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AUGUST 2010

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Board of Directors of COOCVE Meets THIRD TUESDAY of the Month at 9:30 a.m. in the Party Room Official Monthly News/Magazine of the Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida

AUGUST 2010

Your CVE Information Guide, 80 PAGES

VOLUME 33, NUMBER 11

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS SEMINAR PRESENTED BY THE CIVIC AND CULTURAL COMMITTEE OF COOCVE Text By JUDY OLMSTEAD Photo By GLORIA OLMSTEAD On Wednesday, July 7, 2010, in a room packed to capacity, Penni Long, from the Emergency Management Division of Broward County, provided valuable information to the residents of Century Village East on the do’s and don’ts of hurricane preparation and survival. For those who were unable to attend, information can be obtained at www. broward.org/hurricane, www.FloridaDisaster.org, and www.noaawatch.gov for ongoing environmental threats, including hurricanes. Century Village is not in a mandatory evacuation

zone, so anyone needing to go to a special needs shelter must pre-register before a hurricane is predicted. The special needs shelters are only set up for people with minor health issues so any residents confined to bed will need to go to a hospital before the hurricane hits. There are also special shelters for the oxygen dependent, which are set up to generate power 24/7 following a hurricane. For more information, go to www.broward.org/atrisk, call 954-831-4000 or 311 or the Broward County Human Services department at 954-357-6385. If you have

In This Issue 



Condo News

 Features

■ A Seacrest representative will be available to meet with you regarding any concerns that you have at the COOCVE/ MM offices 8

■ Farnham J celebrated the 4th on the 5th and everyone had a great time 47

■ Exercise classes will soon be offered in the evenings and on Saturday mornings 73

■ If you love vintage automobiles, share your memories with Stan 38

■ There is always something new to learn in order to prepare for a hurricane 1

■ August 15 is the 65th

■ Advance season tickets must be ordered by August 31 16 ■ How the Association can collect rent from a tenant when the unit owner falls behind in paying fees 17 ■ There will be several important amendments on the ballot in November 33 ■ Recycling baskets and bags are available for free to Century Village residents 15

anniversary of V-J Day

commemorating Japan’s surrender to the Allies 67 ■ It is amazing how many things from the past have faded out of existence, but also trigger our fondest memories 57 ■ The average person owes about $8,000 in credit card debt 65 ■ Some thoughts on the changes in TV programming since its inception back in the 50’s 55

medical needs, you should also pre-register by calling these numbers so that the police and fire departments can identify vulnerable residents and make sure that everything is alright after a disaster hits. While there have been numerous pamphlets distributed to residents in the past, Ms. Long presented her hurricane do’s and don’ts in an interesting and informative style that emphasized important steps often overlooked. For example, if you plan to leave town when a hurricane is on the horizon, let someone in the building know, and leave a telephone number where you can be reached after the storm is over. It is not enough to just stay away from doors and windows when the hurricane is blowing through,

you must prepare your bathroom with enough food, water, flashlights, blankets, pillows, batteries, and a radio to sustain you if the hurricane

avoid damage from falling branches. Take pictures or video all of your belongings in order to be prepared for an insurance

Hurricane Preparedness Seminar stays around for hours like Andrew in Miami in the early 90’s. While hurricane winds are unpredictable, park your car away from trees to

claim. Stock up on nonperishable food and water. Emergency Management will NOT be giving out water until 72 hours AFTER the hurricane See SEMINAR, pg 3

Master Management Commentary By AL SMITH, Executive Director/ Master Management With the Dog Days of summer upon us and daily heat indexes over 100° F you might want to drop by the Tilford pool and enjoy our temperature controlled water provided by two brand new reverse cycle heat pumps that provide both water heating and cooling. They maintain our pool water at a constant temperature providing heating in the winter and keeping the water cool and refreshing in the summer. The design of the village’s new irrigation system is proceeding on schedule. CVEMM received 50% Design Documents on July 22 which are currently under review by staff and the members of the

Irrigation Committee. Research Irrigation, Inc., our irrigation contractor for preconstruction services, is also doing the value engineering, component cost comparisons, and conducting the first constructability review. Research Irrigation will be providing us with the first

SPECIAL NOTICE COOCVE BOD Meeting For August is cancelled Next meeting will be September 21, 2010 All Directors please make an effort to attend

cost estimate by the end of July. Upcoming project milestones are: August 13, 2010 Complete coordination with the City of Deerfield Beach August 30, 2010 100% Design Documents September 17, 2010 Construction Documents There have been a lot of people who have expressed concern about the floating vegetation in our canals. As a result I asked Todd Barhydt of Aquatic Systems, Inc., our canal maintenance contractor, to come and speak to the CVE Master Management Board of Directors meeting on July See COMMENTARY, pg 3


cv blank michelle color:CenturyVillage

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7/26/10

CVE REPORTER

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AUGUST 2010

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1 Bed / 1 Bath – Garden Apt Ventnor F – Cozy, fully furnished, clean and bright………………………………………….$25,000.00 Durham M – Unique kitchen, newer carpet, furn, tiled patio, close to pool………………….$28,500.00 Farnham L – One bedroom, nicely furnished, must see……………………………………..$54,900.00 Ventnor F – Remodeled kitchen, new vanity, near pool and tennis…………………………….$33,900.00 Tilford M – Attractive, nice furn, ready to move into, freshly painted………………………..$39,900.00 Markham G – 2nd floor, mirrored dining room, priced for quick sale…………………………$26,900.00 Durham J – Nicely Furnished, 2nd fl, custom closets, next to pool, brick walkways….………$36,900.00 Oakridge J – Furnished, new frige, encl patio, hurricane shutters in front and back……………$29,900.00 Lyndhurst B – Has new kitchen, walk to club and pool………………………………………….$30,000.00 Durham A – Across from club, fantastic lake view……………………………………………….$35,000.00 Westbury J – Gorgeous, updated kitchen, open half wall, great location…………………………..$48,000.00 Farnham D – Lowest priced, not bank owned……………………………………………………….$20,000.00 Durham O – Close to pool & club, needs TLC………………………………………………………$27,000.00 Durham E – Water front,bldg claims rentable……………………………………………………….$25,000.00 1 Bed / 1.5 Baths Farnham C – Nicely Furn, 2 New A/C Units, Encl Patio, Close to East Gate………………….$34,900.00 Ventnor I – Quiet area, near pool, bldg claims rentable, move in condition……………………$35,000.00 Cambridge A – Deluxe one bedroom unit, walk to plaza, club, pool, tennis……………………$46,500.00 Newport M – Location! Location!,wood floors,newer appliances,hurricane shutters……………$49,500.00 Farnham E – Garden, corner with lift, fully furnished……………………………………………….$45,000.00 Farnham H – Corner unit,lots of tile,newer appliances,walk to club and tennis…………………… $59,995.00 Durham U – Beautifully appointed with fine furniture,turnkey,move in condition………………..$49,900.00 Prescott B – Cottage like setting,encl patio,newer appliance,bldg has lift………………………….$37,500.00 Ellesmere D – Corner, beautifully furnished, move in condition, lake view………………………$64,000.00 Grantham E – Desirable Grantham section,encl patio,directly across from pool……………………$45,900.00 Prescott E – Renovated unit,Pergot floors,NewA/C,close to shopping……………………………..$35,000.00 Cambridge B – Beautifully furnished,very desirable area,across from clubhouse…………………..$62,000.00 Berkshire B – Patio is sunny in morning,close to clubhouse,walk to plaza,2nd floor……………….$46,900.00 Tilford R – Very quiet,furn,carpet & tile,pool & tennis are steps away……………………………..$39,000.00 Berkshire B – Cheerful & attractive,well maintained,close to pool,club,& plaza…………………$53,900.00 Lyndhurst L – Magnificently renovated corner, new tile & paint……………………………………$37,500.00 Durham R – Nice quiet area,all tiled,clean,newer appliances……………………………………….$39,500.00 2 Bed / 1.5 Baths Prescott E – Two bedroom overlooking majestic garden, Quiet & Serene……………………$47,900.00 Grantham F – Golfcourse view, first floor unit, enclosed patio………..…………………….$64,900.00 Farnham P – Cozy comfortable 2 bedroom garden unit, near east gate…………………………$44,000.00 Ellesmere B – Renovated unit, ………………………..…………………………………………$39,900.00 Tilford F – Two bedroom, 1.5bath, garden in the quietTilford area. …………………………….$78,000.00 Farnham D – 2nd floor, 2 bedroom, corner, garden unit, encl patio……………………………….$69,900.00 Prescott J – Two bedroom garden, on lake, central air…………………………………………….$65,000.00 Farnham G – 2nd floor, corner, tile, designer fan & light fixtures, fabulous furniture…………….. $56,900.00 Farnham C – Furnished, corner unit, garden view, encl patio…………………………………….. $48,900.00 Tilford W – Partially furnished,clean,great lake view from patio,quiet area……………………..$48,000.00 Lyndhurst B – Beautifully renovated apartment, must see, won’t last………………………….…$72,500.00 Markham J – Corner,first floor,newer kitchen,unique bathrooms,come feast your eyes…………$79,000.00 Newport V – First floor, corner, wood floors, bldg claims rentable…………………………………$45,000.00 Ellesmere B – 3rd floor, golf view, floor to ceiling glass enclosed patio, newer A/C……………….$53,900.00 Grantham E – Most desirable area in CenturyVillage Community………………………………….$68,000.00 Farnham Q – Corner,2nd fl,new Refrig,countertops,backsplashes,sink,bldg claims rentable……$49,000.00 Swansea A – Updated kitchen,tile & carpet,close to pool,tennis,plaza……………………………$64,900.00 Ventnor E – Corner, furn, pool nearby, needs TLC………………………………………………….$43,900.00 Newport U – All wood floors, encl patio, new tile in bathrooms…………………………………….$53,900.00 Farnham L – 1st floor,corner,beautiful garden view,updated kitchen,newerA/C…………….…..$79,900.00 Islewood B – Desirable location,beautifully furn,tiled,encl patio……………………………………$52,900.00 Newport S – Totally remodeled,everything top of the line…………………………………………….$89,900.00 Durham H – What a beauty? Bldg claims rentable………………………….………………………….$79,00.00 Markham O – Tile & carpet, hurricane shutters, encl patio………………………………………..$52,900.00 2 Beds / 2 Baths Luxury Lyndhurst K – Prime Location, near clubhouse and pool…………………………..….…$125,000.00 Richmond F – Two bedroom luxury, walk to plaza, club, tennis, and pool………………..$89,000.00 Richmond E – Magnificent luxury in meticulous condition, traditionally furnished……….$84,900.00 Lyndhurst I – Golf course view, walk to club, newer appliances…………………………..$80,000.00 Ventnor G – Wow! What a kitchen, must see to appreciate…………………………………$74,900.00 Oakridge F – Luxury unit with both preserve and water view……………………………….$84,000.00 Ventnor H – Luxury piece of paradise with golf course vew…………………………………$85,000.00 Ventnor H – Updated kitchen, tile & carpet, encl patio, hurricane shutters, golf view…………$75,000.00

Fo l lo w u s o n :

w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / C e n t u r y Vi l l a g e O R

Tw i t t e r @ C e n t u r y Vi l l a g e s

M o r e N A T I O N A L a n d I N T E R N A T I O N A L a d v e r t i s i n g t h a n a n y o t h e r B r o k e r. To l l - f r e e

1.800.237.6701

or

954.698.5900

w w w . c e n t u r y v i l l a g e . c o m C e n t u r y V i l l a g e ® Re a l E s t a t e , I n c . B e n G . S c h a c h t e r, L i c e n s e d Re a l E s t a t e B r o k e r. Pr i c e s / I n v e n t o r y s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e w i t h o u t n o t i c e .


AUGUST 2010

Seminar

continued from pg 1

and the government will NOT be giving out any food or ice WHATSOEVER after a hurricane. It has been determined that it is dangerous to have people going out and looking for water before the first 72 hours of clean-up has passed and that enough stores in the area have generators so that food will be available for purchase. In other words, residents are responsible for their own safety and welfare during and after a hurricane. So BE PREPARED. Pharmacies will

Commentary

continued from pg 1

15. Todd reported that the floating vegetation we are seeing is Hygrophila, an exotic invasive aquatic plant that is a recent arrival in Florida (within the last five years).  The plant is used extensively in the aquarium industry and was released into the South Florida canal systems from people dumping aquariums in the canals, where it proliferated.  Since our waterways are either part of or fed by the C-2 Canal we get whatever comes down the canal, good or bad. Five years ago we didn’t have any Hygrophila in Century Village East; it is seasonal and the only way to fight it is by spraying, which we do on a regular basis, and are increasing the frequency for the next four months.  When the

refill a prescription when a hurricane is predicted, even if it is before the normal refill date. Portable telephones do not work if the electricity is out, so you need to have a hard line telephone with a cord, even to call 911. Do not stay on the line, because telephone service is often limited, and emergency calls need to get through. DO NOT use candles in a storm. There will be no fire trucks at your building if you start a fire. Stock up on plastic bags and aluminum foil to keep crackers and other

food items fresh. Stock up on plastic knives and forks and paper plates and cups in the event the water is tainted and you cannot wash dishes. Make sure that you have enough food and water for a minimum of three (3) days after the hurricane passes through. One gallon of water per person per day is recommended. Do not call the utility companies. They will be aware of the outages and you will just be tying up the telephone lines (if you have telephone service). Hospitals are the number

Hygrophila plant is sprayed it breaks away from the bottom and floats on the surface. The root system remains alive to spring forth again.  What you are seeing is the dead and dying portion of the plants that the spraying has killed or is killing.  It will stay on the surface as it decomposes, eventually sinking to the bottom. The floating vegetation can be mechanically removed, but that is very expensive and it will still come back, as more plants are killed by spraying.  Aquatic Systems recommends putting our money in weed control (spraying) rather than mechanical removal.  CVEMM is however investigating the feasibility of mechanical removal. So far the tropics have been quiet this hurricane

season; let’s all keep our fingers crossed. All bids are in and just in case, pruning and thinning of trees in common areas will begin in early August. Repairs to the fence surrounding the village are winding up. Damaged sections of the fence have been repaired or replaced, and the barbed wire on the top of the fence has been removed in compliance with current city of Deerfield Beach codes. I have had questions about the large sinkhole that developed along Century Blvd. in front of Cambridge A. It was caused by a collapsed underground sanitary sewer structure on a line feeding a lift station. It was repaired by the City of Deerfield Beach Utilities Department at no cost to Century Village East.

one priority for resumption of service. If you leave the Village, make sure you have your ID with you. No one will be permitted to enter gated communities without an ID. Keep grills and generators OUTSIDE. DO NOT walk through standing water. After Andrew an entire family died when they walked through a puddle unaware that a downed line lay at the other end of the puddle. If you sustain any interior flooding, call an electrician before turning the breaker back on.

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In conclusion, while the seminar lasted less than an hour, it was both interesting and informative. If you know of a resident in your building who is the responsibility of a caretaker, give them a copy of the Reporter and if he or she is unable to get assistance from a family member in preregistering the resident, have them call 311 or go to one of the COOCVE officers for assistance. Officers and Board Members of Condominium Associations are not responsible for the care of individual residents.


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CVE REPORTER

AUGUST 2010

The Mayor’s Message By PEGGY NOLAND, Mayor/ City of Deerfield Beach

cvereporter@hotmail.com Editor-in-Chief STEVEN H. FINE Assistant to the Editor Betty Schwartz Editorial Staff Seymour Blum Judy Olmstead Wendy Rosenzveig Betty Schwartz Activities Editor Sandy Parness

Production Sid Goldstein Christie Voss

Sid Birns

Photo Journalists Jules Kesselman Al Miller

Advertising Consultants Susan Dove Arlene Fine Estelle Sabsels Office Staff Lori Benoit, Norman Bloom, Seymour Blum, Carol Carr, Susan Dove, Arlene Fine, Rhoda Jarmark, Estelle Kaufman, Sharon McLear, Barbara Orenstein, Sandy Parness, Toni Ponto, Betty Schwartz, Estelle Sabsels, Mary Ann Surrette Staff Cartoonist Alan G. Rifkin Alvin Sherman 1913-2000

Prepress Technician Christie Voss

Columnists and Regular Contributors Shelly Baskin, Sid Birns, Norman L. Bloom, Sy Blum, Mary Catherine Castro, Herb Charatz, Marion G. Cohen, Richard William Cooke, Arlene Fine, Harry L. Katz, Jules Kesselman, Dory Leviss, Harry Liner, Dr. Norma Locker, Pauline Mizrach, Deerfield Beach Mayor, Peggy Noland, Gloria Olmstead, Judy Olmstead, Lori Parrish, Charles Parness, Dr. Sylvia Pellish, Phyllis Pistolis, Commissioner Marty Popelsky, Eva Rachesky, Bernice Ruga, Irving Ruga, Betty Schwartz, Gloria Shomer, Helene Wayne, Carl Weitz, Lucille Weitz, Jerry Wolf, Robert Winston, Len Witham, Janice Zamsky. Business Manager Steven H. Fine Circulation Outside Pubs., Inc. Barbara Turner

Proofreaders Seymour Blum Carol Carr, Sid Goldstein, Estelle Kaufman, Toni Ponto, Wendy Rosenzveig, Betty Schwartz

As I write this month’s article, the City Commission’s summer recess is coming to an end, and city administrators are busy finalizing the recommended budget for fiscal year 201011. Ahead of us all lies a busy budget schedule, which began with the presentation of the proposed budget at the City Commission meeting held on Tuesday, August 3. The recommended budget is available for review on the city’s website, www. Deerfield-Beach.com. The public will have the opportunity to speak about the budget at two upcoming public hearings at City Hall to be held September 7 and 21. I encourage you to get involved in what is happening in your city by attending Commission meetings, not just at budget time, but throughout the year. The City Commission represents the will of Deerfield Beach residents, but to do justice to that responsibility, we must hear your voices.

The CENTURY VILLAGE EAST REPORTER is published monthly and distributed, without charge, to the residents of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida. It is published for the edification of said residents, and contains reports of the monthly meetings of the corporations, Board of Directors and its Committees, as well as news, bus and theater schedules, and contributed articles of current interest to the residents. The Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Inc. aka COOCVE, a not-for-profit corporation, its officers, directors, editors, staff, any committee people are not responsible for typographical errors or misrepresentations in any advertisements or article. They are not responsible and assume no liability for the content of, or any opinions expressed in, any contributed articles which represent the author’s own opinions and not necessarily the opinion of COOCVE. Acceptance of advertising for products or services in no way constitutes an official endorsement of the product.

Information to contributors: The Reporter reserves the right to edit, accept and refuse articles in the interest of brevity, clarity and the appropriateness of subject matter. Residents are advised to check with the person they are hiring to be sure they are licensed and insured. Due to space limitations, the CVE Reporter reserves the right to limit the length of all Minutes submitted. Strict priority will be given to Motions, Actions taken, and Information disseminated at the Meetings. Full copies of the Minutes can be obtained from the relevant Committees. -BOD CVE Reporter, Inc.

B

y far the most popular and widely read segment of our publication is the Letter-tothe Editor columns. We encourage letters that enable our readers to “sound off” on any subject. However, we will not print letters from the same person on the same subject in two consecutive issues. Also, letters must be from CVE residents, must be signed and, if possible type-written double-spaced. Please include your phone number. When we receive letters about applicable contracts, please remember the Reporter does not endorse any single company. Residents are free to make their own choices each year. Criterion for letters that will not be published: Letters in poor taste, demeaning and vastly untrue.

Ceremonial Bill Signing To the Editor: I want to thank COOCVE President, Steven Fine for attending and helping out with the June 24th ceremonial

By STEVEN H. FINE, President/ COOCVE

more motivated to attend our monthly Board of Directors meetings. The construction of the bus shelters is being delayed because the City of Deerfield Beach is requiring Land Surveys of all the properties involved. However, just as soon as the surveys are completed, we will move forward. This delay is very typical of the red tape in our city. I received an e-mail from Nancy Giordano, Chairman

See MAYOR, pg 17

The Mail Bag

From the President The summer started out somewhat eventful for CVE. On Wednesday, June 24, Governor Charlie Crist arranged to come to our Clubhouse for the ceremonial signing of Senate Bill 1196 into law. Included in this month’s issue of the Reporter beginning on page 28 is a summary of the condominium legislation. The summary which was prepared by the professional staff of the Judiciary Committee has been edited to delete those sections which were not related to condominium associations. It is recommended reading for all residents and especially Board Members, Officers and Directors. Perhaps if Directors are better educated, then they may be

This month, I’d like to share with you some national recognition that the city has received over the past few weeks. The first occurred on the July 8 edition of NBC Nightly News, when a wonderful organization called Surfers for Autism was featured during an event on Deerfield Beach. I am proud to say that Deerfield Beach hosted the inaugural Surfers for Autism event in 2008. The Surfers for Autism organization’s mission is to unlock the potential of

people with developmental disabilities, support advocacy for autism issues, and to raise funding for scientific research. At these events, children with autism are carefully guided into the waves by surfing instructors, and taught to surf, while family and friends cheer them on, and often participate. Fundraising is achieved through raffles or generous donations from local and national sponsors. These events are true examples of inclusion at the highest level, and I was honored to witness it first-hand. Yes, if you saw the piece on NBC, you may have noticed me standing on the beach, beaming from ear to ear as these children dazzled us all. I understand that the city has received calls about the event from as far away as Maine. If you’d like to learn more about Surfers for Autism, visit www. surfersforautism.org. On another positive note, many of you may have seen the recently released annual

of the Recreation Committee that contrary to what has been reported erroneously elsewhere, the pool houses will be closing at 10:00 p.m. The Budget and Finance Committee had a meeting on July 15, and determined that it will be necessary to reinstate the annual dues of $8.00 per unit, which is due by January 31, 2011. It is important that the associations include the appropriate amount in their annual budget. The budget will be submitted for approval by the COOCVE Directors at the November BOD Meeting as stipulated in the COOCVE By-Laws, 11.4. Reminder: August 24 is the election primaries. Your vote counts! That’s it for now.

bill signing of SB 1196 – Community Associations held at Century Village East. I am grateful to Senators Mike Fasano and Jeremy Ring for listening to the people of Florida and for their work to pass legislation that will help maintain the quality of life of residents and owners of condominiums. Again, it was nice to be with you as we signed this bill into law. Sincerely, Charlie Crist, Governor, Florida Response to Poor Turnout To the Editor: I am just as disappointed with the poor turnout for the meetings as you are. It makes it difficult to conduct business and keeps putting off things that need to be done. Personally, I don’t know why there are so many condo associations. As I understand it, there is a chair for each condo group. Can’t these chairs act for the entire group? Complaints and comments can be brought to these chairs and presented at the BOD’s meeting. If something is very major, the rep would show up. Otherwise, business can be conducted and motions

passed. If they don’t show up they have no vote, simple. DAVID GUTTMAN Tilford U (Editor’s Note: The Bylaws require attendance by Association Directors.) Life is Good – Sometimes To the Editor: In case you get hot this week think of the temperatures up North. It’s been 100 degrees for weeks. The opposite is true here in California. The temperature has been below 70 degrees all summer. Maybe the melting at Antarctica has had an effect on the global temperatures. I’m sure the next season will make up for it. Oops! We just had a 5.4 earthquake here in southern California. The chandelier swung and it lasted about 30 seconds. This is the second earthquake this month. The folks around here are used to it. Try to enjoy every day by taking advantage of the Clubhouse, classes and swimming pools. Hope to see you all well in November. SAM GLASSMAN Cambridge D


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AUGUST 2010

Village Minutes Minutes of Master Management Board Meeting July 15, 2010

Acting President Dan Glickman called the meeting to order at 9:33 a.m. on Thursday, July 15, 2010. In attendance were: Norman Bloom, Caryl Berner, Harry Chizeck, Anthony Falco, Dan Glickman, Bill Goddard, Jules Kesselman, Jack Kornfield and Mel Schmier. Via Telephone: Gene Goldman, Fred Rosenzveig, Ira Somerset, Dick Ciocca (later); Not Present: Bob Marcus and Alan Schachter. Guests Present: Executive Director, Al Smith; Office Manager, Donna Childrey; Business Manager, AJ Bock. PLEASE NOTE: THESE MINUTES HAVE NOT YET BEEN APPROVED BY THE BOD. (Viewers of this meeting on the internet, CVEDB.COM, can use the time points, below, as reference points.) (9:33:30) Mr. Glickman discussed an item on the agenda “Approval of Agenda”. He then asked the Board if anyone had any further items to be considered to add to the agenda. Jack Kornfield asked that the following motion be placed on the agenda. Mr. Kornfield moved for MM to immediately hire an attorney (for no more than $15,000) with specific expertise in cable contracts to consolidate its complaints and seek remedies. Mel Schmier seconded. Mr. Glickman ruled the motion out of order. Jack appealed the ruling and Mel Schmier seconded the appeal. After a detailed discussion and a role call vote, the ruling of the chair failed 5-7. (Yes: Ira, Dan, Harry, Gene, Fred; No: Norm,

Caryl, Anthony, Bill, Jules, Jack, Mel). The Board then spoke about their disapproval of “Approval of Agenda.” Mr. Glickman stated that this process will be eliminated and “Approval of Agenda” was removed from the agenda. (9:50:45) Mr. Smith introduced Todd Barhydt, the District Manager with Aquatic Systems. Mr. Barhydt distributed to the BOD a monthly report which was used for discussion purposes. Aquatic Systems has been taking care of the lakes/waterways, using contact herbicides at CV for the last 20+ years. They have been spraying chemicals on the waterways 2x per month to control the aquatic weed and algae. There are approximately 10 miles of perimeter lakes and they spend about 4-5 hours 2-3 times per month treating the lakes. The problem with Hygrophila is that as it spreads, they treat it, it breaks ups, floats to the top and then decomposes which is what you see now. The odor is coming from the treatment and the chemical decomposing process. Currently you are in the cycle and in the next 30-45 days the canals will look clean and by Feb/April you will see the same thing again - it is a cycle. You can add another visit to the contract. We would then be out here about 3-4 times/months to try and speed up the process. There are removal boats out there that remove the Hygrophila which cost upwards of $100,000. The cost to do the removal process costs

approximately $1,000/day, which is for 8 workers, and would take about 7 or 8 workdays. We have been in business for 34 years and don’t own a removable boat because we cannot guarantee that it will not be back in 3-4 months. Removal of Hygrophila will help with aesthetics but it is not a long term solution and we do not recommend this process. We will be adding a 3rd visit during the summer, at no charge, to show you that it does work. Regarding the insects that come from the lake, the chemicals we use for the algae are also good for midge flies and mosquito larvae. There is live bacteria larvacide that can be sprayed for mosquito larvae but it is not recommended. Adult mosquitoes must be treated with pesticide, which Aquatic Systems, a lake management company, does not do. (10:24:00)Open Mike: Roslyn Nehls: Has written several letters and has not received any response from the Transportation Committee and has also requested a breakdown of the cost to make the transportation changes requested at the last meeting. Ruth Porter: Asked the Board to consider putting a higher wall or fence around the Village. Since the removal of bushes and barbed wire there are many people climbing over the fence. Rita Pikar: The Newport area lake has not looked good in over a year. Also are there any grants available in the Florida area for cleaning up the waterways? Rhonda Pittone: Would like the Towne Center, East Route on Saturday extended to 5 p.m. and for the busses to stop at the Muddy Waters shopping center. Fred Sherman: Stated his displeasure with the missing History Channel and they are in breach of contract for removing the channel without telling us. Minutes: Bill Goddard moved to waive the reading of the Minutes from the MM BOD meeting on June 10, 2010. Jack Kornfield seconded. Ms. Berner asked why the minutes are published in the newsletter prior to being approved. Ms. Berner also suggested that the next to last two paragraphs prior to adjourning be reversed. Mr. Goddard moved to accept the minutes with the proposed changes. Mr. Bloom seconded. Motion passed unanimously.

Mr. Goddard stated that perhaps when we submit the minutes to the Reporter, we state that the minutes have not yet been approved. (10:38:07) Financial Report – Norman Bloom, Treasurer The CVE Master Management Financial Report, prepared by Donna Childrey, was distributed to all Board members and discussed in detail. For the month of June 2010 the Total Income was $899,386; Total Expenses were $736,908; Net Income was $162,478. YTD Total Income is $5,400,719. Total Expenses are $4,793,763; Net Income is $606,956. Total Assets are $2,324,794; Total Liabilities are $959,122 and Total Equity is $1,365,672. Cash on Hand is $1,548,099; Prepaid Dollars are $433,816; Overdue accounts receivable from unit owners is $388,097 representing 512 unit owners. Mel Schmier stated that it would be beneficial for us to have a six month review of the budget in detail so that we can better understand where we are. Ms. Berner also requested a workshop to understand the six month budget performance and financials better. Jack Kornfield moved to accept the Financial Report; Mel Schmier seconded. Motion passed unanimously. (10:52:40) Acting Presidents Report – Dan Glickman The recording of this videotape is on high definition video with a greater resolution and quality. Regarding irrigation, on July 22 we will be at the 50% document stage and then have eight days to review the documents and proceed forward and will be at the 100% stage around the end of September. There was an offer to continue the promotional offer by Comcast but not for those who have returned their boxes. The main concern with Comcast is breach of contract and will continue through our legal counsel to address this issue. Comcast has changed the History Channel without consulting us – the remedy is to call Comcast and state to them you want to view the History Channel, and they will give you the adapter free for six months. Because of difficulties with our internet connection, we have not yet received the status report from Mr. Murphy. Once it is received board members will receive a copy. Ms. Berner stated that it was very remiss of the Board not to make the recent offer from Comcast

public knowledge prior to the return date. Mr. Kornfield asked the Chair to obtain a code number from Comcast in order to receive credit from Comcast billing department for the box. (11:12:25) Executive Director’s Report – Al Smith Mr. Smith discussed the feasibility of posting the audio recordings of meetings on the CVE website. We already have the MM management meeting on the website; this was for the other Board meetings. The cost is $10/month per meeting. After a discussion, Mr. Kornfield spoke about using services such as You Send It for sharing video/ audio recordings. Mr. Ciocca moved not to start the audio recording since we already have the video recording and they can be listened to. Bill Goddard seconded. Motion passed. No vote: Jack Kornfield (11:18:45) Mr. Smith asked for clarification on the 6/10/2010 motion by Gene Goldman, “cancel the current contract with Tropical Growers and proceed with a full analysis and specification and go to bid on that”. Mr. Smith stated that he would go out for prices and break it down into, at least, four phases. Mr. Goldman clarified that he would like Al Smith to look into the issue and to provide the Board with his recommendation. My recommendation is to take the worst first (10th Street), and remove those sections and replace them with cocoa plum and do it in sections as we can afford to do it. I chose 10th Street first as the City has grant money for a sidewalk and they are landscaping the area as well. Mr. Smith also mentioned that he has met with all but three Board members to get a handle of the priorities that the Board members have. (11:32:30) Mr. Smith discussed the past due collections procedure that is currently in place and working well. We are currently deactivating barcodes to residents who are behind more than $300. There are three different letters that will be distributed; letter from MM, letter from Cen-Deer and a letter which Security will distribute when the barcode is deactivated. We are not denying access, it is just an inconvenience. Mr. Somerset stated that it should not be up to Security to inform residents that their barcode is deactivated due to See MASTER, pg 9


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Village Minutes COOCVE Executive Committee Meeting July 12, 2010

Meeting was called to order by COOCVE 1st Vice President Charlie Parness at 9:30 a.m. He led the Pledge of Allegiance and asked for a moment of silence. Minutes Bill Goddard moved to waive the reading of the minutes. Ruth Porter seconded and the motion passed. Since there were no changes, the minutes were accepted and approved. President’s Report Mr. Parness spoke about gathering names and addresses of all handicapped individuals in the community. He will be distributing a form to all Area Chairs to distribute to the Presidents for them to complete listing all senior citizens with walkers, wheelchairs and those in need of assistance during an emergency. This information will then be forwarded to the Fire Department. Nancy Giordano also stated that she will be distributing forms at the Area Chair meeting for them to distribute to Presidents for those who require special needs during a hurricane evacuation. Residents must register prior to a hurricane for a special needs shelter and transportation will be provided, as long as they are pre-registered. Norm Kaplan: I appreciated Steven Fine’s editorial in the July Reporter. Norm stated he’s getting tired of calling to get a Director or alternate to attend a COOCVE BOD meeting. Jack Kornfield: We were supposed to get an agenda for this meeting and we did not receive one. Committee Reports Master Management – Dan Glickman Comcast – Mr. Glickman stated that MM recently held an Executive meeting and one of the topics was Comcast. MM also had a meeting with Comcast representatives, Maggie Hutter and Ramona Smith. Al Smith, Dan Glickman and Patrick Murphy (MM Attorney) were also in attendance. Mr. Glickman discussed the recent elimination of the History channel and stated that residents should call Comcast to complain that the History channel was eliminated. He will post information on the website for residents regarding the procedure. Mr. Kornfield stated that an attorney was hired by MM without expertise in cable law. Mr. Glickman stated that the Committee later changed from hiring a cable attorney to hiring a cable expert. A Cable attorney is not necessary because this is a contractual issue. Comcast is in breach of contract and MM is negotiating, based on the fact

that they are not abiding by the current contract. What is being done with the money that we are paying each month? Mr. Glickman responded that the money is in the bank and has not been spent on anything. Irrigation - MM and Masuen signed a contract approximately two months ago to have Masuen design a proposed irrigation system for CV in the amount of $65,000. Research Irrigation, working along with Masuen, is being paid approximately another $3,000-$4,000. We are still in the design phase and approaching the 50% document completion which is July 22 and at that time they will present the documents to us. At 100%, (the end of September), we will receive document drawings and will then have the ability to take the drawings out for bid. Ruth Porter - What was done prior to Masuen? About two and a half years ago, IDG prepared a study which was a definition of what existed in the old system, which was finished about a year ago. Security – MM was not part of the closing of the pool restrooms. Eva Rachesky notified security; security should have notified MM and should have been part of the process. This vandalism was because of tissue paper and was overreacted to. Regarding the laundry facility breakins, they were all in high rise buildings and all the doors were unlocked. Bill Goddard - BSO is actively pursuing the laundry room thefts and has some leads. The Committees in each of the buildings should empty the coins boxes more frequently. Recreation – Nancy Giordano There is no recreation meeting tomorrow 7/13/10. Pool restrooms will be closing early at 6 p.m. and Nancy will be having a meeting with Eva regarding this and she will try and rectify the situation. Budget and Finance – Gloria Olmstead : no issues Advisory Committee – Not present Civic and Cultural Committee – Nancy Giordano Recently had a hurricane presentation and will be distributing special needs shelter information at the Area Chairs meeting. On Wednesday, July 14 at 1 p.m. there will be a program in the theatre showing clips of the upcoming show season. The meet and greet with candidates on July 20 has been cancelled and a question and answer session with the election winners will be scheduled. Area Chairs

Berkshire – Naomi Redisch: When the Reporter is delivered, who removes the old newspapers? It is up to the building to do so. Farnham – Norm Kaplan: At the last meeting, I asked about the plantings along the fence and Mr. Smith stated that they will be removing it in phases. The minutes of the MM meeting stated a motion was made to discontinue the contract with Tropical Growers, what is the status? Mr. Glickman stated that at the MM meeting on Thursday 7/15, it is on the agenda; the motion will be discussed for further direction. Grantham – Bill Goddard: No issues Harwood – Joe Rudnick: Thanked all the workers for quickly repairing a broken pipe in Harwood. It was repaired in three days and everyone was kept informed. Islewood – Eleanor Wollman: No issues Keswick– Phillip Norris: mentioned that the drivers are still using cell phones while driving. Mr. Glickman stated that he will mention it again to the bus company. Norm Kaplan asked to invite the owner of the bus company, Louis Herring, to the Area Chair meeting on Wednesday 7/14 – Roz Nehls will look into this. Lyndhurst – Roz Nehls: spoke about three dead trees on Lyndhurst property and that the fire alarm box stickers are peeling and need of replacement – who is responsible? That would be a building issue. Markham – Oswald Rosado – An individual has two large chairs on the catwalk and he has been asked a number of times to remove them. The President has asked him to remove the chairs. Mr. Parness stated that you can fine him but it needs to be through the Board. Bill Goddard stated that there is a process that you should follow; send resident a certified letter informing them of the violation of personal building documents with return receipt requested. At that point, he is then on notice and must comply with the documents and then you proceed further. Newport – Rita Pickar – What is being done about the canals? Aquatic Systems will be addressing the lakes and canals at the next MM meeting. Oakridge – Jules Kesselman: no issues Prescott – Jack Kornfield: no issues Upminister – Ruth Porter: no issues Ventnor – Charles Parness: East Coast was at

the area meeting and was very informative in talking about residents moving in. The charge for an American investigation is $100 and for a Canadian investigation, you have to go back to the association for additional monies. Mr. Parness will be looking into this with Seacrest. State Bill 1196; there are a lot of changes, some are very beneficial. Ombudsman meetings have been very informative and will be repeated again this fall. Jack Kornfield: What is the status on the suit against us in terms of failure to produce documents? Mr. Parness stated it was nothing. Mr. Glickman stated that it was not able to be heard and was to be rescheduled for a full hearing. Mr. Parness stated he had no knowledge of that. Open Mic: Harry Chizeck – As Chairman of the Collections Committee, Harry spoke about residents who are late making payments. When a resident purchases a condo, in their

welcoming package, there is going to be a letter stating what MM and Cendeer can do if you are late making your payments. We are going to start to shut off the barcodes for those who owe more than $300 – this is an inconvenience for residents. Cen-Deer is going to start denying people from using the Clubhouse – such as purchasing tickets. If someone at the gate is denied, the gate will give them a notice telling them to see MM because they are late with their payments. There are currently 293 condos who owe over the $300 amount. Joe Rudnick – At Prescott there is an individual who cannot take care of herself, what can be done? You can call the Department for Social Services. Joe Rudnick - What is the $100 investigation fee for? It is for a credit and background check only. A motion was made to adjourn at 11:15 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Charlie Parness 1st Vice President

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Village Minutes Council of Area Chairs July 14, 2010

Meeting was called to order by Roslyn Nehls. Roll call was taken and a quorum was present. Charlie Parness moved to waive the reading of the minutes. Ruth Porter seconded. There were no changes/additions to the minutes and they were approved as submitted. Security – Andre’ Vautrin Mr. Vautrin discussed with the residents the recent laundry room and car breakins that have occurred during the past six weeks. Security, along with BSO and Seacrest have dedicated a lot of hours to do everything they could to solve this and at 6:45 a.m. this morning (7/14/10) in the Ashby area, a man was apprehended in the act of breaking into a car, it is suspected that the person was a guest of a resident. Master Management – Al Smith and Dan Glickman Both Al Smith and Dan Glickman took questions from the residents. Basil Hales: What is the status on Comcast? Dan Glickman: There are major problems with Comcast and because we are under pending litigation/strategy with Comcast I cannot discuss specifics. If there are problems with Comcast, this is the place where vendors should be invited to appear, so those problems can be addressed. Al Smith: Comcast made an offer last week for those residents who have not yet turned in their converter box. These residents will not be charged the $1.50 fee. Comcast recently moved, without our knowledge, the History Channel to another tier. If you call up Comcast and let them know you want to see the History Channel, they will provide you with an adaptor for free for six months. Rhonda Pittone: I am still being charged for the converter box, also is there any standard in stopping them from removing channels? How long will they be offering the free converter box? Al Smith: I will follow up with them on the billing. This offer is valid until the contract is resolved. Jack Kornfield – Please clarify, are we in litigation with Comcast? Al Smith: No, we are not. Jack Kornfield: When you call Comcast for the credit on the converter box, the Comcast rep requires a number or code identifier for the discount. Al Smith: All you need is an account number - I’m not aware of a code. Rita Pikar: Where is the $1.50 that we have been paying each month?

Al Smith: We are holding it in an account until we get through the negotiations. Ruth Porter: The golf course is dumping a lot of waste next to Upminister J on golf course property – is there anything that can be done? Al Smith: It is their property and we cannot stop them, you can call code enforcement but they may not do anything because it is vegetative waste. Roslyn Nehls: Thanked MM for replacing the bus sign at the entrance to the trolley road. East Coast Maintenance James Quintano had nothing to report and there were no questions. Seacrest Services Steve Kittredge and Fred Collins. We are starting our annual meeting and budget preparation. The Clubhouse will begin taking reservations as of September 7 - if you require food, the Party Room is the only room available. Property managers will be at the MM and COOCVE offices to answer accounting issues every Wednesday from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. and property management issues every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Part of the budget process is insurance and we are currently looking into what the premiums will be. Citizens Insurance is now requiring a mitigation form every year. Broward County has set up a website containing information on all high rise elevators. We have on hand a hard copy of the guide book and the link to the Senate Bill that was recently signed into law. Landscape replacements have been on-going – the issue is that we are not getting enough water. Ruth Porter: Why are you replacing plants if there is no water and how do you get new material for your building? Fred Collins: We want to continue to keep the buildings looking nice, we currently have a worker watering all new material. You must contact your property manager to get plants replaced. Norm Kaplan: In Farnham C, I have had several complaints that the lawnmower is going 40mph around the property and the grass is being mowed too low. Fred Collins: I will look into this as we are addressing the height of the mower. Nora Wolf: I am in Cambridge C and the hedges have not been cut for two months. How often do you cut them? Fred Collins: They are cut once a month, we will look into your area. Naomi Redisch: In Berkshire, we have trees that

are touching the building. Is that part of your contract? What about tree trimming? Fred Collins: We are only obligated to cut up to eight feet. If you call a work order in, we can look at it for you. We can also have someone give you an estimate for tree trimming. Dan Glickman – In response to trimming hedges, is there a schedule? Fred Collins: It is once a month, sometimes it is held up because of rain. Roslyn Nehls: We had a lantern out as well as a flying saucer that wasn’t working and I want to thank the worker for getting them to work. We have another one on the road to our building that is out. We get watered 15 minutes on Sunday night and yet the plot next to us gets four hours. Steve Kittredge: If you give me the information we will look into it. Phillip Norris: The grass is growing very high – when will it be cut. Fred Collins: We fertilized a couple months ago and everything is growing. We cut grass 3x/month and are on schedule. If you want to call me I can let you know when they will be in your area. Steve Kittredge: We will work on getting you a schedule for cutting/trimming of grass and trees but you need to be patient for weather delays. Jules Kesselman: We need a schedule for when the watering was completed and when the grass is cut. We have asked in the past for an irrigation report. Steve Kittredge: We will add an item to the report sheet on the buildings and when the irrigation guys are there they will initial it. We will try to initiate this within the next month. Rita Pikar: Is there a city ordinance cutting back trees prior to hurricane season. Fred Collins: I’m not sure, we will look into it. Edith Cohen: The window for the exterminator is from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. They recently sprayed for carpenter ants and suggested I call Seacrest to get an extra perimeter spray. I called the office and they told me no, they don’t spray for carpenter ants outside the building. Can the window be shortened as four hours is very long? Steve Kittredge: I will speak to the office regarding the window as well of them determining the outcome they should be just taking the message. Dan Glickman: Tony D’Amato stated several

months ago that that window would be shortened. It should be either morning or afternoon. Rhonda Pittone: In Newport L, the worker who irrigates is never around and we still have three heads that are broken. Danielle Labono: Does a Seacrest building get more water than a non-Seacrest building? We also have heads that are not working properly. Fred Collins: The system is very antiquated and there are areas that need to be left open to water other areas so some areas may get more water. We recently hired two new guys to clean heads. If you are having problems with heads/gushers – please call in a work order and we will replace it with a popup. The work order number is (888) 928-6465. Roslyn Nehls: We have a red cover over fire alarms and there are white stickers peeling off. Boca Fire wants to charge us $19 to replace the stickers. We need to have stickers replaced as those are instructions for the residents. Joe Rudnick: What is the meaning of the color of flags? Steve Kittredge: There is no meaning to the colors. COOCVE- Charlie Parness Operation Medicine Cabinet. This is a prescription drug take back program sponsored by the Broward County Sheriff’s Office. On August 3 between the hours of 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. at Quiet Waters Park-Pavilion #10 (401 South Powerline Road), Sheriff’s Deputies will be collecting unused or expired medications and unwanted over-the-counter drugs. In exchange for these medications you will receive a $5 Wal-Mart or CVS gift card. We are gathering information for residents that are handicapped and disabled or who need help during a building emergency. We have forms for every area, so please pick them up after the meeting. Every year we ask you to fill out the directors and officers sheets. Please inform your building presidents not to just cross out the year on the old sheet but to fill out the new sheet that is “2011” as this form has added information such as e-mail addresses. At the COOCVE Executive meeting, it was asked that we invite Mr. Herring from the bus transportation to this meeting. The main complaint is that drivers continue to talk on their cell phones while driving as well as eating. Joe Rudnick: Do the bus drivers get a regular lunch hour? After five hours of work you must give employees a 15 min. break. Dan Glickman: BCT

drivers do not get lunch hours. Jules Kesselman: Roslyn, it was suggested at the COOCVE Executive meeting that you contact Mr. Herring to come to this meeting – did you do that? Roslyn: No I did not. I will do it for the next meeting. Recreation Committee Danielle LaBono Today, 7/14 at 1 p.m. there is the season opening of the shows in GPA. The pool houses will be closed beginning at 8 p.m. Roz Nehls: When will you be working on the North Lyndhurst pool? Nancy Giordano: Around the second week in August. Ed Gallon: When will the pool area at Durham be upgraded? Nancy Giordano: Durham will be the next pool to get pavers. The indoor pool has been remodeled and we are waiting for the fire department to sign off. Once that is complete, the outdoor pool will be closed for renovations. Roz Nehls: What is the status of the handball court? Danielle LaBono: That is a high priced project and we are still exploring quotes. Arthur Dove: The signs at the pool state that it is open from dusk to dawn. Nancy Giordano: They will start to close the pool houses at 8 p.m. and most likely finish around 9:30 p.m. We want to make sure that when it is dark, which is when we have the vandalism problems, the pool houses are locked. If there is a problem at any of the pools, please call security, do not handle it yourself. Nancy Giordano – I heard that at the Ventnor pool there is a dog swimming in the pool and asked Charlie Parness to check into it for her. Civic and Cultural - Nancy Giordano – We recently had a program for hurricane preparedness. If there is a resident who would like to reserve a spot at a special needs shelter you must fill out a form prior to a hurricane. You can pick up the forms after this meeting. There are several special needs shelters in the area and depending on the level of need that the resident requires, is where you will be assigned. We will be having a program for individuals over 90 years old on December 12. Please advise your Presidents that they will be receiving a phone call from Civic and Cultural Committee asking for the addresses and names of residents that are over 90. Charlie Parness: The Contract Negotiating See COUNCIL, pg 17


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Village Minutes Master

continued from pg 6

non-payment. The Board had a lengthy discussion on the point of collection. This will continue to be the procedure. (11:47:00) Mr. Smith discussed with the Board, the Policy for Real Property Ownership, Liens and Foreclosures. He would like to make the recommendation to refer to the Real Estate committee to refine it a little more. Mel Schmier moved to refer to the Real Estate committee to discuss the policy with Al Smith and come back with a recommendation. Bill Goddard seconded. Mr. Glickman referred the policy to the Real Estate committee. The Real Estate committee is Anthony Falco; Chairman, Harry Chizeck and Mel Schmier. The next meeting of the Real Estate committee is on Thursday, July 22 at 1 p.m. Mr. Chizeck moved to allow having up to three unit foreclosures without having the finished policy to enable us to write a policy more efficiently and to be managed by the Real Estate committee. Jules seconded. Caryl Berner moved to table the motion. Jack Kornfield seconded. Motion to table failed 3-10 (Yes: Dan, Caryl, Jack; No: Ira, Harry, Norm, Dick, Anthony, Gene, Bill, Jules, Fred, Mel). Ms. Berner stated that we should be using a real-estate attorney and not our general counsel. After a discussion, Mr. Ciocca moved to make a friendly amendment to the motion to add “temporarily” as an exercise in setting policy. Harry and Gene accepted the amendment. The amended motion reads: Mr. Chizeck moved to temporarily allow up to three unit foreclosures without having the finished policy to enable us to write a policy more efficiently and to be managed by the Real Estate committee. Jules seconded. Motion passed 10-3 (Yes: Ira, Harry, Norm, Dick, Anthony, Gene, Bill, Jules, Fred, Mel; No: Dan, Caryl, Jack). (12:08:15) Business Manager’s Report – AJ Bock Contracted with Cool Team, Inc. to install pool heaters at Tilford pool and was completed on 7-2; Broken glass pane at LeClub replaced by A-Bob Glass Services; Termites treated at main guard house; Activity Center walls damaged by leaky windows have been repaired, irrigation pump #33 was replaced and pumps #29 and #38 were repaired; main gate and east gate replacing damaged plants due to cold weather – proposal signed 6-30; preserve area perimeter has been cleaned up by Seacrest at no charge. A sink hole developed behind

Cambridge A – the City was notified and they are addressing the problem; Water line break was repaired and completed at Harwood B; signs were ordered for Prescott, Tilford and Ventnor; McKay construction has finished the bench pad project; we have one open permit which should be cleared up this week. Floyd fence should be finished this week; preparing scope of work for the replacement of audio system in the Activities Center; replacement bus stop decals have been ordered; revised scope of work on MM tree trimming responsibility; verification of all bus stop pads and chairs that will require maintenance; purchased vinyl lettering and address of MM/Activities Center/LeClub/COOCVE offices. Committee Reports (12:27:30) Transportation Committee – Dan Glickman The Transportation Committee met on July 17 at 10 a.m. Mel Schmier, Al Schacter and Dan Glickman met with about 17 additional residents. Two items on the agenda – motion was made and passed unanimously changing the east route from 9-3p.m. to 10-4p.m. When the motion was made, an effective date was discussed, so we will have to come back before the BOD with an effective date. The Committee and Al Smith have a meeting scheduled for July 20 to discuss an effective relationship going forward between the Executive Director and the TC. Another item that was discussed was a potential route change, but it was tabled. Ms. Berner asked about the cost to the routes that were changed. Mr. Glickman stated that the items under consideration had no cost. (12:31:00) Irrigation Committee Mr. Falco asked Mr. Smith why he was meeting with Masuen and not including the Irrigation Committee. Mr. Smith stated that he is meeting daily with Masuen on an on-going basis for project management. Mr. Smith stated that the Committee will be meeting when the 50% drawings are complete. Unfinished Business – none. (12:40:25) New Business Mel Schmier read the following resolution: Whereas the Executive Director has requested instruction from the Board of Directors regarding requests by individual Directors to have access to the documents and records of the Corporation, and Whereas none of the corporation’s governing documents, including the

Articles of Incorporation or Amendments thereto, the Bylaws or Amendments thereto, the Master Management Agreement or the Assignment and Assumption Agreement, place any restrictions on Director’s rights of access thereto, and Whereas FS 617, which governs Not For Profit Corporations, places restrictions or conditions on such access only upon ordinary members and no such restrictions upon the Directors of the Corporation, and Whereas the Executive Director’s Employment Agreement clearly contains the right of individual Directors of the Corporation to request such access, and Whereas the same Agreement clearly states that it may not in any way diminish the right or ability of Directors of the Corporation to exercise their due diligence and fiduciary responsibilities, and Whereas a fiduciary duty is the highest standard of care required of Directors at either law or equity. It is therefore moved and the Executive Director is hereby advised, that in accordance with the Employment Agreement, individual Directors of the Corporation may request to view Documents and Records of the Corporation and shall have same made available in the Corporate Offices, without further approval of the Board, in a reasonable time frame. Directors are advised that such Documents and Records are not to be made public without the expressed approval of the Board of Directors pursuant to the restrictions of FS 617 and other governing documents. Directors are further advised that such requests should be as specific as possible, not overly broad, and as infrequent as possible so as not to place an undue burden on the staff. Should the Executive Director determine that access to certain records may be excessive or violate individual privacy rights, he may request further direction from the Board. Mel Schmier moved to adopt the above resolution to direct the Executive Direct to make available, within limits, the documents and records of the corporation to individual Directors. The Executive Director may seek Board direction as needed. Caryl Berner seconded. Motion passed 7:2 with 1 abstention (Yes: Dan, Norm, Caryl, Anthony, Gene, Jack, Mel; No: Ira, Fred; Abstain: Jules). (12:56:10) Caryl Berner read the following resolution: Whereas I was asked by our Executive Director what the difference is between

management, administration, and policy and Whereas I wasn’t sure and whereas I have made inquiry of a person who holds title of both President and CEO and he said he wasn’t sure but he’d be looking into it, and Whereas I have gotten books on management since, that talks about Boards, their purpose, the fact that all Boards face the same problems with reference to Board Members not knowing their responsibilities etc, and Whereas I have been to the City of DB Visioning Conference which was facilitated by a professional (the public was invited to attend but did not speak) and Whereas I’ll be engaged at the end of the month in a Strategic Planning Session which will be conducted by a professional facilitator for the DBHA, (Therefore) I move that with the money budgeted in the Executive Director line item months of which we didn’t have an Executive Director, which is the same budget item that was used to hire a Management Advisor and since there is a portion of money still in this line that could be appropriated for this purpose, I move that we either hire a local professional facilitator and/or look to SCORE wherein retired executives may come and speak with us about the role of a strong governing Board and how one works versus a rubber stamp Board and that will enable us to work with a Strong Executive Director and make this a better community for all and put an end to the bickering and the trivial issues that beseech this Board among other issues we have. Ms. Berner moved to adopt this resolution. Mel Schmier seconded. After a discussion, Fred Rosenzveig moved to table the motion. Gene Goldman seconded. Motion passed 6-4. (Yes: Ira, Dan, Norm, Gene, Fred, Mel; No: Caryl, Anthony, Jules, Jack). The Chair asked Ms. Berner to change the wording as best as possible so it is clear to everyone what they are voting on. It will come back on the agenda next month under unfinished business. (1:08:35) Jack Kornfield moved for MM to immediately hire an attorney (for no more than $15,000) with specific expertise in cable contracts to consolidate its complaints and seek remedies. Anthony Falco seconded. Dan Glickman moved to table the motion. Mr. Glickman withdrew his motion to table. Mr. Glickman stated that Mr. Murphy has been consulting with Jay Abbazia who has over 15 years experience in cable matters. After a detailed discussion, the motion passed

5-3 with 2 abstentions (Yes: Caryl, Anthony, Jules, Jack, Mel; No: Ira, Gene, Fred; Abstention: Norm, Dan). (1:28:48) Jules Kesselman moved that we revisit having BSO come into the village. Mel Schmier seconded. Fred Rosenzveig made a friendly amendment to include costs, pros and cons. He then withdrew his amendment. Motion passed 9-0 with 1 abstention (abstention: Caryl). (1:36:15) Members’ Comments Ms. Berner stated that Code Red is in effect in the City of Deerfield Beach and to go to the Deerfield-beach.com website to register. Mr. Falco asked that a committee list be printed so that we all know who is on what committee and so that each member is recognized for their effort. Mr. Kornfield stated that in the Staff Office there are forms available for those to sign up for Code Red. He also spoke about getting information on legal matters on a timelier basis. For example, we made a motion in February for our attorney to provide us with an Ethics affidavit and it was brought up again in April to Mr. Somerset. We need to get communications that go out to our attorney as well as receive information coming in. Mr. Kesselman stated that there was a recent meeting with Comcast and the Comcast Committee was not aware of it. Mr. Glickman stated that two members of Comcast requested to speak with Mr. Smith approximately 10 days ago. Mr. Glickman was at the meeting as well as Ms. Childrey. Gene Goldman thanked Al Smith for his work thus far. Fred Rosenzveig also thanked Al Smith for his efforts and appreciates the time he took to speak to the Board members individually as well as looking at longer term plans and putting out all these fires. Dan Glickman stated that Al Smith has been a tremendous help and thanked him as well. Ms. Berner stated that Mr. Smith is not supposed to meet with us individually, so since two individuals from Comcast asked to meet with him, can I get another Board member to meet with him individually? Jack Kornfield moved to adjourn at 1:50p.m. Anthony Falco seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Respectfully submitted, Dan Glickman


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Condo News CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ORGANIZATION OF CENTURY VILLAGE EAST, iNC. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS December 31, 2009 and 2008

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Condo News COOCVE Advisory Committee Report

Handicapped Assistance

By FRED ROSENZVEIG

By CHARLES K PARNESS

Free Condominium Courses (Repeat Series) Offered by the Office of the Condominium Ombudsman and taught by Bill and Susan Raphan. Sponsored by COOCVE Advisory Committee. Thursdays, 1-4 p.m. Clubhouse, Rm. GP-A. Registration required at Clubhouse Staff Office. Educational material will be provided for each course. You can register for one or more courses. Places are limited. Nov.18, 2010. Condominium Elections An all inclusive class on the requirements for the noticing, mailing, and balloting in a condominium election. An actual election will be

conducted. Jan. 13, 2011 Condominium Rights and Obligations A general explanation of the statutory rights and responsibilities of board members and unit owners. Jan. 20, 2011. Basic Condominium Finances An overview of condominium finances, including statutory requirements, budgets, financials, and reports

Feb. 3, 2011. Condominium Rules and Regulations A review of rules and regulations in Florida condominiums and how they affect the community. Feb. 10, 2011. Condominium Meetings A comprehensive course on condominium meetings, notices, and parliamentary procedure. To register, please sign up at the Clubhouse Staff Office.

During a major emergency to a building such as a fire or hurricane, some residents who use wheelchairs or walkers may have difficulty getting out of their building to safety. I spoke with the Deerfield Beach Fire Department and they agreed that it would be helpful if they had a list of these residents. The list would be entered into their computer and used to facilitate their efforts. I have prepared a list

for Condo Presidents to enter the names of their handicapped residents. Copies of the blank list can be obtained from your area chairman or from the COOCVE Office. When we have accumulated these names we will submit them to the Fire Department. If you do not have a blank form, make up your own handicap form providing the names, apartment and building address, phone number and e-mail, if available.

Jan. 27, 2011. Serving on a Board of Directors What you need to know to serve on a board of directors in a Florida condominium.

PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE BYLAWS TO BE VOTED ON AT THE COOCVE SEPTEMBER MEETING Amendments on Area Chairpersons The amendments will: 1. Legalize the recognition of Area Vice-Chairpersons (not in Bylaws now) 2. Require documentation on proof of their election 3. Require area chairs mandatory meeting with the areas unit owners. We propose amending the bylaws as follows: (note: the words underscored are additions to the bylaws) Article IX - COUNCIL OF AREA CHAIRS Sec. 9.1 There is hereby created a Council of 21 Area Chairs representing each area in Century Village East, to be elected by the unit owners of the area from among such areas’ total number of directors or alternate directors to COOCVE for a term to commence the following February 1st. “The Area Chair elections shall take place in January.” The area unit owners shall also elect an Area Vice-Chair

from the COOCVE directors or COOCVE alternate directors of its area in the same manner as the election of the Area Chair. The Area Vice-Chair, in the absence of the Area Chair from their area, will be entitled for all the rights, duties and privileges of an Area Chair, including representation on the Executive Committee and the Council of Area Chairs.” Sec. 9.1A “An Area Chair or Area Vice-Chair must provide a copy of the election meeting minutes as proof of election. The minutes are to be presented to the COOCVE President in order to be certified as elected. “ Sec. 9.1B “Each area shall have a unit owner meeting with either the Area Chair or Vice-Chair who are required to convene and hold such meetings at least three times a year. A copy of the minutes of such meetings shall be given to the COOCVE President and the Chair of the Council of Area Chairs. Failure to meet these requirements are

possible grounds for dismissal and such charges shall be handled as set forth in Section 8.10“. Sec. 10.1 Executive Committee

Replacing “the Twenty-one (21) members of the Council of Area Chairmen” with “the Twenty-one (21) members of the Council of Area Chairs”

Sec. 11.10”…at least quarterly with the Council of Area Chairs” replacing the word “Area Chairman” with “Area Chair.”

COOCVE Appointed Committee Members for 2010 – 2011


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Condo News News and Views By JUDY OLMSTEAD We have had a rash of petty crimes in the Village over the last six weeks. An arrest was made of the individual taking items from unlocked automobiles. An article in the Sun-Sentinel states that he found it easy pickings because so many cars were left unlocked. The perpetrator was a 22 year old residing in one of our buildings. The man was caught because an alert resident called 911 when they saw someone suspiciously trying door handles on more than one car. There has also been a rash of laundry room break-ins. These have occurred in high rise buildings where the laundry rooms are left unlocked and the perpetrator has removed many coin boxes from the washers and dryers. If you see or hear anything, immediately call the BSO. They have asked that first you dial 911, and then Security, so that there is no delay in response time. Security should also be called for any other noncriminal incidents at 954-421-3552. These incidents

are also suspected to be the work of an insider. Neither our documents, nor the Fair Housing Act, prevent an owner from having their adult children or grandchildren from staying with them, where they are just being called in to the gate every day. The Boards, however, should not approve them as residents with ID privileges due to their age. Other incidents reported by Security this month included several confiscations of fraudulent and outdated ID cards. Although we cannot stop dishonorable people from calling in friends or relatives who then commit crimes in our Village, Security

is stopping people who have been given a pass belonging to a unit owner or people using fraudulent passes that they have created, and those who previously had a visitor’s pass or gate pass which are no longer valid. So, if you are delayed at a gate, be glad that Security is doing their job and actually checking ID cards. Remember, the East and West gates are only for residents who have an ID card or a decal on their windshield. There are many people who are angry about the loss of the History channel on basic cable. If it is any consolation, my friend in Pompano called Comcast complaining about the same issues and her bill for basic cable each month is $76. It appears that Comcast moved the History channel up a tier for everyone, not just Century Village Arlene Fine, the wife of Steven Fine, our Editor and COOCVE President, has been seriously ill for the last month. Steve has been staying at the hospital with

her 24/7. Please include her in your prayers. The staff of the Reporter and the other officers of COOCVE have done an admirable job of

picking up the slack during his absence, but we miss his daily input which keeps the Reporter and COOCVE moving forward.

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Condo News

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AUGUST 2010

CVE REPORTER

Condo News Free Recycling Baskets or Fabric Bags By MARNIE ROSEN & JULES KESSELMAN DEERFIELD BEACH - The Broward County Office of

Waste and Recycling Services, in coordination with City

of Deerfield Beach multifamily recycling collection, is donating small plastic recycling baskets or fabric bags to allow the condominium residents in Century Village to easily transport their recycling materials from the kitchen to outdoor recycling bins. The baskets feature a durable, ergonomic handle and a dropfront design, which makes for easy insertion and removal of recyclables. The baskets weigh only two pounds fit easily under the sink and are made with up to 50% recycled content. Baskets or bags are free to Century Village residents. The only condition is that the resident provide their address and contact information, so the department can gather feedback about the bin’s usefulness. Quantities are limited. To order yours, call Marnie Rosen at 954-480-1420. For the latest information about recycling in Deerfield Beach, visit www. Deerfield-Beach.com and search “recycling

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Condo News Recreation’s Most Commonly Asked Questions By EVA RACHESKY

Administration/CenDeer Communities Office Ongoing problems with Channels 99 and 98 There have been ongoing problems with broadcasting the two cable channels provided to the Village by Comcast. As we stated last month in this column, Comcast provided us with new equipment that we thought would resolve the issues. However, continued inability to broadcast revealed that additional work and tweaking was necessary. Through the combined efforts of several Comcast technicians, a

Cenrec, Inc. IT tech and an independent IT person we now believe all problems have been laid to rest. The importance of keeping your personal ID with you A few weeks ago staff made the sad discovery of an unidentified man who had passed away. Paramedics and police were summoned but there was no identification on the person. We cannot stress enough how important it is to have some sort of identification information on your person at all times. While personal photo ID is now required to gain

access to the Clubhouse, we urge all our residents to ALWAYS carry an ID with them, wherever they may go – even if it is just for a walk around their building! Reminder: Changes in Recreation Staff As announced in this column last month, there have been recent staff changes in the Staff Office and the Class Office. We are asking that you please be patient while our new employees assume their responsibilities and learn their way around the Clubhouse and Century Village. Athletic Department Can I continue to exercise if I have an injury? Always consult your doctor before attempting any type of exercise. Exercise isn’t just working out on a machine or in an aerobics class. There are very simple exercises

that can be done sitting, standing, even lying down. Your medical professional will be able to advise you on the type of exercise that is safe for you to attempt. Recreation Maintenance What is the status of the work being done at the Indoor Pool? Remodeling of the Indoor pool has been extensive. Early July saw a necessary break in work while waiting for the new lights to be manufactured and delivered for installation. The bathroom has been made ADA compliant; the coping and diamond brite for the pool has been completed; new drains are being installed; the pool deck and bathroom floor will be a decorative nonslip, long lasting epoxy material that has been used before at the Grantham and Markham pool bathrooms. New drains will

be installed that comply with the code upgrade requirements. Once the Indoor pool has been completed, work will then begin on the Outdoor pool. Ticket Office Announcement: Advance Season Flyer Available The 2010 / 2011 Advance Season Ticket Flyer is now available at the Ticket Office. If you are interested in purchasing tickets for the upcoming season (2010/11) you must submit your order by August 31. Please bear in mind that in our ongoing effort to improve seating assignments, this year the seat assignment will be ‘first come, first serve’. For preferred seating you should get your order in to the Ticket Office as soon as possible.

Century Village Recent Sales

As a new feature in the Reporter, recent sales in Century Village will be published monthly. The Volunteer Staff of the Century Village East Reporter

welcomes our new neighbors. With proof of ID, new residents will receive a gift of one complimentary (your choice) breakfast or lunch for two at Café Zen on

the Green, located behind the Clubhouse. Just bring this article and your Century Village I.D. with address as listed in the Reporter to the restaurant. (Tip not included).


AUGUST 2010

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Condo News LEGAL CORNER Patrick J. Murphy General Legal Counsel For COOCVE and MM

Patrick J. Murphy & Associates, P.A. Question: Does the Association have the power to rent a vacant unit being foreclosed while the foreclosure action is pending? Answer: No. Today’s economic climate has affected many residents of Century Village whose units are being foreclosed usually by the lender. While the foreclosure action is pending and before the Court has determined the priority of all the parties’ interest on the unit, the association has no rights to the vacant unit. Pursuant to the Bylaws the Board, in the name of the Association, may acquire a unit at a foreclosure sale. The Condo Act also permits the Association to purchase the unit at the foreclosure sale and “to hold, lease it, mortgage or convey it.” §718.116(6)(d). If the Association purchases the unit at a foreclosure sale and becomes the new owner, it can rent the vacant unit at that time, if the governing documents so permit. Question: Can the Association require the tenant to pay rent directly to the Association if the unit owner falls behind on his assessments? Answer: If the Association has not filed a foreclosure action against the unit owner to foreclose its lien for past due assessments, then it won’t be able to divert rent from the tenant to itself unless the governing documents so provide. A lease agreement is normally entered between the unit owner and the tenant. While the Association may permit the unit owner to rent pursuant to the governing documents, it does not, however, become a party to the lease agreement. The Association could, however, amend its governing documents to include a provision that would require the Association to become a party to the lease agreement by way of an addendum to the lease, authorizing the Association to divert rent from the tenant to the Association in the event the unit owner falls behind on assessments. The lease addendum would create a contractual relationship between the unit owner, tenant and the Association giving the Association the right to claim rent directly from the tenant.

If the Association has filed a foreclosure action against the unit to foreclose its lien for past due assessments and the unit is rented while the foreclosure action is pending, the Condominium Act permits the Association to petition the Court to appoint a receiver to collect rent from the tenant,§718.116(6)(c). (Association must go through all steps precedent to filing foreclosure action.) If an Association is faced with many owners who are delinquent on their assessments, the Judge can appoint a “blanket” receiver

to collect monies from owners renting their units without having the Association seek a separate receivership order for each unit each time. Authority of Receiver: The receiver will have authority to collect rent from the tenant of the unit owner whose unit is being foreclosed by the Association. Will be able to hire a property management company to manage and re-rent the unit during the period the unit is subject to foreclosure action for failure to pay past due assessments. Monies collected by receiver, will first go to pay cost/fees of receiver. The remaining monies will be disbursed pursuant to Condo Act 1) accrued interest, 2) late fees, 3) costs/attorney fees incurred in collection, 4) delinquent assessments. Receiver has to maintain a separate accounting for each unit for which rent is collected.

Budget & Finance Committee - 2010

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Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mary Rudd Robinson. Paid for by Committee to Re-Elect Mary Rudd Robinson, Non Partisan, for County Court Judge, Group 14

JUDGE MARY RUDD ROBINSON About Judge Robinson

Professional Experience

Community Leadership

Happily Married to Attorney Michael Robinson, with three daughters

Broward County Court Judge for the 17th Judicial Circuit since 1989

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Bachelor of Arts in 1975

Broward General Master for the 17th Judicial Circuit from 1985-1989

North Carolina Central University School of Law, Juris Doctor Degree in 1980

Attorney for Legal Aid Service of Broward County in 1982-1985

Former Board of Directors, Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Broward County; Metropolitan YMCA; Young at Art Children’s Museum Former member and chairperson of the Drop-Out Prevention Advisory Committee Boys and Girls Clubs of Broward County Mentor Delegate - People to People Ambassador (Africa) Program 2003 Trailblazer Award - T.J. Reddick Bar Association Distinguished Achievement Award African American Research Library and Cultural Center Outstanding Achievement Award - Dr. James F. Sistrunk Historical Festival Committee

Admitted to the Florida Bar in 1981 Mentor to young lawyers and new judges Lecturer for college admissions, scholarship and mentoring forums Member- New Mt. Olive Baptist Church, Ft. Lauderdale; Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.; NAACP-Life Member, Jack and Jill of America, Inc.; Charmettes, Inc.

Member of the Trial Lawyers Section of the Florida Bar and Federal Bar, United States Southern District of Florida Faculty member- National Judicial College, Reno, Nevada (teaching judges); Circuit representative- Florida Conference of County Court Judges Member of the National Bar Association; Virgil Hawkins Chapter of the NBA and the T.J. Reddick Bar Association; Broward Bar Association

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AUGUST 2010

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Statutes:


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Mayor

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continued from pg 4

MONEY magazine “Top 100 Best Places to Live,” and may not have realized that Deerfield Beach was a contender in the ranking. While Deerfield Beach did not make the top 100 list, we were ranked #1 on Money magazine’s “Where Homes are Most Affordable” list. In July, MONEY editor Donna Rosato recognized Deerfield Beach on two national news programs, American Morning and Your Bottom Line. As described in the article, “Residents who live in these 25 growing towns see their incomes go the furthest.” View the article at: http://money. cnn.com/galleries/2010/ moneymag/1007/gallery.best_ places_affordable_homes. moneymag/index.html As always, if you have suggestions, questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me through the City Manager’s office at 954-4804263, or via email at web. commission@deerfield-beach. com.

Council

continued from pg 8

Committee has put a list together of different companies that deal with hurricane preparedness. If you are considering a change, you need to provide them with 60 days notice. Old Business: None New Business: Naomi Redisch: Showed the residents a reflector to wear when walking around the Village and stated that it would be good for CVE residents. Ms. Nehls asked Ms. Redisch to provide her with the name of the company that makes the reflector so that they could look into it. Rita Pikar: It would be a good idea if visitors such as contractors and salesmen be issued visitor passes when they enter the village. Dan Glickman: Suggested that it be brought up at the next MM meeting. Danielle LaBono: Workers come into the Village in their private cars – how do I know who they are? Andre Vautrin: Unless they are in a company shirt you won’t know. If you see someone suspicious, call Security and let us look into it. Roz Nehls: Who is responsible for the replacing the stop sign located leaving the old bus depot onto Century Village Blvd. that was knocked over? Dan Glickman: Asked Mr. Vautrin to send his recommendation for the stop sign to Mr. Smith so he can look into it. A motion was made at 11:00am to adjourn. Respectfully Submitted by, Joe Rubino

VOTE AUGUST 24th, 2010 To Retain

COUNTY COURT Group 12

JUDGE John

“Jay” HURLEY

“Judge Hurley... is the gate keeper in County Court, as Broward’s first full time first appearance Judge ... We Recommend that Judge Hurley be retained. He’s used common sense and discretion to separate the defendants who truly belong in jail from those whose charges stem more from social and economic difficulties. THAT SAVES BROWARD TAX PAYERS.” The Miami Herald, Editorial ... July 13, 2010

“Judge Hurley has treated my clients fairly ... I believe people should only run if it improves the bench. I think Hurley is already doing a fine job.” Howard Finkelstein, Broward County Public Defender Help Me Howard, Channel 7 • BrowardBeat.com 1-16-10


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Aug. 24

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Integrity, Fairness and Experience 9 9 9

Your Broward Circuit Court Judge since 2007 State Prosecutor for 21 years, 19 years in Broward, 2 years in New Jersey Resident of Plantation for 20 years; Married to Laura Day Rebollo who works for AutoNation; One child, daughter Melissa Rebollo who is a freshman at Florida International University in Miami and a Volunteer Guardian Ad Litem (“GAL”)

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AUGUST 2010

Do you work? Need a bar code? Call I.D. office for an appointment.

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Condo News The Florida Senate

SB 1196 BILL ANALYSIS AND FISCAL IMPACT STATEMENT Prepared By: The Professional Staff of the Judiciary Committee

(This document is based on the provisions contained in the legislation as of the latest date listed below.) BILL: CS/CS/CS/SB’s 1196 & 1222 INTRODUCER: Judiciary Committee, Military Affairs and Domestic Security Committee, Regulated Industries Committee, Senator Fasano, and others SUBJECT: Community Associations DATE: April 9, 2010 I. Summary: The bill revises laws related to community associations, including condominium, homeowners’, and cooperative associations. The bill permits condominium, cooperative, and homeowners’ associations to demand payment of any future regular assessments from the tenant of a unit or parcel owner. The bill revises and clarifies the property insurance requirements of condominium associations and condominium unit owners under ch. 718, F.S. The bill repeals the requirement that condominium unit owners must maintain property insurance coverage and the requirement that the condominium association must be an additional named insured and loss payee on policies issued to unit owners. It repeals the provision that a condominium association may purchase property insurance at the expense of the owner when the unit owner does not provide proof of insurance. It requires that residential condominium unit owner policies issued or renewed on or after July 1, 2010, include loss assessment coverage of $2,000, for certain assessments with a deductible of no more than $250 per direct property loss. The bill also sets limits for the amount of a unit owner’s loss assessment coverage that can be assess for any loss. The bill creates the “Distressed Condominium Relief Act” to define the extent to which successors to the developer, including the construction lender after a foreclosure and other bulk buyers and bulk assignees of condominium units, may be responsible for implied warranties. Regarding condominium associations, the bill: • Requires intent to cause harm to the association or one or more of its members in order for a person to knowingly or intentionally fail to create or maintain accounting records; • Expands the forms of information in the association’s records that are not accessible to unit owners to include disciplinary, health, insurance, and personnel records, and passwords; • Revises the requirements related to financial reporting by the association; • Includes communication services, information services, and Internet services within the scope of the types of bulk contracts that may be considered common expenses; • Revises requirements related to the election of board members, the terms of board offices, vacancies on the board, and the qualifications of board members. It provides for a post-election certification by each newly elected or appointed director, and permits completion of the educational curriculum as an alternative to a written certification; • Provides that unit owners must vote to forego retrofitting and engineered lifesafety system by the affirmative vote of a majority of all voting interests in the affected condominium; • Requires a foreclosing lender to pay up to 12 months of delinquent assessments rather than 6 months of assessments under current law; and • Authorizes the suspension of a unit owner’s rights to use certain association facilities if he or she is more than 90-days delinquent for a regular or special assessment. It permits condominium, cooperative, and homeowners’ associations to demand payment from the tenant of any unit or parcel owner who owes unpaid monetary obligations to the association. The tenant receives credit for any prepaid rent for the applicable period, and the amount of a tenant’s rent owed to a unit or parcel owner is credited to any

amount he or she has paid to the association. The association may evict the tenant if he or she fails to make the required payment. The bill allows a condominium to forego the requirement for emergency generated power for elevators in high-rise multifamily dwellings over 75 feet in height upon an affirmative vote of a majority of the voting interests of the condominium. This bill substantially amends the following sections of the Florida Statutes: 399.02, 617.0721, 617.0808, 633.0215, 718.103, 718.110, 718.111, 718.112, 718.115, 718.116, 718.117, 718.202, 718.301, 718.303, 718.501, 719.106, 719.108, 719.1055, 720.303, 720.304, 720.305, 720.306, 720.3085, and 720.31. This bill creates the following sections of the Florida Statutes: 617.1606, 627.714, 718.701, 718.702, 718.703, 718.704, 718.705, 718.706, 718.707, 718.708, and 720.315. II. Present Situation: Condominiums A condominium is a “form of ownership of real property created pursuant to ch. 718, F.S., which is comprised entirely of units that may be owned by one or more persons, and in which there is, appurtenant to each unit, an undivided share in common elements.”1 A condominium is created by recording a declaration of condominium in the public records of the county in which the condominium will be located.2 A declaration is like a constitution in that it: strictly governs the relationships among condominium unit owners and the condominium association. Under the declaration, the Board of the condominium association has broad authority to enact rules for the benefit of the community.3 A declaration may include covenants and restrictions concerning the use, occupancy, and transfer of the units permitted by law with reference to real property.4 A declaration of condominium may be amended as provided in the declaration. If the declaration does not provide a method for amendment, it may generally be amended as to any matter by a vote of not less than the owners of two-thirds of the units.5 Condominiums are administered by a board of directors referred to as a “board of administration.”6 Division of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares, and Mobile Homes Condominiums are regulated by the Division of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares, and Mobile Homes (division) of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation (department), in accordance with ch. 718, F.S. The division is afforded the complete jurisdiction to investigate complaints and enforce compliance with ch. 718, F.S., with respect to associations that are still under developer control.7 It also has the authority to investigate complaints against developers involving improper turnover or failure to turnover, pursuant to s. 718.301, F.S. After control of the condominium is transferred from the developer to the unit owners, the division’s jurisdiction is limited to investigating complaints related to financial issues, elections, and unit owner access to association records pursuant to s. 718.111(12), F.S. As part of the division’s authority to investigate complaints, s. 718.501(1), F.S., provides the division with the authority to subpoena witnesses, take sworn statements from witnesses, issue cease and desist orders, and impose civil penalties (fines) against developers and associations. Condominium Insurance In 2003, the Legislature established the property and casualty insuring responsibilities of the condominium association and those of the individual condominium unit owner under s. 718.111(11), F.S.8 The legislation provided that on or after January 1, 2004, every hazard insurance policy provided to the association must include coverage for specified portions of condominium property located inside and outside of the units as well as condominium property required to be covered under the declaration of condominium.9 The law provided that the real or personal property located inside the boundaries of the owner’s unit, which is excluded from coverage to be provided by the association, must be insured by the individual unit owner.10 During the 2007 Special Session, legislation was enacted clarifying that the above

provisions apply to “residential” condominiums.11 The legislation further provided that windstorm insurance coverage for a group of three or more communities operating under the Condominium Act (ch. 718, F.S.) may be obtained if the coverage is sufficient to cover an amount equal to the probable maximum loss for communities for a 250-year windstorm event. In 2008, comprehensive condominium legislation was enacted to revise and clarify the insurance requirements in s. 718.111(11), F.S., for condominium associations and unit owners.12 The act specifies that adequate hazard insurance13 required by the association be based on the replacement cost of the property to be insured as determined by an independent insurance appraisal or update of a prior appraisal. The full insurable value must be determined at least every 36 months.14 The association may determine the insurance deductibles on the basis of available funds and predetermined assessment authority at a meeting of the board.15 The meeting notice must state the proposed deductible and the funds and assessment authority relied upon by the board and estimate any potential assessment amount against each unit, if any. Such meeting may be held in conjunction with a meeting to consider the proposed budget. Existing law specifies the provisions that must be contained in every hazard insurance policy issued or renewed on or after January 1, 2009, to an individual unit owner.16 Such policy must contain a provision providing that the coverage afforded by the policy is excess coverage over the amount recoverable under any other policy covering the same property. Also, such policies must include a special assessment coverage17 of not less than $2,000 per occurrence. However, a policy issued to an individual unit owner does not provide rights of subrogation against the condominium association operating the condominium in which the individual’s unit is located. Improvements or additions that do not benefit all of the unit owners must be insured by the unit owner or owners who use the improvements or additions. Alternatively, the association may insure the improvements or additions at the expense of the unit owners who use them. Current law mandates that unit owners provide evidence of their hazard and liability insurance policy to the association upon request, but not more than once per year.18 If the unit owner fails to provide their certificate of insurance within 30 days of the delivery of the written request by the association, the association may purchase a policy on behalf of the unit owner. The unit owner is responsible for the cost of the policy and for any reconstruction costs incurred by the association. These costs may be collected as assessments under s. 718.116, F.S. The association must be an additional named insured and loss payee on all casualty insurance policies issued to unit owners in the condominium operated by the association.19 Loss Assessment Coverage and Deductibles In general, all condominium unit owner property insurance policies provide for loss assessment coverage.20 Effective January 1, 2009, those policies are required to include an assessment coverage of not less than $2,000 per occurrence.21 Most policies provide that unit owners may increase this limit up to $50,000. Under the typical loss assessment provision, the insurer will pay up to the policy limit for the insured’s share of loss assessment charged during the policy period against the insured by the condominium association when the assessment is made as a result of direct loss to the property owned by all members collectively and caused by the insured peril. The policy limit is the most the insurer will pay with respect to any one loss, regardless of the number of assessments. The triggered event for the loss assessment coverage is an assessment by the association taking place during the policy period and the date of the occurrence that generated the assessment is not a factor. If the assessment is made during the policy period, even if the actual occurrence causing the property damage took place prior to the effective date of the policy, then the triggering criteria have been met. In order for the assessment to be covered under the policy, the peril

causing the loss must be a covered peril under the unit owner’s policy. Most property insurance policies have an all-other-peril (AOP) deductible of $500, which applies to loss assessment claims.22 However, with the passage of legislation in 2008, the Office of Insurance Regulation (OIR) has taken the position that a deductible does not apply to loss assessment coverage under a unit owner’s policy.23 Representatives with the OIR state that the Insurance Services Office forms approved prior to the passage of the 2008 legislation do apply a policy deductible for loss assessment claims. Condominium – Official Records Existing law requires that the official records of a condominium association must be maintained within the state for at least seven years.24 The records must be made available to the unit owner within 45 miles of the condominium property or within the county in which the condominium property is located. The records must be made available within five working days after a written request is received by the governing board of the association or its designee. The records may be made available by having a copy of the official records of the association available for inspection or copying on the condominium property or association property. Alternatively, the association may offer the option of making the records of the association available to a unit owner electronically via the Internet or by allowing the records to be viewed in electronic format on a computer screen and printed upon request. The association must maintain accounting records and separate accounting records for each condominium that the association operates.25 All accounting records must be maintained for a period of not less than seven years. The statute prohibits any person from knowingly or intentionally defacing or destroying accounting records required to be maintained by ch. 718, F.S. It also prohibits knowingly or intentionally failing to create or maintain accounting records required to be maintained by ch. 718. F.S. Persons who violate this provision are personally subject to a civil penalty pursuant to s. 718.501(1)(d), F.S. Condominiums – Financial Reporting Section 718.111(13), F.S., sets forth the financial reporting responsibilities of the association. A condominium association has 90 days to prepare and complete a financial report for the preceding fiscal year either after the end of the fiscal year or annually as provided by bylaws. The types of financial statements or information that must be provided are based on the total annual revenues of the association. If the association has a total annual revenue of $100,000 or more, but less than $200,000, the association must prepare compiled financial statements.26 If the association has a total annual revenue of at least $200,000 and not less than $400,000, the association must prepare reviewed financial statements.27 If the total annual revenue is $400,000 or more, the association must prepare audited financial statements.28 If the total annual revenue is less than $100,000, a report of cash receipts must be prepared. An association with less than 50 units regardless of annual revenue must prepare a report of cash receipt and expenditures instead of financial statements.29 Meetings and approval of budgets must occur prior to the end of the fiscal year.30 Condominium – Assessments and Foreclosures Current law defines an “assessment” as the “share of the funds which are required for the payment of common expenses, which from time to time is assessed against the unit owner.”31 “Special assessment” is defined to mean “any assessment levied against a unit owner other than the assessment required by a budget adopted annually.”32 A unit owner is jointly and severally liable with the previous owner for all unpaid assessments that came due up to the time of transfer of title. This liability is without prejudice to any right the owner may have to recover from the previous owner the amounts paid by the owner.33 If a first mortgagee, (e.g., the mortgage lending bank) or its successor or assignee, acquires title to a condominium unit by foreclosure or by deed in lieu of foreclosure, the first mortgagee’s liability for unpaid assessments is limited to the amount of


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Condo News assessments that came due during the six months immediately preceding the acquisition of title or 1 percent of the original mortgage debt, whichever is less.34 However, this limitation applies only if the first mortgagee joined the association as a defendant in the foreclosure action. This gives the association the right to defend its claims for unpaid assessments in the foreclosure proceeding. A first mortgagee who acquires title to a foreclosed condominium unit is exempt from liability for all unpaid assessments if the first mortgage was recorded prior to April 1, 1992. The successor or assignee, in respect to the first mortgagee, includes only a subsequent holder of the first mortgage. Unpaid Assessments for Condominiums in Foreclosure A first mortgagee or its successor or assignee who acquires title to a unit by foreclosure or by deed in lieu of foreclosure is liable for any unpaid assessments that become due before the mortgagee’s acquisition of the title is limited to: • The unit’s unpaid common expenses and regular periodic assessments which accrued or came due during the 6 months immediately preceding the acquisition of title and for which payment has not been received by the association; or • One percent of the original mortgage debt.40 This liability only applies if the first mortgagee joined the association as a defendant in the foreclosure action. Alternate Power Generators for Elevators During the 2006 Regular Session, s. 553.509(2) (a), F.S.,62 was enacted to require that any person, firm, or corporation that owns, manages, or operates a residential multifamily dwelling, including a condominium, which is at least 75-feet high (high-rise residential buildings) and contains a public elevator, have at least one elevator capable of operating on alternate generated power. In the event of a general power outage, this elevator must ensure that residents have building access for an unspecified number of hours each day over a five-day period following a natural or manmade disaster, emergency, or other civil disturbance. The alternate generated power source must be capable of powering any connected fire alarm system in the building. The alternate generated power requirements under current law do not apply to high-rise buildings that were in existence on October 1, 1997, or which were either under construction or under contract for construction on October 1, 1997.63 Newly constructed residential multifamily dwellings meeting the criteria of this section must meet the engineering, installation, and verification requirements of s. 553.509(2), F.S., before occupancy.64 At a minimum, the elevator must be appropriately pre-wired and prepared to accept alternate generated power.65 The power source must be capable of powering the elevator, a connected building fire alarm system, and emergency lighting in the internal lobbies, hallways, and other internal public portions of the building. The dwellings must either have a generator and fuel source on the property or proof of a current guaranteed service contract providing such equipment and fuel source within 24 hours of a request. Proof of a current service contract for such equipment and fuel must be posted in the elevator machine room or other place conspicuous to the elevator inspector. Verification Requirements A person, firm, or corporation that owns, manages, or operates a building affected by this requirement must provide to the local building inspection agency verification of engineering plans for alternate generated power capability by December 31, 2006.66 The local building inspectors must verify the installation and operational capability of the alternate generated power source and report to the county emergency management director by December 31, 2007. Posting Requirements The owner, manager, or operator of the highrise residential building must keep written records of any contracts for alternative power generation equipment and fuel source.67 Quarterly inspection records of life-safety equipment and alternate power generation equipment must also be posted in the elevator machine room or other place conspicuous to the elevator inspector.68 Emergency-Operations-Plan Requirements Each person, firm, or corporation that is required to maintain an alternate power source must also

maintain a written emergency operations plan that details the sequence of operations before, during, and after a natural or manmade disaster or other emergency situation.69 The plan must include, at a minimum, a life-safety plan for evacuation, maintenance of the electrical and lighting supply, and provisions for the health, safety, and welfare of the residents. The written emergency operations plan and inspection records must be open for periodic inspection by local and state government agencies.70 The owner or operator must keep a generator key in a lockbox posted at or near any installed generator unit.71 Inspections Certified elevator inspectors must confirm that all installed generators are in working order, the elevators have current inspection records posted, and a generator key is located near the generator.73 If there is no installed generator, the inspector is required to confirm that the appropriate pre-wiring and switching capabilities are present and that the guaranteed contingent service contract is posted. Senate Review of Elevator Safety and Regulation The October 2008 interim report prepared by the professional staff of the Senate Regulated Industries Committee also studied the extent of compliance with s. 553.509(2), F.S., and reviewed the problems that citizens and governmental agencies have had in implementing these requirements.74 Senate professional staff recommended that the Legislature consider the repeal of s. 553.509(2), F.S. The repeal recommendation was based upon the following findings and conclusions: • The requirement may pose a threat to public safety, i.e., the availability of emergency power for elevators during the five days after a declared state of emergency may encourage persons to stay in high-rise buildings and areas that are not safe and do not have the necessary infrastructure for safe habitation; • The requirement does not have a clearly defined state or local agency that is responsible for its on-going enforcement; • Enforcement of the requirement by a state agency would carry a fiscal burden without a clearly defined benefit that may outweigh the public safety concerns; • The requirement does not appear to have any clearly defined impact on elevator safety; • It is not clear what penalty, if any, should be imposed on building owners who cannot comply with the requirement because they cannot afford the expense; and • To the extent that an alternate emergency power for elevators provides a public benefit, the Florida Building Code currently requires emergency power for elevators in new highrise residential construction. Alternatively, the professional staff recommended that the Legislature could continue to require emergency generated power pursuant to s. 553.509(2), F.S., but, to ensure uniform compliance, provide funding for the Bureau of Elevator Safety within the Division of Hotels and Restaurants, Department of Business and Professional Regulation, for the enforcement of this provision. Post Hurricane Wilma Legislative Hearings The Legislature held committee hearings in South Florida in the aftermath of 2005’s Hurricane Wilma. These hearings highlighted that significant damage to the region’s electrical grid caused many high-rise residential building occupants to become stranded on the upper building floors in the absence of working elevators. Section 553.509(2), F.S., established requirements for alternate power operations of at least one elevator in such buildings for an unspecified number of hours each day for up to five days to mitigate the problem. Lessons learned from Hurricane Floyd, in 1999, indicated that an evacuation of a high density population center such as the South Florida region can require almost three days to clear a substantial portion of the population to as far away as Orlando. Current storm evacuation strategy envisions short evacuation distances, generally within a county, mainly to avoid storm surge. Emergency shelter strategy envisions sheltering those persons whose residences are at risk due to flooding potential or the inability to withstand high wind loading as well as those persons with special medical needs. Persons living in reinforced concrete high-rise structures that are capable of withstanding high wind loads are often encouraged

by emergency managers to prepare themselves to be self-sufficient for a minimum of three days and to shelter-in-place. If the electrical power grid cannot be substantially restored within three days, then emergency planning contingencies must be prepared to support the needs of persons, particularly the elderly and those with physical disabilities, who will not be able descend and climb multiple flights of stairs. This may then require additional emergency shelter arrangements for a significantly large population. Current Division of Emergency Management estimates for Category 5 general population shelter spaces for the South Florida Region is 124,804. The current inventory of American Red Cross standards compliant shelter spaces for South Florida is 164,197. However, six of Florida’s eleven RPC regions have deficits of standards compliant shelter spaces. Florida as a whole has a deficiency of 315,285 standards compliant general population spaces.75 While the South Florida Region’s inventory exceeds estimated demand, additional demand for shelter spaces by high-rise building residents who are unable to remain in their residences because of inoperable elevators, may well exceed the region’s current excess shelter capacity. Section 553.509(2), F.S., does not affect elevator safety per se. The requirement for inspection of pre-wiring installation for alternate emergency power operation of a high-rise building’s elevator is designed to ensure the safety of electrical grid repair personnel. Improperly wired generators have led to deaths by electrocution among grid repair personnel. III. Effect of Proposed Changes: Safety Code for Existing Elevators and Escalators (Section 1) The bill amends s. 399.02, F.S., relating to updates to the code requiring modifications for Phase II Firefighters’ Service on existing elevators as amended into the Safety Code for Existing Elevators and Escalators, ASME A17.1 and A17.3. The code modifications may not be enforced on elevators in condominiums or cooperatives issued a certificate of occupancy as of July 1, 2008, for five years or until the elevator is replaced or requires major modification. This exception does not apply to a building for which a certificate of occupancy was issued after July 1, 2008. This exception does not prevent the elevator owner from requesting a variance nor prohibit the division from granting a variance pursuant to s. 120.542, F.S. The division is directed to adopt rules to administer this section. Corporations Not for Profit (Sections 2-4) The bill amends the following provisions to provide exceptions for condominiums, cooperatives, and homeowners’ associations under chs. 718, 719, and 720, F.S., respectively: • Section 617.0721, F.S., relating to voting requirements for members of the corporation; and • Section 617.0808, F.S., relating to removal of corporate directors. The bill also creates s. 617.1606, F.S., to provide an exception for condominiums, cooperatives, and homeowners’ associations from the provisions of s. 617.1601 through s. 617.1605, F.S., which relate to corporate records and financial reporting requirements. Chapters 718, 719, and 720, F.S., currently provide requirements relating to voting by members, removal of directors, records and financial reporting, including access to records, for condominiums, cooperatives, and homeowners associations. Fire Alarm Systems (Section 6) The bill amends s. 633.0215, F.S., the Florida Fire Prevention Code, to exempt a condominium or multifamily residential building that is less than four stories in height and which has an exterior means of egress corridor from installing a manual fire alarm system required by the Life Safety Code adopted in the Fire Prevention Code. Condominium Insurance (Sections 5 and 9) The bill creates s. 627.714, F.S., pertaining to condominium unit owner coverage and loss assessment coverage. For policies issued or renewed on or after July 1, 2010, a residential condominium unit owner’s policy must include loss assessment coverage of at least $2,000, for all assessments made as a result of the same direct loss to the association property, regardless of the number of assessments. The loss must be of the type of loss covered by the unit owner’s residential property insurance policy. The bill authorizes insurers to apply a deductible of no more than $250 per direct

property loss. A deductible does not apply if a deductible has been applied to other property loss sustained by the unit owner for the same direct loss to the property. The maximum amount of any unit owner’s loss assessment coverage for any one loss is limited to an amount equal to the unit owner’s loss assessment coverage limit in effect one day before the date of the occurrence. Any changes to those limits for loss assessments made on or after the day before the date of the occurrence do not apply to the loss. Regardless of the number of assessments, an insurer providing loss assessment coverage to a unit owner is not required to pay more than an amount equal to the unit owner’s loss assessment coverage limit as a result of the same direct loss to property. The bill requires every property insurance policy issued or renewed to an individual unit owner to contain a provision stating that the coverage afforded by such policy is excess coverage over the amount recoverable under any other policy covering the same property. The bill amends s. 718.111(11), F.S., pertaining to condominium insurance. The bill changes terminology by deleting the terms “hazard” and “casualty” in referring to insurance in multiple paragraphs in this subsection and replaces those terms with the term “property.” Property insurance is insurance on real or personal property and is the usual and customary term used in the Insurance Code.76 Casualty insurance77 refers to liability insurance and is not the appropriate term to be used in this context, and hazard insurance is not a usual or customary term under the Insurance Code. The bill clarifies that adequate property insurance shall not be based upon the “full insurable value” of the property, but must be based on the “replacement cost” of the property to be insured, which must be determined at least once every 36 months. The bill deletes the requirement in s. 718.111(11)(c)3., F.S., that the board meeting notice state the proposed deductible and the available funds, the assessment authority relied upon by the board, and the estimate of the potential assessment amount against each unit, if any. The bill also removes the provision that permitted the board meetings to be held in conjunction with a meeting to consider the proposed budget or budget amendment. The bill clarifies, in s. 718.111(11)(f)3., F.S., that the property that is excluded from the association’s insurance coverage (i.e., the personal property within the unit or limited common elements, and floor, wall, and ceiling coverings, electrical fixtures, appliances, water heaters, water filters, built-in cabinets and countertops, and window treatments, including curtains, drapes, blinds, hardware, and similar window treatment components, or replacements of any of the foregoing) is located within the boundaries of the unit and serve only such unit. The bill further clarifies that the excluded property is the responsibility of the unit owner and the unit owner’s insurance. The bill amends s. 718.111(11)(g), F.S., to provide that the unit owner’s insurance policy must conform to the requirements of s. 627.714, F.S., created in the bill. The bill deletes the following provisions from s. 718.111(11)(g), F.S.: • A unit owner’s hazard insurance policy, issued or renewed on or after January 1, 2009, must contain a provision stating that the policy coverage is excess coverage over the amount recoverable under any other policy covering the same property; • A unit owner’s hazard insurance policy must include special assessment coverage of $2,000 per occurrence; • A unit owner’s hazard insurance policy does not provide the right of subrogation against the unit owner’s condominium association; • All improvements or additions to the condominium property that benefit fewer than all unit owners must be insured by the unit owner or owners having the use thereof, or may be insured by the association at the cost and expense of the unit owners having such use; • The association may require each owner to provide evidence of a hazard and liability insurance upon request, but not more than once per year; • Should the unit owner fail to provide hazard and liability insurance upon written request within 30 days, the association may purchase


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Condo News a policy on the owner’s behalf and the unit owner is responsible for the cost of the policy and for any reconstruction costs incurred by the association and such costs may be collected as assessments under s. 718.116, F.S.;78 and • The association must be an additional named insured and loss payee on all casualty insurance policies issued to unit owners in the condominium operated by the association. Condominium Association Records (Section 9) The bill amends s. 718.111(12)(a)11. and (12) (c), F.S., relating to accounting records and official records, respectively, to clarify that a person who knowingly or intentionally defaces or destroys accounting or official records required to be created or maintained for a required period as provided in ch. 718, F.S., or who knowingly or intentionally fails to create or maintain accounting records as required with the intent of causing harm to the association or one or more of its members is subject to a civil penalty as provided in s. 718.501(1)(d)6., F.S. The bill amends s. 718.112(12)(b), F.S., to provide that the association is not responsible for the use or misuse of the information provided pursuant to the compliance requirements of ch. 718, F.S, unless the association has an affirmative duty not to disclose the information. The bill also amends s. 718.111(12)(c), F.S., to add the following additional information to the list of information that is not accessible to unit owners: • Disciplinary, health, insurance, and personnel records of the association’s employees; • Email addresses, telephone numbers, emergency contact information, and any addresses of a unit owner that are not provided to fulfill the association’s notice requirements; • Electronic security measures used to safeguard data, including passwords; and • Software and operating systems used by the association to allow manipulation of data. The bill permits access to the following personal identifying information: the person’s name, lot or unit designation, mailing address, property address, and other contact information. Financial Reporting (Section 9) The bill amends s. 718.111(13), F.S., to require that association rules must include a standard for presenting a summary of association reserves that includes, but is not limited to, a good faith estimate disclosing the annual amount of reserves necessary for the association to fully fund the reserves for each reserve item that is based on the straight-line accounting method. The disclosure does not apply to reserves funded via the pooling method. The bill deletes provisions requiring that the rules include a uniform accounting principle and standard for stating the disclosure of at least a summary of the reserves, including information as to whether the reserves are funded at a level sufficient to prevent the need for a special assessment, and if not, the amount necessary to bring reserves up to a level that will avoid a special assessment, and that the person preparing the financial reports is entitled to rely on an inspection report prepared for or by the association to meet the fiscal and fiduciary standards of ch. 718, F.S. The bill requires that an association with less than 75 units, regardless of annual revenue, must prepare a report of cash receipt and expenditures instead of financial statements. This is an increase in the minimum number of units under current law. Under current law, associations with less than 50 units must prepare a report of cash receipt and expenditures instead of financial statements. Certificate of Compliance (Section 10) A provision must be included in the bylaws requiring that a certificate of compliance from a licensed electrical contractor or electrician may be accepted as evidence that the condominium units are in compliance with the applicable fire and life safety code. An association or condominium is not obligated to retrofit the common areas or association-owned property of a residential condominium with a fire sprinkler system if the unit owners have voted to forego such retrofitting by a two-thirds vote of all voting interests. This bill removes the provision prohibiting a condominium association from retrofitting a fire sprinkler system of the common areas in a high rise building defined as greater than 75 feet. If there has been a previous vote to forego retrofitting, a special meeting of the unit owners may be called by petition of at least 10 percent of the unit owners to consider requiring

retrofitting. Such vote may be called only once every three years. The bill authorizes an association to opt out of the requirement of s. 553.509(2), F.S., relating to provisions for alternate emergency power for high rise building elevators by a majority affirmative vote of the voting interests of the affected condominium. Bylaws – Board Members (Section 10) The bill amends s. 718.112(2)(d)1., F.S., to exempt timeshare condominiums from the requirement that the terms of all members of the board expire at the annual meeting. The bill amends s. 718.112(2)(d)1., F.S., to provide that board members whose terms have expired become automatically eligible for reappointment and need not stand for reelection if the number of board members whose terms have expired exceeds the number of eligible members showing interest in or demonstrating an intention to run for the vacant positions. Current law provides for automatic reappointment to the board. The bill provides an exception to the prohibition against co-owners of a unit serving on the board at the same time. The bill would permit co-owners who own more than one unit to serve on the board at the same time. Co-owners may also serve at the same time if there are not enough eligible candidates to fill the vacancies on the board at the time of the vacancy. It also exempts condominium associations that include timeshare units or timeshare interests from the prohibition against co-owners of a unit simultaneously serving on the board 40 days before a scheduled election. The bill provides that persons who are delinquent in the payment of a fine or special or regular assessment are not eligible for board membership. Current law only disqualifies persons from board membership who are delinquent in the payment of a fee or assessment. The bill also amends s. 718.112(2)(d)3., F.S., to delete the requirement for a pre-election certification by candidates to the condominium board. It requires candidates for the board to give a written notice to the association of his or her intent to be a candidate. The bill creates s. 718.112(2)(d)3.b., F.S., to provide a post-election certification requirement for newly elected board members. Within 90 days of being elected or appointed, a new board member must certify that he or she: • Has read the declaration of condominium for all condominiums operated by the association and the association’s articles of incorporation, bylaws, and rules and regulations; • Will work to uphold such documents and policies to the best of his or her ability; and • Will faithfully discharge his or her fiduciary responsibility to the association’s members. As an alternative to a written certification, the newly elected or appointed director may submit a certificate of satisfactory completion of the educational curriculum administered by a divisionapproved condominium education provider. This course must have been completed within one year before the 90-day deadline. The bill provides that a board member is automatically disqualified from service on the board if he or she fails to timely file the written certification or educational certificate. The secretary of the association must keep the written certification or educational certificate for inspection by the members for five years after a director’s election or appointment. The bill also provides that the validity of any appropriate action is not affected by the association’s failure to have the certification on file. The bill further amends s. 718.112(2), F.S., as follows: • Paragraph (n) is amended to add nonpayment of any monetary obligation due the association to the list of criteria for which a director or an officer may be deemed to have abandoned office when such director or officer is more than 90 days delinquent in the payment of the fee, fine, or special assessment; and • Paragraph (o), which provides that a director or officer who is charged with a felony theft or embezzlement offense involving the association’s funds or property must be removed from office, is amended to clarify that the removal is effective until the end of the period of suspension or the end of the director

or officer’s term of office. The bill also clarifies that the charge of a felony is by information or indictment. Fire Sprinkler Systems (Section 10) The bill provides that unit owners must vote to forego retrofitting and engineered lifesafety system by the affirmative vote of a majority of all voting interests in the affected condominium rather than a two-thirds vote as required under current law. The bill also provides that, by December 31, 2016, an association that is not in compliance with the requirements for a fire sprinkler system or other form of engineered lifesafety system and has not voted to forego retrofitting of the system must submit an application for a building permit for the required installation with the local government demonstrating that the association will become compliant by December 31, 2019. Common Expenses and Common Surplus (Section 11) The bill amends s. 718.115(1)(d)1., F.S., to provide that communication services, as defined in ch. 202, F.S.,79 information services, or Internet services are included in the scope of the types of bulk contracts which are a common expense. References to a master antenna television system or duly franchised cable television services are deleted. Under the bill, a bulk contract for such services would not be deemed a common expense as provided under current law. Current law requires that, as a common expense, such service costs would be allocated on a per-unit basis. The bill provides associations with the discretion to allocate costs of a bulk-rate contract on a per-unit basis or a as a percentage of basis. The bill provides that a contract made by the board on or after July 1, 1998, may be cancelled by a majority of the voting interests present. The bill also amends s. 718.115(1)(d)2., F.S., to clarify that cable or video service are the types of common expense services that may be discontinued by a hearing impaired or legally blind person, or by a person receiving supplemental security income or food stamps, without incurring a common expense charge, and adds video services in place of the current term “television” in regards to the type of expense, including cable, that must be shared equally by all participating unit owners if fewer than all unit owners share the expense. The bill also permits the association to make an assessment for video, as well as cable services. Condominium – Assessments and Foreclosures (Section 12) The bill amends s. 718.116(1)(b), F.S., to require a foreclosing lender to pay up to 12 months of delinquent assessments rather than 6 months of assessments as allowed under current law. The bill also amends the provision in s. 718.116(5)(b), F.S., that the claim of lien shall secure all unpaid assessments that accrue after the recording of the claim of lien and before the entry of a certificate of tile. The bill replaces the term “certificate of title” with “final judgment” because, in a foreclosure action on a lien, the title is transferred through a final judgment and not through the entry of a certificate of title. Condominiums – Assessment Payments by Tenants (Section 12) The bill creates s. 718.116(11), F.S., to authorize the association to demand payment of any future monetary obligation from the tenant of a unit owner if the unit owner is delinquent in payment. The association must mail written notice of such action to the unit owner. The tenant is obligated to make such payments. These provisions are identical to the provisions in ss. 719.108(10) and 720.3085(8), F.S., for tenants in cooperative associations and homeowners’ associations, respectively. The bill does not require that the tenant pay any unpaid past monetary obligations of the unit owner. The tenant is required to pay monetary obligations to the association until the tenant is released by the association or by the terms of the lease, and is liable for increases in the monetary obligations only if given a notice of the increase not less than 10 days before the date the rent is due. If the tenant has prepaid rent to the unit owner before the receipt of the association’s demand for payment, and the tenant provides written evidence of the prepaid rent to the association within 14 days of receipt of the written demand, then the tenant must make all accruing rent payments thereafter to the association. The tenant will receive credit for the prepaid rent for the applicable period, and those payments, and those payments will be credited against the monetary obligations of

the unit owner to the association. A tenant who responds in good faith to a written demand from an association shall be immune from any claim from the unit owner. It is unclear to what extent “claims” are precluded by the immunity afforded in this provision. For example, if the tenant pays the obligation and subtracts that amount from the rent owed to the unit owner, the unit owner could be precluded from recovering in a “breach of lease” claim. The landlord and unit owner must provide the tenant a credit against rent payments to the unit owner in the amount of monetary obligations paid to the association. The tenant’s liability to the association may not exceed the amount due from the tenant to his or her landlord. If a tenant fails to pay, the association may act as a landlord to evict the tenant under the procedures in ch. 83, F.S. However, the bill expressly provides that the association is not otherwise considered a landlord under ch. 83, F.S., and does not have the duty to maintain the premises as required by s. 83.56, F.S. The tenant’s payments do not give the tenant voting rights or the right to examine the books and records of the association. If a court appoints a receiver, the effects of s. 718.116(11), F.S., may be superseded. Termination of Condominium (Section 13) The bill amends s. 718.117(2)(a)1., F.S., relating to termination of condominiums because of economic waste or impossibility, to clarify the criteria for economic distress and the ability to recreate a condominium on the property. Under current law, a condominium may be terminated if the estimated cost of repairs needed to restore the condominium to its former condition and compliance with applicable laws and regulations exceed the market value of all the units in the condominium after the repairs. The bill includes costs of construction. This would permit the condominium to be terminated while still in its initial construction phase. The bill also amends s. 718.117(19), F.S., relating to the creation of another condominium after the termination of a condominium, to replace the term “creation” with the term “filing of a declaration of condominium or an amended and restated declaration of condominium,” which is a more specific description of how a new condominium is created after a termination. Condominium – Sanctioning Unit Owners (Section 16) The bill amends s. 718.303(3), F.S., to authorize condominium associations to suspend a unit owner’s use rights if the unit owner is delinquent for more than 90 days in the payment of a monetary obligation to the association. The suspension may be, for a reasonable period of time, for the right of a unit owner or a unit’s occupant, licensee, or invitee, to use common elements, common facilities, or any other association property. The association cannot suspend the right to use limited common elements intended to be used only by that unit, common elements that must be used to access the unit, utility services provided to the unit, parking spaces, or elevators. The declaration of condominium or the bylaws of the association must authorize the suspension. Before a suspension or fine is imposed, notice and an opportunity for a hearing must be provided. This provision could be interpreted to conflict with s. 718.106(4), F.S., which grants a tenant all use rights in the association property and those common elements otherwise readily available for use generally by the unit owners. The bill provides that suspensions may not be imposed by an association unless it first gives at least 14-days notice and a opportunity for a hearing to the unit owner or occupant, if applicable. Current law only provides a reasonable notice requirement before imposition of a fine and does not reference unit occupants. The bill also authorizes associations to provide in their bylaws or declaration of condominium that a unit owner’s voting rights may be suspended due to nonpayment of assessments, fines, or other charges payable to the association which are delinquent in excess of 90 days. The suspension shall end when the payment due or overdue to the association is paid in full. The suspension of voting rights could be read to conflict with s. 718.106(2)(d), which provides that membership in the association, with full voting rights, passes with a unit as appurtenances thereto. IV. Constitutional Issues: A. Municipality/County Mandates Restrictions: None. B. Public Records/Open Meetings Issues:


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Condo News None. C. Trust Funds Restrictions: None. D. Other Constitutional Issues: The provisions in the bill allowing associations to demand rent from a tenant could be challenged as an unconstitutional impairment of contract if an association demands rent from a tenant who entered into the lease prior to the effective date of the bill. Article I, section 10 of the Florida Constitution and the United States Constitution precludes the enactment of any law impairing the obligation of contracts. The first inquiry in an impairment of contract analysis is whether the state law has, in fact, operated as a substantial impairment of a contractual relationship.84 “The severity of the impairment measures the height of the hurdle the state legislation must clear.”85 Utilizing this analysis, some courts have recognized that a statute may be declared unconstitutional as an impairment of a tenant’s lease or contract when the statute requires payment under a lease executed prior to the enactment of the provision.86 The provisions in the bill allowing associations to demand rent from tenants appears to apply prospectively and there is no expression of the Legislature’s intent to apply the provision to leases already in existence. However, if challenged, the constitutionality of the provision will likely turn on a determination of the extent and severity of the impairment of the tenant’s rights under the lease. V. Fiscal Impact Statement: A. Tax/Fee Issues: None. B. Private Sector Impact: Condominium unit owners should benefit under the bill’s provisions by not being required to obtain property insurance coverage on their unit and by not having their association be an additional named insured and loss payee on their policy. However, if they wish to purchase such insurance, they must obtain $2,000 of loss assessment coverage, after any applicable deductible is due under the policy. The deductible may not exceed $250 per direct property loss. The Department of Business and Professional Regulation (department) noted that the bill should result in more bulk investors getting into the business, which should improve the financial position of condominium associations in which a significant number of units are unsold and unoccupied. The department also stated that the purchase of unsold inventory would have a positive effect on the depressed condominium market.87 C. Government Sector Impact: None. VI. Technical Deficiencies: None. VII. Related Issues: None. VIII. Additional Information: A. Committee Substitute – Statement of Substantial Changes: (Summarizing differences between the Committee Substitute and the prior version of the bill.) CS/CS/CS by Judiciary on April 7, 2010: The committee substitute: • Specifies that the maximum amount of any unit owner’s loss assessment coverage that may be assessed for any loss is an amount equal to the unit owner’s loss assessment coverage limit; • Provides that any changes to the limits of a unit owner’s coverage for loss assessments made on or after the day before the date of the occurrence are not applicable to the loss; • Clarifies that, regardless of the number of assessments, an insurer is not required to pay more than an amount equal to the unit owner’s loss assessment coverage limit as a result of the same direct loss to the property; • Provides that, except for those portions of the common elements designed and intended to be used by all unit owners, a portion of the common elements serving only one unit or a group of units may be reclassified as a limited common element upon the vote required to amend the condominium declaration; • Deletes a reference to “common areas” in the provision specifying that an association, condominium, or unit owner is not obligated to retrofit the common elements, association property, or units

of a residential condominium with a fire sprinkler system; • Provides that unit owners must vote to forego retrofitting an engineered lifesafety system by the affirmative vote of a majority (rather than two-thirds under current law) of all voting interests in the affected condominium; • Requires an association that is not in compliance with requirements for a fire sprinkler system or other form of engineered lifesafety system and that has not voted to forego retrofitting to initiate, by December 31, 2016, an application for a building permit for the required installation with the local government demonstrating that it will become compliant by December 31, 2019; • Requires a foreclosing lender to pay up to 12 months of delinquent assessments rather than 6 months of assessments under current law; • Removes the provisions in the bill (ss. 718.116, 719.108, 720.3085, F.S.) providing that costs may include delinquency letters and collection efforts by a licensed management company or a licensed manager relating to a delinquent installment of an assessment incurred before filing a claim of lien that does not exceed $75; • Provides that a tenant will receive credit for any prepaid rent for the applicable period for any rent paid to a unit owner before receiving a demand from the association in ss. 718.116, 719.108, and 720.385, F.S.; • Creates a new provision within s. 718.202, F.S., to clarify the Division of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares, and Mobile Homes’ (division) policy requiring separate accounting for escrow deposits in new condominium projects; • Replaces references to the “creating” developer with “original” developer; • Clarifies that a bulk assignee must file with the division and provide to a prospective purchaser a description of any rights of the developer which have been assigned to the bulk assignee or bulk buyer; and • Replaces the term “share owner” with the term “unit owners” in the provision allowing an association to demand delinquent monetary obligations from a tenant; CS/CS by Military Affairs and Domestic Security on March 17, 2010: This CS differs from CS/SB’s 1196 & 1222 as follows: • It amends s. 399.02, F.S., to provide for a delay in the retrofit of a special access key for elevators in condominiums and cooperatives until the elevator is replaced or requires major modification; • It removes the repeal of s. 553.509(2), F.S., relating alternate emergency power for high rise residential building elevators. The bill allows associations to opt out of the current law by an affirmative vote of the majority of the voting interests in the affected condominium; • It amends s. 633.0215, F.S., to exempt condominium, cooperative, or multifamily residential buildings less than four stories in height with exterior corridor egress from installing a manual fire alarm system; • It restores the audit thresholds and timing for the annual report found in s. 718.111, F.S., to current law; and • It amends s. 718.112, F.S., to provide for a retrofit exemption to condominium associations for fire sprinkler systems in common areas of a high rise building. The bill provides that a previous vote to forego retrofitting may only be reconsidered once every three years. CS by Regulated Industries on March 3, 2010: The committee substitute (CS) combines SB 1196 and SB 1222. The CS also differs from SB 1196 as follows: • It amends s. 617.0721, F.S., relating to voting requirements for members of the corporation; • It amends s. 617.0808, F.S., relating to removal of directors; • It creates s. 617.1606, F.S., providing an exception to ss. 617.1601 through 617.1605,

• • •

• •

• •

F.S., for condominium, cooperative, and homeowners associations under chs. 718, 719, and 720, F.S., respectively; It amends the definition of “developer” in s. 718.103(16), F.S.; It amends the condominium insurance provision in s. 718.111(11), F.S.; It amends s s. 718.112(2)(d)1., F.S., to exempt timeshares condominium from the requirement that the terms of all members of the board expire at the annual meeting; It also amends s. 718.112(2)(d)1., F.S., to include timeshare units or timeshare interests from the prohibition against coowners of a unit simultaneously serving on the board, and to reference “eligible candidates” in place of “owners”; It amends s. 718.115(1)(d)1., F.S., to delete the term “deemed” in the context of a bulk contract being deemed a common expense. It also provides associations with the discretion to allocate costs of a bulk contract on a per-unit basis or a percentage of basis; It does not amend s. 718.115(1)(d)1., F.S., to provide that a unit owners-controlled association may cancel any contract made by a developer-controlled association, and that the cancellation must be made within 120 days after the unit owners elect the majority of the board; It amends s. 718.116(5)(b), F.S., but does not permit a fee greater than $75 for the collection management company to prepare a letter or estoppel certificate required under ch. 718, F.S. It also does not provide for the charging of a reasonable fee related to the preparation of the letter or estoppel certificate. It also references delinquency letters instead of collection letters. It amends s. 718.116(5)(b), F.S., to replace the term “certificate of title” with the term “final judgment”; It revises the tenant foreclosure provisions for condominiums in s. 718.116(11), F.S., to reference “monetary obligations instead of “assessments”. It clarifies that the notice of an increase in monetary obligations must be in writing, clarifies that notice must be made not less than 10 days before the rent is due, and clarifies the tenants obligations when the rent has been prepaid; It amends s. 718.117(2), F.S., relating to the termination of condominium; It amends s. 718.303(3), F.S., relating to the suspension of member’s rights due to delinquent payment of monetary obligations to the association, to provide that the notice before the suspension is imposed must be a written notice of at least 14 days, and that the suspension ends when the delinquent obligation is paid; It amends s. 718.501, F.S., to include bulk assignees and bulk buyers within the division jurisdiction to investigate complaints and enforce compliance with the provisions of ch. 718, F.S.; It amends the definition of the term “bulk buyer” in s. 718.707(2), F.S., to include the rights to be exempt from the payment of working capital contributions to the association and from the specified rights of first refusal which may be held by the association; It does not include subsection (3) of s. 718.706, F.S., of the bill, which requires compliance with the nondeveloper disclosure requirements in s. 718.503(2), F.S.; It amends s. 719.106, F.S., relating to filling vacancies on the board of a cooperative; It amends s. 719.108(3), F.S., but does not permit a fee greater than $75 for the collection management company to prepare a letter or estoppel certificate required under ch. 718, F.S. It also does not provide for the charging of a reasonable fee related to the preparation of the letter or estoppel certificate. It also references delinquency letters instead of collection letters; It revises the tenant foreclosure provisions for cooperative associations in s. 719.108(10), F.S., to reference “monetary obligations instead of “assessments”. It clarifies that the notice of an increase in monetary obligations must be in writing, clarifies that notice must be made not less than 10 days before the rent is due, and clarifies the tenants obligations when the

rent has been prepaid; It amends s. 720.306(7), F.S., to correct a cross-reference to s. 607.0707, F.S.; • It amends s. 720.306(9), F.S., to provide for the filling of vacancies on the board of a homeowners’ association; • It revises the tenant foreclosure provisions for homeowners’ associations in s. 720.3085(8), F.S., to reference “monetary obligations instead of “assessments”. It clarifies that the notice of an increase in monetary obligations must be in writing, clarifies that notice must be made not less than 10 days before the rent is due, and clarifies the tenants obligations when the rent has been prepaid; • It amends s. 720.31(6), F.S., to provide that this subsection is intended to clarify existing law and that it applies to associations on the effective date of this act; and • It amends s. 720.303(5)(c), F.S., to provide the following additional items to the list of information that is not accessible to unit owners: 1. Email addresses, telephone numbers, emergency contact information, and any addresses of a unit owner that are not provided to fulfill the association’s notice requirements; 2. Electronic security measures used to safeguard data, including passwords; and 3. Software and operating systems used by the association which allow manipulation of data. The CS differs from SB 1222 as follows: • It amends s. 617.0721, F.S., relating to removal of directors; • It amends s. 617.0808, F.S., relating to removal of directors; • It creates s. 617.1606, F.S., providing an exception to ss. 617.1601 through 617.1605, F.S., for condominium, cooperative, and homeowners associations under chs. 718, 719, and 720, F.S., respectively; • It amends s. 718.112(2)(d)1., F.S., to include timeshare units or timeshare interests from the prohibition against co-owners of a unit simultaneously serving on the board, and to reference “eligible candidates” in place of “owners”; • It does not amend s. 718.112(12)(l), F.S., relating to the retrofitting of condominium with fire sprinklers; • It amends s. 718.112(12)(o), F.S., relating to director and officer offenses; • It amends s. 718.115(1)(d)1., F.S., to delete the term “deemed” in the context of a bulk contract being deemed a common expense. It also provides associations with the discretion to allocate costs of a bulk contract on a per-unit basis or a percentage of basis; • It amends s. 718.116, F.S., relating to claims of liens and the tenant’s payment of the unit owner’s monetary obligations; • It amends s. 718.117(2), F.S., relating to the termination of condominium; • It amends s. 718.303, F.S., relating to the suspension of member rights; • It amends the definition of the term “bulk buyer” in s. 718.707(2), F.S., to include the rights to be exempt from the payment of working capital contributions to the association and from the specified rights of first refusal which may be held by the association; • It does not include subsection (3) of s. 718.706, F.S., of the bill, which requires compliance with the nondeveloper disclosure requirements in s. 718.503(2), F.S.; and • It provides an effective date of July 1, 2010, instead of taking effect upon becoming a law. The CS also amends the following sections of the Florida Statutes as described in the analysis: 718.501, 719.106, 719.108, 720.304, 720.305, 720.306, 720.3085, 720.31, 720.303, 720.306, and 720.315. B. Amendments: None. •

This Senate Bill Analysis does not reflect the intent or official position of the bill’s introducer or the Florida Senate. See SOURCES, pg 32


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CVE REPORTER

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Consumer Interest “Ask Lori…Parrish on Appraisal” Broward County Property Appraiser Lori Parrish Answers Your Questions… “Market is Down, But Florida Law Increases Assessments” Dear Lori: I am a long time homeowner in Oakland Park.  After filing for my Senior Exemption at City Hall, I noticed my Just Value has dropped over $30,000 but my Assessed/SOH Value still increased 2.7%.  Why do assessments increase in a down market? G.S., Oakland Park, FL A little known quirk in Florida Law will mean that almost 177,000 long time homeowners in Broward County will see their property tax assessments go up – not down this year.  The higher assessments come despite the fact Broward properties dropped on average 11.7% in the past year, the third straight year of value declines. In 1992, the “Save Our Homes” tax cap became law.  But in 1995, Gov Lawton Chiles and the Florida Department of Revenue approved a rule,

Sources

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1 Section 718.103(11), F.S. 2 Section 718.104(2), F.S. 3 Neuman v. Grandview at Emerald Hills, 861 So. 2d 494, 496-97 (Fla. 4th DCA 2003). 4 Section 718.104(5), F.S. 5 Section 718.110(1)(a), F.S. 6 Section 718.103(4), F.S. 7 Section 718.501(1), F.S. 8 Chapter 2003-14, Laws of Fla. 9 Florida Office of Insurance Regulation (OIR), Condominium Insurance Report (Nov. 19, 2004), available at http://www.floir. com/pdf/Condo_Study.pdf (last visited Mar. 31, 2010). Condominium associations purchase commercial residential property insurance policies in both the admitted and non-admitted markets in order to provide required insurance. The admitted market includes those insurers that are authorized to transact insurance in Florida and file forms and rates with the Office of Insurance Regulation pursuant to ss. 627.410 and 627.062, F.S. The nonadmitted market includes those insurers that are eligible to provide coverage for risks that cannot be insured in the admitted market. These policies are written pursuant to ss. 626.913-626.937, F.S. (Surplus Lines law). 10 Condominium unit owners generally purchase personal residential property insurance policies in both the admitted and non-admitted markets in order to provide required coverage. 11 Chapter 2007-1, Laws of Fla. 12 Chapter 2008-240, Laws of Fla. 13 Hazard insurance is not a usual or customary term under the Insurance Code. The term “property” insurance is utilized under the Insurance Code and refers to real or personal property. 14 Section 718.111(11)(a), F.S. 15 Section 718.111(11)(c), F.S. 16 Section 718.111(11)(g), F.S. 17 The Florida Insurance Code does not define the term “special assessment

coverage.” In a letter to the OIR Commissioner, Senator Jones (a sponsor of the 2008 legislation) stated that the use of the term “special assessment” had caused some confusion and that it was the intent of the Legislature that this term only apply to assessments for loss, as opposed to assessments for routine maintenance and upkeep, such as painting and repaving. It was not the intent of the sponsor to create a new liability for assessments that were not triggered by loss. See Letter from Senator Jones to Commissioner McCarty (September 8, 2008) (on file with the Senate Banking and Insurance Committee). Under s. 718.103(1), F.S., an “assessment” is defined as the “share of the funds which are required for the payment of common expenses, which from time to time is assessed against the unit owner.” Section 718.103(24), F.S., defines a “special assessment” as “any assessment levied against a unit owner other than the assessment required by a budget adopted annually.” 18 Chapter 2008-240, Laws of Fla. 19 Id. 20 The Insurance Services Office (ISO) writes and provides to insurers standard condominium unit owner property insurance policy forms (HO-6 policies) that contain loss assessment coverage provisions. While not all insurers use ISO forms, the coverage provisions provided by those insurers often closely track the ISO forms. 21 Chapter 2008-240, Laws of Fla. 22 A deductible is the amount an insured must pay before the insurance coverage applies to a covered loss. 23 Chapter 2008-240, Laws of Fla. 24 Section 718.111(12), F.S. 25 Section 718.111(12)(a)11., F.S. 26 Section 718.111(13)(a), F.S. According to information provided by Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountants (FICPA), a compilation of financial statements does not provide an expression of assurance

Florida Administrative Code Rule 12D-8.0062(5) which requires our office to increase your overall assessed value each year (up to a maximum of 3%) until it reaches the same amount as the market value. A taxpayer automatically receives “Save Our Homes” protection starting the year after first obtaining a Homestead Exemption. This law limits the increase in assessed values for properties receiving the Homestead Exemption to not more than 3% or the increase in the Consumer Price Index (CPI), whichever

regarding the financial statements and whether modifications to the financial statements are necessary. 27 According to information provided by FICPA, a review of financial statements provides the accountant with a reasonable basis for expressing a limited assurance that there are no material modifications that should be made to the statements for them to be in conformity with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). 28 According to information provided by FICPA, an audit of financial statements permits the accountant to provide a reasonable basis for expressing an opinion regarding all material respects of the financial statements. 29 Section 718.111(13)(b)(2),F.S. 30 Section 718.111(13)(d), F.S. 31 Section 718.103(1), F.S. 32 Section 718.103(24), F.S. 33 Section 718.116(1)(a), F.S. 34 Section 718.116(1)(b), F.S. 35 Section 718.203, F.S. 40 Section 718.116(1)(b), F.S. 62 Chapter 2006-71, s. 12, Laws of Fla. 63 Section 553.507, F.S., exempts such buildings, structures, and facilities from the provisions of ss. 553.501-553.513, F.S., the “Florida Americans with Disabilities Implementation Act.” 64 Section 553.509(2)(c), F.S. 65 Section 553.509(2)(b), F.S. 66 Id. 67 Section 553.509(2)(b), F.S. 68 Section 553.509(2)(d), F.S. 69 Id. 70 Id. 71 Id. 73 Section 553.509(2)(f ), F.S. 74 Comm. on Regulated Industries, The Florida Senate, Review of Elevator Safety and Regulation (Interim Report 2009-125) (Sept. 2008), available at http://www. flsenate.gov/data/Publications/2009/ Senate/reports/interim_reports/pdf/2009125ri.pdf. 75 Florida Division of Emergency

is lower. The Florida Department of Revenue set this year’s SOH cap rate at 2.7%.  The limit does not cover new construction or construction that was not taxed before the “Save Our Homes” limit applied to a property.  It also does not apply when the property sells.  The new owner starts the limitation all over once he or she qualifies for Homestead Exemption. Under Florida Law, a homestead “recapture rule” will cause some taxable values to rise even when the overall market value dropped from last year. Please remember the Property Appraiser does not set or collect your taxes. Sincerely, Lori Parrish, CFE    If you have a question for Lori, please email her at lori@ bcpa.net or write to her at the Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office, 115 South Andrews Avenue, Room 111, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301.  (July, 2010)

Management, 2010 Statewide Emergency Shelter Plan (2010), available at http://www. floridadisaster.org/Response/engineers/ SESPlans/2010SESPlan/documents/2010SESP-maintext-final.pdf (last visited Mar. 31, 2010). 76 Property insurance is defined under s. 624.604, F.S. The Insurance Code consists of chs. 624-632, 634, 635, 636, 641, 648, and 651, F.S. Under s. 624.604, F.S., property insurance is defined as insurance on real or personal property of every kind and of every interest, whether on land, water, or in the air, against loss or damage from all hazards or causes, and against loss consequential upon such loss or damage, other than noncontractual legal liability for any such loss or damage. 77 Casualty insurance is defined under s. 624.605, F.S. 78 Section 718.116, F.S., authorizes condominium associations to place a lien on the condominium unit for failure to pay the assessment. It also provides for interest, if the declaration or bylaws so provide, to accrue at the rate of 18 percent per year, and for late fees not to exceed the greater of $25 or 5 percent. 79 Chapter 202, F.S., is the Communications Services Tax Simplification Law. 84 Pomponio v. Claridge of Pompano Condominium, 378 So. 2d 774, 779 (Fla. 1979). 85 Id. 86Tradewinds of Pompano Ass’n, Inc. v. Rosenthal, 407 So. 2d 976 (Fla. 4th DCA 1981) (holding that s. 718.401(4), F.S., requiring payment of rent into a court depository was unconstitutional as an impairment of lease contracts predating its enactment). 87 Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Office of Legislative Affairs, 2010 Legislative Analysis Form: SB 1196 (Jan. 22, 2010).


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My Presence in the Village By MARTY POPELSKY, Commissioner District 3 As you know, we have an important election in November, which will include ten amendments on the ballot for voter approval. Over the next few months I will present information to my constituents to help explain what the amendments mean. This month we will discuss Amendments 4, 5, and 6. Amendment 4 REFERENDA REQUIRED FOR ADOPTION AND AMENDMENT OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLANS The Hometown Democracy Amendment would require that the voters approve any amendment to the County or City Comprehensive Land Use Plan. Supporters of the amendment argue that it will provide citizen input directly into curtailing growth. Opponents point out that there are dozens of comprehensive plan amendments considered in Broward County every year and that the referendum requirement would be extremely costly and delay

development. Additionally, there is concern that, given the form of government in Broward County where the County has ultimate control over all Land Use Plans, a Land Use Plan Amendment in Deerfield Beach could require a vote of the whole County, thus placing the City of Deerfield Beach’s land use future in the hands of the rest of the County. Opponents also are concerned about the impact of the amendment on an already sluggish Florida economy. Amendments 5 & 6 STANDARDS FOR LEGISLATURE TO FOLLOW IN LEGISLATIVE REDISTRICTING STANDARDS FOR LEGISLATURE TO FOLLOW IN CONGRESSIONAL REDISTRICTING Amendments Five and Six prohibit legislative districts from being drawn to favor or disfavor any incumbent political party. It also prohibits districts being drawn to deny racial or language minorities’ equal opportunity to participate

in the political process. Generally, federal law already deals with the issue of prohibitions on restricting against racial minorities. These two amendments have language requiring the districts to be compact, as equal in population as feasible, and where feasible make use of existing city, county and geographic boundaries. On a separate note, I would like to recognize the fine men and women of Deerfield Beach Fire Rescue for their professionalism when responding to a call at

Le Club on Sunday, July 18. During a meeting of nearly 300 people, a burning smell was detected and everyone had to be evacuated from the building. Thankfully, there was no cause for alarm, but everyone appreciated the courtesy and attention shown by firefighters. NEWS & UPCOMING EVENTS Moonlight Melodies Concerts on the Beach It’s that time again when you can bring your beach chair, and beach towels to sit beneath the balmy summer breeze and enjoy the beautiful sounds of our Moonlight Melodies Concert Series. You won’t want to miss it. Mark your calendar, call your friends and make sure you capture all the great performances. All concerts are free and will be held in front of the Main Beach Parking Lot, Ocean Way and S.E. 1st Street. Refreshments will be sold at all concerts. Bring a blanket/chair for your comfort Upcoming concerts include: Viva–ClassicRock-n-Roll–

Friday,August20,7:00 p.m. This band will play all your favorite songs from the 50’s, 60’s, Hot Brass Monkey – High Energy Dance Band - Friday, September 10, 7:00 p.m. Presented by Hot Tomatoe Italian Restaurant & Wine Bistro Retro music of Motown, R&B, Funk, Rock, Disco to Salsa/Merengue, Reggae, and current hits For more information, call 954-480-4433 or visit www. Deerfield-Beach.com. Remember that I am your only full time Commissioner. I am always here to assist you in any way I can. Call me any time, and I will be glad to help you resolve your problems. City Hall Office  954-4804218 City Assistant Phone  954480-4263 E-mail:    web.commission@ Deerfield-Beach.com Regards & Good Health Marty Popelsky Your District 3 Commissioner

Sherriff’s Report By SHERRIFF AL LAMBERTI Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes in our nation. The Broward Sheriff’s Office is investigating hundreds of active cases right now. With many of these “active” cases, the crimes actually occurred months before they were ever reported. Identity theft occurs when an imposter obtains key pieces of information such as Social Security and driver’s license numbers to obtain credit, merchandise and services in the name of the victim. The victim is left with a ruined credit history that can be extremely difficult to repair. Some victims unwittingly supply vital personal data to smoothtalking criminals, who may pose as bank representatives or law enforcement officers. In other cases, criminals use their computer savvy to glean personal information without any interaction with their victims. The victims often have no idea that their identities have been compromised until creditors begin to inquire about outstanding bills. Our agency recognized this problem and initiated Shred-A-Thon events throughout the summer and fall. From Cooper City

to Deerfield Beach we have assisted residents with shredding more than 30 tons of documents containing personal information. Additionally, our deputies have been distributing educational material with important safety information to residents of Broward County. While it is difficult to prevent identity theft, there are some steps you can take to reduce your risk of becoming a victim: Share identity information only when necessary. Never give anyone your credit card number unless you initiated the transaction. If someone calls you on the phone and asks for your credit card number or social security number, don’t give it to them!

Social Security numbers should not be provided to anyone other than employers or financial institutions that need them for tax reporting purposes. Do not carry unnecessary identification cards. Thieves usually obtain identity information through the loss or theft of purses and wallets. To reduce the risk, only carry the basics, such as your driver’s license, one credit or debit card and an insurance card. Secure your mailbox. The second most common way that thieves obtain identity information is through stolen mail. Many thieves raid mailboxes as soon as the postal carrier is through. Never place outgoing mail in an unlocked residential mailbox. Secure information on your personal computer. Credit card numbers should not be provided to anyone on the Internet unless you initiated the contact. Shred documents containing identity information before tossing them in the trash. This includes credit or debit card receipts, canceled bank checks and statements and junk mail, especially pre-approved credit applications. If you

can, purchase an inexpensive home shredder. Promptly review all bank and credit card statements for accuracy. Report any irregularities to your bank or credit card company and the three main credit reporting agencies. When someone realizes they have become a victim

of identity theft, they should immediately file a report with the Broward Sheriff’s Office or their local police agency where the identity theft occurred. The women and men of BSO are committed to fighting identity theft. To learn more about this growing trend, visit our website www.sheriff.org.


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The Family of Temple Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nai Shalom Requests the honor of your presence on the high holy days Conducted by: Rabbi Alton Winters ~ Cantor Gary Sherman

Rosh Hashanah September 8th at 8pm September 9th at 10am September 10th at 10am Yom Kippur September 17 - Kol Nidre Service - 8pm September 18 - Regular Service - 10am Yiskor Service - open to all - 3pm Closing Service - 4pm Tickets are only $65pp Why eat alone? Join us after service September 18 for a break-fast and bring friends and family $18 members $25 non members Call Sandy Schmier 954-428-8231

Helen Baumann 954-426-2532


AUGUST 2010

ANNUITY OWNERS COULD PAY UP TO 40% TO THE IRS IN TAXES! Many annuity owners are positioned to lose a significant portion of their annuity’s value to taxes, and most are not even aware of the problem. The IRS is not required to notify annuity owners about an exemption to the tax code that could save thousands of dollars in income and estate taxes. A complimentary booklet is available that shows current annuity owners how to avoid mistakes and possibly save thousands! This complimentary booklet creates an awareness around the most costly annuity owner mistakes and provides tips and strategies to help you make the most of your hard-earned assets. Call (877) 856-7986 today to get your no-cost, no-obligation copy of the 16-page “Guide to Avoiding Common Annuity Mistakes” and learn how to potentially:

• Avoid paying unnecessary taxes • Increase your retirement income by properly handling your annuity • Avoid mistakes that could cost you or your beneficiaries thousands of dollars

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Call (877) 856-7986 today for your complimentary 16-page booklet!

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Phyllis’ kitchen By PHYLLIS PISTOLIS CREAMED SPINACH Large bag of spinach – wash and boil for three or four minutes, drain and squeeze dry. Set aside. Sautee onion and garlic in two tablespoons of butter and olive oil till translucent. Add red pepper flakes, ¾ cup heavy cream (I used whole milk), ½ teaspoon nutmeg and grated parmesan cheese. Chop the spinach and add. Simmer all together and enjoy! Yummy ANGEL FOOD CAKE For a quick, refreshing and low calorie dessert. In a food processor - puree one mango – peeled – ½ cup of orange juice -- set aside. Clean and slice grapes, kiwi, star fruit and pineapple in a bowl, add fresh mint and juice of an orange and mix. Slice your cake and spoon the mango puree around it and top with fruit mixture. A little low fat cool whip won’t hurt. Yum. CHEESY CHICKEN BISCUIT One can crescent rolls Sliced Colby cheese Deli turkey, sliced thin One can cream of chicken soup ¾ cup water Separate rolls, place a triangle of cheese on top with a slice of turkey. Roll up, starting with the widest end. Place in baking dish. Mix the soup and water and pour over rolls. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes or until golden brown.

AUGUST 2010

Happy Ending By HERB CHARATZ Sandy and I were sitting by our kitchen table trying to figure out how to get a car so I could drive to work. The walk to the bus, the bus to the train, the train to downtown Brooklyn, and then the seven avenue blocks walk to work, no matter the weather, was getting the best of me. A parking lot for employees was another incentive to having a car. The only thing we could afford was a used car, but we had heard lots of sad stories of people being stuck with a bomb. We circled a few possibilities in the newspaper ads and then said the best thing was to read these to Sandy’s dad for his opinion. Nana and Poppy, (Bertha and Max) my in-laws, who lived across the street, listened to our ideas and to our delight they agreed it was a good idea, but warned us not to rush into anything until we checked it out. Max said that he would go with me if I could set up an appointment right away. There was one particular ad that appealed to me since the price was right, and when I called, the owner invited us to come right over. I kissed Sandy for luck and my maven (expert) and I left. When we knocked on the door of the seller’s bungalow home, a slender well-groomed man, with dark hair and a small amount of gray around the edges that showed his age, answered the door with a smile and a handshake. The introductions started so smoothly and relaxed, we felt we were off to a wonderful start. My father-in-law and I were put right at ease as we walked outside and around

to the back of the house to a small garage. As soon as Mr. Maresco opened the double doors we saw the hospital clean floor and walls and as he opened the hood of the car my father-in-law grabbed my arm and pulled me back outside the garage and said, “Tell Mr. Maresco you’ll buy the car.” I was shocked because he hadn’t even started the car yet, but I did as I was told. When we got home Sandy, Nana and the baby were waiting outside as I drove up with the car. Max jumped out of his car and came over to me as I parked right in back of him and asked how I liked my Little Flivver. I told him I couldn’t believe it happened so fast. Max pointed out that the cleanliness of the man revealed how he took care of the car. It was time to sit at the kitchen table again and figure out how to handle our new expense. We were able to save on all my carfares and we would buy just enough gas per week to get me back and forth. We would scrimp a little here and there if we wanted to buy extra gas for the weekend, if we wanted to go somewhere special. On one particular Sunday, a few weeks later, Sandy and I were going to visit friends who lived in Manhattan Beach. Sandy dressed our beautiful little girl and I dressed at the same time. When I finished, Sandy gave me the baby while she took care of herself. We were early so we started walking down the three flights of stairs so we could stop a minute to show Sandy’s parents how adorable

the baby looked. I told Sandy to go inside while I got the car. I knew I had parked it about half-way down the block but I couldn’t find it where it should have been. Finally, I returned to their house because the car was nowhere to be found. After the whole family agreed that it was gone, we called the police and our friends to apologize for not making it. The police came over in a short time and got all the information of interest pertaining to where the car was originally parked, the look and exact model and year. We also told them the car needed gas as I had planned to get some when we went to visit our friends. I would always get the gas on a Sunday so I would have no trouble getting to work on Monday. The officers were very caring and said they would send out a description immediately. They were not too sure that an old car with little gas would be found in good shape, if it was found at all. We remained visiting downstairs with our in-laws all day as they were expecting a favorite aunt and uncle of ours. My father-in-law told them that he was sure that our Little Flivver would not be found. So the whole afternoon’s conversation was about stolen cars or cars involved in accidents. The baby awakened from her afternoon nap and Sandy and I finally got ready and returned to our across-thestreet apartment. We went upstairs, getting the baby ready for her dinner when the phone rang. I

figured we left something downstairs, which happened many times. To my surprise it was a policeman checking who I was and then said that they had found the car. The car was found parked a block away from Plumb Beach. They were looking there because that is where young couples were known to go to makeout. The policeman, with a slight laugh in his voice, continues – not only was the car in great shape but it had a full tank of gas!

In Loving Memory By Gloria Olmstead Rose (Palumbo) Ananian Rose (Palumbo) Ananian passed peacefully in her sleep on July 25. Rose was a resident of Cambridge D and lived her life to the fullest. All who knew her and loved her will miss her very much. She was truly a remarkable woman. She leaves her children, Michael & Ellen Fink, Donna & Ray Capobianco, her sisters, Fran Lamothe and Mary Alfano.


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Popsicle Money By NORMAN L. BLOOM Nowhere else to my knowledge, except in the little town of Bradley Beach, New Jersey, have Popsicle sticks had a history as a form of currency. “Popsicle sticks you say?” Yes-the sticks around which the flavored ices and ice cream is formed for the frozen dessert treats you can buy almost everywhere. You see, in the summers of 1945 to about 1951, my cousin Harvey and I became entrepreneurs, starting at the ages of seven and eight respectively. One particular day, while playing on the beach, we built a six foot tall mound of sand, and embellished it with our imagination, near the ocean water’s edge. We carved out several tunnels and formed several different paths for a soft rubber ball to roll freely in many directions, before finally rolling out at the bottom of our mound, into a small pool we had placed there. We played with our sand game all day and one of the alternate games we invented was a type of bowling. For that game, we erected ten Popsicle sticks as pins in a bowling ball pattern at the bottom of our mound. The exit for the rubber balls was reconfigured so that the balls approached the ten “pins” from several different directions and at several different speeds. Harvey and I took turns rolling the ball down, around and through our mound of sand, trying to knock down as many pins as possible with each turn. Some other children, also playing on the sandy beach, saw us taking turns and asked for a turn as well. We allowed them to place the ball at the top of the mound and to roll it down our maze of paths and tunnels, until the balls came to the end of its journey and knocked down some of our Popsicle stick, bowling pins. The kids got a big kick out of the game and wanted to play it again and again. It was fun being popular so we let them play for a while. The next day, we rebuilt the same mound plus we built a second mound with different games, but all of the games involved the use of Popsicle sticks – they were used to make bridges, gates, road blocks and other uses as needed. The two game mounds attracted a lot of kids who wanted to play in our games and again we enjoyed the popularity and also the control over the game that we had.

Then I came up with an idea to replace the Popsicle sticks that were sometimes broken by the speeding ball. Any kid, who wanted to play in our game, had to pay us with a popsicle stick. The kids found them in the trash and on the sand all over the beach, so they had no problem finding the “fee” to play our game. The kids also asked their moms for money to buy a Popsicle so they could get the stick, and the twin stick Popsicle became very popular in our beach area. Each day Harvey and I would rebuild our mounds that were knocked down by beach parties at night. And, each day the games would be a little different and they

would become a little more elaborate as Harvey and I gained experience. We included games where the players could earn several more popsicle sticks than the one stick required to play the game but we made sure to make it difficult enough that we came out ahead of most players. (Sounds like the casinos today does it not?) The Popsicle stick fees kept coming and the kids did not lose interest in playing. Then something unexpected happened. We had a large collection of Popsicle sticks earned from our games which we had left with our mothers who were, of course, also on the beach watching us. Our

mothers were approached by several kids offering such things as toys, food and even a portable radio for a quantity of the sticks! We realized that the sticks had become valuable to all the kids on our beach. Harvey and I were able to use our large hoard of sticks just like money, to buy stuff from the other kids, including having them buy food snacks for us in exchange for some of our sticks! So we paid in sticks and the kids came and used the sticks to play our games, thereby giving back the same sticks, which was a sweet arrangement for us, to say the least. And the same bartering,

for and with the sticks, was going on between the other kids on the beach as well. The Popsicle sticks had literally become a monetary system for kids in our beach area. It stayed that way for several summers until about 1951, and, of course, there were many other kids who erected games sometimes in competition with us and sometimes when we were not there vacationing. Of course my cousin and I grew tired of it at times and did not put up a game. Life was gentle and innocent in those days. The Federal Treasury Department would probably have arrested us if we had done this now.


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Confessions of a Car Nut By STAN WEINSTEIN If you’ve read my columns in the past, you know I’m a certifiable car nut. Besides tinkering with the real thing, I have a passion for collecting die cast miniature model cars. If I were Jay Leno, who is a notorious real car collector, I would definitely have a collection that would equal or exceed his. Living in Century Village however, where space is somewhat limited, I don’t know where I would be able to find a 50100 car garage with climate control to store all the cars I’ve enjoyed throughout my life! I have found an easier alternative. About twenty-six years ago I started collecting 1:18 scale, miniature replicas of the cars that I loved most and remember fondly from my youth. To those of you who are not familiar with die cast model collecting, it goes like this: the model car is

approximately 1/18 the size of a real car. That means it will neatly fit into a shoebox. Such models usually weigh 3-5 pounds each and are very artistically reproduced to show a miniature version of the car it represents. My fondness is fifties to sixties, chrome-laden automobiles. I started out with two model cars that I picked up at a gas station on a whim. That was back in 1984 when I set aside a small amount of money for my hobby. Since then I have accumulated a couple of hundred models. I have met other model collectors on eBay who have amassed in excess of 1500 model cars which they store in their basements and garages. I have been actively buying and selling these cars as a hobby on Ebay since 2005. Being a former used car dealer, mechanic in addition

to others auto related activities, I’ve never gotten cars completely out of my life. You have no idea how addictive and pleasurable this hobby is. The models range in price anywhere from $10 - $250. The reason for the range in price is the amount of detail and authenticity which is involved in the reproduction. I have managed to accumulate a very nice collection of cars that have great detail and personality. For example, 1955 was a banner year for Chevrolet. The first V-8 engine was produced and the styling was completely redone and over the top. I don’t think there’s anybody out there who doesn’t know what a ’55 Chevy looks like! I have at least a dozen of them in various color combinations from mild to wild. These

cars have nicely detailed dashboards, opening hoods and steerable wheels. They are also painted in the authentic colors that were used on those particular models. To look at one is to see a miniaturization that could be held in your hand of an actual car. I got hooked on it so bad I started looking for cars that everybody asked me about. Hey, my uncle had a ’67 Plymouth – could you get one of those? My aunt Roz had a’55 Olds – I’d love to see one of those! Well, I just kept on and on and not only do I have Chevys and Plymouths, I also have taxicabs, police cars, some exotic limousines and even a replica of the Godfather Cadillac complete with a replica of Don Corleone (before he got shot!). Chances are if you ever ask me about a certain make, year and model, I could

probably tell you a lot about that car and maybe show you a replica of it. In my youth I owned a countless number of cars. I try to keep some of the ones that really made an impact on me. I have an identical replica of a ’55 Chevy convertible, black and white with red seats and a white top, that I owned and drove in 1962 while stationed at Fort Ord. I know I can’t come up with one of everything that’s ever been produced in the last fifty years but if anybody has a particular fondness or an urge to see something from their past, feel free to contact me. My email is: stanwaiting@ aol.com. I might be able to pleasantly surprise you! Looking forward to hearing from anybody who shares my love for vintage model cars.

We Remember Nana By HERB CHARATZ Sandy and I lived in a lovely house in an “Over 55” development called Concordia in New Jersey while we were still working. The house was bought “as is” at a very low price, leaving us enough money to fix it up. Sandy enjoyed designing the kitchen, adding additional cabinet space, a work island, and an eating area. She also added a room which served as our den and installed a fireplace which was open on three sides. The stunning flames were visible from the kitchen, den, dining room and living room. She enlarged the dining room by adding a deep, wide bay window

which made the tree outside of it appear to be in the house. Sandy was always anxious to show her family the latest improvements and she loved their compliments. Her mother, Bertha, (the rest of the family called her Nana) was a wise woman and one who noticed everything whether good or bad – and she would tell you the truth. One time when Sandy was “fishing” for a compliment from her, she said we had made one error – the tree outside our bay window bloomed just once a year and its beautiful white flowers which made you feel that a garden was in the house, was

there for a short time only. We explained to her that we did not select the tree – it was there when we moved in! “Well,” she continued, “there are many holidays during the year when you use the dining room. You have no control of the date, but if you ever plan a party make sure you make it on an afternoon when the tree is in full bloom since the house looks its very best at that time – it absolutely glows!” Nana fell and was placed in a nursing home near our home. When we would visit her, she always asked about the whole family and also about the tree. When she

spoke of the family a smile would come over her. The same expression came on her face when we told her that the tree was in bloom. It was a hard time for all of us visiting her and watching her get older and sicker. There wasn’t a child, grandchild or greatgrandchild that didn’t love and respect her. Her death was a great loss. Bertha’s funeral was held in upstate New York, where she and Sandy’s late dad resided prior to the nursing home. After the funeral, all the family went to sit Shiva at her brother’s home, where they could be visited by local family and friends. After

several days Sandy returned to our home to sit the balance of her Shiva. Her daughters preceded her, making our bed and vacuuming and making our home presentable for company. Sandy, of course, wasn’t told what they were doing and fretted the whole way home. While parking our car we saw two other cars parking at the same time. They were neighbors, bearing food and expressing their sympathy. Sandy was inching her way in front of them, hoping to enter first to be able to do whatever damage control she could. At the same time she was reproaching herself for thinking about this when she had just lost her mother. As she entered, her home looked “spic and span” and particularly beautiful. When she realized that this was the handiwork of her daughters, she was filled with love and gratitude to have such a caring family. “Yes Mom,” she thought of the many times her mother told her that if you raised your family with love, they would be there when you needed them. I brought in the “mourner’s sitting bench,” placed it in the living room for Sandy, where she had a full view of the living room and dining room, which were aglow with white flowers as the tree had apparently just bloomed – as though to please Nana – at a very special party in her honor.


AUGUST 2010

CVE REPORTER

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Sounding Board The Art of WaTER By SHELLY BASKIN “Water, water, everywhere; and all the boards did shrink. Water, water, everywhere; nor, any drop to drink.” Shakespeare. The Merchant of Venice. Water is everywhere. It encompasses over seventyfive percent of the earth’s surface. Most of our bodies are made up of water, too. Even Century Village has canals all over. There are lakes and waterways to observe, wherever we drive or walk. Beautiful. The ducks, cormorants, gulls, herons, gallinules, egrets, and countless other water birds depend on water from our lakes and canals, daily. Even land foul drink and bathe daily from our waterways and sprinklers. Watch them as they flutter around with their friends and

companions, while soaking up and splashing in the lifegiving water. I never knew what a liter was until I started drinking bottled water. The terminology used to be pints, quarts, gallons. Now, we have to deal with, “liters.” Many people go to the supermarkets and buy bottled water. Some fill up their gallon (milk) containers from a machine in the marketplaces. Who knows if this water is coming from the sink hose attached to the machine that dispenses the water? Fortunately, we have some of the best water in the country, right here, in our faucets. The filtering system, recently completed, and located on Goolsby

Blvd. nearby, has some of the best filtered water in the area. Try it. You’ll like it. At a Deerfield Beach Commission meeting, bottled water from this filtering system was handed out by the boatload. It didn’t taste any different than New Jersey water, but it was supposed to be purer. I’ll take their word for it. During April and May of 2005, the lakes and canals in the Village were very low. Water was scarce for the growing flowers and plants and even for the sprinklers to work with proper pressure. A few years back, during the “one hundred year hurricane”, the water overflowed my canal and it was only a matter of time as to when the torrential downpour would add

enough energy to push the flow a few more feet to my rear window. Fortunately, it didn’t happen. Water; a necessity for good and bad. In the North, we weren’t at all concerned with the abundance of water. The only way many of us saw water was from our lawn sprinklers, bird baths or an occasional April shower. Others, would go “down to the Jersey shore.” In an earlier life, and when we all had a full head of hair, some would take off for the Hamptons. The rich, also with good hair, would go to Fire Island. Others went to Jones Beach or Coney Island. I remember my mother telling me about Orchard Beach. Everyone loves water. Some, like us, here at

Century Village, usually have an abundance of this clear liquid. The beach; pools; canals; sprinklers; and plenty of rain at the end of May. To see some of the canals get so low as to see bottom, is unpleasant. What will the water birds do? The fish? The condo owners who like to look out upon this beautiful landscape; what will they do? Fortunately, the rains come; the lakes fill in; the birds are happy; the fish are doing, again, what fish do; and, I, for one, am ecstatic. We had three downpours this week for ten minutes each. How nice; how life giving. It is the life cycle in this part of the world, our home, in Century Village. And, time and life go on.

Volunteer Spotlight Photo & Text by Barbara Nathan Marcus Meet James (Jimmy) Grodsky. Jimmy hails from Memphis, Tennessee. A Southerner, he calls me “Bahhhhhh bra.” He has lived in CVE since the late 1980’s when he bought a small garden condo and ”snow-birded” for several years just to see what life was like in Century Village. He became a full time resident in the early 90’s and liked CVE so well that he and his late wife Rhoda moved on to a high-rise condo. Jimmy has been a volunteer much of his life, both here at CVE and before. “This country has been good to me and I want to give something back,” he said. After Jimmy retired, he did many volunteer jobs in and around Washington, D.C. He was an Audubon Society trail guide and part of a five member team that brought the world of nature to inner city schools in DC. He was a public library volunteer and was editor of the MD Common Cause Newsletter. He was a driver of seniors (mostly to doctors) and an interviewer for seniors seeking public housing. He was a community service volunteer for his Congressman, Michael Barnes. In Florida, outside of CVE, he was a volunteer at a public elementary school. Jimmy was involved in just about everything involving the Tennis Club of CVE, socially and athletically, for many years.  “I was on senior CVE competitive teams in both

James (Jimmy) Grodsky Broward and Palm Beach County, never a top notch player but played on team 4 and occasionally 3.  The teams as a whole did pretty well, sometimes first and if not, 2nd or 3rd. I was a regular “helper” with our annual

picnic and helped in our annual end-of-season dinner and awards banquet.” Volunteering for Jimmy is a way of life. He has always “helped.’ The word “helped” is his choice of words: nothing formal or

official for him. Jimmy “helped” my spouse and me. Upon learning that we were interested in buying a condo several years ago, he phoned us in Ottawa. He had heard of one that was available. We expressed interest and

asked other friends, (John and Roz Caliendo and my friend, the late Joyce Gash) their opinion. They all liked the condo and we bought it sight unseen. Further, when I flew down to CVE for my interview, Jimmy helped me clean out the condo. We brought car load after carload to North East Focal Point. That is Jimmy. And how did he meet his present wife? She is the talented and dedicated artist, Ethel Waldner. Someone in Durham B, where they both lived (he was a member of the Board) told her that Jimmy was handy and always willing to help. Jimmy tried to affix a compass in her car. He didn’t do well with the compass, indeed it was a failure, but they related so well, they became good friends and later married. Jimmy has been active in all three buildings in which he had condos, serving on the Board in the last two and being active in gardening. “I am not a professional activist but am interested in the management of CVE and have participated in a small way in management.” he says.   Says Jimmy, “I have been a tennis player much of my life and was very active in all things involving tennis for many years -- playing on many CVE competitive teams and writing the tennis column for the Reporter for about ten years.” He has also published much poetry and many good stories in the Reporter.


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CVE REPORTER

AUGUST 2010

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     

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Remember!

 

Yield to Pedestrians Use Directional Signals & Drive Carefully!


AUGUST 2010

In the early 1970’s, Costa Rica began its “Pensionado Program” offering residences to retired people who wanted to get out of the “rat race.” The President, Pepe Figueres, thought that the pensions of U.S. retirees would be sufficient for a good life and American brains would foster new business opportunities to this unspoiled but ambitious country. I qualified because I had a permanent income from commissions from printing supplies in New York City. Another pensionado was Bob Brown who had been working for the Offshore Investment Services in Colombia which was headed by a sharp operator named Bernie Cornfield but, that is another story. Unlike the pensionados, Bob was in his early 40’s and had a striking wife, Dawn Brown. In her thirties, slim, stylishly dressed and, although she spoke perfect Spanish, had a clipped British accent. It was reputed that the Browns had left

CVE REPORTER

DAWN BROWN

All About Salt

By JERRY WOLF

By HELENE WAYNE

Colombia with a chunk of Bernie Cornfield’s money but Bob said that he was broke and, since he didn’t have a pension of any kind, had to work at something and was finding new locations where he could broker real estate. Dawn also opened “Brown’s Secretarial Services” where she did bilingual translations and was the fastest typist I had ever seen. Should anyone ask for financial advice, she would refer them to her husband. Bob didn’t seek new clients but he would honor those who were referred by Brown’s Secretarial Services and might be inclined to take a deposit on a promising plot of land or the location for building a house by the beach or with a mountain view. While Dawn was chic and businesslike, Bob was a plodder with a Midwest accent. I lost track of the Browns after I tried to charter the small boat I had shipped from Long Island Sound to Puntarenas on the Pacific

Coast. My enterprise flopped because gasoline had to be carried in, in five gallon containers, and the ride from San Jose to Playa Del Coco took five hours. When I decided that my enterprise would remain in San Jose, I found out that Dawn’s Secretarial Services was still active but she couldn’t find any bilingual secretaries to assist her. Bob was going great guns and had dozens of clients with bargains of promising homes. Shortly after my return to civilization, Bob disappeared with the accumulated down payment funds leaving Dawn to face the music. A few weeks later, she closed her secretarial services and disappeared too. Today, Costa Rica frowns on big investors and tourism. The days of easy residences have long passed but it appears that only gamblers and wealthy pensionados are welcome. Alas, the tropical paradise that was, is now gone. It’s a great place to live had you arrived there twenty or thirty years ago.

There really is a difference ...

You see before you a person who has always had a love affair with those “Big Fat Pretzels” that vendors sell on the streets of Manhattan. My greatest joy was seeing one with his cart, and getting that hot salty thing in my grubby hands. Whoever my companion was on those little jaunts “downtown” knew I was looking for a pretzel guy. But, time marched on and my local doctor let me know that too much salt is not good for you. Therefore, about 30 years ago, I cut down on the use of this delicious condiment. After being a “low salt person” for so long, I have realized that each individual food really has its own taste and that by salting it, you mask its flavor and merely taste the salt. The hardest part of this separation is that it is difficult to go to most restaurants because of their heavy use of salt. I sit there and eat their servings and it says to me, “you really can’t taste the food itself, only the

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salt flavoring.” But, I found this little Italian place and its right across the street. (Hillsboro). Two young fellows, Chris and Luigi, run it. When we eat there, I remind them to cut the salt and, low and behold, the soup comes out tasting like soup should. It has a tomato flavor, with beans, veggies and pasta in it and is truly delicious. The main course arrives tasting like whatever it is that I’ve ordered. Then, they even give you a little schnitzel of dessert to round out the meal. They are so pleasant to be around and you might be interested in knowing that their Early Bird “flies” all night. I still eat those big fat pretzels at home. There is a version of them that comes frozen. The evil salt is in a little plastic bag and you can control how much you use. Yes, there is a way of living with this, in fact, even learning to love it. P.S. The name of this little restaurant is Marios.

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7300 Del Prado South • Boca Raton, FL 33433 Whitehall Boca is an Illinois Limited Partnership


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CVE REPORTER

AUGUST 2010

Happy Birthday

The Boat

By HELENE WAYNE

By SANDI LEHMAN

When was the last time you really had the feeling of patriotism? Well, this July 4, was the first time in years that this was exactly the way we felt. We attended a cookout sponsored by the local American Legion Chapter. In spite of the fact that the day was hot, soggy, and I should say “wet,” the sun came out at the right times. They held this function outside of their meeting building and had pitched a large tent just in case old man weather came knocking at the door. I can truly say that I felt like I had just returned to my youth. All of these folks were so gung ho about loving our country. They waved flags, had sparklers and a few firecrackers cracking. When they sang our country’s songs, they all joined hands and sang with feeling. The cream on top of this day was a live show

right out there, under the tent. The singer sang every patriotic song we had all learned in school. Part of his performance included two beautiful, young dancing gals in gorgeous costumes. They changed their costumes according to whatever song he was singing; one outfit more beautiful than the one before it. Of course, hamburgers, hot dogs and chicken were the stars of the grill. There were, perhaps, two dozen kinds of salads, (many that I had never seen or heard of before; quite an education). An assortment of fruits that was so beautiful, I regretted not bringing my camera. They finished with many, many delicious desserts. It was simply a delightful, delicious, patriotic way to celebrate the birthday of our country. Made you say, “I’m so proud to be an American.” God Bless America.

One sunny Sunday afternoon after visiting Ellis Island with our friends, Charlotte and Shelly, we went to Chinatown in New York City. We often visit our favorite Chinese restaurant at 17 Mott Street where you have to walk down a steep flight of stairs. My husband Mike and I and our friends enjoyed a sumptuous medley of soup with everything wonderful in it; shrimps, chicken, pora, wontons, etc. After our lunch we decided to take a walk and enjoy the charms of old Chinatown so we went directly across the street and gazed at a shop window filled with beautiful Chinese art and giftware. My husband saw a boat directly in the middle of the window display. The boat was crystal and gold with three carved gold and crystal masts which contained a shiny red and gold base with little lights glittering on it. I thought it was nice but my husband loved it. He said, “I’d love to have that boat, it is so beautiful.” After being in

the Navy he was attracted to boats but this boat seemed to really capture him. We had just moved to our new condo in Florida and before we moved we cleared out many of our mementos and collectibles. We certainly didn’t want any more as we decided to live a simpler lifestyle and furnished our new home with clean, simple contemporary lines without clutter. Still my husband looked at this boat with such admiration and he being quite conservative in taste, I was rather surprised that he fell in love with this particular boat. When we arrived home to our co-op in Brooklyn, which we maintain for the summer, he spoke of the boat once more. That night I couldn’t fall asleep as I was disturbed by the fact that perhaps I was wrong in my negative attitude. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion and taste, and I thought if my husband really took such a fancy to that particular boat, he should have it and

if I saw something I really liked, would it be fair on his part to dissuade me from having it? The more I thought about it, my plan started to materialize. I would buy that boat that he loved and surprise him with it! The next morning, when I was alone in the house I called the Chinese restaurant where we ate lunch. I spoke to the owner and asked him if he would be kind enough to go across the street and get the phone number of the shop where the boat was. He called me back immediately and gave me the phone number. I called quickly only to learn it would be a difficult chore to ship this delicate crystal boat to my condo in Florida. So I devised another plan. I called my friend, Gloria and said we must go to Chinatown and “ buy that new mah jongg set you have been looking for.” The plan was in motion! Next Sunday my friends, Gloria and her husband Gus, and Mike and I went out for the day. We went to SoHo and after a while my friend said she was hungry and where else should we do lunch – you guessed it – 17 Mott Street, here we come! Before we went into the restaurant we looked in the window of the gift shop – the gold boat that my husband admired the week before was still there next to a gorgeous jade necklace. My friend and I went into the shop to inquire about the “mah jongg set” she wanted and told the owner to pack it up securely and after lunch we would pick it up. The deed was done! My friend, Gloria, carried the “mah jongg set” and brought it to her house for safekeeping until we left for our drive back to Florida. I was a bundle of nerves as I pushed the package along with my luggage and shopping bags into our trunk. When we arrived back at our condo in Florida and all the baggage and bags were brought up to our apartment, I told my husband to unpack this large package. He opened it and his smile widened when he saw the boat and couldn’t understand how I got it from that shop in Chinatown without his knowledge. He gave me a big hug and kiss and then he saw a small box fall to the floor. He picked it up and said, “What’s this, honey?” I said, “Didn’t you see that magnificent jade necklace lying next to our boat in the window?”


AUGUST 2010

CVE REPORTER

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CVE Watering Schedule Days

An Invitation for Lunch & a Tour

R ETIREMENT L IVING The Horizon Club is a resort style community where residents live on their own terms. The Horizon Club residents enjoy all the advantages of a care-free life. Amenities and services such as: Beautiful apartment homes with full kitchens, washer and dryer, & screened patios Outdoor heated swimming pool and Jacuzzi Full service Beauty & Barber salon

There’s always something happening at The Horizon Club. Join us for one or all of the activities listed below. Call us to learn more about these and other educational, social and cultural events and programs. Bring your friends along, or come and meet new friends. Call or visit us today to learn more.

Date: Friday, August 6th & 20th, 2010 Current Events with Carl Sparks Time: 2 pm to 3 pm Join this lively discussion about recent events and topics that affect your life. Date: Tuesday, August 10th, 2010 Time: 1 pm to 2 pm

Date: Friday, August 20th, 2010 Time: 11 am - 12 noon

Fashion Show by Fashion Faze View the latest sizzling summer styles guaranteed to keep you cool.

Alliance Presents: Fall Prevention and Proper Use of Assistance Devices Learn valuable tips for getting around safely and minimize your chances of falling.

Date: Wednesday, August 25th, 2010 Happy Hour Time: 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm Join a special hour of musical interlude with Bobby Kent as you mix and mingle with our residents.

Ask us how we can host your clubs’ event or card party at our community, or we can bring a speaker to you.

For more information or to schedule a tour, call 954-481-2304 today!

Assisted Living Facility #5422

954-481-2304

Sunrise Senior Living’s events and occasions for Seniors and their Families at The Horizon Club

Date: Wednesday, August 11th, 2010 Cocktail Party Time: 2 pm to 3 pm Make new friends, enjoy music and have a cool drink at our monthly social hour.

Fitness Center (on-site) Housekeeping & linen service Social educational, devotional and recreational programs Gourmet inspired cuisine And much more!

The Horizon Club

The Happenings

1208 South Military Trail, Deerfield Beach

For more information and a FREE online newsletter, visit www.sunriseseniorliving.com

Date: Thursday, August 26th, 2010 Time: 1:30 pm to 2:30 pm

Vital Legal Documents

Date: Tuesday, August 31st, 2010 Time: 1:30 pm to 3:30 pm

Friends and a Flick

Jay Feldman, an eldercare attorney, identifies important information to help your loved ones carry out your directives.

“Play the Game”, Starring Andy Griffith and Doris Roberts - bring your friends, share some popcorn and see this delightful, romantic comedy.

RSVP to 954-481-2304 at least two days before the event(s) of your choice. The Horizon Club 1208 South Military Trail Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 954-481-2304

Assisted Living Facility #5422

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CVE REPORTER

AUGUST 2010

Highrise Units 1/1 Durham A Completely Tiled..Encl. Patio..Water View..Just Move-in Tilford E Updated, Tile & Carpet, Encl. Patio. Rentable Building

$39,900 $33,900

Garden Units 1/1 Ventnor F Gr. Floor..Nicely Furnished..Encl. Patio..Garden View Tilford M Gr. Floor..Quiet Area..Ceramic Tile..Renovated Kitchen Tilford S Just Bring Your Toothbrush And Move-in..Fully Furnished Westbury G Bright & Cheerful Unit..2A/C’s..Furnished..Encl. Patio

$25,000 $34,000 $34,900 $38,000

Highrise 1/1.5 Newport N Water View..Near Pool & Tennis..Tiled..Furnished Newport H Clean Condo..Unit Requires Some Work..Water View Berkshire A Penthouse location..Near Plaza, Encl. Patio..Water View Berkshire A Walk to Plaza..Updated Kitchen.Newer Baths..Encl.Patio Swansea B Great Location..Furnished..Encl. Patio..Steps To Pool Westbury F Water View..Fully Tiled..Nicely Furnished..Near Pool

$44,850 $45,900 $49,900 $49,900 $49,900 $79,000

Garden Units 1.1/5 Westbury C Furnished..2 A/C’s..Encl. Patio, Many Upgrades. Prescott A “Clean”..Furnished..Enclosed Florida Room..Just Move-In Prescott A Affordable..Needs Some TLC..2 A/c’s..Newer Appliances Westbury J Fully Furnished..2nd. Fl. Corner..Central Air..Move-In Oakridge S Tiled..Enclosed Patio..Near Pool & Clubhouse..Needs TLC Farnham L 1st. Floor..New Tile..Newer Appliances..Encl. Patio Tilford G Corner Gr. Floor..Water View..Tiled..Furnished..Central Air Newport A Corner 1st. Floor..Central Air..Furnished..Encl. Patio Lyndhurst C “Wow” Water View..Encl. Patio..Tiled..Newer Appliances Farnham I Well Cared For Condo..New Appliances, Near Pool, Move-In Tilford S Near Pool, Theater And Shopping...Spotless, Furnished Westbury F Water View..Tiled..Clean..Furnished..Walk To Pool Farnham Q Gr. Floor..Needs Some TLC..Encl. Patio. Rentable Unit Westbury C New Berber Carpet..Clean..**Currently Rentable** Tilford S Completely Tiled..Redone Bath..Lift In Place..Near Pool Newport A Gr. Floor..Ceramic & Laminate..Fresh Paint..Bring Offers Durham V Water View..Completely Remodeled..Open Kitchen..Near Pool

$34,500 $34,500 $34,900 $34,900 $34,900 $38,500 $42,450 $42,500 $45,900 $49,900 $59,000 $79,000 $21,900 $29,500 $29,900 $29,900 $59,900

Highrise 2/1.5 Units Newport Q Totally Furnished..Enclosed Patio..”Bring Your Best Offer” Newport Q 4th Floor..Tile & Carpet..Newer Kitchen..View Of Pool Grantham F Great Location..Steps To Clubhouse & Pool..Priced To Sell Ellesmere A Neat As A Pin..Gr. Fl..Fully Furnished..Ceramic Tile Newport U 2nd. Fl..Fantastic Water View..Galley Kit..Baths Redone.. Grantham E “wow” Newer A/C..Upgraded Bathroom..Great View Westbury F Beautiful Furniture..New DW..Laminate Floors..Water View

$49,900 $57,500 $59,900 $59,900 $64,900 $79,450 $79,500

Garden 2/1.5 Units Newport E Ground Fl..Bright & Airy..Encl. Patio..Walk To Pool & Tennis Harwood H Corner Unit..Walk To Pool, Tennis, Clubhouse & Restaurant Farnham G 1st. Floor..Furnished..Priced To Sell Quickly..Encl. Patio Tilford F Dead End Location..Furnished..Laminate Floors..Rentable Bldg. Tilford K Water View..2nd. Fl. Corner..Tile & Carpet..A/C 5 Years Old. Ventnor M 2nd. Fl. Location..Lift Installed..Steps To Pool & Tennis Tilford N Bright Corner..Water View..Immaculate Unit..Furnished Tilford G Water View..Wood & Carpet..Renovated 2nd. Bath With Shower Westbury I Corner..Walk To Plaza & Pool..Prime Area..Many Amenities Newport O Corner Gr. Fl..Steps To Pool & Tennis..Clean Unit..Newer A/C Ventnor Q Corner..Rentable Bldg..Tile & Laminate Floors..Near Pool Westbury C 1st. Floor..Walk To Plaza..Furnished..Tile & Carpet..Encl. Patio

$39,500 $49,850 $49,900 $49,900 $49,900 $50,000 $52,000 $52,850 $54,900 $55,000 $59,600 $59,900

Luxury Highrise 2/2 Ventnor O Wonderful Location..Across From Pool ..Needs Some TLC $71,500 $79,450 Oakridge D Nicely Decorated..Encl. Patio..Near Pool..Beautiful View Lyndhurst J Prime Location...Walk To Clubhouse & Pool..4 Miles To Beach $79,900 Ventnor G “Country Setting Overlooking Golf Course”. Private Pool Area $85,000 Oakridge D Renovated Condo..Prime Area..Preserve View..Spotless Unit $99,850 Keswick C Most Beautiful Condo..White Tile..Furnished..Encl. Patio $99,900 Ventnor G Corner Unit..Spacious & Clean..Near Pool & Tennis Court $115,000 Berkshire C Water & Golf View, Nicely Tiled Throughout $110,000 Lyndhurst K Corner Unit..Completely Redone..Tiled Floors..Encl. Patio $129,000 Harwood E “Rare Find Executive Model”..Completely Renovated $169, 000 Lyndhurst N Top Of The Line Luxury Unit..Completey Redone $178,900 Oakridge D Magnificiently Furnished.. Decorator’s Delight..”Come See” $ 87,500

Accurate Real Estate Is looking For Agents. Knowledge Of French Or Spanish Language Would Be Helpful.

FORGET THE REST GO WITH THE BEST


AUGUST 2010

CVE REPORTER

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CVE REPORTER

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AUGUST 2010

United Order of True Sisters Text & Photo by JULES KESSELMAN On June 22, the Humana HMO sponsored a year end bagel luncheon for over 100 members of the United Order of True Sisters Inc. #65. UOTS will not meet in July and August. The UOTS meets every 4th Tuesday of the month in Room N of the Clubhouse at 11a.m. UOTS is the oldest women’s philanthropic organization in the country. They were founded in 1846 as a secret organization, prior to electricity, women’s suffrage, the abolition of slavery and the civil war.  On August 4, UOTS will be holding the 100th Anniversary of Friendship Day with a luncheon at Carrabba’s Italian Grill Restaurant on SW 18th Street in Boca Raton. They will be celebrating the 165th

Anniversary of the organization on November 14 at the Crown Plaza in West Palm Beach. In 1947 the United Order of True Sisters dedicated its mission to helping children and those patients afflicted with cancer. They provide emotional and financial support to the cancer patients and their families. To join this worthwhile organization call President, Marilyn Asner, 954-427-0461 or Betty Swinkin 954-570-9526. Pictured right: Seated L/R  Betty Peyser, National President; Marilyn Asner, President; Francis Albert,Treasurer Standing L/R Jo O’Callaghan, Recording Secretary; Sherrill Bennett, Jr. VP; Florence Koser, 1st VP

Blast at Farnham J Text and Photo by JERRY WOLF Farnham J used to be a cold place here in the Sunshine State, but Milton’s idea for an international food party has heated up this garden condo. Ron said, “Let’s have a 5th of July party,” and his neighbor Claire, offered to supply soda pop for the whole group. Jerry’s wife Hilda drew up a poster advertising the FIFTH OF JULY INTERNATIONAL FOOD PARTY with requests from other residents to donate goodies for this event. The response was very gratifying. Our little Japanese resident offered to bake brownies (we hoped she would make sushi). Hilda said she would make Costa Rica ceviche and rice

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and beans. Rita promised chicken and noodles. Ron made sausage and peppers, Italian style. Milton cut up a watermelon. As a matter of fact our cup runnith over. Things have changed in Farnham J. Instead of a friendly wave or a grunted Hi, our residents call each other by their first names. Music was supplied by Jerry with CDs of Sousa marches and he played American traditional songs on his harmonica. Things went so swimmingly, that Milton is considering another lawn party. Pictured Right: Farnham J Lawn Party

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Meditation - The Art of Relaxation By HELAINE WEISBERG There are so many reasons we can find to be stressed out these days. We think about the economy, or the oil spill, family matters, or suffer the loss of a loved one - and so on. An overload of stress has been proven to affect us on many levels; emotionally and mentally (depression), and

even physically (heart problems, headaches, ulcers). So how can we counter the effect of these stress causing events?  What sort of defense can we use? How do we just relax?  Meditation is one tried and true way to reduce stress.  There are many different ways to approach meditation - or the focusing of the

Village Lady Buys

Vintage Slide Rules & Engineering Tools, Old Fishing Lures & the like. Leave message: 954-415-7679

mind - so that we can relax.  One simple and elegant way is through our breathing.  Breathing is very interesting.  For one thing, it is our only biological system that works both involuntarily and voluntarily.  We don’t have to think about taking our next breath. We can totally forget about it. We can concentrate on other things and let our body take care of breathing on its own. However, we can consciously take over and control it if we want to.  We can take a longer breath or a shorter one; can hold or release the breath; can let it out slowly or quickly; can take a deeper breath or a shallower one. In the practice of Yoga, it is believed that since breathing brings more oxygen to the blood and to the brain, it is a vital life force, which they call Prana. Consider this: we can live for weeks without food. We

can sustain ourselves for days without water. But we count in minutes the amount of time that we can go without breathing air.  It is that important to our body’s survival. How to use breathing to meditate: Get comfortable in a straight backed chair.  Close your eyes. Breathe in deeply through your nose.  Feel your diaphragm and belly expand.  Hold that breath for a few seconds.  Push the air out through your mouth.  You will make a whooshing sound as the breath leaves your body, and your belly and diaphragm will push in towards your spine.  Remain like that for a few seconds, then repeat the process three times. Hint: For some of us, we want our bellies to expand at the exhale and shrink at the inhale.  But think about it.   When we blow air into a balloon, the balloon gets bigger. When we take some-

Athletic Schedule Century Village® East

June 1st thru October 31st, 2010 Health Club All Levels 8:00 9:00 9:45 10:35 12:00 1:00 1:15 1:45 2:00 2:30 2:45

Monday Low Impact Aerobics Weights Stretch & Tone Low Impact Aerobics Line Dance Weights

Tuesday Wednesday Low Impact Low Impact Aerobics Aerobics Weights Stretch & Tone Low Impact Low Impact Aerobics Aerobics Pilates Weights

Balance Tai-Chi

Chi-Gung

Thursday Friday Low Impact Low Impact Aerobics Aerobics Weights Stretch &Tone Low Impact Low Impact Aerobics Aerobics Zumba Zumba Weights Chair Stretch Balance

Party Room Intermediate Advanced 12:00

Pilates Aquatic Schedule All Levels

9:15 Outdoor

Aquacise

Aquacise

Aquacise

Aquacise

Aquacise

No registration necessary: You must consult your doctor before involving yourself in any exercise program. Aquacise classes will be cancelled if air temperature is 60 degrees or below. For Tennis lessons see Mark at The Clubhouse Courts. (Must bring a new can of balls) Athletic Classes are restricted to CVE residents and renters only. You must have your resident ID card. Party room classes are more intense. Equipment Orientation is made by appointment only. (No phone appointments)

This schedule is subject to change.

thing in is when we get bigger, to make room for it. When we let the air out of a balloon, it gets smaller. If breathing deeply into your diaphragm is confusing or difficult, try this: Lie on the floor or on a bed (no pillow!). Place a book on your belly. With your inhale breath, push the book up; then, as you exhale, let the book drop.  This exercise will help you to be aware of the muscles you use for deep breathing and will help you develop a rhythm. As you focus on your breathing, your body begins to relax, and your mind starts to focus inward.  You automatically start to call your energy back to you from wherever you sent it.  This energy recall makes you stronger, makes you more complete.  Let your breath return to normal.  Follow your breath without altering it in any way.  Breathe in.  Breathe out.  Breathe in.  Follow the breath into your nose, down your trachea (throat), into your lungs, feel your diaphragm expand. Breathe out. Feel your diaphragm push towards your spine, feel your lungs empty, feel the air flow through your trachea, through your nostrils and out of your body. Do not make judgments about this. Judgments would be thoughts of: too long/short, not right, and so on.  Just follow the path without altering it. If thoughts surface while you are doing this, it’s okay.  Acknowledge the thought, then let it go.  Refocus your attention on your breath.+ When you are ready, and have been breathing and meditating for five to ten minutes, slowly open your eyes. Wiggle your fingers and toes.  Move your head very gently. Congratulations! You have launched your meditation practice.  Many of you will feel the benefits immediately; and you will discover that there is a cumulative effect as well.  Set aside a few minutes in the morning and a few minutes at night for your meditation. Reflect on this old proverb, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step.” Meditation is a wonderful journey. Focusing your attention on your breathing is a restorative first step.   It is a loving thing for you to give your mind, your body, and your spirit. Relax, and have fun with it!


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Electropollution By ELLEN KAMHI, PhD RN Environmental epidemiology is the scientific discipline which investigates the detrimental effect that environmental toxins have on human health. It is well known that chemical toxins, irritants and allergens trigger a variety of human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and neuro-degenerative diseases. A common example is that aluminum is believed to be one of the possible causative factors involved in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. In many cases, the underlying biochemical mechanisms are understood. In contrast, relatively little is known about electropollution. In this case, electropollution refers to man-made electromagnetic fields (EMF) in the environment. Bioelectromagnetics is the scientific discipline which studies the biological effects of EMF. From a historical point of view the first studies in this field were focused on the beneficial effects of certain types of EMF. This area of research was abolished when the American Medical Association(AMA) was first formed and medical research focused on “wonder drugs” like penicillin, and abandoned research into other possible areas of treatment. Bioelectromagnetics research re-emerged in the 1960’s when it was discovered that certain types of EMF could promote healing of bone fractures. Concomitantly, while certain EMF frequencies were linked to healing, different frequencies were suspected of causing cancer, especially in people living near power lines. This inspired government funding to confirm this finding and to study how such effects might come about. The link between power lines and cancer was indeed confirmed and it was discovered that particular frequencies and field strengths were probably responsible. As it happens, EMF with the frequency of power lines, 60Hz (cycles/second), at field strengths experienced in homes relatively near overhead power lines have the combined parameters that may initiate cancer. EMF can be considered co-carcinogens acting in conjunction with chemicals and other factors known to cause cancer. On the other hand some types of EMF can have beneficial effects on the body. Further research in this area has shown that not only power lines, but several other types of man-made EMF also have a detrimental effect on the body. Offending electronic devices include microwave ovens, TV’s, computers, electric water beds, cell phones and portable home phones. Depending on the frequency of the device, and the length of exposure, a wide

variety of diseases can be triggered including cardiovascular diseases and neuro-degenerative diseases. These effects have been demonstrated by several different laboratories at major universities in several countries in both human and animal models. Effects have been measured at the molecular- e.g. DNA, cellular (e.g. human immune cells) and clinical levels. In general experiments have measured harmful effects on the nervous system, the immune system, the cardiovascular system and carcinogenesis (induction of cancer). Several neurological effects have also been observed including detrimental effects on the cognitive functions of the brain (alertness, task performance, memory) direct damage of nerve cells, altered sleep patterns, headaches and depression. In some cases the biochemical mechanisms underlying these physiological effects have been elucidated. Most disturbing are studies demonstrating a link between EMF pollution and cancer. Molecular and cellular experiments have indicated the sensitivity of DNA to radiation from electronic devices which has been shown to be genotoxic (8) - causing direct damage to the structure of DNA similar to that seen by ionizing radiation (X-rays). Clinical studies have confirmed these cellular studies and have clearly shown a correlation with high levels of EM fields in homes and the incidence of several types of cancer (3.5). Studies with childhood leukemia are the most definitive and disturbing. Most recently, scientists studying Bioelectromagnetics have researched the detrimental effects of cell phones, because of the universal use of these devices throughout most of the world. Experiments with cell phones are particularly difficult, since unlike power lines which are comprised of only one frequency, 60Hz, cell phones emit in three different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum- ELF (extremely low frequency), RF (radio frequencies) and MW (microwaves). There is scientific evidence that each of these regions produce different types of biological effects at the biochemical level. Each of these effects, of course, will contribute to the complex response observed in the human body. Initial studies indicate that a certain type of brain tumor was triggered by chronic (long-term) use of cell phones. In general, the same detrimental effects that were observed for power lines were also observed for cell phones. These results have now been confirmed by independent University labs in several countries.

The cell phone and power industries of course were not pleased with these results and embarked upon their own studies to disprove the University results. Industry experiments took advantage of the well known fact that biological effects of EMF are highly dependent on the frequency and strength of the fields. Biological effects are also dependent on other experimental conditions like whether the body is exposed continuously or intermittent, the orientation of the biological system relative to the fields and the strength of the geomagnetic field in the local environment. Industry scientists chose experimental conditions which they knew were least likely to produce harmful biological effects. They simply chose conditions outside the known effective “windows”, as they are called to ensure no effects were observed. This is relatively easy since all of the effective experimental conditions are not yet known. Most studies use acute exposure conditions, but the situation is worse after long-term exposures because even if the required conditions are not met on a given day, they are likely to be met at another time that the electronic device is used. Some experiments have revealed only a few minutes of exposure to EMF under the right conditions are enough to trigger a complex cascade of biochemical processes resulting in a disease state. When assessing the experimental design used to evaluate the safety or hazards of electromagnetic fields, there are many factors to consider. If the experiment uses electromagnetic fields (EMF) limited to individual frequencies known to be emitted by electronic devices, the results are skewed, since the body responds very differently to individual frequencies, in contrast to the complex mixture of frequencies emitted from an actual electronic device. Results from these experiments do not reflect real-life situations. Another example of poor experimental design is the use of ultra-low strength EMF’s which can be significantly different from the radiation actually emitted from an electronic device. Such experiments would not be expected to produce detrimental effects on biological systems. This phenomenon was clearly demonstrated in a recent study at Pisa University in Italy where it was shown that human immune cells exposed to cell phone radiation showed DNA damage which was highly dependent on the intensity (and duration) of the radiation . The same study also demonstrated a large variability from one individual to another. In

general we do not know why some people are so sensitive to the EM fields, but the phenomenon of EM hypersensitivity is by now well established. We do however know that young children and older individuals are more sensitive to radiation from power lines. Since these individuals are also known to show increased sensitivity to chemical carcinogens, they clearly constitute a high-risk sub-population. Finally, we must consider the issue of interpretation of data. Studies examining different experimental conditions will often conclude that radiation from electronic devices has no detrimental effects, even if one of the conditions does, in fact, show such an effect. This bias in the design and interpretation of scientific data is assumedly due to the fact that the cell phone industry has funded much of this research. In 1966 the WHO established an International EMF Project to address health risk assessment from exposure to power line, VDTs (computers) and cell phones. In the last few years the Safe Wireless Initiative was founded by Dr. George Carlo under the auspices of the Science and Public Poly Institute in Washington DC. (www.sppionline.org).The goal of SWI is to educate the public about the harmful effects of cell phones and to evaluate and recommend safe and effective protective technologies. Indeed there are now sev-

eral technologies available to the consumer to help protect them from harmful effects of cell phones. Partly because this technology is new and partly because the government is not acknowledging or funding cell phone related health issues, the research behind these technologies is often lacking. Most companies have demonstrated their technology reverse cell phone induced imbalances in the acupuncture meridian system which can be measured using EAV-type electronic monitoring devices. These measurements are unfortunately not recognized by most biomedical researchers. Other companies have measured more established biological endpoints. Although these neutralizing technologies are in the infancy, it seems prudent to have some form of protection on our cell phones, and to limit the use of these devices as much as possible. Ellen Kamhi PhD RN, The Natural Nurse®, is the author of The Natural Guide to Great Sex, Cycles Of Life, Herbs and Energy Techniques for Woman and co-author of The Natural Medicine Chest, and Arthritis, The Alternative Medicine Guide. Dr. Kamhi has been involved in natural health care for over 4 decades. She answers consumer questions at www. naturesanswer.com , and has a private practice on Long Island. For more information: www. naturalnurse.com 800-8290918


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Active CVE Republican Club New and regular members call for updated meeting information. Call or fax Ron Goldfarb at 954-5965198. American Red Magen David for Israel (ARMDI) Freedom Chapter of Deerfield Beach meets the fourth Wednesday of the month, 11:30 a.m. in Temple Beth Israel. For further information call Rose Trugman 954-428-6627 or Rose Vaupen 954-426-2392. AMIT (Americans for Israel and Torah) meets second Monday of every month at Young Israel Synagogue at 12:30p.m. Board meetings are held on the 4th Monday of the month from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. in General Purpose Room G, September to May. For information call Norma 954-4282386 or 954-571-8673. Art Club of CVE meetings are held on the second Friday of each month (November thru April), from 10 a.m. to noon in Clubhouse Room GP-A. Membership is $15. Come see our interesting programs; join our trips & exhibitions; look up our web site at http://artclubofcve.site.voila.fr/ Artists and non-artists are welcome. For information call Claudette Roberge, President (November 2009 through April 2010) at 954-428-1005. Astronomy Club begins its meetings in November. Meets the 2nd Tuesday of the month from 7 to 8 p.m. in General Purpose Room E. For information call Jerry 954-4289381 or Norma 954-480-8938.

Ballroom Dance Club meets every Thursday in the Exercise Room at 7:30 to 9 p.m. at no charge. Singles and couples welcome. For information, call Ernie Feder 954-418-8895. B’nai B’rith Unit #2995 for Men and Women. The following is a schedule of membership meetings for the year 2010. Membership meetings, September 23, 2010 6:30 p.m., October 21, 2010 6:30 p.m., November 18, 2010 6:30 p.m., December 23, 2010 6:30 p.m. Board meetings for the year 2010 are as follows: September 12, 2010 10:00 a.m., October 10, 2010 10:00 a.m. November 14, 2010 10:00 a.m., December 12, 2010 10:00 a.m. All meetings will be held in the Activity Center and includes board and membership.

AUGUST 2010

For further information contact Dave Polak 954-420-0096. Bible Study Group meets every Thursday in the clubhouse from 1 3 p.m in General Purpose Room N. Study the old and new testaments. All welcome. For further information, call Roslyn Nehls at 954-6986184. Billiard Club of CVE If you are interested in joining, call Martin Feldman 954-419-9477 for further information. Bowling Club of CVE meets every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. at Strikes of Boca (formerly Boca Bowl), Town Center Rd and Military Trail. All welcome. Come join us and have fun. For information, call Nelson at 561-865-3864. Broward Council of Na’Amat USA (formerly Pioneer Women) meets fourth Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Na’Amat Council office, 1721 N. State Road 7, Suite H, Margate. For information, call 954327-0770. Broward Homebound Program your donations will enable elderly and disabled residents to live independently at home with dignity. For further information, call Sharon Ross at 954-786-2484. Calling All Lois’s-The Lois Club is a group of women with their first name in common, who meet for lunch four or five times a year. There are 30 states that have Lois Clubs, the first chapter started in 1979. The club has a Lois song and a Lois Club Convention every year. Now, a Lois from Connecticut has come here to Deerfield to start her own Lois Club and welcomes all named Lois to join. For information call 954-425-6922. Cameo Drama Club meetings take place the first and third Tuesday of the month in Room G. If interested call 954-570-8884. Canadian Club of CVE. The Canadian Club of CVE was formed in 1976 through the efforts of Harry Arnold and Mike Marmer of Toronto, as a social club for Canadian winter residents of CVE. Its objective was to foster pride in our national heritage and to promote goodwill toward our host American neighbors. The Club also takes steps to promote and enjoy together various social activities

as decided by its executive and membership. The club also has as its mandate the investigation of problems and/or situations peculiar to Canadians while domiciled in CVE and to seek possible solutions for these problems and/or situations. The major benefits of joining the Canadian Club of CVE is the friendship and camaraderie that develops through inter-action with fellow Canadians. Enjoy meetings, entertainment and outings especially designed with Canadians in mind. Many of these friendships endure from year to year, not only here in Florida, but back home in Canada. Membership is only $5 per person for the year FOR RESIDENTS OF CVE. The first regular meeting for 2010-2011 will be on the 2nd Thursday in December. For more information, check the website at www.canadianclubcve.com. Catholic Social Club Catholic Mass Team meets every Saturday at 5:45 p.m. in Le Club Activity Room A, open to all denominations. Catholic Social Club Catholic Mass Team and Choir meet every Saturday at 5:45 p.m. Mass begins at 6:15 p.m. every Saturday, same room. Monsignor James, Pastor of Our Lady of Mercy Church, is our Celebrant. For further information, call Mary Ann Braun at 954-571-2266.

Center for Group Counseling’s SAGES (Senior Adult Group Experiences) meets at the Clubhouse Room D, Thursdays from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. to share thoughts, feelings and concerns in a private confidential setting. It is open to everyone and is free of charge. For Information call Paul Greenwald, Ph.D. 954-483-5300. Century Camera Club meets the first & third Tuesdays at 2:30 p.m. in Room F, at Clubhouse. Demonstrations, lectures, competitions, instructions, exhibits, shows and field trips are planned. All who are interested in photography are invited. For information call Jerry Raines 954-427-6785. Century Juniors Club of CVE. Active, couples only, social club meets at 7 p.m. second Thursday of each month in Clubhouse, Room N, accepting new members. For information call Harriet at 954426-3008. Choraleers CVE produced and directed by Bill Weinhaus, meets every Wednesday, 10 a.m. in the

Clubhouse Party Room. We rehearse for a once a year concert in our theater. If you enjoy singing join us. For information, call Solly Huberman, President 954-4261379. City University of New York (CUNY) Alumni Club meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Clubhouse in General Purpose Room A. All CUNY graduates and their spouses are welcome. There will be no meeting during the summer. The next meeting will be held in November, 2010.. We have interesting programs and field trips. For information, call Norma 954-480-8938, Rosalie 954-427-1593. Clubhouse Bingo every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. in the party room. It is new and exciting and lots of fun. Only dabbers are used, no more chips. A six pack sells for $3, the Early Bird and Bingo Special $1. The Early Bird and Bingo Players Special each pay $75. Bingo will be played all year. For more information call David 954-428-2849.

Cornerstone Community Baptist Church, Pastor Bret M. Lovitz, Worship Services 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m., Wednesday Service 7 p.m., CCBC Youth Group 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., For information call 954-421-2530 CVE CAMERA CLUB- Bob Mulligan and Myra Mahl can be contacted for further information about this club. For further information call 954-464-5754. CVE Duplicate Bridge Club. Games Monday, Tuesday and Saturday, 12:00 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Card Room B. For information, call Irving Ruga at 954698-9741. CVE FISHING CLUB-Salt & Fresh water fishing. Meets 3rd Tuesday of the month at 2 p.m. at the Clubhouse, Room C 1st floor. For more information call Lucy Mel 954-684-6881. CVE Interfaith Prayer hotline: 954-571-1763 continuing the work of the late Geri Hope has Catholic and Jewish residents praying in their own homes from the same prayer list page. Call the Prayer line at any time to request prayer for yourself or others. Requests may be anonymous. Just state the specific need, with the name or ini-


AUGUST 2010

tials of the person needing prayer. Miracles still happen. For information call Mary Anne Surrette at 954-734-0095. CVE Mandolin Orchestra now meets every Monday afternoon from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Clubhouse General Purpose Room. Musicians who can play cello, viola or clarinet are invited. For further information, call Vincent Zappi at 954-428-1794. CVE Sewing Club meets every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 12 noon in the Sewing Room. For further information, call Rita at 954-5711645 CVE Shuffleboard Club meets first Friday of each month at 10:30 a.m. at the Clubhouse in Room A located on the second floor of the Clubhouse. Membership of $7 entitles you to free coffee and donuts, free lessons, use of club equipment, open play all season and social events. The first meeting of the 2010-2011 season will be held on Friday, December 3rd. Call Secretary Shelia Guernard at 504231-2333 or E-mail Larry Norris at hlnorris@comcast.net. CVE String Chamber Group is open to capable musicians. Come

and get a musical workout year round on Wednesdays 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the mezzanine (3rd floor of clubhouse) music library office next to elevator. For information call Blanche 954-426-4513.

CVE Volleyball Club meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 9:15 a.m. and beyond, next to tennis court. All invited. Contact Max Amichai Heppner 954-903-0567. E- mail: Maxamichai@comcast.net.

CVE Symphony Guild supports our Symphony Orchestra. We are urging you to participate in their fundraising efforts. Meet the Board of the CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild at their meeting open to the public. You will be rewarded with a wonderful musical program. Details of these fundraisers can be found in the flyer in the staff office or in the guildâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s column in this REPORTER or on channel 99. Become a member of the GUILD. Support your orchestra! For further information contact President Bea Guccione, 954-426-3540. For membership in the Guild phone Kitty Cole, 954-360-7956.

Dance With Us for Folk and Line Dancing meets on Tuesday from 1p.m. to 3 p.m. in the Health Club. No Charge. For information call Gloria 954-480-6474 or Jerry 954-698-9240.

CVE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA-Our 65 member orchestra practices on Sunday mornings during the season. We perform one concert each month from December through March including professional soloists. We are looking to add more 2nd violinists. If you are an experienced string player and would like to join us, please call Mary Ellen at 561-295-5645.

Deerfield Beach Computer Club is on summer break. Classes resume at 10 a.m. on Friday, September 10, 2010 at the Westside Park Recreation Center, 445 SW 2nd Street, which is off W. Hillsboro Blvd and SW Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. For information call Barry or Bev at 954-725-9331 or visit the Club site at www.db-cc. org. Deerfield Beach Democratic Club meets the second Monday of the month at 7:00 p.m., at the Activity Center. Stimulating political discussions. All invited. Refreshments served. For information: call Bernie Parness, President at 954415-5658. Deerfield Progressive Forum meets Saturdays, 10 a.m. to noon,

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in Le Club for lecture/discussion sessions on political, economic and social issues. For information call Roz Bloom 954-428-1598. Deer-Raton Lions Club meets on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Atlantic Bread Co. 296 S. Federal Highway in Deerfield Beach. For information call George Gsegnet 954419-9647.

District 65 U.A.W. (formerly South Florida Retirees) meets every third month on the third Tuesday of the month, 12 noon, at the Activity Center. Updated reports will be made on the 65 Security Plan. Please attend and bring new members. For further information, call Pearl Hill 954-421-7776. District Council 37 Retirees: Next meeting held at Temple Anshei Shalom, 7099 Atlantic Ave., Delray, 33436. For information call Chairman Vincent Socci at 561451-3643. Egyptology Club meets for group study, discussion and videos every Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. in General Purpose Room C. Future meetings will concentrate on the history, culture and art of Ancient Egypt. The club will continue with the video lectures by Dr. Bob Brier.


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For further information, call Golda 954-360-7377. Emunah of America meets third Wednesday every month at 12 noon in the Young Israel Synagogue in Century Plaza. Light lunch and interesting program. All cordially welcome. For information about this chapter call Ina Ciocca at 954360-0740, Selma at 954-427-8674 or Pearl at 954-426-0189. Friends of Deerfield Beach Arboretum 2841 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Free tour of the Arboretum every Friday 10 a.m. and first Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. Seminars held at 7 p.m. in recreation room of Constitution Park. All seminars followed with an auction featuring plants, herbs and trees from our nursery. Refreshments served. All invited. Volunteers needed to help spread mulch, weed and participate in planting activities. For further information, call 954-480-4494. Hadassah Deerfield Beach meets monthly on the third Monday at noon at Activity Room B at the rear of LeClub. Use bus No. 5. Interesting programs. For information, call Minerva Katz, 954-4279902 or Adele at 954 427-4970. Hebrew Speaking Circle is formed to meet in the Clubhouse. For information, call Dr. Lee Lubin 954-428-8642. Hispanic Club meets at the Clubhouse every second Sunday of each month in Music Room A from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. Come and meet new friends and help us plan club activities. For information call Judith Smith at 954-427-8248. Humanist of the Gold Coast meets at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2601 St. Andrews Blvd., Boca Raton. Exact date to be advised in future issue. For information contact Dr. Robert Griffin 954-426-5021. Italian American Club, your heritage, meets the second Monday of each month at 11 a.m. in the Clubhouse Party Room. Join us for fun. Some of our functions: Pizza Parties, Picnics (the Italian Way), Trips, Lunch/Dinner Theatre, Guest Speakers and more. Contacts all year: Lena Radicella 954-428-2184, Lucille Carlucci 954421-2406 and Toni Ponto 954-4280286. JOIN, JOIN, JOIN. Jelly Belly Dancers TroupeMeets Wednesdays 6 p.m. in Health Club. Members are required to perform year round at various dance events. For more information call Sandy 954-4212541. Jet Setters, CVE’s new club for widows, widowers and singles.

AUGUST 2010

Plans for various day trips will be discussed and members will be able to sign up for these events. For information call Lila 954-5969949 or Sandi, 954-725-5895. Jewish War Veterans Post and Auxiliary 265 meets the 3rd Sunday of the month in the Activity Room C behind LeClub at 10:30 a.m. Show your support of our troops by joining and getting involved in our numerous programs benefitting our armed forces. We need more JWV of Korea and Vietnam wars. Meetings start again September 19, 2010. For information call Kitty Cole 954-360-7956, Shirley Goldstein 954-480-8716 or Mickie Maurer 954-570-6342. Knitting Club of CVE meets every Monday from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Sewing Room at the Clubhouse. We welcome beginners and experienced knitters and crotchetiers. If you have an “Itch to Stitch” come and have fun and make someone happy. Call Florence 954-698-9421. L’Alliance Francophone CVE. Join more than 800 Frenchspeaking residents of the Village, mostly snowbirds from Canada. The association was established in 1995, offering great activities. For information, call Yvan Sinotte 954-425-4355 or Pierrette Pelletier 954-426-6132. L’Alliance Francophone of CVE. Si vous parlez Français, joignez-vous aux 800 personnes déjà membres de notre association. Nous avons de nombreuses activitès tres diversifièès a vous proposer. Pour toute information appeler Yvan Sinotte 954-425-4355 ou Pierrette Pelletier 954-426-6132. Lapidary Club members only, work every Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Lapidary Room. Supervisor must be present. Sessions will be added as needed. For information call Walter Reich 954-421-6875 or Victor Goldring 954-418-2174. Lets Talk meets the 2nd and 4th Tuesday each month, 2 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Room N. Discussions, Daytrips, films will be topics of the day. For further information call Gladys 954-421-9232, Irene 954-4189156, Shirley 954-427-0951.

Magic Club Meets December through March on the 2nd and 4th Monday of the month from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Clubhouse General Purpose Room N. Discussions, Magic Learning. Speakers discuss magic – Conventions – Demonstrations. For information call Jeff Saks after 12 noon at 954-788-1080. Mended Hearts Cardiac Support Group an affiliate of the American Heart Association, meets the 1st and 3rd Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. Heart Healthy Snacks will be served. Open to all

cardiac patients and their families in the community. Located at 7300 Del Prado Circle South, Boca Raton. For information call 561-392-3000. Na’Amat USA For further information, contact Marjorie Moidel at 954-970-8609. National Council of Jewish Women. Meetings are held at the Clubhouse, Room N, at 12 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month, October through April. All welcome, non sectarian. Call Rhoda Bell 954-428-7606 or Sylvia 954-421-8870 for further information. Nature Club will meet the third Friday of every month from November to April in Clubhouse Room A at 10 a.m. A different speaker is at each meeting and several trips each year are enjoyed by the members. These trips are to a variety of nature sites. For information call Shelly Baskin, 954-428-0634. Newbies Come and meet new people interested in social activities, dinners and trips. We meet the 1st Tuesday of the month from November to April, Room F, 7 p.m. For information, call Virginia at 954-426-9455 or Beverly at 954428-3705. New Covenant Church Celebration Service every Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and Evening Service and Bible Study every Wednesday at 6:45 p.m. For further information, call 954-781-3170. New Horizons Church of Deerfield Worship Service 10 a.m., Sunday School 10:30a.m .For information call church 954-427-3045. New York Transit Retirees of Florida meets the second Wednesday of the month at 11 a.m. at Centura Park Clubhouse, 2395 N. W. 36th Ave. Coconut Creek. Keep informed of your pensions and medical benefits. For information, call 561-479-2149.

North East Focal Senior Center: Adult Day Care service, Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m .for individuals with dementia, Alzheimer or memory loss. Contact Mary Jo Bodnick, Case Manager at 954-480-4463. Ballroom Dance lessons every Tuesday 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., “Hot Topic” discussions every Tuesday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Open Water Color Painting class every Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Contact Laura Newman at 954480-4447.Silver Sneakers class by Humana first Thursday monthly from 12 noon to 1 p.m. Beginner Computer lessons offered one-onone at $40 for six one-hour lessons. Contact Laura Newman 954-480-

4447 for appointment. Vision Impaired Support group every Wednesday 12 noon to 1 p.m. Tai Chi every Thursday, 12 noon to 1 p.m.; Arm Chair Fitness every Friday, 12 noon to 12:30 p.m,; Stretching/Yoga Lite every Monday 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.. Line Dancing ($4 donation) for beginners/intermediates every Friday 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Volunteers required to demonstrate and assist in Floral Arrangements. Contact Claire Riccardi 954-480-4447. Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church, 5201 N. Military Trail, Deerfield Beach, Fl. Services Monday to Friday, 9 a.m., Saturday Vigil 4 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., and 11 a.m. by Monsignor James Parappally, Pastor. For further information, call 954-421-3246.

Parent & Adult Children Club meets the first Sunday of the month, Room F. This is a Social Club. Learn nutrition tips, exercise tips, meet new people, outings. The parent and adult child must come to the meetings together. If one does not live in the Village invite them to attend the meeting with you. For further information call Linda 954-725-3762. Philadelphian’s and Neighbors Club meets October through March. Entertainment at every meeting. Greet old and new friends. For information call Selma Edelman, 954-708-7799 or Irene Axelrod 954-418-9156.. Philosophy of CVE meetings are held the first and third Monday of every month, beginning November 1st through April. The Philosophy Club invites everyone for an hour and a half of using our minds to question and learn about the greatest topics of our Age, Science, Religion, Art, Music and more. Bring your curiosity. For details, call Jerry Saxon 954-428-9381. Poetry Lovers meet every Monday 2 to 3:30 p.m. We read poetry, which leads to the discussion of politics, religion, The meaning of Life and so on. Wise Up! Come, share and enjoy For further information call 954-571-7148 or 954-571-7148. Red Hatters Club, JCP Red Hatters meet the second Wednesday of each month in the clubhouse. Monthly outings planned. Requirement for membership is a Red Hat and Purple Dress, Blouse, Pants etc. must be worn on outings. For more information phone Josephine Privitera at 954-425-7026. Russian Club will be meeting every third Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the home of Galina Baraz, 2064 Ventnor P. For further information, contact Galina at 954-428-3870.


AUGUST 2010

Saint Ambrose Catholic Church, Pastor Rev. Bryan Dalton, Daily Masses 7:30 a.m., 11 a.m., 7 p.m., Saturday morning Vigil Masses 4 p.m., 5:30 p.m., Sunday Masses 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12 noon, 6 p.m., Confessions Saturday, 11 a.m. to 12 noon, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., For information call church 954-427-2225. Scrabbleers meets every Thursday at 7 p.m. in Room C at Clubhouse. All scrabble players welcome. Bring set if possible. For information, call R. Levin 954427-4092. Senior Volleyball for men and women on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the Volleyball Court, next to the main tennis courts back of the Clubhouse. Everyone who attends plays. Call Max Amichai Heppner 954-596-0484, E-mail: Heppnershanamax@aol.com. Sisterhood of Young Israel of Deerfield Beach meets at the Synagogue the first Tuesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. There will be no meetings during the summer. Gift Shop now open Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. Everyone welcome. For further information call Helen Hagler 954-360-9939 or Tobi Kleiman 954-725-3776. Sisterhood of Temple Beth Israel meets on the second Thursday of each month at 11:30 am. A mini lunch is served followed by an interesting program. For further information call the Temple office at 954-421-7060 . Sixty-five Social Club – Come join us with a social club that has been in existence for a long time. If you are a couple & like to be active & enhance your life style, our club affords the opportunities of meeting new friends, going on many different cruises, experiencing many restaurants, as well as day trips to museums, casino gambling, shows & theaters, weekends away & mystery trips. Don’t waste another minute, for information call Lillian, 954-360-2941. Social Single If you are 70 years old or younger and feeling young at heart, Social Singles is the club for you. We are a club that enjoys going to shows, museums, nature outings and more. We dine at local restaurants for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner. Our meetings are held the second Monday of the month in the clubhouse at 7 p.m., room G. For more information, please call, Frieda 954-429-1750 or Sheila 954-725-1521.

SOCO (Symposium of Concerned Owners) meets the second and fourth Friday of each month in the Clubhouse. In-depth lectures and discussions with guest speakers. For information, call Jeff Chester at 954-429-9285. Soft Ball Players now forming Century Village teams. No age limitations. Call Ed Obeid at 954421-2228. South Florida Gold Coast Chapter of Myasthenia Gravis support group meets on the second Saturday each month at 1 p.m. at the North Broward Medical Center, I-95 and Sample Road. For information call Gladys or Evelyn 954-429-0455. South Florida Harmonica Club-Do you play the harmonica? Would you like to play in an active harmonica group? We are a performing harmonica club, often playing gigs. Our audience tells us that we are their best entertainment. We meet at the North West Focal Point Senior Center on Wednesday afternoons from 1 to 3 p.m. The center is located at 6009 N.W. 10th Street in Margate, Fl. 33063. Please call Sam at 954421-5792 or Bea at 954-426-3540. Stained Glass Club meets on the first Wednesday of every month until April at 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse Stained Glass room. For further information, call Harry Liner at 954-426-4853. Stamp and Coin Club meets every 4th Thursday at 12 noon to 2 p.m. in the Clubhouse, Room C on the 1st floor. Residents and guests are invited to have their stamps and coins there to sell, buy & trade. For more information call Rafael Vance 954-421-8579. Stock Market Discussion Club meets the first and third Monday each month at 10 a.m. Room N. Exchange information about stocks, mutual funds, ETF’s and bonds. No fee involved. For further information call Janine 954-428-2303 or Hortense 954-429-1604. Talking Book Club the JBL Library, in conjunction with the Low Vision Group in CVE is forming a monthly Talking Book Club. Each participant will receive the same audio book. A representative for the JBI Library will facilitate the book discussion once a month. The group will meet the second Tuesday of the month at 10:30 am. For information call Janine Pitch 954-428-2303 or Hortie Lawrence 954-429-1604. Tai-Chi. The class will be on Wednesday from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.

in Exercise Room at Clubhouse with instructor, Terry. Come join our class and get rid of stress Temple Beth Israel Cantor Irvin Bell and Rabbi Jack Riemer will colead High Holy Day Services. Free music and story-telling program on Saturday, 7:30 p.m. September 4, before Selichot service. For High Holy Days tickets or more info, call us at 954-421-7060 or drop by our office and see Lee or Gloria. Regular services Mon. & Thurs. 8:30 a.m., Shabbat 9:00 a.m.

Temple B’nai Shalom (Reform) Services are conducted every Friday at 8 p.m. at Le Club by Rabbi Alton M. Winters and Cantor, Gary Sherman. Oneg Shabbat follows services every week. For additional information call Helen Baumann 954-426-2532. The Auxiliary meets the fourth Monday of every month at 10 a.m. For information call Julia Bale 954-427-6669 or Bea Rosner 954-360-7760. The Theosophical Society of Deerfield located at 831 SE 9th Street, phone number 954-4200908 offers a free Sunday Speaker’s Forum every week from 3:30 to 5 p.m. In addition we have many interesting classes during the day and evenings, also without charge. To obtain a free quarterly bulletin call the lodge at the above number or Lillian Mayer, a CVE resident for more information about specific classes we offer at 954-360-7080. The Village Vagabonds Jazz band plays Wednesday afternoons from 3:30-5:30 in the Music Room A from November until April. For information, call Ted at 954-4280578. United Federation of Teachers/ Retired Teachers Chapter Meetings at Temple Anshei Shalom, W. Atlantic Ave. West of Jog, Delray. For further information, call Hilda Cohen 954-428-6805. United Club No. 7 (Retirees of ILGWU & ACTWU) meets on the first Thursday or first Saturday of each month in the Clubhouse, Room N at 1 p.m. For information, call Bea Jacobs at 954 427-0665. United Order True Sisters. All welcome. For information contact Betty Swinkin, Membership Chairperson, 954-570-9526. Visionally Impaired Persons (VIP) meet the first Wednesday monthly in Room E at 10:30 a.m. We exchange information and have guest speakers. We also have a book club and plan trips to seminars. All are welcome Contact Rose Shanhan 954-427-1399 or Elaine Bill 954-421-4652.

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Waves (Navy Gals) Meets every month on the first Saturday at 12 noon at the Olive Garden on Federal Highway in Ft. Lauderdale. For further information, call Eunice Westin at 954-4277119. We Care of CVE still available for supplies (wheelchairs, walkers, canes, etc.) only. Contact Barbara Brown at 954-5749675. Women Marines Association membership is open to women who serve or have served honorably in the U.S. Marine Corps or U.S. Marine Reserves. Many people are not aware of our existence. For information, call Ruth Beisner at 954-428-1637. Workmen’s Circle, Branch 1051 meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday at South County Civic Center on Jog Rd. or information call, Miriam Guz 561-495-7378.

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Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Just Askinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; By LEN WITHAM Why is it that the Hollywood types get a free ride for their bad behavior? The oh so Catholic Mel Gibson (Passion of the Christ) gets divorced from his wife (against church rules) and verbally abuses the mother of his child she had out of wedlock (another church nono) and apparently physically abuses her. Now, remember when he said â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jews were responsible for all that is wrong with the worldâ&#x20AC;?? He got a pass and still made movies. Now, during a taped rant against this woman he shows us that he believes any white woman who dresses sexy will be raped by â&#x20AC;?a pack of n*****s.â&#x20AC;? Of course he did this using the F word, the C word and about every other unprintable word. However, none of this stopped people from defending himâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;including Whoopie Goldberg. Listen, Whoopie, if a guy thinks packs of black men are waiting for their chance to gang rape a white woman he is a racist!!! And if he rants against Jews when drunk, it means his self-ed-

ACE

iting mechanism is impaired and he is voicing his true antiSemitic views!!! Roman Polanski used his position and casting couch to molest an under age child starlet. He bolted to Europe after a guilty plea to avoid jail time. He lived in luxury and continued to make movies. And when he was about to face extradition to serve his sentence, a host of Hollywood hot shots came to his defense in a full page ad. What were they thinking? How would they like their daughter, granddaughter or niece to be molested and her attacker to get off? In the end, Roman was allowed to avoid extradition. Jackpotâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;he got off with a reprimand then got off two more times for the crime. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not even going into the Hollywood airheads like Paris, Brit and Lindsay who thinks a few days in the slammer is cruel and unusual punishment for their dangerous behavior and ignoring probation instructions. But Charlie, I really didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind that you went to highpriced call girls. You were

just being a loveable bad boy. However, pulling a blade on your babe is a whole different ballgame. And it shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t result in your getting a big

raise for playing YOURSELF on Two and a half Men. So, who is to blame for this double standard for the famous? The Hollywood

types? The legal system? Or is it the public that still buys the products and tunes into the shows? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just askinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.

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AUGUST 2010

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“Free” TV – The Great American Ripoff By SY BLUM, Associate Editor We bought a new TV recently to replace one that was more than 20 years old. But, of course, it displayed the same dreadful programs and non-stop commercials as the old one. Needless to say, we expected nothing else. All of which set this writer to reminiscing about the “old days.” I must mention at this point, that the younger generation which probably dominates CVE today may not be aware of the early history of TV. As a result, you may not fully realize how far the programming quality of present-day television has fallen from Day One, back in the early 50s. It is hard to believe that the air waves are actually in the public domain. They really belong to us, the people. Back then there were strict guidelines as to how much advertising could be shown within the course of the program. As an example: one of the most popular TV productions at the time was the Texaco Star Theatre starring comedian Milton Berle. If memory serves me right, it was a one- hour show

sponsored only by Texaco, and the commercials were limited to maybe 60 seconds every quarter hour. The balance of the program was entertainment. Back then, commercial time was limited by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). It still is, sort of! Other popular programs at the time were Ed Sullivan, Jack Benny, and several others who I no longer remember, all with strictly limited commercial time. So, what happened? Down through the years, the ever increasing power of corporatesponsored lobbyists gradually watered down federal restrictions. As a consequence, as we all know, virtually anything goes for a medium whose programs enter the living rooms of all of America, and thus, in many ways, greatly influence our perception of the outside world. Of course, there are many good things about modern day television: almost instantaneous reporting of important events, weather reports (especially warnings of severe weather), wall-to-wall sports reporting,

etc. We are also bombarded by mind-numbing analysis by “talking heads.” Admittedly, the latter could be negative or positive depending on the viewer’s taste. In this writer’s opinion the above plusses amount to just a minuscule percentage of the hundreds of channels that are available for that “boob tube” in your living room or wherever. The point of this column is to show how the overall quality of TV programming has deteriorated from an entertainment medium to what can only be recognized as an electronic shopping guide! In addition, as bad as it is today, it seems that it will be worse tomorrow. For example, I am an avid sports fan and enjoy tremendously watching a baseball, hockey or football game live on television. Unfortunately, with increasing frequency, more and more commercials are intruding on the otherwise smooth presentation of a sports event. You now find a short commercial between pitches at a ball game and do not be surprised if they find some way to inject a mini-

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second ad from the time the ball leaves the pitcher’s hand until it hits the bat or the catcher’s mitt! In many other televised sports you sometimes are not certain if the cleverly created commercial is not part of the action. And, pity the paying spectator at the game, the time between baseballs’ half innings, other sports’ time outs, endof-period breaks are getting increasingly longer to enable more commercials to be shown. Suffocating commercials are not exclusively just part of the sports scene. Frequently I try to watch TV movies. Without fail, just as a critical point of the movie is shown, bingo, up comes a series of ads that last so long that you no longer remember what happened to that point. The only oasis to TV movie watching is the Turner channel, which shows “ancient” movies in their entirety, without commercials. We usually watch the NBC Nightly News. Their modus operandi seems to be to present solid news for the first quarter hour and for the remainder predominately commercials,

with just bits and pieces of news items. In reality, it becomes a quarter hour and “change” news program. And, are you aware as am I, that some “news” is not news at all? With increasing frequency we are seeing meaningless interviews that sometimes dominate a news program. Anything to fill in the time between commercials! Then, of course, most television programs are aimed at the 20-40s crowd which, of course, is go, go, go. This results in frequent razzle-dazzle minisecond flashes of inane scenes and people, none of which you can identify as they flit across the screen. I suppose you could say that with all the channels available you should be able to find something substantial, something devoid of too many commercials. Good luck with that! And for this we are buying expensive, and ever larger TVs, plus cable service charges. So much for “free” television. Maybe Howdy-Doody wasn’t so bad after all!


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From The Internet Retarded Grandparents Submitted By MIRIAM SACHS After Christmas, a teacher asked her young pupils how they spent their holiday away from school. One child wrote the following: We always used to spend the holidays with Grandma and Grandpa. They used to live in a big brick house but Grandpa got retarded and they moved to

Batemans Bay where everyone lives in nice little houses, and so they don’t have to mow the grass anymore! They ride around on their bicycles and scooters and wear name tags because they don’t know who they are anymore.   They go to a building called a wreck center, but they must

have got it fixed because it is all okay now. They do exercises there, but they don’t do them very well.   There is a swimming pool too, but they all jump up and down in it with hats on.   At their gate, there is a doll house with a little old man sitting in it. He watches all day so nobody can escape. Some-

times they sneak out, and go cruising in their golf carts! Nobody there cooks, they just eat out. And, they eat the same thing every night - early birds.   Some of the people can’t get out past the man in the doll house. The ones who do get out, bring food back to the wrecked center for pot luck.

My Grandma says that Grandpa worked all his life to earn his retardment and says I should work hard so I can be retarded someday too. When I earn my retardment, I want to be the man in the doll house. Then I will let people out, so they can visit their grandchildren. 

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From The Internet We Remember Them Well Submitted By HARRY CHIZECK How’s This For Nostalgia? All the girls had ugly gym uniforms. It took three minutes for the TV to warm up. Nobody owned a purebred dog. A quarter was a decent allowance. You would reach into a muddy gutter for a penny. Your Mom wore nylons that came in two pieces. You got your windshield cleaned, oil checked, and gas pumped, without asking, all for free, every time. And you didn’t pay for air. And, you got trading stamps to boot. Laundry detergent had free glasses, dishes or towels hidden inside the box. It was considered a great

privilege to be taken out to dinner at a real restaurant with your parents. Teachers threatened to keep kids back a grade if they failed…and they did it. No one ever asked where the car keys were because they were always in the car, in the ignition, and the doors were never locked. Playing baseball with no adults to help kids with the rules of the game. Stuff from the store came without safety caps and hermetic seals because no one had yet tried to poison a perfect stranger. Being sent to the principal’s office was nothing compared to the fate that awaited the student at home.

Basically we were in fear for our lives, but it wasn’t because of drive-by shootings, drugs, gangs, etc. Our parents and grandparents were a much bigger threat. But we survived because their love was greater than the threat. Remember that the perfect age is somewhere between old enough to know better and too young to care. Can you still remember Howdy Doody, the Peanut Gallery, the Lone Ranger, The Shadow Knows, Nellie Bell, Roy and Dale, Trigger and Buttermilk. How many of these do you remember? Candy cigarettes; wax coke-shaped bottles with colored sugar water inside; soda pop machines that

dispensed glass bottles; coffee shops with table side jukeboxes; Blackjack, Clove and Teaberry chewing gum; home milk delivery in glass bottles with cardboard stoppers; newsreels before the movie; telephone numbers with a word prefix…(Yukon 2-601); party lines; peashooters; HiFi’s and 45 RPM records; 78 RPM records; green stamps; mimeograph paper. Do you remember a time when…decisions were made by going ‘eeny-meeny-mineymoe? Mistakes were corrected by simply exclaiming, ‘Do Over!’ ‘Race issue’ meant arguing about who ran the fastest. Catching fireflies could happily occupy an entire evening.

It wasn’t odd to have two or three ‘Best Friends’. Having a Weapon in School meant being caught with a Slingshot. Saturday morning cartoons weren’t 30-minute commercials for action figures. Spinning around, getting dizzy, and falling down was cause for giggles. The Worst Embarrassment was being picked last for a team. War was a card game. Baseball cards in the spokes transformed any bike into a motorcycle. Taking drugs meant orange-flavored chewable aspirin. Water balloons were the ultimate weapon. IF YOU CAN REMEMBER MOST OR ALL OF THESE, THEN YOU HAVE LIVED!!!!

Remember Snowbirds: 09/12/2010

The Reporter is your source for village

information

cve reporter.com

09/12/2010

09/12/2010

09/12/2010

09/12/2010

09/12/2010

09/12/2010


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CVE REPORTER

AUGUST 2010

Attention: CVE Residents The Reporter welcomes all items for the In Loving Memory Section. Please send via e-mail to cvereporter @hotmail. com or fax to 954-421-9269 or hand deliver to Reporter office, ATTN: Gloria Olmstead.


AUGUST 2010

CVE REPORTER

See Retailer for complete details.

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Special Financing Options Available

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60 OFF A Set Of 4 Goodyear Eagle® Tires

40 OFF A Set Of 4 Dunlop® Tires

30 OFF Two Goodyear Eagle® Tires

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$

Oil, Lube & Filter

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20 OFF Two Dunlop® Tires

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16" or larger Must present coupon to get this offer. Discount off regular price. No other discounts apply. Offer available at Gold Coast Tire only. See Retailer for complete details. Offer ends 10/31/10. CVD

Must present coupon to get this offer. Discount off regular price. No other discounts apply. Offer available at Gold Coast Tire only. See Retailer for complete details. Offer ends 10/31/10. CVD

Tire Rotation & Balancing Balance All Four Tires

24

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Must present coupon to get this price. Most vehicles. No other discounts apply. Offer valid at participating Gold Coast Tire. Additional charges for shop supplies, up to 7% or $25 maximum, may be added. See Retailer for complete details. Offer ends 10/31/10. CVD

20 OFF Regular Price

$

DISCOUNT Includes: PACKAGES • Front caster, camber & toe set to manufacturer’s specifications, where applicable AVAILABLE • Reference & compensation, or adjustment of thrust line, depending on alignment type (Many front wheel drive vehicles today require rear wheel adjustment at an additional cost.)

Must present coupon to get this offer. Most vehicles. Offer valid at Gold Coast Tire. Canister, special filter, diesel and 5W20 oil extra. Vehicles requiring 5W20 may be extra. Additional charges for shop supplies, up to 7% or $25 maximum, may be added. Waste oil/filter fee may apply. Kendall and the Kendall logo are trademarks of the ConocoPhillips Company. ©2010 ConocoPhillips Company. See Retailer for complete details. Offer expires 10/31/10. CVD

A/C Not Cold?

Radiator Cooling Maintenance

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Must present coupon to get this price. Most vehicles. No other discounts apply. Offer valid at participating Gold Coast Tire. Disposal fee may apply in some areas. Extended life antifreeze and DEXCOOL may be extra. Additional charges for shop supplies, up to 7% or $25 maximum, may be added. See Retailer for complete details. Offer ends 10/31/10. CVD

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Must present coupon to get this offer. Most vehicles. Discount off regular price. No other discounts apply. Offer valid at participating Gold Coast Tire. Additional charges for shop supplies, up to 7% or $25 maximum, may be added. See Retailer for complete details. Offer ends 10/31/10. CVD

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• Install new pads or shoes • Resurface drum or rotors • Inspect and repack wheel bearings on non-drive axles • Inspect master cylinder hoses and brake lines • Inspect hardware or spring kits Free safety inspection ($10.00 value) 12 Month/12,000 Mile Warranty

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Computerized Wheel Alignment

Brake Special

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59

Discounts Available!

Your Local Goodyear Gemini ™ Dealer • AAA - approved auto repair shop. • Century Village resident discounts available! • Serving South Florida since 1978. • Complete auto, light truck and hybrid repairs on foreign and domestic vehicles.

PAGE

$

Computerized engine evaluation.

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Must present coupon to get this offer. Most vehicles. Discount off regular price. No other discounts apply. Offer valid at participating Gold Coast Tire. Additional charges for shop supplies, up to 7% or $25 maximum, may be added. See Retailer for complete details. Offer ends 10/31/10. CVD

30K-60K-90K Mile Service

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• Chassis lubrication • Four tire rotation • Replace air filter • Maintenance inspection • Replace fuel filter

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38067gyregneastGoldCoastInsert_V6.indd 1

7/15/10 4:44:27 PM


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CVE REPORTER

AUGUST 2010

Help Stop Medicare Fraud An important message from Medicare for people in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties

Fraud costs the Medicare Program billions of dollars every year. Fraud can happen when Medicare gets billed for items or services you didn’t get. Or, fraud can happen when someone uses your Medicare number to bill Medicare without your knowledge.

Take action to help stop Medicare fraud! your Medicare statements to make sure Medicare M Check isn’t charged for items or services you didn’t get. you suspect a fraudulent charge on your Medicare M Ifstatement, call Florida’s Medicare Fraud Hotline at 1-866-417-2078.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Medicare Fraud Hotline 1-866-417-2078


AUGUST 2010

Design © 2010 by Ciro Limon 954-610-8975 -!

3pm-6pm-all parties must be seated by 6pm. Dine-in only. Valid w/this flyer. Buy one Early Bird and receive a 2nd Early Bird for 99¢ (w/purchase of 2 beverages), 2nd entrée must be of equal or lesser value. All early bird dinners include garlic rolls, choice of a cup of soup or salad. Not valid w/other specials or discounts. Limited time.

Hillsboro Blvd

Powerline Rd

FL Turnpike

Palmetto Rd

I-95

Promise of Satisfaction

Lyons Rd

Baked Ziti…………………………. 10.99 Spaghetti with Meatballs or Sausage………………………... 11.99 Meat Lasagna……………………. 12.99 Fettuccine Alfredo…………….. 11.99 Angel Hair alla Rotelli………...11.99 Light & Garlic Linguine……… 11.99 Eggplant Parmigiana…………..11.99 Penne alla Vodka………………..11.99 Penne Chicken and Broccoli.. 13.99 Grilled Spa Chicken Breast…. 12.99 Tilapia Francese………………... 13.99 Shrimp Parmigiana……………. 13.99 Shrimp Scampi Sautéed shrimp.. 14.99 Linguine with Clam Sauce….. 13.99 Veal Parmigiana………………... 14.99 Veal Francese……………………. 15.99 Veal Marsala……………………...15.99 Chicken Parmigiana…………… 13.99 Chicken Francese………………. 13.99 Chicken Marsala………………...13.99 Chicken Cacciatore……………..14.99

CVE REPORTER

If, for any reason, you find Rotelli’s service less than great, we’ll make it right with the right replacement or refund your money.

Sample Rd

All Day Blow-out. Valid only at: 3992 W. Hillsboro Blvd & Powerline Rd, Deerfield Beach

Cheese Pizza, no coupon needed, not valid w/other specials or discounts.

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CVE REPORTER

AUGUST 2010


AUGUST 2010

CVE REPORTER

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CVE REPORTER

AUGUST 2010

Coverage for all residents of Century Village with great service at very affordable rates. Did you know that beginning January 1st, 2009 all owners of Condominiums in Florida are required to have a Condominium Insurance policy? We can write this policy for you at a rate you can afford. Stop by our office or call for a Free Quote!

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Or visit us on the internet at: www.underwriting.com


AUGUST 2010

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

65

A History of Credit Cards By BETTY SCHWARTZ, Assistant to the Editor When I was a teenager I had a friend whose father had a grocery store. That was a time when we all shopped at Mom and Pop stores. I think the only store at that time which resembled a supermarket was the A&P. Whenever I went to pick up my friend at her father’s store, I would see women choosing their groceries. Instead of paying cash, however, my friend’s father would take out a ledger and enter the sale. I always thought it strange as we always paid cash for what we bought. When did giving credit actually start? The first recorded use of credit dates back nearly 3,000 years to ancient Babylon and Egypt. In these civilizations, buyers who did not have the necessary hard money to pay for goods could purchase items from certain merchants and agree to pay for them at a later date. The use of credit has continued throughout history as merchants utilized a variety of methods to keep track of their custom-

ers’ debts. One early method was to use long wooden sticks with notches on one side, representing the payments made and notches on the other side representing the amount of money still owed. Other types of credit tokens, such as metal plates and coins, were also used to keep track of debt in ancient and early modern times. The first credit cards originated in the United States during the 1920s. Individual companies began issuing cards to their customers that would allow them to make purchases at the store or company and pay the money back at a later date. However, these cards could only be used at the store that issued them. In 1950 the Diner’s Club issued the first universal credit card in the United States. While the 1950 card was technically a charge card, meaning that the customer was required to repay the entire amount when billed by the Diner’s Club, it officially became a credit card in 1951, allowing

the customer to repay over time. By the late 1950s, many banks and merchants were beginning to recognize the value of plastic credit cards. For merchants, accepting cards resulted in fewer instances of fraud or processing errors, and customers tended to purchase more when using credit cards. For banks, credit cards were a source of constant revenue with interest charged to customers and loan coverage fees paid by merchants. Many current credit card practices can be traced to one man: Andrew Kahr, a sort of credit card whiz kid. Before him, credit cards required customers to pay 5% of their balance every month. Kahr convinced banks to lower minimum payments while raising credit lines, which caused profits to soar. People charged more and strung it out over longer periods of time. “High balances are more profitable than small balances,” said Kahr. Today the average person

who carries credit card debt owes approximately $8,000. Many people discover that it feels nice and so convenient to be able to spend money that they don’t have. Unfortunately, they don’t understand how important

their credit scores really are and only find out after the damage has been done. As the credit card continues to evolve in the coming years, only time will tell what the future credit landscape will look like.

Medals, uniforms, maps, documents, photos & artifacts relate the stories of hundreds of patriotic women and men who served since the mid-1800s through the current conflicts.

Exhibit runs thru January 2, 2011

Also enjoy our core exhibit MOSAIC: Jewish Life in Florida, art exhibits, Museum Store and Bessie’s Bistro Hours: Tuesdays – Sundays,10am - 5pm. Closed Mondays & Jewish & Civil Holidays

Jewish Museum of Florida 301 Washington Ave. Miami Beach, FL 33139 Phone 305.672.5044 www.jewishmuseum.com

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Bring this ad in for 2 for 1 admission

CVER

The Catholic Mass at CVE Text By MARY ANNE SURRETTE, Photo By BOB MULLIGAN Did you know we still have a beautiful weekly Catholic Mass right here on campus every Saturday night at 6:15 p.m.? It is celebrated in the Le Club Activity Room A, and is open to all CVE residents and visitors.  Although Monsignor James is currently recuperating in India from an illness (prayers, please,) the Reverend Harry Loubriel, Director of Campus Ministry for the Archdiocese, is now OLM’s Temporary Administrator; and he is celebrating our Summer Masses, assisted by resident Rev. Mr. James O‘Neill, Deacon. (See Photo taken 7/3/2010).  Interestingly, Father Harry, a native of Puerto Rico, is the 15th child of a family of 18 children, and was an engineer before his ordination to the priesthood in year 2005. Monsignor James Parappally, Pastor of Our Lady of Mercy (OLM) Church at 5201 N. Military Blvd., started this CVE Mass here about seven years ago, as a result of the efforts of many people. Gloria McNamara and her Catholic Social Club members had been booking buses to

take them back and forth to local Masses for quite some time, and Lillian & George Johnson, together with Michelle and Ira Grossman provided the necessary planning and communication to make a CVE Mass happen. To all of these good people, we will be forever grateful. The original purpose of the CVE Mass was to enable CVE Catholics, who were unable to drive to the Church, to attend Mass right here at home. Today, this Mass is central to the lives of a diverse group of CVE Catholics (year-round and snow bird residents,) CVE visitors, and a surprising number of CVE “Returning Catholics.” Besides being able to participate in this very convenient Mass, our CVE community enjoys singing the many well-known Christian hymns with great enthusiasm, and listening to our animated Scripture Reader, Jean Glover, who just celebrated her 95th birthday with us.  The #5 and #6 trolleys or a good neighbor, can easily take you to this Mass.  Confessions, recitation of the

Rosary, and special requests for Masses for a living or deceased loved-one can be made before Mass begins.  Occasional coffee socials are available, after Mass. All CVEers are welcome to volunteer to serve, or be trained to serve, as a Eucha-

ristic Minister, Reader, Pianist, Cantor, Acolyte, Usher, Greeter, Altar Preparer, Mass Gift-bearer, Bulletin-Preparer, etc. Or, if you wish, you may occupy one of the seats in the back rows, reserved for those who prefer that no one notice them as they participate qui-

etly in their worship. If you have any questions, please call Mary Anne Braun, President of The Mass Team, at (954) 571-2266, or just show up and chat with your fellow CVEers before or after this Saturday’s CVE Holy Mass.

L/R Rev. James O’Neill, Deacon, Rev. Harry Loubriel, Priest


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66

CVE REPORTER

AUGUST 2010

What’s Bugging You By HARRY L. KATZ The US Food and Drug Administration have, for many years, been doing a

good job protecting the public from insects and harmful chemicals in foods. Food

NEED A NEW HIP?

processing factories are fined heavily if inspectors find a forbidden additive in a food product. Many years ago, when I identified a single beetle in a light trap in the HJ Heinz plant in Pittsburgh, PA, the Heinz Company returned the whole carload of apricots to the farm that shipped it. The Environmental Protection Agency has banned many useful chemicals from the market place because of possible harm, however slight, to the public. The term “chemicals” scares the public. Little is known, however, about the natural chemicals in all the foods that we

eat every day. There are few foods that we eat that do not have a potentially hazardous natural chemical, however small. Many fungal species occur in our foods. Some are molds which are harmless and even desirable. Camembert and Roquefort cheeses get a pleasant flavor from a fungal mold. Other molds are dangerous and capable of damaging liver, brain, nerves and other body parts. One mold produces Aflatoxin, a potent carcinogen, especially in the liver. The FDA prevents marketing peanuts if they contain more than 20 parts per billion of Aflatoxin (this is equal to

You Have a ChoiceAnterior Hip Replacement Using the state-of-the-art Hana table No muscles cut Less pain Faster recovery No Standard precautions Why wait to get back to being you again! The surgeons at Broward Health North Broward Medical Center have performed more anterior hip replacements using the Hana table than any other area surgeons.

VISITORS ARE NOT BEING CALLED IN AT THE FRONT GATE CAUSING DELAYS AND CONFUSION PLEASE CALL ALL VISITORS INTO THE AUTOMATED SYSTEM BY DIALING 954 421-2556 AND CLEARLY SPEAK THE NAME OF YOUR VISITOR WHEN PROMPTED TO DO SO. CALLS FOR VISITORS ARRIVING THE FOLLOWING DAY MUST BE MADE AFTER 8:30 PM. FOR A SPEEDY ENTRY, PLEASE MAKE SURE ALL VISITORS HAVE YOUR FULL NAME AND ADDRESS AND YOUR TELEPHONE NUMBER.

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one needle in 267 tons of haystack.) Potatoes contain oxalic acid, tannins, nitrates and arsenic. Salfrole, present in small amounts in several common spices as a flavoring ingredient, in high doses can produce cancer in the liver. Spinach and rhubarb contain oxalic acid. Some other common foods actually contain traces of hydrogen cyanide, a deadly poison. Does this mean that we are being poisoned by eating these foods? Of course not! They can be ignored because they are present in small quantities. Our body can deal with them without harm. The dose makes the poison. The Food and Drug Administration has established an extremely wide margin of safety in regulating food additives. Food manufacturers have also established a wide margin of safety in stamping dates on their products. The rule to keep some foods refrigerated however is important to follow, to prevent harmful fungi from developing. Excesses in eating “safe” foods can be dangerous. Table salt is not a dangerous “chemical,” but too much of it can be harmful. I hope this column does not kill your appetite.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP! 6/11/09 11:33:57 AM


AUGUST 2010

CVE REPORTER

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V-J Day By BETTY SCHWARTZ, Assistant to the Editor August 15 is the 65th Anniversary of V-J Day. V-J Day commemorates the anniversary of Japan’s surrender to the Allies in 1945, ending World War II. Almost all of the veterans of that war are now in the twilight of their lives. However, those of us who were there will never forget the exuberant and wild celebrations around the United States and all over the world, which demonstrated the overwhelming sense of relief and exhilaration felt by the citizens of the Allied nations. We were at last at the end of that long and bloody conflict which changed the lives of millions of people forever. In Times Square, New York City, thousands and thousands of people congregated to express their joy and thankfulness that the nightmare in which the world had been plunged, was over at long last. Alfred Eisenstaedt, a photographer for Life magazine snapped the now famous pho-

to of a sailor in uniform passionately kissing a nurse in the midst of a crowd of celebrators in Times Square. This photograph became a cultural icon overnight because it caught the spirit of youth, who could now look forward to a normal life of hope and happiness. By establishing his copyright, the photographer carefully controlled the rights to it, only allowing a limited number of reproductions which determined how it could be used. Since his death in 1995, the rights to the photograph have passed to the Getty Museum as part of their Life archives. U.S. Navy photo journalist Victor Jorgensen captured another view of the same scene, which was published

in the New York Times the following day. Jorgensen titled his photograph Kissing the War Goodbye. Unlike the Eisenstaedt photograph, which is protected by copyright, this Navy photograph is in the public domain as it was produced by a federal government employee on official duty and can be enjoyed by everyone. Did you know that Rhode Island is the only state with a holiday dedicated to V-J Day (its official name is Victory Day), which is celebrated on the second Monday in August. V-J Day parades are held in several other locations across the United States, including Seymour, Indiana; Moosup, Connecticut; and Arma, Kansas.

Today we still have so many young men and women fighting wars in foreign lands. Our thoughts and prayers go out

to them in the hopes that they will soon come home and we shall all be able to live in peace and freedom.

Prepare to Leave By SAM ADLER Please start packing up and, be prepared to be on the move yet once again. For many years now, we have labored under the illusion that we are a reliable, responsible and family oriented people who have contributed, in many ways, to the growth and status of our country. It seems, I guess, in the minds of some, that it is not just so. Once again, get ready to tramp through the desert for many, many years. But, we do not have a suitable desert here at our disposal and, without Moses to guide us, it will be very difficult. But, we shall persevere because that is our heritage. However, we do have oceans that we can cross, as we have already been instructed. We have already made arrangements for thousands of luxury boats and yachts that will transport us to our new environment. We can then find a suitable desert for the many, many years that we are in store for. We could go on but we know you all clearly understand our predicament. We will keep you informed and, when all is ready, we will advise you of the “Sailing Date!” Please do not hesitate to make the necessary arrangements and, yes: “RESERVATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED.”

Even this time of year, you may qualify to make a Medicare plan choice. People approaching age 65 may choose their Medicare coverage beginning three months prior to their birthday month. But you may also get a special opportunity to choose or change your plan if: You have just moved into the area You’re retired and losing your company health coverage

You receive Medicaid assistance

You have diabetes

Call Humana to find out more! We offer a variety of Medicare health plans, including prescription drug plans and all-in-one Medicare Advantage plans. And our licensed representatives have the knowledge and experience to help you choose the plan that suits you best.

Call us today for a personal consultation:

1-866-836-5082 • (TTY 711) 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week

HMO, PPO, PFFS and PDP plans with a Medicare contract. This is an advertisement. Y0040_GHA07U7ES2

BRO 08/10


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CVE REPORTER

AUGUST 2010 The Visit In earth sunken by neglect unmarked by love or stone my mother lies so cold.

Dinner for Two I love to watch The cooking TV show, I learn from the masters Cuz they know An appetizer dressed up So nice, Champagne cocktails On cracked ice. Shrimps and scallops Are cooked to perfection I invited my sweetie The object of my affection. I’ll prepare a delicious Lobster stew Or a rack of lamb May also do. Or perhaps you wish Another dish Veal Scallopine, Veal Marsala With wine a touch Garlic, steaming hot bread, a green salad Is never too much. Dessert is wonderful Dressed on a chocolate dipped dish Crème Brulee, fresh strawberries Topped with whipped cream Or a chocolate mousse If you wish. Candle lights flicker Such a romantic dinner For us two. A lacy napkin, a pink tablecloth And fresh flowers too. However, the words that you say Has upset me so! You’re not hungry now! You ate two hot dogs an hour ago! - SANDI LEHMAN

Think On It! In my youth I couldn’t quite understand Why surgeons (bloody knife in hand) Removing an obnoxious growth, Like tonsils, adenoids, or both. Declared with erudite vision The need for such complete excision, Though ignorant of the “raison d’être” Of tonsils, adenoids et cetera. So too, in curing social ills, Man sharpens up his knife – and kills! Nor ever stops, or even pauses To recognize the basic causes That underlie all human strife. He simply sharpens up his knife. Twould seem to me a bit more wise If man, instead, would analyze The ills that human folk befall. Perhaps some thought might cure them all. Who knows? A little cerebration Might aid the health of every nation! - A. BYRON GREENBERG

I Have Seen and I Have Heard “I have seen and I have heard Twice blessed is my good fortune Such a beautiful panorama unfolds Musical sounds fill the air.” “So much good to embrace So much evil to fight off My heart melts with joy As I view the mountain peaks standing tall and proud.”

Martha was gone… and so were our ecstatic nights: she, chimera-like in candlelight, naked, dancing, swirling, lilting Keats, engulfing us in dementia.

“I have seen the enemy I have heard the artillery shells Nowhere to hide or escape Just standing fast to retaliate and survive.” “Blind singers and musicians Pour forth with their sensitive souls The talent is so evident They see with their aesthetic sensitivity.” “The deaf hear with their heart and their vision The blind clasp their inner strength I appreciate the precious journey that life provides I have seen and I have heard.” - GEORGE SHEVELOVE CAST CALL

I wander now among marble spheres and granite needles, and pillared circles of stone encircling silence, envious of the epitaphs, photos and notes… testaments to love and grief – while I feel shunned even by the dead.

Whose voice had called? Her huddled body rigid and abandoned now so much asylum waste! My lover, who with brush and word had led me to the cusp of her dreams. Or had she fled because I made them mine? Mother, we were meant to give and take, not to usurp. Soon, too soon we will lie side by side… like stray stones.

I cast a line like an old woman of the sea At The Beach hoping to troll to fish from unfathomed depths A beach, - STUART SLOAVES a prayer soft, fuzzy, a song warm as a peach a mermaid’s soul of sand or some species of “keeper” lying casually, to press between pages caressing, flirting, label a poem. a delicious tickly feeling to your toes, - SANDY WICKER nestled close to liquid, wet, cool, calm, ocean water The Worst Year of My Life softly stirring ever so slightly as a whisper dressed in green-blue The worst year of my life was when I became a widow       to a foam-topped wave  instead of a wife. spraying a few droplets of dew  I still miss our banter and talks and the sun smiles and shines  And the early evening after dinner walks over this paradise  Now I visit from time to time of a honey, lazy, summer day  But a cold stone plaque does not reply  at the beach! So I stay awhile and have a good cry  Then I say my goodbye and I’m on my way - SANDI LEHMAN  I put on a smile and face another day.   - BETTY SCHWARTZ, Assistant to the Editor Mama, The First Word

Magical Moments

Grandma, what do you talk about with your friends? Do you have any friends left? Have they all died? Are they all sick? If alive, do they know what is going on in this world? Is there, at least, one old lady as smart as you? Is there one old man left to hold your hand? To say, “I love you?” My dear child, little old ladies Mostly sit in silence. They try to remember everyone they once loved, Everyone who once loved them. We sit in silence remembering the first word each of our children ever spoke. The word is MAMA. We hear it loud and clear. It imbues our hearts with warmth and love, It keeps us alive in our now, sometimes, lonely and silent world. - DORY LEVISS

Thunder rolls across the sky; Raindrops kiss my windowpane, Clouds part; the sun peeks through. A regal swan glides on the lake; It seems he is propelled by a mute phantom motor, Head held high on graceful neck; Feathers glist’ning in the sun, Magic is this moment. Barely visible in nest of grass, I spot a tiny blossom, Plucking dainty wildflower, I inspect it curiously. Violet with golden stamen; A miniature orchid that fairies wear for high-school prom. My heart leaps ecstatically. Magic is this moment. A spectral artist was my guest. Delicate depictions grace my windowpanes. Jack Frost has left his mark, with icy finger; Painting in his secret tongue visions of his fantasies. A feast for my eager eyes. Magic is this moment. - NORMA LOCKER


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Cooke’s Look at Books By RICHARD WILLIAM COOKE A monthly look at books of interest – new and, occasionally, not-so-new, fiction and booksellers.

THE LAST STAND: CUSTER, SITTING BULL AND THE BATTLE OF THE LITTLE BIGHORN

By Nathaniel Philbrick, Viking, 466 pages, $30.00 Nathaniel Philbrick brings his immense talents to this cannot-put-it-down telling of the ultimate mythic story of the American West, The Battle of the Little Bighorn. Many mass market readers were first introduced to author Philbrick via his hugely successful – and Pulitzer Prize Award finalist – Mayflower, reviewed in this column in November of 2006. By June of 1876, when the 650 soldiers of Custer’s regiment approached the vast, softly rolling plains along Montana’s Little Bighorn River, they found – to their shock and ultimate regret -- that the brave Indian warrior, Sitting Bull, had at his command a village of more than 8,000 Native Americans who, outraged at the treatment they had received from the American government, were set to fight. Philbrick deftly portrays both Custer and Sitting Bull as men of peace who, even against their own wishes, were drawn into one of the bloodiest battles in American history. The author writes, “Custer and his men were

last seen by their comrades galloping across a ridge before they disappeared into the seductive green hills. Two days later the surviving members of the regiment found them: more than two hundred dead bodies, many of them hacked to pieces and bristling with arrows, putrefying in the summer sun. Amid this scene of sickening, ghastly horror, they found Custer lying face up across two of his men with a smile on his face.” Philbrick says during his research he came across dozens of fatally distorted accounts – some contained in Hollywood movies -- of the famous battle. It wasn’t until his third visit to the battlefield, while following a winding, steep-sided ravine towards the Little Bighorn, that he stumbled upon the ultimate truth of what happened. Following Philbrick in the exciting pursuit of this truth will keep you glued to the pages of this wonderfullywritten new account, sure to win the author yet another bundle of prestigious awards and prizes.

SUPER

By Jim Lehrer, Random House, 209 Pages, $25.00 Jim Lehrer, best known as the affable, long-time anchor of PBS-TV’s The News Hour with Jim Lehrer, now The PBS News Hour, is, to the surprise of many, also a successful author. How the man has also had time to publish 19 previ-

ous novels, two memoirs and three plays, run his TV production company and also act as moderator for eleven nationally-televised presidential debates – including the 2004 debate held in close-by Coral Gables, Florida – is anybody’s guess. In this, his latest novel, Lehrer places the reader aboard the Super Chief, the legendary Santa Fe Railroad train which carried movie stars and internationally-famous celebrities – as well as average folks who could afford to ride in “Super” luxurious comfort – between Chicago and Los Angeles. In its heyday, the train was so replete with wealth and celebrity that it became known as “The Train of the Stars.” In the tradition of Murder on the Orient Express, in his new novel Lehrer brings together a cast of characters as fascinating as the train itself. The tale begins in Chicago’s Dearborn Station as passengers -- famous and infamous, anonymous and enigmatic – begin to board. Clark Gable creates a stir when he steps aboard. Harry Truman, accompanied by a railroad detective also boards. There are others – a once great, now downon-his-luck, Hollywood producer; a mysterious, disheveled man who has not paid for a ticket; and a deathly ill millionaire who knows this will be his last trip on the great train – all swept up into a series of deadly events and bizarre deaths that occur as the train speeds westward. Even for movie-idol Gable, who has ridden these very same rails for years, indulging, while aboard, in booze and women with equal fervor, this time something is strangely and uneasily different. Full of remarkable detail about a world of travel opulence, now history, this tale will keep readers turning pages at top speed, gasping and guessing until the final destination is reached.

ROAD TRIP USA

By Jamie Jensen, Moon Publications, 923 Pages, $24.00, Paperback If you’re like most people of a certain age, summer brings back fond memories of family car trips, long-distance drives

that had Dad at the wheel, Mom beside him struggling with folding maps (picked up for free at every gas station), both of them scouting out roadside restaurants and motels and kids in the back counting passing license plates, playing Twenty Questions – and whining, “Are we there yet?” The half-century from the 1920s until the arrival of the Interstate Highway System was the golden age of American motor travel. This fantastic guide – easily the best book of its type – celebrates the open road, often taking the reader off the interstate at the next exit and onto a two-lane highway to experience the unique charms of smalltown America. (Deerfield Beach didn’t rate a mention but Boca Raton picked up several including “one of the more chichi spots in the state,” its “ornate Miznerdesigned Town Hall” and its Gumbo Limbo Nature Center “where you can wander at will past coastal dunes, mangrove wetlands and rare sabal palm hammocks.”) The first transcontinental American road, the Lincoln Highway from New York to San Francisco, was completed in 1915. Motor courts, diners and other businesses quickly sprang up along the roadside to serve the passing trade – and America’s love affair with the open road was off and running. Whether you’re still driving or whether long auto trips are now just a memory, you’ll love paging through this Second Edition of Road Trip USA, subtitled Cross-Country Adventures on America’s Two Lane-Highways. Author Jensen and over one dozen contributing writers have provided this stylish retro experience which includes hundreds of photos, many of which are vintage WPA era. Routes are all intensively mapped and smartly placed margin notes provide nuggets of useful and fascinating information about towns and sites along the way. Sit down with a copy of this wonderful guide and have a great trip following Yogi Berra’s good advice, “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.”

ROSES

By Leila Meacham,

Grand Central, 609 Pages, $24.99 This hefty new novel, its cover adorned with – what else? – magnificent ruby and pink rose petals – aspires to be another Gone With the Wind, Texas-style. Author Meacham gives it her best shot – and she should be hugely gratified that it made a brief appearance on The New York Times bestseller list -- and the book does have its fans (you can read their fervent reviews on any bookseller’s website) but comparing it to the Civil War classic and to, as well, The Thorn Birds, as the publisher does on the book jacket, is grossly unfair…to those other books. Comparing Roses to the old Dallas TV series prime-time soap, also, interestingly, Texas-based, might be more apt. The fact that Meacham, who makes her home in Texas, is a former teacher, shows. The multi-generational story centered on the romantic relationship between two powerful business tycoons – one female, one male -- in the town of Howbutker (no jokes, please), Texas, moves rapidly through this over 600-page tome and the writing is crisp and clear. However Howbutker (again, restrain yourself ) is no Atlanta and Somerset, the family homestead plantation, is no Tara. Mary Toliver (cotton tycoon) and Percy Warwick (timber tycoon) fall in love but they are both too stubbornly in love with their respective business careers to marry. Over the next three generations, deceits and tragedies surround them threatening not only their own happiness but the glowing legacies they are hoping to leave for their heirs. Their story, while mildly interesting is, unfortunately, told in a way that is pedantic and plodding. What could be ravishing and beguiling characters perform more often like cardboard puppets being moved about on a makeshift stage. That said, the many fans of this book are loud, exuberant and legion. To others, regrettably, it’s more a long, drawn out, sudsy soap.


AUGUST 2010

CVE Duplicate Bridge Club Winners for june By BERNICE RUGA SATURDAY 6/5/10 - R. Colman/L. Fertik – B. Ruga/I. Ruga 6/12/10 – R. Davis/G. Schulhoff – B. Lilienfeld/ L. Fertik 6/19/10 – R. Davis/G. Schulhoff – B. Lilienfeld/B. Feldstein 6/24/10 – G. Rothman/R. Rosen – B. Luber/P. Tepper MONDAY 6/7/10 – B. Weinberg/B. Wolf – F. Boudien/H. Luber 6/14/10 – F. Boudien/B. Wolf – B. Cordes/C. Parness 6/21/10 – L. Fertik/R. David

– R. Colman/B. Weinberg 6/28/10 – A. Shore/T. Loria – R. Colman/B. Cordes TUESDAY 6/1/10 – S. Babich/R. Colman – R. Wasserman/T. Loria 6/8/10 – L. Fertik/R. Davis – B. Ruga/I. Ruga 6/15/10 – J. Crown/C. Vilinsky – F. Beaudin/B. Wolf 6/22/10 – R. Wasserman/G. Schulhoff – J. Iovino/H. Luber 6/29/10 – B. Cordis/ B. Feldstein – J. Iovino/H. Luber

The Puzzler By: CHARLES K. PARNESS Who has the ID card? The CVE Clubhouse decided to try something new - a game show with residents as the contestants. For the try-outs for this show, they came up with a puzzle to help select contestants. Each contestant was allowed a maximum of thirty seconds to solve the puzzle, and those with the fastest response time and the correct answer were selected. Here is the puzzle. We have four residents Alice, Bud, Carl and David, but only one of the four has a new ID card.

When each is questioned, each responds. There are four statements, and three of them are false. See if you qualify as a potential contestant. Who has the ID card? Alice: Bud or David has the ID card. Bud: Alice or Carl has the ID card. Carl: I don’t have it. David: I have it.  Okay, who has it. You have 30 seconds.   The Solution to Puzzler can be found on page 73.

Bridge By IRVING RUGA

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SUDOKU Sudoku doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t require any special math skills or calculations. It is a simple and fun game of logic -- all thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needed is brains and concentration.

There is really only one rule to Sudoku: Fill in the game board so that the numbers 1 through 9 occur exactly once in each row, column, and 3x3 box. The numbers can appear in any order and diagonals are not considered. Your initial game board will consist of several numbers that are already placed. Those numbers cannot be changed. Your goal is to fill in the empty squares following the simple rule above. 1. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each row. 2. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each column. 3. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each 3x3 box. 4. A complete Sudoku puzzle contains the numbers 1 through 9 in every row, column, and 3x3 box. Hint: Start with a square that only has three numbers missing. Look at surrounding squares and grids to see which numbers you need to fill that 3x3 grid. SOLUTION ON PAGE 76

JUMBLE

CRYPTOGRAM

By CHARLES K PARNESS

By CHARLES K PARNESS

1) A I O U N N M T ( _) ( _) _ _ ( _) _ _ ( _) 2) A D E E K N R R T U ( _) ( _) ( _) _ _ ( _) _ ( _) _ _ 3) A A C C E H I L M N ( _) _ _ _ _ _ ( _) _ ( _) ( _) 4) E I M N N R S T T U _ ( _) _ _ ( _) ( _) _ _ ( _) _ 5) A D E G I N R T ( _) ( _) ( _) _ _ ( _) ( _) _

mabcb def eg hik leg ho mabclhrsieb,

dah gbtbc kuk egsmaugv rchrbcis;

wzm mabs feIk, Io shU xahhfb

How you might describe the building of the Egyptian pyramids? // ( _) // ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) // ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) //

mh whui bvvf ug shUc fahbf,

shU faeii gbtbc cbleug ug mabclhrsieb.

bkdeck ibec

Unscramble each word, then use the letters in the brackets to solve the jumble. Solution on page 76

Hint: The letter m appearing above stands for the letter T SOLUTION ON PAGE 76


AUGUST 2010

Movie Review August By SANDRA PARNESS SHUTTER ISLAND – Someone is missing. Drama is set in 1954, U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels is investigating the disappearance of a murderess who escaped from a hospital for the criminally insane and is presumed to be hiding on the remote Shutter Island. Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley, Max von Sydow. R, 138 minutes. Rated R for Adult Situations. Playing Wednesday, August 11, 2010, 2 & 8 p.m., Thursday, August 12, 2010, 8 p.m., Friday, August 13, 2010, 8 p.m. EASY VIRTUE- Let’s misbehave! A young Englishman marries a glamorous American. When he brings her home to meet the parents, she arrives like a blast from the future – blowing their entrenched British stuffiness out the window. Starring Jessica Biel, Colin Firth. PG-13. 97 minutes. Playing Sunday, August 15, 2010, 8 p.m., Mon-

day, August 16, 2010, 2 & 8 p.m., Wednesday, August 18, 2010, 2 & 8 p.m. DEAR JOHN – Is duty enough reason to live a lie? A romantic drama about a soldier who falls for a conservative college student while he’s home on leave. Starring Channing Tatum, Amanda Seyfried. PG-13. 105 minutes. Playing Thursday, August 19, 2010, 8 p.m., Friday, August 20, 2010, 8 p.m. Sunday, August 22, 2010, 8 p.m., Monday, August 23, 2010, 2 & 8 p.m. VALENTINE’S DAY – A love story, more or less intertwining couples and singles in Los Angeles break-up and make-up based on the pressures and expectations of Valentine’s Day. Starring Jessica Alba, Kathy Bates, Patrick Dempsey, Jamie Foxx. PG-13. 125 minutes. Playing Wednesday, August 25, 2010, 2 & 8 p.m., Thursday, August 26, 2010, 8 p.m., Friday, Au-

gust 27, 2010, 8 p.m., Sunday, August 29, 2010, 8 p.m. BOOK OF ELI – Some will kill to have it. He will kill to protect it. A post-apocalyptic tale in which a lone man fights his way across America in order to protect a sacred book that holds the secrets to saving humankind. Starring Denzel Washington, Gary Oldman. R. 118 minutes. Playing Monday, August 30, 2010, 2 & 8 p.m. Wednesday, September 1, 2010, 2 & 8 p.m., Thursday, September 2, 2010, 8 p.m. TEMPLE GRANDIN-A biopic of Temple Grandin, an autistic woman who has become one of the top scientists in humane livestock handling. Starring Claire Danes, Catherine O’Hara. PG. 108 minutes. Playing Friday, September 3, 2010, 8 p.m., Sunday, September 5, 2010, 8 p.m., Monday, September 6, 2010, 8 p.m.

Have you Seen These Men By SID BIRNS Have you seen these men?   No, they are not “wanted”, but they need all the help

they can get. All are members of the Canadian Snowbirds Bowling League and are gath-

ered at the Alley to practice for the League play-offs.

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Classes Offered By the Class Office Classes Offered By the Class Office Registration for the next Class Session will be 8/16 thru 8/27/10 (Registration continues to the 2nd week of classes – no prorating of class fee) To register please pick up a Class Flyer at the Class Office; flyers are available two weeks before registration begins. Acrylics & Oils Beginning Bridge – Step One Beginning Bridge – Step Two Intermediate Bridge Advanced Bridge Beginning Computers Intermediate Computers Intermediate/Advanced Computers Clay Pottery Clay Sculpture Digital Cameras & Photography Realize Your Photographic Vision Mixed Media Painting Spanish Beginners Spanish Intermediate Beginning Watercolor Relax, Meditate and Toning Daily Relax WithYoga If you have any questions, please call the Class Coordinator at 954-428-7696 Monday through Friday 9:30am – 12noon and 1pm – 4:30pm

Solution of PUZZLER Only one statement is true. Looking at the statements by Alice and Bud, since they mention all four of the residents as having the ID card, one of those two statements is false and the other is true. Since we know that there is only one true statement, then the statements by Carl and David are false. Carl says he doesn’t have the ID card, and since he is lying, he does have it. And there you are.

Shown left to right: Sid Schwartz, Marv Starr, Pat McCann, George Nashen, Rolly Malett and Murray Galganov.

Changes for Athletic Classes in the Clubhouse The Athletic Office is happy to announce that, beginning in September, there will be Athletic classes

offered in the evenings and on Saturday mornings. Yoga will join our lineup of complementary Fitness and

Aerobics classes. The Athletic schedule for evenings and Saturdays will be posted once it is available.

08/31/10


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Sudoku Solution: Cryptogram Solution: THERE WAS AN OLD MAN OF THERMOPYLAE, WHO NEVER DID ANYTHING PROPERLY; BUT THEY SAID, IF YOU CHOOSE TO BOIL EGGS IN YOUR SHOES, YOU SHALL NEVER REMAIN IN THERMOPYLAE. ~ EDWARD LEAR

Jumble Solution: 1) Mountain 2) UNDERTAKER 3) Mechanical 4) Instrument; 5) Gradient Answer: “A MONUMENTAL UNDERTAKING”

2010 Area Chair and Vice Chair


AUGUST 2010

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Also stops at COOCVE and Master Management.

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New Bus Procedure for the West Route (to Deerfield Mall, etc.)

Guaranteed Seats 1. At the Clubhouse, tickets will be handed out on a first-come, first-served basis up to the seating capacity of the bus. 2.

When the bus arrives at the Clubhouse, residents with tickets will board. The tickets will be collected as you enter the bus. Note: This does not apply to the internal CVE bus system, only the external West Route.

• Mini Buses replace blue trolleys • Inside routes remain same • Express coaches run SHOW NIGHTS only � � from November through March


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There are currently over 200 properties available in Century Village East, stop in today to discuss your real estate needs! There are no surprises and no minimum fees, when you are dealing with DUBMAN REAL ESTATE, INC. We are always on the competitive edge of the real estate business. Our experienced team of multi-lingual realtors® take pride in bringing you our knowledge, values, and skills, when you are selling or buying property.

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PRESCOTT J MARKHAM I PRESCOTT O

2 BEDROOM 1/1.5 BATH FURNISHED – ANNUAL 1 BEDROOM 1/1.5 BATH FURNISHED – ANNUAL 2 BEDROOM 1/1.5 BATH FURNISHED – ANNUAL

$950.00 PER MONTH $800.00 PER MONTH $900.00 PER MONTH

DURHAM UPMINSTER HARWOOD

HI-RISE

DURHAM DURHAM

HI-RISE

NEWPORT NEWPORT WESTBURY CAMBRIDGE CAMBRIDGE FARNHAM NEWPORT NEWPORT CAMBRIDGE OAKRIDGE NEWPORT CAMBRIDGE HARWOOD NEWPORT

S L I

Nagy Yassa French

Meadows of Crystal Lake

CORNER, GREAT LOCATION WALK TO POOL & CLUBHOUSE FURNISHED, GROUND FLOOR, GARDEN VIEW CORNER, REMODELED KITCHEN & BATHS, HURRICANE SHUTTERS

1 BEDROOM A A

Jennie Hastings Spanish

1 BATH

GROUND FLOOR, TERRA COTTA TILE FLOOR, ENCLOSED PATIO LAMINATE FLOORS, FURNISHED, SCREEN PATIO, WATER VIEW

1 BEDROOM

U N H E A N U S A A U F D H

1.5 BATH

BEAUTIFUL WATER VIEW, SCREEN PATIO FURNISHED, WATER & PRESERVE VIEW FOR SCREEN PATIO ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW, WALK TO POOL & PLAZA, FURNISHED FURNISHED, WATER VIEW, ENC. PATIO TILE WALLS & FLOOR FURNISHED, OPEN KITCHEN, UPDATED, ENC. PATIO FURNISHED, SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW, ALL TILE FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO WITH A/C, WATER VIEW REMODELED KITCHEN, NEW ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW FURNISHED, WALK TO POOL & PLAZA, ENC. PATIO FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW, NEW A/C FURNISHED, ALL TILE, ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW ALL TILE, ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW, STEPS TO CLUBHOUSE FRESHLY PAINTED, ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW, SALE OR RENT FURNISHED, UPDATED KITCHEN, WATER & PRESERVE VIEW

HI-RISE 2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH HARWOOD ELLESMERE HARWOOD GRANTHAM ASHBY GRANTHAM GRANTHAM WESTBURY CAMBRIDGE ELLESMERE

LUXURY

FARNHAM KESWICK FARNHAM VENTNOR RICHMOND LYNDHURST VENTNOR VENTNOR KESWICK

E B E F C E F F F B

SCREEN PATIO, BEAUTIFUL WATER VIEW ALL TILE, ENC. PATIO, GOLF VIEW, FURNISHED SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW, TILE & CARPET FURNISHED, STEPS TO POOL & CLUBHOUSE, SCREEN PATIO WATER VIEW, ENC. PATIO, 2 FULL BATHS, CARPET & TILE FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO, GARDEN VIEW, STEPS TO CLUBHOUSE CENTRALLY LOCATED, NEW COUNTER TOPS, TILED PATIO UPDATED KITCHEN, WOOD LAMINATE FLOORS, WATER VIEW ENC. PATIO, SPECTACULAR WATER VIEW, WALK TO CLUBHOUSE FURNISHED, SCREEN PATIO, GOLF VIEW

2 BEDROOM

O C O P C I G G C

PRESCOTT UPMINSTER DURHAM DURHAM FARNHAM DURHAM DURHAM OAKRIDGE LYNDHURST FARNHAM HARWOOD PRESCOTT MARKHAM FARNHAM

2 BATH

CORNER, FURNISHED, ENC. PATIO, WATER VIEW, NEW A/C FURNISHED, GOLF VIEW, ENC. PATIO, STEPS TO CLUBHOUSE FURNISHED, MOVE IN CONDITION, STEPS TO CLUBHOUSE FURNISHED, SCREEN PATIO, GOLF VIEW, GREAT LOCATION CARPET & TILE, ENC. PATIO, WALK TO PLAZA & POOL GREAT LOCATION, ALL TILE, STEPS TO CLUBHOUSE FRESHLY PAINTED & CLEANED, GOLF VIEW, ENC. PATIO IN NEED OF TLC, GOLF VIEW CORNER, TASTEFULLY FURNISHED, GOLF VIEW, ENC. PATIO

O 2 BEDROOM C 1 BEDROOM F 2 BEDROOM F 2 BEDROOM B 1 BEDROOM O 1 BEDROOM O 1 BEDROOM I 1 BEDROOM M 1 BEDROOM H 1 BEDROOM D 1 BEDROOM J 2 BEDROOM P 2 BEDROOM Q 1 BEDROOM

1/1.5 BATH 1/1.5 BATH 1/1.5 BATH 1/1.5 BATH 1/1.5 BATH 1 BATH 1 BATH 1/1.5 BATH 1/1.5 BATH 1/1.5 BATH 1/1.5 BATH 1/1.5 BATH 1/1.5 BATH 1 BATH

FURNISHED – SEASONAL FURNISHED – SEASONAL FURNISHED – ANNUAL FURNISHED – SEASONAL FURNISHED – ANNUAL FURNISHED – ANNUAL FURNISHED – ANNUAL FURNISHED – SEASONAL FURNISHED – SEASONAL FURNISHED – SEASONAL UNFURNISHED – ANNUAL FURNISHED – SEASONAL FURNISHED – SEASONAL UNFURNISHED – ANNUAL

$55,000 $54,500 $57,500 $39,900 $38,900 $35,000 $49,999 $56,900 $63,000 $61,500 $67,900 $39,000 $49,900 $42,500 $54,900 $49,900 $65,500 $42,500 $58,900 $52,900 $52,900 $61,500 $58,900 $79,000 $62,000 $93,000 $83,500 $69,500 $44,900 $99,950 $77,229 $89,900 $75,000 $95,000 $142,000 $78,000 $66,900 $94,500

$1,800.00 PER MONTH $1,750.00 PER MONTH $900.00 PER MONTH $1,650.00 PER MONTH $900.00 PER MONTH $700.00 PER MONTH $1,200.00 PER MONTH $1,550.00 PER MONTH $1,500.00 PER MONTH $1,650.00 PER MONTH $800.00 PER MONTH $1,800.00 PER MONTH $1,800.00 PER MONTH $625.00 PER MONTH

Reporter August 2010 Volume 33 Number 11  

Text By JUDY OLMSTEAD Photo By GLORIA OLMSTEAD ■ It is amazing how many things from the past have faded out of existence, but also trigger o...

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