELED KITCHEN C GOLF VIEW, PAINTED, FURNISHED, ALL NEW APPLIANCES D CORNER, REMODELED KITCHEN & BATHS, ENC. PATIO D FURNISHED, NEW A/C, NEW CARPET IN BEDROOMS G REMODELED, NEW KITCHEN & BATHS, PAINTED, GOLF VIEW G LAMINATE WOOD FLOORING, GOLF VIEW, STEPS TO POOL D REMODELED KITCHEN & BATHROOMS, PRESERVE VIEW G FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO, GOLF VIEW, STEPS TO POOL

TILFORD J TILFORD J MARKHAM I NEWPORT P ISLEWOOD A

2/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED 2/1.5 ANNUAL RENTAL – FURNISHED 1/1.5 ANNUAL RENTAL – FURNISHED 1/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED 1/1.5 SEASONAL RENTAL – FURNISHED

HI-RISE APARTMENT RICHMOND E 2/2 ANNUAL RENTAL – FURNISHED OR NOT NEWPORT U 1/1.5 ANNUAL RENTAL – UNFURNISHED

$127,900 $99,500 $119,900 $135,800 $87,000 $99,000 $115,000 $139,900 $108,900

$1,600.00 PER MONTH $800.00 PER MONTH $800.00 PER MONTH $1,000.00 PER MONTH $1,500.00 PER MONTH

$850.00 PER MONTH $975.00 PER MONTH

Reporter February 2009 Volume 32 Number 5  

By ANITA LYNN much larger, brighter and the staff is very excited about it! Upon my arrival, re- ceptionist Sharon McLear, CVE REPORTER PAGE...

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