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Coupé and Leibman

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Robbins refers to as “everyday” or quotidian millenarianism, in which time progresses both in a steady manner (the slow pouring of sand) and is liable to radical ruptures (flight).16 The quotidian millenarianism of the community is also reflected in the nearly ubiquitous use of the “mosaic pavement,” a symbol that we discuss in a moment, in the later Jewish cemeteries.

Fig. 8. Neoclassical Winged Time. Gravestones of Elias P. Delvalle (1927) and Sarah P. Delvalle (1960). Mikvé Israel section of Beit Haim, Berg Altena.

Fig. 6. La Casa de Rodeos (left) and the House of the Cohenim (right) on the south side of the Beit Haim Bleinheim Cemetery and adjacent to the Shell Oil Refinery.

The obsession with death impurity and the transitioning of the death into the world to come can be seen in two key structures at the Beit Haim Bleinheim Cemetery: the Casa de Rodeos (House of the Rounds) and the house of the Cohenim (Priests) (Fig. 6). After the ritual washing of the

Profile for Chris Davis

Markers XXVII  

Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

Markers XXVII  

Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

Profile for cvdavis
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