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Vincent F. Luti

Fig. 14. Joseph Fisher, 1760. Franklin, Massachusetts.

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Fig. 14a. Margaret Fisher, 1761. Franklin, Massachusetts.

network of carvers yet to be researched, and the extent of his influence on other carvers. He certainly was far superior to any of his probable imitators. His production of skull stones is especially noteworthy because that design had been completely abandoned in the religiously progressive and tolerant Narragansett Basin by the time he started his career. His highly original skulls may demonstrate his graceful adaptation to a general anachronistic preference for skulls that lingered in central Massachusetts from the 1750s right up to the turn of the century, a topic that has never been explored, but might be the result of simple provincialism and the aftershocks of the Great Awakening. Taken as a whole, the skill, variety, and influence of this major stone-carving family, whose influence spanned the last three quarters of the eighteenth century, is enormous. George Allen Jr.’s contribution to this cohesive family network (father and two sons) was almost complete when, one final piece of the puzzle fell into place in 1992. Postscript: 1992, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts In Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, Kevin Samara, living in the historic home of the second minister of the Shrewsbury Congregational Church, was concerned about the condition of the eighteenth-century stones in the cemetery across the street. He attended a restoration workshop at the 1991 Association for Gravestone Studies conference and formed and chaired the Shrewsbury Graveyard Restoration Project. Working on that committee was Mrs. Martha Thomas, with her eleven-year-old son, Matthew, assisting. In the early summer of 1992, Mrs. Thomas and Matthew were probing for

Profile for Chris Davis

Markers XXVII  

Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

Markers XXVII  

Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

Profile for cvdavis
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