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Bruce S. Elliott

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Notes 1. Susan-Mary Grant, “Patriot Graves: American National Identity and the Civil War Dead,” American Nineteenth-Century History 5, no. 3 (Fall 2004): 84-86. The exclusion of the Confederate dead from the federal program was a topic of angry and divisive debate. 2. Mark S. Schantz, Awaiting the Heavenly Country:The Civil War and America’s Culture of Death (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2008), 2-3, 89; Drew Gilpin Faust, This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2008), xi-xiv. 3. Grant, “Patriot Graves,” 86. 4. Other examples include David W. Blight, Race and Reunion: the Civil War in American Memory (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2001); Kirk Savage, Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves: Race, War, and Monument in Nineteenth-Century America (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1997); John R. Neff, Honoring the Civil War Dead: Commemoration and the Problem of Reconciliation (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2005); Monuments to the Lost Cause: Women, Art, and the Landscapes of Southern Memory, ed. Cynthia Mills and Pamela H. Simpson (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2003). 5. The literature specifically on the national cemetery system and military headstones is mostly descriptive and does not contextualize the headstone program or deal at any length with its contested nature. Mark C. Mollan, “Honoring Our War Dead: The Evolution of the Government Policy on Headstones for Fallen Soldiers and Sailors,” Prologue 35, no. 2 (Spring 2003); Department of Veterans Affairs, “History of Government-Furnished Headstones and Markers,” www.cem.va.gov; “The History of U.S. Military Grave Markers,” www.militaryhistoryinstone.org/history.php; Therese T. Sammartino, “A Promise Made – A Commitment Kept: The Story of America’s Civil War Era National Cemeteries” (2000) and Edward Steere, “Shrines of the Honored Dead: A Study of the National Cemetery System,” Quartermaster Review (1953-54) both on www.cem.va.gov/hist-histhome.asp.; Mark Hughes, Bivouac of the Dead (Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, 2008). Sarah Amy Leach notes the controversy over Meigs’ cast-iron blocks: “Remembering Veterans: The Past and Present of Their Historic Headstones,” American Cemetery (May 2003): 20-21, 54 (I am grateful to Jennifer Perunko for sending me this article). 6. Caroline E. Janney, Burying the Dead but Not the Past: Ladies’ Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008). 7. Thomas A. Zaniello, “Chips from Hawthorne’s Workshop: The Icon and Cultural Studies,” in Puritan Gravestone Art II, ed. Peter Benes (Dublin, N.H.: Boston University, 1977), 73. There is a large and diverse literature on modernity. Useful reviews include Alan O’Shea, “English Subjects of Modernity,” in Modern Times: Reflections on a Century of English Modernity, ed. Mica Nava and Alan O’Shea (London & New York: Routledge, 1996), 7-37; Simon Gunn,

Profile for Chris Davis

Markers XXVII  

Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

Markers XXVII  

Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

Profile for cvdavis
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